The Forestry Forum

General Forestry => Forestry and Logging => Topic started by: Ron Scott on March 24, 2002, 02:14:52 PM

Title: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 24, 2002, 02:14:52 PM
Hydro-Ax Shears, 611 EX in northern hardwoods thinning.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/hydroax1.jpg)

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on March 24, 2002, 02:28:40 PM
Is that ours Ron? Maybe not, I thought Billsby's has a saw head. You say thats a shear.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 24, 2002, 04:08:19 PM
No, That one's Rothig Forest Products working on the Dahlgren Sale across from the Timbers Resturant on H-115 northwest of Cadillac. I think I gave the better photos of yours along with your survived skidder (the stuck in the wetlands photo on the forum) to the landowner.  

Landowners like to have photos of their land management activities, especially those that don't get to see the action first hand.

You should have some large oak to saw from the Austin Sale just purchased. I'll get some photos there.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 25, 2002, 02:29:13 PM
Barko 885 with sawhead thinning in oak

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/barko in oak.jpg)

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 26, 2002, 06:06:52 PM
Timbco T 415-D;  tracked feller buncher Thinning in red pine.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/timbcofeller.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on March 26, 2002, 06:17:09 PM
Sidell Forest Products used a similar Timbco, maybe the same model, equipped with a saw head on an aspen, soft maple clearcut chip harvest on Grandma's a couple years ago.  Very impressive machine to watch in operation 8).  The operator kept two BIG John Deere grapple skidders busy and never waiting ;D.  
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 26, 2002, 06:47:05 PM
This was a new machine, just 6 months old. It was producing 25 + cords/day in the red pine. Its saw head can handle 24" oak trees. Machine is owned by Ellias Hilliard who works for ADJ Forest Products, but was working for Jason Lutke at the time, producing for Pine Tech, Inc.

It was down for awhile one day after a heavy snow storm when the encoder on the computer was acting up and it wouldn't function. Weather related I guess, but impressive.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 27, 2002, 07:45:07 AM
John Deere DC-70D Feller Buncher on Tracks. Older model working in red pine thinning.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/jdeerefeller.jpg)

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 27, 2002, 04:29:39 PM
Sawyer with Stihl Chain Saw. Thinning in red pine.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/chainsawredpine.jpg)

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on March 27, 2002, 05:49:22 PM
I've heard snowbird farmers talking about cutting their trees in the winter like this picture shows.  Then they say they go back in the spring and cut the 10 or 12 foot butt cut.  :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 27, 2002, 05:59:44 PM
Tom,
That's after they shovel out the power poles and power lines.  ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 28, 2002, 06:20:08 PM
Sawyer with 2 "Huskies" harvesting Oak logs.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/chain_saw_on_red_oak.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gordon on March 29, 2002, 07:21:20 AM
Kubota with skidding winch


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/logginwinch1.jpg)


Gordon
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 29, 2002, 04:18:34 PM
Valmet 546 Feller-Buncher. Works well in pine.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Valmet Feller-Buncher.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Frank_Pender on March 29, 2002, 07:34:27 PM
Gordon, I sure hope you don't over load the tractor for pulling. 8) 8) 8)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gordon on March 30, 2002, 06:20:25 AM
Hay Frank, you that that Mobile Dimension mill you have could handle a log that big? :D

Little twigs like that come in handy to put in the soft areas of the skidding trails. Waste not what not.

Gordon
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Frank_Pender on March 30, 2002, 06:52:55 AM
  They work great, also for bar ditching.  :D:D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 30, 2002, 02:10:18 PM
Valment 546 Forwarder.
Working in a red pine thinning. A good system with the 546 Feller/Buncher of previous photo.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Valmet Forwarder in Pine.jpg)

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Kevin on March 30, 2002, 02:45:41 PM
Old model Canadian Feller Forwarder Buncher Hauler Stacker Harvester

(http://www3.sympatico.ca/kvn.rob/Felling.jpg)

   (http://www3.sympatico.ca/kvn.rob/hurts.gif)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on March 30, 2002, 03:20:30 PM
I have one that looks a lot like that one, Kevin.  An older model but it still works pretty good.  I've been thinking about retiring it to the house, the new models are too quick. :-/
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 30, 2002, 04:59:17 PM
Kevin,

Excellent picture. It's hard to find a chain saw on some of the jobs here anymore. I sure endorse them for still doing some of the better quality work.

How about expaining some of your "colorful" clothing and its purpose, i.e. the Kevlar boots etc.  
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on March 30, 2002, 05:20:02 PM
And the Hat! Don't forget the hat!
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Kevin on March 30, 2002, 05:28:06 PM
Ron,
I wouldn`t consider operating a chainsaw without every available safety device.
I wear chainsaw protective boots, chaps, gloves and hardhat when operating any chainsaw.
I try to wear bright colored clothing so other people that I may be working with can see me from a distance.
The work as you know is dangerous enough without taking unnecessary risks.
When I get tired I quit and go back another day or put the chainsaw away and do something else.
I think if we keep informing people of the dangers involved we`ll get a few to buy the stuff and wear it.
If a few think it`s too costly, I say ... try having an accident !

Jeff, I knew you would spot that sooner or later, that was for the photo opp.  :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: woodmills1 on March 30, 2002, 08:09:18 PM
right on with the woods work be careful info.  i go into the woods fresh and rested, wear orange hard hat and protective shirt.  no drinking the night before.  best advice might be to think and plan.  trees come down fast and hard and are not forgiving.  also if something doesn't feel safe it probably isn't.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Cedar Eater on March 30, 2002, 09:17:03 PM
Hey Kevin, I've been looking for boots that have kevlar, steel toes and paks. I can find steel-toed paks, but not with kevlar. Do they have anything like that in your neck of the woods?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Kevin on March 31, 2002, 06:13:24 AM
The boots are from Husqvarna, my local dealer stocks a pretty good supply.
These are kevlar, steel toes and paks.

(http://www.usa.husqvarna.com/files/UserImages/1020-241x120.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 31, 2002, 07:57:33 AM
Excellent Safety Tips for chain saw users from those with sawyer experience. The bright colors are life and limb savers.

Many of the chain saw dealers, especially, "Husky" handle the Kevlar rubber boots. The Forestry Suppliers Catalog also has them, the Swede Pro brand. I imagine that the other logger supply catalogs have them also. (See Forum Links)

Cedar-Eater, if your ever down this way near Ebels' Hardware Store in Falmouth, MI, they have them. They're a popular Husky dealer in this area.



 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 01, 2002, 06:35:37 PM
John Deere 548 G Grapple Skidder. Tree length skidding Red Pine.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/John Deere Grapple Skidder, R. Pine.jpg)

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 02, 2002, 05:01:43 PM
John Deere Grapple Skidder. Tree length skidding hardwood pulpwood.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/John Deere Grapple Skidder, Hdwd Pulpwood.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 03, 2002, 06:05:05 PM
Timberjack Cable Skidder. Small size, skidding tree length logs and pulpwood.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Timberjack Cable Skidder.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 04, 2002, 05:44:24 PM
Cable Skidder, Older model, home built.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Anitique Cable Skidder.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on April 04, 2002, 06:20:38 PM
Pig with an Axe
Young pig, around 200 lbs.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/pigchop1.jpg)


(Sorry Ron, couldn't resist :D )

THIS PIG DOES NOT COUNT TOWARDS CONTEST!
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on April 04, 2002, 06:28:25 PM
Another Pig  Trimming stump height to please the consulting forester.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/pigchop2.jpg)


THIS PIG DOES NOT COUNT TOWARDS CONTEST!
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 05, 2002, 03:00:58 PM
A good ending to this Thread as it dies for lack of interest!  :'(
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on April 05, 2002, 03:21:14 PM
It's not dead yet.  What's that homemade rig built out of?  It looks good.  Sombody put a lot of time into it.  That Timberjack looks to be from a distance the same model I've been running for the last two winters.  Works great in hardwoods.  The guys who own it have sold it and it goes down the road Monday :(.  Glad I'm almost done with it.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: DanG on April 05, 2002, 03:26:51 PM
You losing interest, Ron? I'm not! 568 reads says somebody's interested. Would be nice if someone else would chip in a pic or 2, though.  Thanks for the ride.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: J_T on April 05, 2002, 07:23:05 PM
Hey Ron Got any more info on that or another home built skidder?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on April 05, 2002, 08:01:39 PM
I hope there is a picture here of a Skyhook used in my area in the 1950s. It had dual 2" skylines,and 7/8" traction lines,with a 300' dropline underneath.It was suspended across a steep valley.(notice the operator hunched over)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Image1.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Steve on April 05, 2002, 09:10:51 PM
I just had to pipe in here with a great book. Handloggers by W. H. Jackson. I've only been able to find it as a collectors item for big dollars, but if you get a chance to read it, do. It takes place in S.E. Alaska in the 50's and 60's. The technique at the time was to find a nice stand of timber that was growing on a steep hillside above saltwater and either fall the timber directly into the water or slide it down the steep slope into the water. Often the tree would hang up and he would have to jack it loose so it could continue on its way.
He and his wife would live on their little troller (boat) and raft up logs until the order was filled, then tow it to town.

Steve
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on April 05, 2002, 09:21:13 PM
Steve,I read that book several years ago.I really enjoyed it.That independence,and the chance to make a few buck in the process is appealling.I wonder what would happen if we fell trees directly into fish habitat these days? ::)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bud Man on April 05, 2002, 09:32:56 PM
I spect you'd be wearing stripes and looking out small windows !!     :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 06, 2002, 11:40:41 AM
I don't know just exactly what this cable skidder was all made from. Just bits and pieces from his home junk yard.

He was a firewood producer who came in to cut firewood and clean up the topwood after a sawlog job. The skidder was just able to handle the lighter topwood. It was a little under powered for bigger stuff. It was a conversation piece when compared to the fancy Timber Jacks etc.

This person was the type who just made everything from junk parts, his wood splitter, haul truck etc were all home built as needed. He had to pour oil into the wood splitter engine while he split wood; quite an operation, but not environmentally sound.

He bought an old big Ford Crown Victoria from the landowner who had it parked in his "bone yard" back in the woods for a number of years. He paid $25.00 for it. I didn't think that it would ever run and asked him what he was going to do with it.

The next day he was driving it around the woods to his firewood operation. He was more of an inventor than a firewood producer as things seemed to run without all the parts.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Antique Skidder, Home Built.jpg)


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: psychotic1 on April 06, 2002, 05:12:10 PM
Don't even think those sorts of things :o
Now I'm gonna have to look over my shoulder for weeks to be sure the envir-cops and the forest service aren't following me.  The get downright snippy if they catch you rolling a beach log back into the water.  And that's one that's already been in the water for awhile.  I've seen people get fined for walking too close to a "salmon stream" that hadn't had any fish in it for twenty years.
It was fun while it lasted.  But now Alaska is closed except for tourism.  And I here the "tree-huggers" will be starting on that next.  The smoke from the cruise ships is causing air pollution don't you know.

