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Author Topic: Steel I (WF) Beam Info  (Read 1446 times)

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Online submarinesailor

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Steel I (WF) Beam Info
« on: February 08, 2018, 07:51:21 PM »
I have been looking for someway to install a bridge over the Rose River in Syria, VA.  I need to span about 50' +/- 5'.  Recently (last night) I found several beam at are "65 feet, 27 inch web with 10 inch flange."  I am having problems finding a load table for this "size".  I need to know if it will meet my needs.  Looking at using 2 of them to support about 15-20 tons on a 2 point load - a heavy truck going across it.  The steel type is not known.

Does anyone in the heavy construction business have any info on this size beam.

Help - PLEASE.

Bruce

Offline dgdrls

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Re: Steel I (WF) Beam Info
« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2018, 08:13:02 PM »
http://www.cmrp.com/blog/faq/calculations/how-to-identify-a-steel-beam-size.html

You need all this data to make a reasonable determination
and any mill stamps if available.

D

Offline ChugiakTinkerer

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Re: Steel I (WF) Beam Info
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2018, 08:28:16 PM »
I'm no engineer but I've worked up some calculations using this site: https://webstructural.com/beam-designer.html

My interest was for a beam to for a sawmill shed.  The steel beams are identified by the flange width and the weight ib pounds per running foot.  Looking online, I'd guess yours runs about 100 lbs per ft.  I'd go with the W10x100 as a starting point.

Using a 60' span, a distributed load of 500 lbs/ft (braces and bridge decking, a guess), and two 10,000 lb point loads 12' apart at the center, the beam fails.

There's a lot of engineering in these calcs and I'm learning my way, but even for a 50' span those beams look undersized. 
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Offline Dave Shepard

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Re: Steel I (WF) Beam Info
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2018, 08:56:35 PM »
 It should be fairly easy to identify the beams. They are usually not exactly an even size. Like that 10" wide is likely 9.8", or somethiing odd. I've got my eye on some W24x94 pound beams 39' long to makes my 75' mill shed.
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Offline starmac

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Re: Steel I (WF) Beam Info
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2018, 09:12:31 PM »
Can't answer your questions, but what we have done in the past was use a railroad car for a bridge. I am not sure if a guy can even get them anymore, but they are bound to be available somewhere.
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Offline Don P

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Re: Steel I (WF) Beam Info
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2018, 09:54:03 PM »
The AISC manual is available through interlibrary loan.
From what I see in the manual can you narrow it down...
Stock 27" with 10" flange can be 84, 94, 102, 114, and 129 lbs/ft. Typically in 36 or 50 ksi steel
web thickness in same order .460, .490, .515, .570, .610
flange same order .640, .745, .830, .930, 1.100

Just at a quickie, max uniform loads, not a 2 point rolling load,  at 50' range from 67 to 109 kips.

Offline DelawhereJoe

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Re: Steel I (WF) Beam Info
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2018, 11:45:38 PM »
I don't know if it's the same there as it is here but for a bridge, even over a tax ditch it has to be able to hold a fully loaded water tanker in the event there is a fire on the other side it has to hold the trucks needed to put the fire out.
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Online Al_Smith

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Re: Steel I (WF) Beam Info
« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2018, 05:55:11 AM »
I've got a structural steel design book floating around here someplace .The question is exactly where is it ?

Offline Ed_K

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Re: Steel I (WF) Beam Info
« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2018, 08:45:30 AM »
This ad is in Western World "40' to 89' (no 70' available) flat car and box car bottoms available for bridges, best prices. 360-426-8386  fehorse@basicisp.net".
 Maybe this would work.
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Offline loggah

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Re: Steel I (WF) Beam Info
« Reply #9 on: February 09, 2018, 04:54:16 PM »
The railcars are a great way to go,pull the trucks and put them across the river and build the ramps on each end.We had on here in town for years,loaded logging tractor trailers weighing over 120,000lbs going across steady. In building general bridges for offroad trucking ,or access roads was 1" thickness of web for every foot of length between supports. 50' span =50" in the  beam web and that would be 4 beams,with a lot of diagonal  bracing between them. Don
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Offline jason.weir

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Re: Steel I (WF) Beam Info
« Reply #10 on: February 09, 2018, 05:05:01 PM »
never heard of such a thing - sounds like a reasonable cost for a bridge if you can get them shipped reasonable enough..

lots of them available..

http://www.sterlingrail.com/classifieds/Listings.php?type=Flat%20Car%20Bridges&fsw=FS

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Re: Steel I (WF) Beam Info
« Reply #11 on: February 09, 2018, 05:58:30 PM »
The ones im familiar with had steel sides about 8" high,when you go across them in a big truck you cannot see the bridge on each side only in front of you.  ;D
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Offline maple flats

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Re: Steel I (WF) Beam Info
« Reply #12 on: February 11, 2018, 04:33:27 PM »
It seems you may want 2 side by side for such a bridge. bolted together with about 1" grade 8 bolts every 6-8".
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Offline Don P

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Re: Steel I (WF) Beam Info
« Reply #13 on: February 11, 2018, 05:54:58 PM »
These are some rolling load beam equations;
 

 

Offline Stuart Caruk

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Re: Steel I (WF) Beam Info
« Reply #14 on: February 11, 2018, 09:46:17 PM »
One simple way to take a wide flange beam and increase it's load capacity is to split the web in half in a zig zag pattern. Best done on a large plate processing machine with Plasma or Oxyfuel. Program a cut starting about 6" in from one end, cut paralell to the flange a few inches down from the web for about 6 - 8" then cut diagonally towards the other flange to a point a few inches down from the flange and go another 6 - 8", then cut diagonally towards the other flange. repeat this zigzag cut until about 6" before the end of the beam. Nip the ends with a torch, slide the 2 pieces sideways until the flat faces in the middle line up and weld them together. You end up with a substantially deeper, stronger beam with holes in the center. Like a solid truss. It the separation of the flanges in tension and compression that carry the load, not the web.
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Offline Dave Shepard

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Re: Steel I (WF) Beam Info
« Reply #15 on: February 11, 2018, 09:52:32 PM »
That's very interesting. A lot of work.
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Offline Don P

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Re: Steel I (WF) Beam Info
« Reply #16 on: February 11, 2018, 10:57:17 PM »
The web does carry shear. That isn't usually the control but worth mentioning/thinking about.

Online Al_Smith

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Re: Steel I (WF) Beam Info
« Reply #17 on: February 12, 2018, 05:12:04 PM »
What is being talked about is overhead crane rails .However many of these are fabricated using a soft flange (as if steel is soft ) on top and a harder flange on the bottom to prevent wear from the trolleys riding on them . The top is under compression and the load bearing bottom under tension .The rails in my shop are composite .
Older riveted bridges used the same thing only the webbing was riveted .Must have been okay ,many are still standing .The ones that aren't were probably made for a model A ford until somebody got the great idea to take a loaded semi flat bed over it with a D7 Cat on the trailer---oops ---  :o

Offline Don P

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Re: Steel I (WF) Beam Info
« Reply #18 on: February 12, 2018, 05:41:54 PM »
Crane rail is a different animal from a wide flange beam. Plate girders, railroad bridges are made that way pretty often. A composite beam is a steel and concrete composition, just flipping through all of those in the steel manual.

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Re: Steel I (WF) Beam Info
« Reply #19 on: February 12, 2018, 06:07:32 PM »
Speaking of overloading bridges. There was a covered bridge in a nearby town that survived into the '80's until a local contractor tried to cross it with a heavy lowboy. It didn't fail catastrophically, but it was toast after that. Amazing it held up as long as it did.
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