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Author Topic: Building with field stone, and site wood framing  (Read 3607 times)

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Offline MbfVA

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Re: Building with field stone, and site wood framing
« Reply #40 on: December 12, 2017, 12:55:49 AM »
Following up on building into the hill, here is about the building spot and it shows the view we are trying to capture:

 

 

The stuff past the fence was cut days later but this was the last photo from the site that I had.

The Southwest Mountains which run from Albemarle up through Orange County and a bit beyond, are tiny at this distance but just visible in the photo if you look carefully.  They are not the "mountain views" I wanted (Don P has them), but they are the ones we will have.  The river valley almost makes up for it.

There is a maybe $6 MM home on 600+ acres hidden in the trees on the hump just off center of the view, maybe 1000 yards away and across the river.  Home of the engineer who invented Michael Bloomberg's "black box" used by brokers.  He will not like seeing our lights, since there will be few if any trees blocking the view between us.

Offline samandothers

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Re: Building with field stone, and site wood framing
« Reply #41 on: December 12, 2017, 04:09:52 PM »
Really a nice setting for the view.  Sounds like the view will be fairly protected by the large parcels others own.  What is being you, are you on top of a ridge or off on the side somewhat?

When do you hope to start building?

Offline MbfVA

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Re: Building with field stone, and site wood framing
« Reply #42 on: December 13, 2017, 02:20:05 AM »
The land behind looks like this (taken from the same direction, abt 150-200 ft back):
 

 

Flat leading up to it, so access will be good.  We are sort of on a ridge, which overlooks the Rivanna River nicely.  That is the river valley in the background of the previous photo.

Should have started by now.  If we do not use Superior wall, I will be wary of pouring concrete in the winter.  The basement slab could most likely be done later without any disadvantage except not having the storage & access.

Offline samandothers

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Re: Building with field stone, and site wood framing
« Reply #43 on: December 13, 2017, 09:30:31 AM »
Very nice.  Will you contract/build or have someone perform that role?  We are gathering estimates at this time.  Man housing has gone up since we last built 25 years ago,  :D

Offline Don P

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Re: Building with field stone, and site wood framing
« Reply #44 on: December 13, 2017, 11:22:55 AM »
Nice looking site!
Superior requires slab placement quickly, that is all that is holding the walls back from soil pressure. The same is true for a typical basement though. You do have a footer down providing resistance to fill but that wont hold it back if it gets saturated... roof sheathed, no gutters, big rain and there is a swimming hole behind the wall. Plan on putting the slab in and the floor above sheathed prior to backfill. Bracing the box.

There was a series of pics making the rounds a few years ago. One of the basement waterproofing companies had cut a trough out of the slab along the walls in a superior basement with the intention of installing a subslab drain and sump. The wall bottoms simply moved in to the new slab edge wherever they could. It was a tilted buckled mess.

Offline MbfVA

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Re: Building with field stone, and site wood framing
« Reply #45 on: December 13, 2017, 12:48:47 PM »
I was afraid you'd say that, regarding the slab.  Oh, well, we'll just have to be careful about the wx.

That sounds like B Dry, since their modus operandi is something along the lines you describe.  Do you recall if the instant problem was with the slab or with the Superior wall system?  Wouldn't that be hard to sort out if the water was coming in at the intersection of slab & wall?

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Offline MbfVA

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Re: Building with field stone, and site wood framing
« Reply #46 on: December 13, 2017, 12:56:05 PM »
Will you contract/build or have someone perform that role?

We will, with lots of help of 3 friendly Class A guys, including our designer.  If we can ever nail down a design and get started.  The distractions are constant, including a couple of big ones just up.

Offline Don P

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Re: Building with field stone, and site wood framing
« Reply #47 on: December 13, 2017, 06:38:39 PM »
I don't know the particulars of that case, more pointing out that there is nothing holding the wall bottoms in place until the slab is poured.

 If you go with Superior I would pitch the excavation to a drain rather than making it dead flat. Then level the gravel under the slab. Protect the perimeter drains with gravel wrapped in geotextile, convert to solid pipe for the run out to daylight and it looks like a long enough run that a cleanout or two might be in order. While those trenches are open run drains for the gutters as well. Avoid the temptation of dumping the gutters into the perimeter drain. They are trying to keep the subgrade dry, make the roof water go away in its own pipe.
Once those drains are away from the house and below it you can alternatively go to slotted pipe in a gravel bed trying to lose the water underground which is preferred to runoff. However run the pipe out to daylight so that it can get rid of major water when needed. rodent screen the end of the pipe!

Offline landscraper

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Re: Building with field stone, and site wood framing
« Reply #48 on: December 13, 2017, 09:49:10 PM »
Should have started by now.  If we do not use Superior wall, I will be wary of pouring concrete in the winter.  The basement slab could most likely be done later without any disadvantage except not having the storage & access.

Well we are not exactly in Fargo :) , plenty of good weather during a typical winter in Fluvanna for pouring concrete well within accepted temperature ranges, just might have to wait for a window in the forecast.  There is a civil geotech engineer who lives just down the road from you who offers testing and monitoring (soils, drainage, concrete, etc.) services for residential projects, cheap insurance in my opinion to have a trained set of eyes on the work as it goes in.  If your contractor is from Fluvanna or Albemarle odds are he will know this engineer already, if not let me know and I will PM his name to you, I have no pecuniary interest in doing so.  Pretty commonplace anymore around here to get third party inspection either in lieu of or in addition to some of the county inspections.

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Offline MbfVA

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Re: Building with field stone, and site wood framing
« Reply #49 on: January 03, 2018, 02:48:27 AM »
Clarification from the Superior Wall rep has helped me better understand things.  He says it's OK to wait on the slab (tho' as you all have cautioned, watch out for big rain, etc), but it has to be done before backfilling the walls.  I don't he means a long time.

I like Don's details regarding the slab (thank you as always!).  Trying to avoid gutters much as possible in our design--I hate 'em.  We have a nice downhill run coming off the proposed north end of the home which should make doing needed drainage easy without erosion.  Details to be worked out.

Offline kantuckid

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Re: Building with field stone, and site wood framing
« Reply #50 on: January 03, 2018, 09:28:11 AM »
I did exactly what MD based Weekender did above on my full basement foundation. Stepped off blocks above grade for a rock veneer below my logs. Mine runs from 2' to 4-5' high.
I used creek bed, limestone rocks from nearby Bath County, KY. Drove my log truck down into the creek and fetched them one at a time. The limestone cliff behind my house has many rocks below but wasn't enough for my house. I paid a guy to build my fireplace also using them, then I did the foundation myself after we moved in as I did have a day job too.
When I see a "rustic wood house" with an exposed concrete or block foundation, I cringe! :'(
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Offline MbfVA

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Re: Building with field stone, and site wood framing
« Reply #51 on: January 03, 2018, 09:52:01 PM »
I used creek bed, limestone rocks from nearby Bath County, KY. Drove my log truck down into the creek and fetched them one at a time...
When I see a "rustic wood house" with an exposed concrete or block foundation, I cringe! :'(
With you.  Not sure I can drive my vehicle into the Rivah, tho'.  May have to pick 'em up in woods & fields  smiley_brick hits_hardhat


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