Bruce
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on April 06, 2002, 09:17:48 PM
Here are a couple of pictures taken spring 1993,near Pemberton B.C. They are of my dads two brothers,Harold,and Thor. Harold (with his back turned) started falling with axe and misery whip in 1950,with his dad.He said if it wasn't for power saws coming shortly after,he would be doing something else.He quit falling fulltime at 64. (http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/t&h.jpg)




Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on April 06, 2002, 09:27:33 PM
This is Thor.He was 58 in 1993.He was a skilled and highball faller.In July that year a pine snag came down as he was falling a D-Fir and broke his lower back.We packed him out on a spine board,and he was air lifted out on a chopper.He never fell again,but is healthy and fishing now  8)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/thor.jpg)




Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on April 06, 2002, 09:32:04 PM
Fir stand in Pemberton

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/trees.jpg)


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 07, 2002, 08:39:17 AM
Now we're getting into some of the "bigger" timber from other forest areas.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 07, 2002, 02:08:32 PM
Iron Mule 501 C Forwarder. An old standby for short wood logging. Unit is carrying out aspen and red maple pulpwood to landing.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Iron Mule & Pulpwood.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Steve on April 07, 2002, 03:20:04 PM
Seeing the picture of the forwarder reminded me of this couple of pages of pictures I had. Ohia logging and milling the south end of the Big Island.

http://www.curlykoa.com/webpics2/Ohia.html


Steve
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 07, 2002, 07:21:52 PM
Iron Mule Forwarder. Carrying sugar (hard) maple sawlogs to the landing.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Iron Mule & Sawlogs.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on April 07, 2002, 08:26:57 PM
Shortwood Pulp truck used for years to support families on tops, tailings and Urban wood until the big companies saw fit to favor long wood loads.  This is an indangered industry in the south.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/pulpwoodtrk01.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on April 07, 2002, 09:10:44 PM
Alot of people around here used to cut bolt wood/pallet wood.  There were two mills that sawed only short stuff.  There both closed now.  There were lots of rough looking old trucks on the roads.  That was also when the weighmasters were friendlier :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on April 07, 2002, 09:10:51 PM
Tom,That was interesting.What species was on the truck? What would be the value of that load? I hate to see the end of an era,where a guy can make a buck with what is on hand,and a little perseverance.Anymore on the subject would be welcome.

Paul
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on April 07, 2002, 09:46:22 PM
Paul,
That load is pine.  Eddy said he was getting $25 per ton and his load will be about five tons.  Most of the pine grown in plantations here is longleaf, Slash and Loblolly.  Pond Pine (pocosin or black pine) is common and used for pulp but not grown commercially.  These trucks generally carried wood that was left by the big loggers and filled a niche by picking up Urban woods (Oak, Pine or various trees that Arborist need to have disposed).

This gentlemn is a 74+ year old preacher who carries 4 to 6 loads a week to stay out of trouble.  The wood is usually free for the asking and is sold for $75 to $250, dependent upon species and market,.  per load.  It is purchased by the ton.  It takes him about 2 1/2 or 3 hours to create a load by himself.  

I get wood from the county.  Some I saw, some is not good for anything I want to do.  I give the wood to Eddy, the pulpwooder,  just to get it out of the yard.  He knows that when wood is scarce, he can pick up a load or fill out a load at my place.  He also follows a couple of Arborist around and removes their wood.

The biggest detriment to this work is the independence of the big pulpwood companies. they will buy shortwood only one or two days a week and will go sometimes for weeks refusing to buy any at all.  The shortwood haulers used to be welcomed and let into the log yard ahead of the big trucks so they could unload and return for more.  Now I understand they have to wait in line with all the rest of the haulers and it limits them to one or perhaps two loads a day at best.  

Fewer and fewer of these operators can be found today.  Most are selling to an intermediate log yard for a small portion of what they could get at the mill.  The intermediate yard owner holds the wood until the market opens and carries the wood to the mill on big trucks.

Many of the pulp mills are recycling paper.  They get their pulp from boxes etc and  seldom buy logs at all.  

The sawmills are/were owned by the pulp industry.  Lumber was considered a byproduct of making paper rather than the other way around.  Now the sawmills are being recognized for providing the pulp companies with a good portion of their bottom line.  Chip 'n Saws are making lumber and providing clean chips to the pulp mills. Short wood has little market here any more.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 08, 2002, 03:06:52 PM
Iron Mule Forwarder. Loading out shortwood. These small forwarders are becoming a thing of the past and hard to find. I still like to see their use as they are good for "light on the land" timber harvesting which most small private landowners want.

One small producer still has two of them. He runs one and his wife the other. They do some of the best work in quality hardwood jobs.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Iron Mule Loading Pulpwood.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Cedar Eater on April 08, 2002, 03:39:11 PM
Keep these pictures coming Ron and everyone. It's not only interesting, but educational for me to see these machines in action. It looks like I might be having a sawtimber harvest followed by a pulp harvest later this year, so I'm extra curious.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 08, 2002, 07:40:57 PM
Timberjack 230A Forwarder. Working short wood in a hardwood selection harvest.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Timberjack 230A Forwarder.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on April 08, 2002, 10:40:15 PM
Ron, A question.What would have been used 40-50 years ago, to log in these same areas? I am not familiar with this type of logging,and it's quite interesting.Would small Cats(D3-D-4) have been used?
What was used to load? Gin pole maybe?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on April 08, 2002, 11:20:58 PM
This old Mac was still hauling in Oregon,1995.It was hauling out of a skyline thinning show  (http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/truck.jpg)


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 09, 2002, 12:31:26 PM
Yes the small to medium sized crawlers were the primary use machines during that period. They were in the process of replacing horses back then They were versatile over much of the varied terrain and an all purpose machine for road buiding, snow plowing, skidding, forwarding, etc. They were slow in production however, especially for high volumes of production needed to feed the pulpwood mills coming on line. They were also harder on the landscape (people were more respectful of the loggers work methods back then).

Some crawlers were equiped with loading booms, or front loaders. "Gin poles", spars, and "A" frames were also set up at primarly landings to load trucks as were some labor intensive hand methods of "hand roll and lift platforms".

The boon to loading was the development of the Prentice loader in the 1960's. This hydraulic loader was developed by Leo Heikkinen in Wisconsin, and helped revolutionize log loading.

Rubber tired and flexible frame skidding units were being developed, but it took  and adjustment to change period and awhile to perfect a rubber tire that would hold up to the woods abuse, not puncture, etc.

The Gafner Iron Mule as those previously pictured was first built in 1957. They went through several improved models and was one of the most successful pulpwood forwarders ever made. They're still a favorite of mine.

Those western trucks log trucks are monsters. Appreciate your photo. I'll get into a truck series from this part of the country later. I need to get some more photos as I've given many of my best ones away to the owners, drivers, landowners, fellers, operators,etc.



Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 09, 2002, 03:05:09 PM
Timberjack 230C Forwarder. Working short wood in northern hardwood thinning.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Timberjack 230C Forwarder.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on April 09, 2002, 11:55:54 PM
I am enjoying learning about the logging methods out there. I can see how it would shine on the valley floor here.We have a mix of Birch,Alder,Cottonwood,and wild Cherry.

Here are a few old pictures from the area. This one is another view of the Skyhook,used in Squamish B.C. in the 1950s.The box beneath is carrying the fallers. :oJoe Seymour was the rigger on the Skyhook.He is now 74,and driving our off highway log truck,with no plans to retire in the near future!(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/skyhook.jpg)



Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on April 10, 2002, 12:04:27 AM
This one is of moving a steam donkey.All done with block purchase and bullwork.Also a lot of brainpower.Its just cresting the rise.(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/steampot1.jpg)




Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on April 10, 2002, 12:08:47 AM
And there she is.Then it starts all over again,moving blocks,pulling line.....


    ...(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/steampot2.jpg)


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 10, 2002, 05:43:14 PM
Timberjack 230 C Forwarder, older model. Working aspen sawlogs and pulpwood. Aspen removal in hardwood selection harvest.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Timberjack 230C Forwarder, older model.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 11, 2002, 03:53:57 PM
Hydo-Axe Feller Buncher Saw Head Working red pine site clearing.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Hydro-Axe Saw Head.jpg)

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on April 11, 2002, 08:19:56 PM
Moving a 1010 Lawrence on a sleigh.The 1010 had a 6 cyl  flathead Chrysler gas engine.Built in the 1940s,it was a small two drum winch,with a strawline drum.Perfect for the little gypo loggers on the coast
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/1010.jpg)

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on April 11, 2002, 08:27:24 PM
Ron, this little A frame loading poles would be similar to the type you metioned before,wouldn't it?This picture was taken in 1938,Squamish B.C        (http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/loading.jpg)

The pole isn't bent,it was a small picture and my scanner didn't like it.





Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 12, 2002, 07:06:08 PM
Some good logging history photos. Yes that would be an "A Frame" loader type from the old logging days; "where there was a will, there was a way". Some interesting methods used, even with "real horsepower".
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 12, 2002, 07:17:12 PM
John Deere DC70D Feller Buncher Tracked unit; previous photos show it at work. Now ready to leave the job for another area.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/J. Deere Flr.Bcr. on Tracks.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 13, 2002, 09:27:55 AM
"Husky" Chainsaw on  Hard Maple sawlogs. A reliable method.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Husky Chainsaw on H. Maple.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 14, 2002, 09:50:40 AM
Two Loads of Sawlogs. Log haulers out of the woods and parked to tighten down their binders for the highway haul to the mill.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Two Log Haulers.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on April 14, 2002, 10:52:15 AM
Ron, nice shots of the Kenworths. Where are they going,sawmill,or sorting yard?Looks like nice wood to me.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: TJACK on April 14, 2002, 06:05:22 PM
Ron,

What size of Husky are they using for felling and bucking?

TJACK
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 14, 2002, 07:12:59 PM
Yes these were some of our better sawlogs. These logs are going directly to Quality Sawlog's Mill in Sunfield, Michigan. They were the direct buyer of this selectively marked northern hardwoods timber sale.

Most of the Husky saws used on the  hardwood sawlog harvests are the Heavy Duty Professional model 385 XP. Most cutters have two of them on the job, though one of the back up saws might be a lighter or older model, especially for use on the smaller size pulpwood. All the saws are usually the Pro series models.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 14, 2002, 07:24:54 PM
Hauling Log Load out of Woods. Autocar with over cab loader and "pup" trailer.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Hauling Log Load Out.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Frank_Pender on April 14, 2002, 08:31:44 PM
NOW, that is a Whack of logs! ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 15, 2002, 06:59:57 PM
Log Load Out of the Woods. Load binder tightening time on county road before trip to the mill. Autocar with over cab loader and "pup" trailer. Loaded with mixed oak logs.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Log Load Out of the Woods.jpg)


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: woodmills1 on April 15, 2002, 08:06:14 PM
that aint no pup trailer with that whack loaded its a full grown log dog :D :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 16, 2002, 06:06:28 PM
Total Tree Processor. Processing red pine landscape timbers and pulpwood.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Total Tree Proccessor on red pine.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 17, 2002, 05:14:01 PM
Morbark Chipper. Chipping oak tops and loading chip van for trip to cogeneration plant.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Mobark Chipper.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on April 17, 2002, 11:49:01 PM
Ron,have you been around chippers much? The Enviroment Ministry has been talking about phasing out burning debris piles.We have done a little digging on prices for tub grinders,but they are way up there in price.That one looks a little more in line with our waste size.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 18, 2002, 07:25:37 AM
Chipper Being Set Up. Another similar Chipper being set up at landing to begin chipping tops from sawlog & pulpwood timber harvest.

There are various commercial size chippers from small to large. The tree and utility companies use a small size and those in the log and pulpwood chipping business use the medium and larger sizes for production and handling of the larger wood sizes.

I'm not overly familiar with all of them, best to check your specific needs with the various equipment outlets.  

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Wood Chipper Set Up.jpg)



Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 19, 2002, 06:01:51 PM
Hydro-Axe 411E. Proctor Logging, Inc. producing Oak & Aspen sawlogs and pulpwood for Billsby Lumber Company, Inc.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Hydro-Axe 411E.jpg)



Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 20, 2002, 07:59:02 PM
Sawyer Cutting Oak Logs. Cutting with Model 2095 Jonsered chainsaw.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Sawyer Cutting Oak Logs.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 21, 2002, 05:07:15 PM
Timberjack 230A Forwarder. On hardwood selection harvest, short wood operation.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Timberjack 230 A Forwarder parked.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 22, 2002, 06:21:01 PM
Timberjack 230A Forwarder Decking Pulpwood. Woods landing where forwarder operator separates and decks species and products.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Timberjack 230A Forwarder Decking Pulpwood.jpg)

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 23, 2002, 10:54:26 AM
Timberjack 230A Forwarder. Operator sorting oak, maple, and aspen sawlogs at landing.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Timberjack 230A Forwarder Decking Sawlogs.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 29, 2002, 03:37:11 PM
John Deere De-Limber & Slasher Processing & Kenworth Hauler Loading Out Red Pine Landscaping Timber.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Red Pine Landscape Timber Harvest.jpg)

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 30, 2002, 07:28:13 PM
John Deere De-Limber. Working tree length red pine, first thinning.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/John Deere De-Limber.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bibbyman on April 30, 2002, 08:16:09 PM

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/FarmiBelarus.JPG)
Heavy Belarus with Farmi skidder.  160 feet of 5/8 cable gets them out of hills and hollers.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 01, 2002, 02:33:17 PM
Red Pine Cabin Logs. Some "60 footers" loading out on the Kenworth to Natural Log Homes. Log Homes built by the Amish. Watch for theses logs in another thread.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Red Pine Cabin Logs Loading Out.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: DanG on May 01, 2002, 03:15:57 PM
Wow! I'd hate to hafta buy a set of tires for that thing! :o

How are those logs treated before building a house from them?  Do they kiln dry them or use any kind of preservative?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: L. Wakefield on May 01, 2002, 07:41:13 PM

Quote

Red Pine Cabin Logs. Some "60 footers" loading out on the Kenworth to Natural Log Homes. Log Homes built by the Amish. Watch for theses logs in another thread.

  Whooeee! What a gorgeous load! Where from, what species, how d'ya grow them suckas to be that pretty!? :o   lw
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on May 01, 2002, 08:12:12 PM
DanG, thats a baby trailor its only got 6 axles. Heres a pic of our 48 foot 8 axle with a long days work on board. 30,000 feet of Aspen.

(http://www.timberbuyer.net/members/images/billsby.gif)

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Kevin on May 01, 2002, 08:20:28 PM
Jeff,
We hitch a team of those little trucks up to one of our Canadian logging trucks just to get it roll`n.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 01, 2002, 08:24:32 PM
These are red pine logs from a sale I selective marked and sold for the landowner. The sale was purchased by the Amish (Natural Log Homes) who are quite experienced in building log homes. They knew where each log was going to go by size before the trees were cut.

They just de-bark them with pressured water and build the home on the mill site to be sure it all fits together. They mark the logs, take the log home down, transport the pieces to the buyer and then re-erect it on their site piece by piece for the final home. I don't know if any special preservative is used just maybe some clear oil after air drying.

The trees were harvested near Mesick, Michigan just 22 miles from Cadillac, Michigan. The Amish had a timber producer harvest the trees and transport them. They had to get one of the larger trucks in the area to haul the long lengths.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 02, 2002, 07:29:49 PM
Cabin Logs Being De-Barked. The red pine cabin logs are being debarked by the Amish non-motorized method. High pressure water spray.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Cabin Logs Being De-Barked.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 03, 2002, 06:58:25 PM
The Red Pine Product. Log Home Being Constructed by Amish Home Builders.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Red Pine Product.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on May 05, 2002, 06:23:36 PM
Timber Jack skidder loading the saw deck of a portable sawmill with longleaf pine logs.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/timberjack460.jpg)

Then we found the Hitachi track hoe was a lot easier.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/hitachihoe01.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on May 05, 2002, 06:35:27 PM
Hey whats that blue thing?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 05, 2002, 07:49:16 PM
Timberjack 360 Grapple Skidder. Identical Timberjack Skidder Used  to drag tops for chipping on recent clear-cut operation in Lower Michigan.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Timberjack 360 Grapple Skidder.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 07, 2002, 06:44:28 PM
Timberjack 230A Forwarder. Sorting Oak Logs for Billsby Sawmill.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Timberjack 230A Forwarder Sorting Oak Logs.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 08, 2002, 07:04:40 PM
Timberjack 230A Forwarder. Decking Aspen.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Timberjack 230 A Forwarder Decking Aspen.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 09, 2002, 08:14:55 AM
Timberjack 230A Forwarder Assisting Sawyer. Falling trees in a sensitive roadside area may require teamwork.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Timberjack 230A Forwarder Assist Sawyer.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 11, 2002, 06:00:04 PM
Timberjack 230A Forwarder Insures Fall Direction

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Timberjack 230A Forwarder Insures Fall Direction.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 12, 2002, 12:20:41 PM
John Deere 750 BLT Crawler. Clearing access road and landing for site clearing timber sale. Clearing site for new Clam Lake Township Administrative site. Red pine and hardwoods removal.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/John Deere 750 BLT Crawler.jpg)



Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 13, 2002, 07:08:47 PM
John Deere 750 BLT Crawler. Working the landing for incoming haulers. Note all wood products being utilized including topwood ready for chipping.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/John Deere 750 BLT Crawler Working Landing.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 14, 2002, 04:11:04 PM
Hydro-Ax 511E. Working a site clearing timber harvest.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Hydro-Ax 511 E.jpg)


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 14, 2002, 06:27:26 PM
John Deere 548 G Grapple Skidder. For tree length skidding on site clearing timber harvest.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/John Deere 548 G Grapple Skidder.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 15, 2002, 07:54:11 PM
John Deere 548 G Grapple Skidder. Skidding Tree Lengths to the Landing.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/John Deere 548 G Grapple Skidding Tree Length.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 16, 2002, 06:27:43 PM
John Deere 548 G Grapple Skidder & Operator. The operator carries a "Husky" chainsaw for top trimming tree lengths as necessary enroute to the Processor at the landing.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/John Deere 548 G Grapple Skidder & Operator.jpg)

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 17, 2002, 06:58:31 PM
Serco 170-A Processor. Processes total tree lengths into the various forest products.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Serco170-AProcessor.jpg)

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on May 17, 2002, 11:11:01 PM
Ron, is that a cut off saw buried under the brush?I can't tell if it's attached to the loader or part of it.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 18, 2002, 07:27:53 AM
Paul_H

Yes, that's a cut-off saw cutting off various products up to a 4" top. It's an all one unit processor trailered in to the work site.

The clam loader picks up the wood in tree length, lays it down for the cut-off saw to process the various length products to a 4" top and then picks it up to be placed in the product pile, sawlogs, bolts, pulpwood etc. Whatever is being markedted at the time.

The clam loader then picks up the remaining top wood and places it in a seperate pile for later chipping.

The wood chips are then blown into a chip-van and hauled to the local cogen plant for wood fuel.

This is a total wood utilization operation.

See following photo also.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 18, 2002, 07:38:29 AM
Serco 170-A Processor & Cut-Off Saw

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Serco 170-A Processor & Cut-Off Saw.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 18, 2002, 08:37:07 PM
Trelan 23L Chipper. Bringing the Chipper in.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/chipperbroughtin,trelan23L.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 19, 2002, 08:28:47 AM
Timberjack Skidder Assists the Chipper. The skidders are often used as "pushers" when needed.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/timberjackskidderassistschipper.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 19, 2002, 04:54:26 PM
Trelan 23L Chipper. Getting set in place for the chipping operation.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/treelan23Lchipper.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 21, 2002, 08:01:56 PM
Trelan 23L Wood Chipper. Getting ready to chip red pine tops piled from processing operation.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/trelan23Lchipper.jpg )


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on May 21, 2002, 09:00:24 PM
Ron,
Do you carry a video camera?Any chance to see it as "sawmills in action"?It looks like a real tree eater!
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 22, 2002, 06:19:15 PM
No I don't have a video camera. I just carry a simple Ricoh 35 mm with 400 film and a $25.00 backup Kodak when that fails. I'm not too high tech.

That Chipper does eat up the trees and spits them out.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 22, 2002, 06:41:22 PM
Trelan 23L Chipper Blowing Chips. Some excess chips at the end of the operation are blown out to mulch and stabilize the landing before closure.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/trelan23Lchipperblowingchips.jpg )


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 23, 2002, 07:18:03 AM
Kenworth & "Pup". Loading out pulpwood from the landing.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/kenworth&pup.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 23, 2002, 07:22:54 PM
Kenworth Starting to Roll. Loaded with pulpwood.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/kenworthstartstoroll.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 24, 2002, 10:59:12 AM
Kenworth Under-way. Headed for the mill with load of hardwood pulp.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/kenworthunder-way.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on May 24, 2002, 11:11:36 AM
Y'all must have a tremendous used tire problem up there.  Lordy, look at all those axles.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 24, 2002, 04:02:47 PM
They do keep the tire shops in business and we do have a used tire problem. The cogeneration plants fueled by wood chips are now seeking permits from DEQ to burn tires in a mixture with the wood chips. Expensive scrubbers are required on their stacks however to eliminate the sulfides etc. That's the political debate right now.

This producer whose truck is pictured has seven such semi's and an equal number of chip vans and he has another new semi on order. Just think of his tire bills alone. I remember when he started with a chain saw and old iron-mule forwarder on one of my first jobs. He is one that has done well.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 26, 2002, 11:12:45 AM
Sawmill Loading Out Excess Sawdust. A mill's sawdust may also find a market for increased wood utilization.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/sawdustloading.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on May 26, 2002, 11:37:52 AM
Rons' picture of the sawdust loading reminded me of a question that I hear all the Time. What do you guys do with your waste?

I say there is no waste in our mill. Everything is utilized. The Bark is shredded and used for Mulch and Landscaping.

The Sawdust is used for animal bedding, or trucked to co generation plants to be burned and converted to energy. The slabs are chipped and find thier way to a multitude of companies that process them into other products.

Every spec of every Log that comes into our mill is fully used.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 26, 2002, 02:34:10 PM
Jeff,

Maybe you can get some pictures of such waste product uses at your mill for posting. Where does the "waste" go?What happens to chips and sawdust is an often asked question, thus the reason I put that picture in. That one was taken at Nelson's Sawmill near Bristol, MI.  
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on May 26, 2002, 03:12:37 PM
Sawmill by-product

Shredded bark. This is just the way it comes off of the log using our Morbark Debarker. This bark may find its way to almost any part of our state for lanscaping or mulch. Some customers purchase the bark then regrind adding color which makes it last longer. I like it natural, but then again if mine gets to looking old I know where the big pile is.  ;)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/shreddedbark.jpg)
THIS PIG WAS FOUND BY FURBY

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Wenrich on May 27, 2002, 04:08:20 AM
Bark in our area only gets used if it is aged.  They want that dark brown color.  Most bark is double ground, and very little gets dyed.

Our wood chips are also turned into mulch.  We don't do it, but another outfit buys chips to shred.  There are also guys who shred old pallets.  This is profitable since they charge to take the pallets away, and it is cheaper than tipping fees at landfills.  Wood mulch can be aged or dyed.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 27, 2002, 07:19:41 PM
Red Pine Thinning. Red pine thinning area after last winter's work with the Timbco T415D tracked feller buncher seen in previous photos.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/redpinethinning.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on May 27, 2002, 07:41:40 PM
Ron, around here they fight over the bark and the sawdust. All we have to do is keep track of whos checks are good. Sorry Kevin "Cheques" :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Frank_Pender on May 27, 2002, 09:05:27 PM
I have sure appreciated this series.  I have found it to be better than a Sears Catalog on a rainy day. :P 8) 8)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 28, 2002, 06:26:49 AM
Thanks for the complement. I didn't know if there would be much interest when I started it. We need some logging photos from other parts of the country also to see how things are done else where.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 28, 2002, 06:36:18 PM
Red Pine Thinning. The first thinning just starting with hand cutter. The slash and woody debris will be left on site to go back into the soil.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/redpinethinning,ameliajaynesale.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 29, 2002, 07:19:24 PM
Gafner 5110-Iron Mule. This will be the forwarder used on the short-wood red pine sale.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/gafner5110-ironmule.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 31, 2002, 01:28:14 PM
John Deere DC70D Feller-Buncher. Completed its work, being "loaded out" upon completion and closure of timber harvest area.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/johndeereDC70Dfeller-buncher.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 31, 2002, 07:14:41 PM
John Deere 450G Crawler. There is often work to do after the timber harvest. One such task is to clean, grade, level, and seed the landings.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/johndeere450Gcrawler.jpg )

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 02, 2002, 08:09:01 AM
Handwork. Handwork is sometimes needed for the finishing touch, especially where the landing access joins the County road.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/handwork.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 03, 2002, 03:40:12 PM
Log Landing Becomes Wildlife Opening. The landing is seeded with a wildlife seed mixture to be maintained as a wildlife opening until the next harvest in 8-10 years.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/landingbecomeswildlifeopening.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 04, 2002, 02:35:29 PM
Hagar the Horrible. The tree fights back.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/hagarthehorrible.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 05, 2002, 07:59:08 AM
John Deere 450G Crawler. The "clean up" dozer. Access roads and connecting skid trails often need to be closed to prevent unwanted motortized vehicle access on the property after the timber harvest is completed.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/johndeere450Gclosing road.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 06, 2002, 08:39:38 PM
The Living Forest.  "Good Forest Management"  may merit a sign.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/thelivingforestsign.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on June 06, 2002, 08:45:58 PM
How do get one of those signs?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 07, 2002, 08:12:11 AM
From the Michigan Resource Alliance, if they still have them. I got some from Eva Rice when the MFRA Office was in the UP at Crystal Falls.

I don't know where they're at now. Maybe Jeff knows or can round up a sign for you. Let me know if you locate any? Some landowners really like them as they publicize Sustainable Forestry and are good PR.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 07, 2002, 06:00:15 PM
Red Pine Thinning. There is still hand work to be done on small jobs and/or sensitive areas.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/redpinethinninghandwork.jpg )

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on June 09, 2002, 09:29:07 AM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/KW.jpg )


Unloading bush truck at dry sort.
The driver,Joe Seymour, is in his early 70's,with no plans to retire anytime soon.He was the Hook& Rigger that set up the Skyhook in the early 1950's.

My brother Don is running the loader.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on June 09, 2002, 09:40:33 AM
Hey guys, try making your pictures 300 to 350 pixels wide before optimizing. that way they are big enough to see, but still small enough to optimize and retain quality for the 15k limit.

I must be getting old, I cant hardly see em. :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on June 09, 2002, 10:22:50 AM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/kw2.jpg )

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on June 09, 2002, 10:48:32 AM
Cool pics guys. Whil I am at it, here is a tip that will help prevent future problems and a good rule of thumb when dealing with picture files for the internet, or anywhere for that matter.

When naming a file NEVER EVER use capital letters, spaces, or special charactors. They will give a web server fits.

example Mypicture #4.jpg  this breaks all 3 rules, and any one of them could or would cause a problem. The one special character that can be used without trouble is the underscore. Here is the way I would name this file.

my_picture4.jpg  or simply mypicture4.jpg

The uder score lest you make a discriptive name that is good for our gallery when trying to find the picture again.

Example: kevins_big_orange_mill.jpg is easier to find later then kevinsbigorangemill.jpg  and if you used Kevins big orange mill.jpg, you might never find it!
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on June 09, 2002, 11:57:49 AM
Jeff,is that why my picture showed up as an empty box at first?KW #2 should have been kw_log_truck2 or similar?

Also, I was using the Optimiser the hard way,not the right way.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on June 09, 2002, 12:09:09 PM
Yup, sure is. I went in and changed the file name and then fixed your post. Thats why you see it now. Yes, that file name would work well. Discriptive and won't make a webserver hic-up. :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on June 09, 2002, 04:34:37 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/drysort.jpg )
View of drysort from millsite.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/md_3.jpg )

Steve,offbearer for the Mobile Dimension.The fir log on the mill,would only fetch pulp price,so it was milled into 7"x10"x 20' planks for RR.Some beautiful clear edge grain came of as well.We are hoping to mill more of our logs,but this is a trial run.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on June 09, 2002, 04:49:05 PM
One of the sort machines (966C Cat) helping out the 763 Bobcat.
The logs in the sort are bush hauled in from different blocks.As far away as 30 miles,average 15-20 miles.The off-highway truck hauls 60-70 m3.The logs are sorted by grade&species,then shipped out on hwy.trucks 2 1/2 hour to the water.More and more of our logs are also heading over the pass to the interior mills.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/md_2.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on June 09, 2002, 08:58:04 PM
That's quite a log 8)  Why only pulp price?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on June 09, 2002, 09:45:31 PM
Greg,
It was "rough" because it grew next to a large slide tract.Being in the open,it had some pretty large limbs.It was too big at 52" inside bark,for our standard sawlog sort,And too rough for our premium oversize.There aren't to many mills aroud here that can take,or want the big ones. :-/

It was somewhere between 260-300 years old.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 11, 2002, 07:05:33 PM
Red Pine Thinning. First thinning of red pine next to a golf course.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/red_pine_thinning.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on June 11, 2002, 08:16:52 PM
Thats a nice looking stand.Are there many markets for the logs,finger joint,etc? The  Forest service in our district,are starting to put up similar,D-Fir,Western Hemlock timber sales.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 12, 2002, 11:08:34 AM
Roadside Loading Red Pine. Yes, there are good markets for red pine in this area. Depending upon size, it is marketed for utility poles, cabin logs, sawlogs, saw bolts, landscape timbers, fence posts, pulpwood, etc.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/redpine_roadside_loading.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 27, 2002, 06:31:19 PM
Hydro-Ax 321. The smaller three wheeled unit for light, close work.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/hydro_ax_321.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bro. Noble on June 28, 2002, 12:20:23 AM
We have considered such an outfit as this or the three wheeled BELL harvestor.  We only log our own timber so wonder if we can justify one.  We have about 400 acres of mixed timber---mostly on steep hillsides and about 100 acres of planted yellow pine.

We see used ones advertised as low as $10,000---$30,000.  What's the chance of getting one in that price range that would be worthwhile for us.  Would we just be begging for trouble?

If you use the shear heads., how much of the butt is damaged?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 28, 2002, 07:44:57 PM
I wouldn't use this unit on steep hill sides. It works best on flat terrain. A shear head may damage a foot or so of the butt depending upon the operator, shear maintenance, and tree species.

They are "pricey". Check the maintenane records and demo it when buying a used one. There are some good buys if one shops around a bit.

I believe this unit is for sale. It is located up in Michigan's western Upper Peninsula at Iron River, MI.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 28, 2002, 08:18:46 PM
On the Road. "Highballing" on the  US 27 freeway with pine pulpwood load for the mill.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/on_the_road_US27.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on June 28, 2002, 08:26:04 PM
How are the trucks unloaded? It looks like both trucks have a space between front and back.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 29, 2002, 07:27:21 AM
Truck Loader/Unloader. Located at rear of most semi's main bed. Center position allows loading/unloading of truck and its "pup".

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/truck_self_loader_unloader.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Steve on June 29, 2002, 08:01:20 AM
How long does it take to unload a truck and pup trailer like that?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 01, 2002, 08:29:44 AM
Loading Time for truck and "pup" for the average operator is about 1 hour.

Unloading Time at the mill is about 20 minutes.

Mill will often unload you with its yard unloading equipment, but if there is a line-up of semis to be unloaded, they will let you go ahead and unload yourself. An advantage of such a "rig".

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 01, 2002, 03:09:45 PM
On the Road. Drive defensively. Watch for those small vehicles on the "blind" side.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/ontheroad_motorcycle.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 02, 2002, 09:32:07 AM
Red Pine, 1st Thinning. A 3rd row removal. Short wood operation with chain saw. Slash looped and scattered.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/redpine_thirdrow-thinning.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 10, 2002, 07:39:08 PM
Red Pine, 1st Thinning. The Iron Mule forwarder picks up the harvest wood along the thinned rows and runs over the remaining slash for aethetics and decay back into the soil.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/redpine_1stthinning_ironmule.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 18, 2002, 07:47:49 PM
Railroad Transportation. Wood products are also transported by rail. Hardwood pulpwood has been loaded into rail cars at the Gulliver Siding in Michigan's Upper Peninsula.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/railroad_transportation.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 22, 2002, 03:53:05 PM
Timberjack 380C Grapple Skidder. On lowboy transport; being delivered to hardwood timber sale for road closure work.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/timberjack380c_grapple_skidder.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 24, 2002, 07:37:31 AM
Timberjack 380C Grapple Skidder. Lifts large oak log to set in place for road closure. Access roads often need to be closed after the timber harvest.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/timberjack_380C_lifts_log.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 25, 2002, 12:53:22 PM
Timberjack 380 Grapple Skidder. Placing the second large oak log for closure of timber harvest access road.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/timberjack380_grapple_skidder_oak_log.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on July 25, 2002, 03:18:24 PM
There is a piece of "abandoned" property next door to me where folks have found a place to have pot parties etc.  I put a live oak log as big or bigger than those logs in the picture above,  across the road and it butted from tree to tree on either side.  It was a strain on my 555 backhoe but I got it in place    Ju-u-s-s-s-t right.

The scoundrels moved it that night.  From the tracks they had used a pickup truck. :-/ >:( :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 25, 2002, 06:15:00 PM
Tom,

Road closures are often violated, but one needs to be persistent in maintaining the closure.

This one of oak logs isn't the best, but the landowner lives right across the road and its in a well traveled residential area, so there are many to keep an eye on it.

Oak logs especially aren't good to use, but these were two large hollow cull logs that would have been left on the landing for grouse drumming logs or wildlife dens. Instead we used them for the road closure for a more natural appearance.

If they were good oak sawlogs, they would  soon be "stolen". If they were smaller trees, especially oak trees,  fallen across the road, they would have been soon cut up for firewood and the road again opened.

In the back woods areas we usually build a series of "tank traps" (earthen mounds covering exposed stubby woody debris about 4' high or so). We placed an earthen mound at the ends of the logs here, but not excessive. When excessive, they aren't too aesthetically pleasing.

In some cases a heavy steel gate with concrete filled steel posts is used. This is more permanent.

It depends upon what the landowner wants and if he can keep it maintained. ORV's and snowmobiles are usually the most problem, but then when the violator wants to remove the closure they will use a 4x4 truck with chain, winch, or whatever.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/road_closure_tank_trap.jpg )

 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: woodmills1 on July 25, 2002, 06:16:47 PM
Tom, I find if you put a very large rock on both sides of the big log it really is much harder for the scoundrels to move it. ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on July 25, 2002, 07:29:56 PM
James, we don't have any rocks around here.  :D
The closest thing I've seen to a rock was the concreted base of a Power Pole in town one time years ago and on it some youngster had written the Ad for a local radio station.  ROCK 105.  I laughed till I thought I'de die.

Sea Shells wouldn't work, Huh?

If these kids are anything like we were then, the harder you make it to move, the more determined they are to move it.  I may get better results by putting wheels on it.  :D

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 25, 2002, 07:44:46 PM
Large Rocks are excellent here also, but usually had to find unless we haul them in. Expensive, bit that's done sometimes also.

Tom,
How about a couple alligators tied to those logs down your way? :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on July 25, 2002, 08:05:53 PM
The kids would just eat them Ron.  :D ........the gators I mean.  :D :D
Title: AhRe: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on July 25, 2002, 09:03:44 PM
Ahhh the subject of road closures.  Last week we spent four days in the Pigeon River SF reclosing roads.  We got the north half done and the south half will have to wait til fall.  We used mainly earthen berms and mixed large rocks, stumps, logs etc in with the dirt.  A couple places we used large boulders for blockages.  We set them into the ground a foot or so.  This makes it hard to pull them with a 4x4.  Most of our wildlife openings and some other areas are accessed through heavy pipe gates that have a chain and padlock on them.  For the most part these stay locked.  Some of them we have problems with people cutting the locks but not too bad.  The worst times are bear dog training season and bear season.  This brand of hunter around here has no respect for locked gates.  One lock I picked up had been cut off with a torch :o.  At this particular site I built a berm behind the gate too.  They still cut the lock off even though there was no way over the blockage on the other side.  Some of the managers want to try something new.  Treated barrier posts.  We've put some in but they are doomed to fail.  We wanted to drill them and put a piece of 1/2" rebar in the center to keep them from being cut off.  Oh no then in case of a fire the fire officers couldn't cut them off.  It did no ggod to remind them that the fire crew would have a 450 JD dozer or a big four wheel drive that could push out or drive around the posts.  Oh well job security 8) 8)  
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 26, 2002, 03:17:16 PM
Road closures are a major management issue and concern in forest land and resource management, both pro and con. Especially in public land management.

All are aware of the Roadless Areas initiated during the Clinton administration and still under debate.

Road closures are worthy of a new Thread.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 26, 2002, 03:28:47 PM
Timberjack 380C Grapple Skidder and its Carrier. Being loaded for transport after the job is done.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/timberjack_380C grappleskidder-loading1.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 29, 2002, 07:02:11 PM
Iron Mule 5110 Forwarder. With a bunk load of aspen pulpwood.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/iron_mule5110_with_aspenpulpwood.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 01, 2002, 07:47:59 PM
Valmet 544X Forwarder. Loading aspen pulpwood on harvest area for transport to the landing.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/valmet_544X_forwarder_in _aspen.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 04, 2002, 03:32:50 PM
Red Pine Processing Area. Note the slasher in operation and differnt product piles. Tops are in background awaiting the chipper.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/red_pine_processing_area.jpg )


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 11, 2002, 09:15:49 AM
Timber Harvest Access Road. Timber harvest access roads often need to be improved for access and trucking. This hill section of road is being straightened out some and graded before receiving 200 plus yards of gravel. 4 wheeled drive was needed to make the sandy hill before the road work.

A John Deere 750B Crawler does the work.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/timber-harvest-road.jpg )


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: StIhL_MaGnUm_1 on August 11, 2002, 09:56:57 AM
That kinda looks like what I've been doing lately except I use a D9 Cat for the access roads,I just got done my 65 acre clear cutting job,so I guess tomorrow I'll be starting my white pine thinning job it oughta be a fun time,nothing like workin the woods.
  Here's a pic of my new
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/stihlmagnumskidder1.jpg )

                                       Rob
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: StIhL_MaGnUm_1 on August 11, 2002, 10:42:10 AM


Heres some Pine
http://www.ronayne.co.nz/pine/logging.jpg
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: StIhL_MaGnUm_1 on August 11, 2002, 11:10:18 AM
Her's a load on it's way


http://www.superiornationalforest.org/july4thstorm1999/images/visuals/Logging%20truck%20loaded.jpg
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 12, 2002, 06:29:02 PM
It's good to see some posts by loggers from other parts of the country. Keep them coming!
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 12, 2002, 06:43:49 PM
Aspen Deck. A "whack" of aspen pulpwood. Double decked side by side awaiting trucking.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/aspen_decked_at_landing.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on August 12, 2002, 07:32:02 PM
looks more like 40 whacks  :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: StIhL_MaGnUm_1 on August 13, 2002, 06:40:10 AM
Ron,

  Here's a pic of my friends Deere 640 w/ big floaties :D

   http://www.rolligon.com/jpg/tires/72x68-28log.jpg

Her's My Buncher :o

   http://www.audubon.org/chapter/mo/mo/feller~2.jpg
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: StIhL_MaGnUm_1 on August 13, 2002, 06:55:34 AM
Here's another pic my chipper

http://www.sawbill.com/chipper.jpg
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 13, 2002, 09:17:29 AM
This was about 3 days work and 4 truck loads were already hauled out so I called it a "whack". A " mechanized whack". Done with feller buncher, 2 Cat Grapple skidders tree length skidding, and a slasher processing at the landing. No wasted motion.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 13, 2002, 06:32:21 PM
Hood Slasher. Processing aspen sawlogs and pulpwood and decking at the landing.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/hood_slasher.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: StIhL_MaGnUm_1 on August 13, 2002, 07:07:03 PM
Ron,

      There's nothing like seeing a Slasher at it's BEST  ;D

      Do you have any more pics??



                      Rob.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: StIhL_MaGnUm_1 on August 13, 2002, 07:12:46 PM
Welcome to the Jungle :D

http://www.pwamazon.com.br/Arraste2.jpg
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 14, 2002, 03:43:33 PM
Where in the "Rain Forest" are you and what kind of logs?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 14, 2002, 04:01:25 PM
Hood Slasher processes aspen products.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/hood_slasher_aspen.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 15, 2002, 07:01:24 AM
Hood Slasher processing and decking aspen pulpwood

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/hood_slasher_decking_aspen.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 15, 2002, 02:24:11 PM
Two New Cat 525B Grapple Skidders. New to the job. The one on the right has smaller tires for working pine plantation rows.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/cat-525B_grapples.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 17, 2002, 08:09:16 PM
Some Armor Here. Two Cat 525 B Grapple Skidders and Hydro Ax 511 EX with sawhead.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/some_armor.jpg )

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 25, 2002, 02:48:15 PM
Valmet 544X Forwarder. Loading variable length oak sawlogs.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/valmet_544x_forwarder.jpg )

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 28, 2002, 07:02:01 PM
John Deere 648 Grapple Skidder. Working on 5 Oaks Hunt Club Timber Harvest.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/john_deere_648_grapple_skidder.jpg )


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: StIhL_MaGnUm_1 on August 29, 2002, 12:37:04 PM
Ron,
 That kinda reminds me of my skidder a little bit,I' ve been cutting and skidding alot of whiet and yellow Pine as of late,in fact I just bought a new 385XP Husqvarna for some felling and a brand new ;D '02 John Deere 748G dual function grapple skidder,Very nice machine though.I'll post some pics asap

                           Rob..
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 29, 2002, 03:43:34 PM
John Deere 648 Grapple Skidder. Skidders may be used for various purposes. Here its used to push the "pay load" of aspen pulpwood out over the sandy access road.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/john_deere_ 648_pushing _truck.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: StIhL_MaGnUm_1 on August 29, 2002, 03:45:17 PM
Her's a link to a pic of the 748G

http://www.cfr.msstate.edu/images/forestry/skidder.gif
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: StIhL_MaGnUm_1 on August 29, 2002, 03:55:05 PM
Here's another one of my 748's in Colebrook N.H. in June 02

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/stihl_magnum_logging01.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 30, 2002, 06:38:04 PM
Valmet 544X Forwarder. It is also used in pushing the aspen "pay load" over the sandy access road from the harvest area. Note oak logs on bunk for weight.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/valmet_544X_pushes_load.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 31, 2002, 06:31:33 PM
Pulpwood Haulers backed up. Two rigs backed up on sandy section of seasonal county road awaiting a pull and push from skidders. Five Oaks Hunt Club Timber Harvest.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/semi-loads_backed_up.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 02, 2002, 02:42:06 PM
Truck Names. Loggers often name their hauling rigs.
This one is "Hard Times".

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/truck_named_hard_times.jpg )

This one is named "Your Next".

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/truck_named_your_next.jpg )


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on September 02, 2002, 05:40:02 PM
O.K. Ron, be careful. There are some names that come into our mill we aint posting here :D

I dont know how they go down the road like that.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 03, 2002, 07:21:33 AM
Yes, some are unprintable, but a library in themselves.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: StIhL_MaGnUm_1 on September 03, 2002, 04:34:51 PM
Just thought I'd say HI ;D ;D 8)

       Later Rob.. I gotta go change the oil in the skidder now should be a fun time...
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 03, 2002, 05:53:41 PM
Timberjack 230A Forwarder. The hardwood stand is now being selectively harvested in a second operation after the red pine selective thinning.

The infastructure of access road, landing, etc. were put in first during the red pine thinning.These are now being used for the hardwood harvest at a higher value and less cost.

Cay Newhouse Hardwood Sale

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/timberjack_230A_newhouse_landing.jpg )

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tillaway on September 06, 2002, 03:02:59 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/truckbrush.jpg )


Roads should be maintained to provide adequate sighting distances.  This is a mainline haul road on the Plumas National Forest in California.  This road is driven by the public to access private property and recreational sites.  Log trucks were using this road when the picture was taken.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tillaway on September 06, 2002, 03:10:53 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/trucknarrow.jpg )

This is the same road as previous image.
Some roads are difficult to build and maintain.  This is the end of a section of road that keeps sliding into the creek.  It should be relocated and engineered to stay on the hill.

Also there are inadequate pulloffs on this section which is about a mile long.  
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tillaway on September 06, 2002, 03:30:25 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/40inchdf.jpg )

40" 16' Douglas Fir log, about 1000 bf.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/48inch.jpg )

48" 16' Douglas Fir log, over 1000 bf.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/deck3.jpg )

Cull deck.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/oakdeck.jpg )

Oak logs... no market.


California's lack of markets and high hauling costs leads to lots of wasted logs.  This should lead to lots of opprotunities for small portable mill owners but rarely does.  The California Forest Practices Rules discourage these opprotunities.  You will need to be a Licensed Timber Operator, and file a salvage exemtion with the Calfornia Department of Forestry to get these.  As a general rule, large land owners in the state will not allow salvaging these logs due to liabilty reasons.  You will have to have a minimum of $2;000,000 liability policy and you will not be allowed to mill on site.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on September 06, 2002, 04:13:19 PM
What does it take to be a "Licensed Timber Operator"?  Could a Miller operate under a Broker's insurance policy?
If the wood is on Privately owned land, why couldn't the miller mill on site?  I don't understand where the landowner loses the right to process his own trees.  If the miller were milling the salvage logs for the landowner, would the State still prohibit the operation?  Would the landowner then have to be a "Licensed Timber Operator"?

How does the State explain the logs left in the woods to Environmentalist Whacko's when there is a market for the salvaged wood?  I would think that the Government could encur as much grief over this as the landowner may encur from the Wackos for harvesting in the first place.

Just trying to understand because obviously, I don't.  ???

I sure wish I could get my saw to those logs. :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tillaway on September 06, 2002, 04:34:14 PM
Good questions Tom.

In these pictures these logs belong to a large industrial land owner with no milling capacity.

Large land owners in California are very shy about liabilty.  They believe that the economic gain is overshadowed by the possibilty of a lawsuit caused by the operation. (Fire, accident on the road etc.)  Also, many times it will cost more to process the paperwork than the logs are worth.

You only lose the right to process your own trees when you sell the lumber or other final product.  You used to be able to cut and process your own trees for personal consumption with any regs.  This was abused (Large Ski Resort near Tahoe) and now the regs apply but to what extent I don't know.

To harvest any logs in California even on your own land you have to be a LTO.  This includes firewood.

A miller can mill logs... just don't ask any questions about the logs source.  The miller will not get in trouble... the land owner will.

Insurance requirements are up to the land owner, most require $2,000,000 or more.  The state will not issue an LTO license without proof of $1,000,000 logger broad form.  A land owner can get this requirement waved if they log on their own land only.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Frank_Pender on September 07, 2002, 08:28:31 PM
Then, in order to log your own land you have to put a plan together that is put together by a certified foresters that certain fees and reg. that he must file and pay for?  This could or will cost you several thousands of dollars?  I see in the future that Oregon woodland owners will be falling into this trap?! :'( :-[
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 12, 2002, 07:05:23 PM
Valmet 544X Forwarder. It comes over the hill on the skid road to pick up another load on the Five Oaks Hunt Club timber harvest.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/valmet_544X_forwarder_over_the_hill.jpg )

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 13, 2002, 07:11:16 PM
Valmet 544X Forwarder. Loads oak sawlogs for transport to the landing. Five Oaks Hunt Club Timber Harvest.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/valmet_544x_forwarder_loads_oak_sawlogs.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 16, 2002, 12:15:43 PM
Valmet 544X Forwarder. Carries load of oak to the landing. Five Oaks Hunt Club timber Harvest.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/vlmet_544X_forwarder_carries_oak.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on September 16, 2002, 07:06:22 PM
Where's Five Oaks Hunt Club?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 17, 2002, 09:00:14 AM
It's a small private hunt club southeast of Manton, MI and north of Long Lake neighboring State forest land. Cabin and property is owned by 3 brothers and associates from Novi, Dearborn, MI area.

They contract ARC Consulting Services for their land & resource management planning, timber harvests etc.

Another such hunt club I work with is Circle V Hunt Club up on Wheeler Creek north of the Manistee river east of Sherman, Mi and south of Traverse City, MI. It also neighbors State forest land. Such clubs have a lot of huntable acres with the public use of adjoining State forest lands.

The Circle V Hunt Club won the Wexford County Conservationist of the Year award a few years ago due to their land and resource management planning and projects.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: StIhL_MaGnUm_1 on September 28, 2002, 08:11:00 AM
Ron,

        You got any new pics of any harvest's??
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 29, 2002, 08:30:15 AM
Not right now. Should have some more soon; didn't want to bore you. Hopefully others will post some. I would like to see some from other parts of the country.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: StIhL_MaGnUm_1 on September 29, 2002, 09:08:26 AM
Hey Ron here's on of my friends site's with my skidder and his forwarder

http://www.mackenziechamber.bc.ca/skidder_forwarder.jpg
Title: Road Closures
Post by: Bro. Noble on September 29, 2002, 02:42:30 PM
Boy I wish I had a digital camera !
Several posts ago Ron showed a picture of a logging road blocked by two large rocks.  About 6 miles north of us there is a logging road closed the same way.  The rocks are about belly button high.  Yesterday morning we went by there and there was an old junky looking 4WD pickup with big tires balanced on top of the rocks.  I can't wait to hear the rest of the story.

Noble
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on September 29, 2002, 03:00:15 PM
Was he balanced on his wheels or his rocker panels?  It makes a big difference. :D

If he was on his wheels, it is a great sign of defiance. ::)
If he was on his rocker panels it was a sign of defeat ??? ;D :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bro. Noble on September 29, 2002, 05:40:10 PM
All four tires were in the air.  I thought maybe the landowner had put it there to be funny, but it was gone this morning.  I'll bet someone was wearing a real sheepish look.

Noble
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: DanG on September 29, 2002, 09:04:57 PM
Noble, you don't have to spend a lot of money to own a digital camera. Go to  Walmart and look for a Vivitar "Vivicam 10."  It is a point and shoot digital camera that sells for under $50. Comes with all the software you need, and takes some pretty nifty pictures.  If I wasn't so lazy, I'd learn how to post pics and show you some samples.

BTW, it isn't displayed with the fancy cameras. It comes on a bubble wrap card and you will find it over with the Instamatic type rigs.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bro. Noble on September 29, 2002, 11:46:04 PM
DanG, I appreciate that info.

Now all I need is a new computer that can handle the pictures.  I see one advertised on TV for about $700 with all the bells and whistles I would need.
We visited our kids at college this weekend.  Our son is working on a PHD in math and teaches a couple of classes.  He had a little work that had to be done at his office so I went along to check the forum.  Their computers were so much faster than this one it was unreal.  The moniter was about one inch thick.  There was a plug-in on the keyboard to hook the digital camera direct.  I WANT ONE !!

Noble
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 30, 2002, 05:31:24 PM
Stihl,

Excellent pictures and some impressive equipment. I note that you are usually chained up or have tracks on the rubber tires. Do you run this way all the time in New Hampshire or can you run straight rubber?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: StIhL_MaGnUm_1 on October 01, 2002, 01:51:45 PM
Ron,

    I don't always run chains on my equipment,but one of the skidders always has a set on it at all times,and my other skidder usually just runs on the rubber,New Hampshire is strange in some spots you really have to run chains and other's you don't it all depends on where I'am,one thing I know is it's no fun to take them on and off all the time :-[.

                     Later Rob....
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: GarryW on October 04, 2002, 09:32:23 AM
Here is the set up at woodman's place. (he made me do this!)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/003_0_compressed.jpg )

garry
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 06, 2002, 10:10:09 AM
Truck Names

Some log hauler truck names noted in route while crossing the U.P. to Iron River and up to Hancock, MI the past few days were:

"Broke Again"

"Double Vision"

"Spud"
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Steve on October 06, 2002, 12:01:33 PM
Here are a couple for ya!

These were both in Ketchikan, Alaska years ago.

"Hardly Able" logging company. It was his real parent given name.

"Preporation H" Pile driving company. They put in docks and such.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: DanG on October 06, 2002, 08:16:38 PM
Haven't seen too many "creative" names on log trucks, around here, but there was a small paving company, a few years back, that was owned and operated entirely by women. They called it T&A Construction Co. ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: WV_hillbilly on October 06, 2002, 08:42:21 PM
   There is a small 3 man home building company down here called  Close Enough Construction .   The name alone would give me doubts about even having them build me a dog house.  



   
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on October 06, 2002, 08:47:05 PM
I like AFAB Construction.  Anything For A Buck  :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Steve on October 06, 2002, 10:50:10 PM
A friend of mine used to have this sign over his shop door.

"We screw the other guy and pass the savings on to YOU!!"
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bro. Noble on October 07, 2002, 07:14:42 AM
Back in the 60's the favorite stock car driver in Springfield Mo. was Lester Friebe.  He drove a purple Buic.  Lester had a garbage route in Springfield.  His purple trucks had a sign on the side "Satisfaction guaranteed or double your garbage back"

Noble
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: DanG on October 07, 2002, 09:35:09 PM
A couple of signs, seen locally:

On a local radiator shop:  "A great place to take a leak."

On the back of a portable toilet truck:  "Do your business with us."

I won't even mention what was on the truck of a local butcher's shop.  :D :D ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Cedar Eater on October 08, 2002, 09:50:15 AM
On the side of a septic system cleaner's truck:

We're Number One In The Number Two Business!

:D :D :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Frank_Pender on October 10, 2002, 08:54:50 AM
a frined of mine had a septic pumping service with the picture of a skunk painted on the back along with a caption, "STINKY".  Boy, are we getting far from the thread? :'(
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: StIhL_MaGnUm_1 on October 10, 2002, 09:50:16 AM
Guy's what happened to the original thread???
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on October 10, 2002, 04:48:35 PM
Stuff goes round and round here Stihl_Magnum.  It'll come back around one day :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 10, 2002, 07:22:11 PM
"Log hauler" rig names. I talked to one driver yesterday with a new rig. He is going to name the new one "Hard Times". The old one was named "Two Tracker".
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on October 10, 2002, 07:57:18 PM
My Southern Loggin' Times has an article in the Industry News Roundup that Timberjack Replaces the 240D Skidder.

I quote the first paragraph:

"Timberjack made  history again last summer when it ceased production of its 200 Series of skidders.  The last unit, a 240C cable machine bearing serial number WC240CC001178 rolled off the assembly line June 18 at Timberjack's plant at Woodstock, Ontario.  It was number 23,795 of the series, introduced by the company in 1961."
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: StIhL_MaGnUm_1 on October 11, 2002, 05:31:34 AM
Tom,

    You are right the 240 is now gone forever,that was a very good machine for it's size a few friends of mine have a couple that I use from time to time..It will be missed :-[

                           Later Rob,....
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 22, 2002, 01:28:20 PM
What's Timberjack going to replace the 240 with? It seems to be the most most popular forwarder here. There are 4 of them working on 3 on my short wood jobs at present.

A couple more "log hauler" names noted are:

"Daddy"
"Poor Boys Dream"
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 28, 2002, 02:49:24 PM
Small Slasher, Hawk Hydaulics, Inc. Cuts hardwood round wood products at the landing.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/slasher_small_Hawks_Hydraulic.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 29, 2002, 08:27:05 AM
Tree Farmer C5D Cable Skidder. Used on "short wood" job for pulling down leaners and road side trees where safety and falling placement is critical.

Harris Hardwood Sale, 10/02.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/tree_farmer_C5D_cable_skidder.jpg )


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: StIhL_MaGnUm_1 on October 29, 2002, 01:39:46 PM
Hey Ron nice little tree farmer you got there how do you like it?Nice pics by the way I'm suprised no one else post's any pics for us to look at...I have been thinking about looking into purchasin one of the new JD 848G series dual function skidder's for a few weeks now I guess I'll have to swing by NorTrax East this week.... ;)

                         Later Rob....
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 29, 2002, 05:06:51 PM
A Logger's Pick-Up Carries Their Needs.
Tool Box; Fuel Tank for skidder & forwarder fuel; Storage  Boxes for spare parts, hydraulic hoses etc., Lunch Cooler; Chain Saw Oil; Extra Chain Saw ( Husky 288XP) etc.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/logger__s_pick-up_r_wheeler.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: smwwoody on October 29, 2002, 07:39:17 PM
That JD 848 is that the TJ 660 painted yellow?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 30, 2002, 06:17:46 AM
Black Cherry Logs. Ready to be forwarded to the landing after the cutter returns from his lunch break.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/black_cherry_logs.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: StIhL_MaGnUm_1 on October 30, 2002, 12:30:19 PM
smwwoody,

         I don't really know for sure but I will let you know by the middle of next week..

Ron,

         Nice pics as always ;DI almost thought that you took a pic of my truck till I saw the 288 and not a 385 and 064 ;).

                             Later Rob..
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 30, 2002, 04:59:08 PM
1990 Timberjack 240A Forwarder. Carrying out a "bunk" of hardwoods. Harris Hardwood Sale 10/02.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/1990_timberjack_ 240 A_forwarder.jpg )


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: WV_hillbilly on October 31, 2002, 08:08:33 PM
 Ron do they leave the middle piece (the one that saw is touching)in the woods or do they take it out to be sawed into lumber? It seems to me that there would be some real nice crotch wood in that piece.

Thanks Hillbilly
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 01, 2002, 04:50:41 PM
Hillbilly,

The center crutch piece of the black cherry was left in the woods. It's there for anyone that wants it or it becomes a grouse "drumming log".
 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 01, 2002, 05:00:08 PM
Timberjack 240A Forwarder Unloads Sawlogs at the Landing. Harris Hardwood Sale 10/02.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/timberjack_240A_unloads_sawlogs.jpg )

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: TJACK on November 01, 2002, 06:32:10 PM
Ron,

I have noticed in your area they use a lot of forwarders.  Is there an advantage in time or perference in getting the job over cable skidders?  I realize there is less impact on the land.  Why do I ask? I live in North Western PA where most of the timber harvesting (saw logs and veneer, black cherry, red oak and maple) is with cable skidders, very few forwarders.  If you cut pulp or firewood, grapple skidders.  Maybe do to the hills?

TJACK
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: smwwoody on November 01, 2002, 08:44:54 PM
T jack
Forwarders don't work real well on our hill sides I have rented that big franklin that grotzinger equiptment has a few times when we had over a 1.5 mile long skid and used the skidders to pre bunch and then hauled to the landing with the forwarder. and one time when we could not get the log trucks through the snow and the state would not let us plow the truck road because it was being used as a snowmobiel trail so we prehauled with the forwarder down off of the ridge road in emporium to the golf course where the log trucks could get to.  Woody
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: WV_hillbilly on November 03, 2002, 08:03:18 PM
Ron

  that puzzles me as I would think that someone could make some high dollar boards out of that. I don't know anything about sawmilling or logging I just use the boards. But I hope to get a mill in the next 2 years. I own a small farm and would like to cut some of my own trees for lumber.

Hillbilly
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 08, 2002, 06:55:25 PM
Most of my hardwood sales are selectively marked and require short wood variable length logging with none over 17 feet in length. Tree length skidding is not permitted as the primary method, thus forwarders are primarily used.

The land owner clients I have do not want their forest landscape and remaining trees damaged. More resource damage is often done with excessive use of cable skidders.

The forwarders are also easier on the landowner roads and trails. However, there is usally a limited need for cable skidders being used as you stated on hill sides, reaching into wet areas, assisting cutters in pulling down leaners, etc.

Most timber producers have both a forwarder and a supporting cable skidder on the job for support as needed, but they are not the primary skidding method.

There are timber harvests were tree length skidding is permitted and grapple and cable skidders are used, but not in quality hardwood selective harvests. Remaining trees to improve a landowner's stand quality and values can not be damaged in excess.

I've worked both in West Virginia and Pennsylvania and know the hills well in your landscapes. It is much more difficult than what we have here in Michigan, thus the terrain may dictate more use of cables.

I can recall $70,000 +/mile haul roads in West Virginia 20 years ago.  We just need to be as "light on the land" as possible.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: smwwoody on November 08, 2002, 07:08:20 PM
Quote
More resource damage is often done with excessive use of cable skidders.





that should read excessive use of caable skidders with bad or lazy opperators.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 08, 2002, 07:15:38 PM
Truck Driver and Timber Producer. They "talk things over" as they get ready for "a load to the mill".

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/truck_driver_gets_ready.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: smwwoody on November 08, 2002, 07:22:42 PM
Ron

how many ton do they put on those things?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 08, 2002, 07:35:22 PM
I agree. The resource damage is proportinal to the experience and care of the skidder "or forwarder" operator and also the job foreman overseeing the harvest.

If you look back through this thread, you will see cables and grapples in use also. One recent timber harvest had both type machines in full production. The select hardwood area used forwarders and the aspen clear-cut areas used grapples. A cable skidder was used as a support unit on both areas.

Soil types and soil disturbance is also a concern often overlooked as to the type of unit used.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 08, 2002, 07:48:09 PM
Woody,

20-30 tons of green wood depending upon the species.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 10, 2002, 05:52:06 PM
Getting A load Of Sawlogs Out. While the timber producer decks a "bunk" of pulpwood with the 230A Timberjack Forwarder.

Both sawlogs and pulpwood are harvested concurrently during the selective timber harvest. (Harris Hardwood Sale, October 2002.)

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/loading_and_decking.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tillaway on November 10, 2002, 07:00:04 PM
Ron,
It seems as though you have allot of self loader trucks in your region.  Self loaders are rare in California since they usually service small landowners that do their own logging.  Lots of them comparetively in Oregon and Washington though.

Is it common to use self loaders even when a loader is available on the landing.  I ask this since the loggers out west are very concerned about truck payloads since the loader reduces this.

When a forwarder is used out here part of it's task is to load trucks.  So a self loader is redundant for this type operation.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 10, 2002, 07:19:37 PM
Yes, the self-loaders are very popular here with the truckers that haul all roundwood products. Some of the Sawlog only producers will have just the flat bed rig and a seperate loading machine serving at the landing.

They usually don't tie their skidders up for loading trucks. If not a self loader, the seperate loading machine is often a large fork lift.

I'll show a picture of just a log rig maybe tomorrow.  
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tillaway on November 10, 2002, 09:39:21 PM
The most common loader in California is the 966 Cat wheel loader with log forks much to the disdane of some Foresters including me.  Landing are too big when these are used.  I had never seen one in the woods until working in California.  The Northwest uses hydraulic excavators (Cats, Hitachi, Link-Belt, mostly) which are much superior for sorting logs and working under a yarder.  Also landing size is greatly reduced on the ground based sytem sides using these.  I forgot to mention that self loader haul costs are considerably more compared to the long logger used here so that limits their role to do it your selfers, very small operators, and cleanup loads.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 11, 2002, 08:04:27 AM
Till,

How about posting some pictures of the California  or the Pacific Northwest logging operations when you can? Everthing's on a much bigger scale out there with different techniques for the "high country".

I once worked a 16 person logging crew in Oregon during my firefighting days. They were real professionals falling that ponderosa pine on those steel slopes. We traveled in there own bus which their mill provided.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 11, 2002, 08:16:56 AM
On the Road Again. Load of sawlogs on flat bed rig traveling down State Highway 115.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/flat_bed_of_sawlogs.jpg )


Some more Log Hauler Names noted:

"Fast Forward II " (Not sure where Fast Forward I is??)
"Walking The Dawg"
"Gear Jammer"
"Bigger Bear"

These were all noted in Michigan's U.P. "Spud" was also on the road again.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tillaway on November 11, 2002, 05:52:21 PM
I've been trying Ron, but unlike you I don't often get to work with loggers.  My tasks are over long before they show up, sometimes years before.  I was trying to find time to get pictures of a yarder operation in the Sierras this summer but never got over there before they were done.  Yarders are not real common in the Sierras any more.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on November 11, 2002, 07:12:21 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/paul_raising_spar.jpg )

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/Paul_linkbelt_ls98.jpg )

These pictures were taken in 1980,when we were logging at Woodfibre BC.
The top picture is a 1963 Madill yarder.The spar is hinged,and is raised first with a hydraulic ram,then lifted the rest of the way up with the two raising guylines on the front.As it goes up,the donkey puncher,slacks off the other four,till the spar is near vertical.Then they are slacked off & tightened till the pipe is at the desired position.
The man standing on the log pile,is my dad.The donkey puncher is Lorne Crocker.The winch on the yarder is a 110 Skagit, handjammer.It was taken off it's sleigh in 1963,and fitted on a Madill carrier.This was the last season we used it.

The bottom pic is the yarder(Back down the road) and a LS-98 Linkbelt loader.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tillaway on November 11, 2002, 07:41:17 PM
Link- Belt with a snorkel no less, never seen a snorkel in the US. 8)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on November 11, 2002, 08:07:17 PM
 Tillaway,
They're kind of a BC thing aren't they? Do they still run many Link-belts down there?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tillaway on November 11, 2002, 08:14:34 PM
Never heard of one until I went to the Charlottes.  Never saw a grapple yarder either.  Those are unique to BC.  The company out there had a snorkel and a super snorkel on a Madill.

All most all those cable Link-Belts were converted to shotgun yarders as soon as the hydraulics started to get popular.  Some of the old boys still run them in Washington.  I've even seen some old dipper stick type there.

Have you got any shovels with tong throwers up there yet?  
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on November 11, 2002, 08:38:47 PM
I haven't seen any around here.There were a few super snorkels around a few years ago,but aren't to practical anymore because of multi chart areas.It would cost to much to break down,move and reasemble.There was a 150' on a American 72-20.I saw a few working,and was impressed by them.
We have a newer LS98 now that we added a kit to the power down side of the winch.It gives us twice the line speed when needed,and we yard comfortably up to 450'.The 98 is used mostly for cherry picking,but occasionally yard and loads corners and small patches.

I will try to take some pictures of the grapple yarder this week.We mostly use the grapple,but have the dropline carriage on right now.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on November 12, 2002, 05:29:20 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/paul_logtruck.jpg )

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/paul_gy-ll.jpg )

I took some pictures of the grapple yarder,and 330LL working in the fog today.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on November 12, 2002, 05:34:36 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/87N02-11-12(10-40).jpg )

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/paul_landing.jpg )

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on November 12, 2002, 05:47:49 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/paul_gy_landing.jpg )

Looking down from the guyline stump.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/paul_in_cab.jpg )

View from the cab of the 330LL
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tillaway on November 12, 2002, 06:26:47 PM
Those pictures are  8) Paul.  When I was laying out Blocks for the grapples we try to limit the yarding distance to 200 meters.  Can you yard futher than that or is that about it.  We also tried to layout so as we could get a hoe trail around the bottom to use the hoe for a tail spar.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 12, 2002, 06:29:00 PM
Some " heavy duty " logging. Great to see other parts of the country and their forests at work.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on November 12, 2002, 07:07:48 PM
This is a small block,and the maximum distance yarding is around 600-700'.The two mainlines on the yarder are 1150'.They have to be kept close in length,or one line will pull faster,and the grapple will tend to open and close at will.

600'(around 200 meters) is optimum for this machine,but we've been out to the end of the mainlines a few times.In a steep block like this,especially when it's raining,almost every log needs to be grabbed by the loader,before the GY can let go.If not ,the logs will shoot back down to the crew below.

Tillaway,
We love it when there are backspar trails.Number one production 8) Too steep here though,the slope has no break,till the road mainline at the bottom.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/paul_logloader.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on November 14, 2002, 02:54:13 PM
Does anyone have any pictures or expirience with CAT crawler skidders like the 527 or 517. I like thses machines but i don't know a lot about them.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tillaway on November 14, 2002, 03:45:46 PM
Lot's of them out here.  The preferred skidder in these parts, but hey it's steep.  They run them here on slopes up to 70% with with steeper pitches allowed. :o  I'm sure theres a serious pucker factor though. ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on November 14, 2002, 04:17:01 PM
Thats interesting. Unforunatly here on the east coast there really isn't any need for them but i'd really like to see someone try one just to see how it goes. You don't have any pictures of them at work do you?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Steve on November 14, 2002, 04:55:09 PM
So with this high lead grapple, no chokers/setters? Can the yarder operator can see what he is doing and grab the logs?

What a tough dangerous job to eliminate, if that is the case.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on November 14, 2002, 05:34:15 PM
Steve,
In most cases,the operator can spot his own logs.If he can't,the hooker has a radio to guide him.It also speeds things up in the landing,by not having to drop the logs,and slack the lines,and have the chaser run in and unhook the chokers.
If there is poor deflection,the dropline carriage is used,or in extreme ground,the butt rigging is used.Both require chokers
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tillaway on November 15, 2002, 11:46:59 AM
Paul
How does production compare to your drop line rigging.  I'm trying to figure why I haven't seen any working in Oregon or Washington.  One of the reasons I can think of might be the limited yarding distances.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tillaway on November 15, 2002, 11:52:34 AM
I don't have any pictures of the 527 yet.  I'll try to get some next time I see one.  I was told by someone that operated them that they really excell at skidding but don't work as well as a regular dozer for earth moving.  It has something to do with the weight balance.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on November 15, 2002, 07:52:57 PM
Tillaway,
The grapple will out produce the dropline in most cases,especially up to 700-800'.Faster turns,faster landing,no crew to scramble out of the way.Even faster hanging on the excavator.If we are in small wood,and out 800-1000',then it's usually better to fly 3 or 4 chokers on the carriage.

I wonder if the drop carriage is used more in the States because of the thinning and shelterwood systems?I also noticed more Longline shows.In our district,we have more for small patches,and guts&feathers left by the bigger outfits that came through before us.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tillaway on November 15, 2002, 09:44:42 PM
I think your right Paul, it's the partial cuts.  Road building is another, it's avoided whenever possible.  The blocks I was laying out up there had allot more roads  bisecting them.  We would have just put one road at the top or bottom in the states and long lined it.

I had the pleasure of working with a very sharp logging engineer for several years.  They take great pride in logging helicopter units with cable.  He used a 110' Berger tower with massive skyline extensions to do one near Happy Camp, CA.  They flew out the haywire with a helo and used a rock drill to bore holes in a cliff face to set bolts to use for tail holds.  There wasn't any trees on that side of the canyon that would hold.  I can't remember how far it was to the tail holds but I do know it was over a mile.  He did some serious pencil scratching to figure that one out.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on November 15, 2002, 10:53:14 PM
Tillaway,
That is a mind boggling distance.They must have had a block purchase to lift the skyline.Just the weight of the line alone,would be something,then to add the weight of the logs onto that,look out.Were there intermediate supports?

The rock anchors work well,but we always feel better hung on a stump.,Just a mindset I think.

Are there breaks/incentives for logging a heli block with a conventional system?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tillaway on November 16, 2002, 04:28:21 PM
No multispan, they were operating at the absolute weight limits.  I asked him about the wieght problem and he had it all calculated.  They had to buck the logs in the same mind set as on a helo unit to keep the weight within the working load of the lines.  By the way they had just respooled the yarder with fresh cable and, may haved been the swaged stuff but I DonT recall.  I asked him about the bolts as well and he said that they were stronger than any stump, of course he was in good rock too.

I was at the Oregon Logging conference a few years back and the manufacturer of Acme carriages was giving a seminar on long spans.  It was his belief that 90% of whats helo logged now could be cable logged.  He had a video of one his carrriages working rediculously long span 6000' or so If I remember correctly.  The yarder hit fourth gear sending the carriage out.  It was a 300' drop from the carriage to the ground.

Nearly avery cable logger does multispan and has long span capabilities, if you don't then you are very limited on the jobs coming your way.  

There's a significant financial payoff for logging helo ground with the long spans.  Company "A" bids on the timber sale as laid out for helo planning to use helo.  Thier bid on the timber will be significantly lower than company "B" that plans on getting creative with a cable system.

Have you seen the Eagle carriage that can go around curves?  It was also discussed in the seminar.  So now if you want to cable log in Oregon or Washington you need to be able to multi-span, long-span and go around curves. ::)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on November 16, 2002, 04:51:24 PM
We have been dragging our feet on doing any heli logging.There has been pressure from our District Manager at BCForest Service to access hard to reach timber.We have built road into some pretty tough spots,and have done a cold deck and swing in a block at North Creek.The numbers were run before hand,and it was worth it.

One reason we don't want to fly our wood is it would shorten up the season for our crew.Another is we have the equipment,and the manpower,but most of it would sit idle,while the helicopter company is making the money.Heli has its place,but not for us right now.

Do you remember the size of the Skyline(diameter).Berger is a pretty good yarder isn't it?

I haven't seen the Eagle carriage,but it sound interesting.Is it the Eaglet motorized carriage that is used down your way?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tillaway on November 16, 2002, 08:15:28 PM
I don't remember the size of the skyline, it's been a while maybe 1 1/4" but its just a guess.

The engineer that did the pencil scratching was also part owner of the mill and purchased that big Berger years before.  It was the biggest he could buy at the time.  He liked them allot and in fact and this yarder was pretty much the last of the really big iron running in the state in the late 1980's.  Part of their niche was contracting out to competing mills to log sale units that could only be done with the big Berger.

Yes Eagles, Acmes, and Boman come to mind.  I don't know which is more popular. They are all motorized carriages.

Heli is popular in California simply because yarders are scarce outside of Redwood country.  Also the loggers that do have them usually aren't interested in multi-span, long-span operations.  Also forest engineers are scarce here and the Foresters that write the Timber Harvest Plans are not real up on engineering so they don't write a skyline option into the plans.  Also CDF is not real sharp about logging systems either, so allot of cable units get flown needlessly (Columbia Helicopters is happy about that).

The last OLC I was at Canadian Air Crane put on seminar about selective harvesting high quality trees in really nasty places.  They would climb the trees and limb and top them then cut at the stump leaving a little strip of holding wood with wedges in the saw kerf to hold them up.  They hung a set of Esco graples horizontally form a Skycrane and grabbed the upright tree, gave it a wiggle and flew away with it.  The tree never hit the ground until it reached the landing.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on November 17, 2002, 04:36:49 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/paul_skyline.jpg )

This was taken in 1987 from the tail block on the Skyline.We had a 071 Madill mini tower.The spar on the yarder was 42' high.The system we were using is what we learned as a North bend.The mainline comes out through the fall block,and up to the carriage block on the skyline.It allows us to side block along the skyline road,and take a larger swath.This ground was broken up,and had a sharp break at the backend,and a bad hump in the middle.This particular road was out over 1000'

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/paul_skyline_garibaldi.jpg )

This shot was taken up at the hump,looking back toward Mt Garibaldi.(dormant volcano)

Tillaway,
I have seen pics of that heli grapple system in a lumbermans magazine,interesting.Have you seen where they are flying disasembled hoe chuckers into heli blocks in pieces,then reasembling them?They chuck the block into bundles for the chopper.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tillaway on November 17, 2002, 06:41:31 PM
I bet it's a real bear to reassemble them in the block. Do they fly the under carriage first then set the house on top with the boom to follow?

Do you run your own D lines and use Logger PC?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on November 17, 2002, 07:52:52 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/feller_buncher.jpg )

This is the machine I was refering to,not an excavator at all ::)
It belongs to Tymatt Contracting,here in BC.He contracts for Weyerhauser,Stillwater Division.These next two pictures are from Logging &Sawmilling Journal.They show the buncher being reasembled after it's components were flown in by chopper.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/feller_buncher_a.jpg )


Tillaway,
We don't run our own deflection lines,that is done by our forestry consultant,John C Howe of JCH Forestry.He is based out of Squamish,but also does a lot of work on BC s mid coast.They didn't lay our skyline block out,it was done by a engineer by the name of Dave Cameron.He had cut the line off at a good point,but there was good wood just behind it that we felt was worth the extra rigging.

Logging Journal link (http://www.forestnet.com/archives/Sept_2002/index.htm)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 14, 2002, 05:42:31 PM
On The Road Again. Log haulers headed north on I-75. An empty passing a full load.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/log_haulers_empty_&_full.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 14, 2002, 05:56:09 PM
Log Hauler Names, noted on last trip up to western U.P.

"Animal"
"Flash"
"Gear Jammer"
"Not Satisfied"
"Spud"
"Hot Dog"
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 16, 2002, 09:35:01 AM
Chip Van. Ready "to roll" with a load of fuel wood for the local Cogen. Plant.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/chip_van.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 17, 2002, 06:06:33 PM
Jonsered 2054 Turbo Chainsaw. Being rested on a stump while harvesting black cherry and hard maple sawlogs.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/jonsered_2054_chinsaw.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 18, 2002, 06:36:23 AM
Load Of Sawlogs On Way To The Mill. Hardwood sawlogs from the Newhouse Hardwood Sale; October 2002.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/load_of_hardwood_sawlogs.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 19, 2002, 06:29:54 AM
Timberjack 240A Forwarder and Tree Farmer C5D Cable Skidder. Parked at the landing. Timber producers often have one of each type on the job. Harris Hardwood Sale ; October 2002.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/timberjack_and_tree_farmer.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 20, 2002, 04:21:39 PM
Delivering The Equipment To Start The Logging Job. During the winter's first snow. Kendziorski Hardwood Sale; December 2002.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/delivering_equipment_winter::s_first_snow.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 21, 2002, 01:41:09 PM
The Logger's Pick-up. A look at another one carrying the needs for the day. Kendziorski Hardwood Sale; December 2002.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/logger__s_pick-up_r_wheeler.jpg )



Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: craigc90 on December 22, 2002, 09:59:07 AM
I am going to try this one more time this is my friends Timberjack460 cable skidder and JD650g(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/skidtj460.JPG )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: craigc90 on December 22, 2002, 10:00:53 AM
Wow  I finally figured it out the pic is a little fuzzy but I think its ok.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: WV_hillbilly on December 22, 2002, 10:26:56 AM
  Looks like you did it to me Craigc90. It takes some gettin used to but should be easier now. That's some nice equipment. I just wish I had some like it.

Hillbilly
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 23, 2002, 10:54:19 AM
Valmet 544X Forwarder. With "bunk" of hardwood pulpwood. Kendziorski Hardwood Sale; December 2002.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/valmet_544X_forwarder_wheeler::s.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on December 24, 2002, 06:55:31 AM
 Those look like some nice sticks for pulp. Do you guys use a chipper in the woods or are those logs chipped at the mill?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on December 25, 2002, 05:19:13 AM
We do both here Scott, but in the case of the load on that forwarder, that wont be chipped in the woods I would bet. When total chipping in the woods they take tops and all. Most chip operations will use a feller buncher to "bunch" skids of wood in a accessable spot the usually a grapple skidder will take it on to the landing.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: mapleveneer on December 25, 2002, 06:07:19 AM
Quite an interesting thread of posts and photos.  Too bad I can't sit still for long enough to look at all of them!
If any of you ever get to NY state, there is an extensive and quite interesting logging exhibit at the Adirondack Museum in the hamlet of Blue Mountain Lake in the Adirondacks.  See www.adirondackmuseum.org.  Visit their section on history/adirondack industries.  Also check out the book store in the History section for some books on the history of logging.  Very Interesting.

Now you guys talk about a "whack of logs"??  Let's see if I can make this picture load!


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/hwack2.jpg )

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on December 25, 2002, 06:52:26 AM
Tha's quite a Wack, MV.

Yep I drink a lot of coffee too ;D :D

Make your next cup decaf and see if you can stay awhile, we
re having fun and the more the merrier. ;) :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 26, 2002, 01:44:32 PM
Husquvarna 395XP Chainsaw. Being used by this cutter to harvest Aspen and Oak sawlogs and pulpwood. Kendziorski Hardwood Sale; December 2002.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/husqvarna_395XP_.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 28, 2002, 05:21:25 PM
Pulpwood Hauler. Prepares for turn off US-2 for access into Mead Paper Mill's wood yard. Escanaba, Michigan; December 2002.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/pulpwood_hauler_enters_Mead.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 30, 2002, 12:23:12 PM
Railroad Siding. Rail cars of pulpwood being loaded for pick-up at the Gulliver R.R. Siding in Michigan's U.P.; December, 2002.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/railroad_siding_pulpwood.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: TJACK on December 30, 2002, 08:08:46 PM
I am suprised all these photos don't show snow on the ground, being in the UP of Michigan.  We haven't seen grass in Northern PA since a week before Thanksgiving.  Great pictures Ron.  It is interesting to see how things are done in your neck of the woods.

TJACK
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 31, 2002, 08:50:03 AM
Yes, it has been somewhat unusual so far. We haven't had a lot of snow yet. The snow has been all around us. Not much in the UP either. They were getting a little yesterday I guess. It rained here most of the day yesterday with temps up to 40 degrees. Got washed out of the woods.

There will be some snow photos ahead though.

How about some Pennsylvania photos? I do recall some heavy snow seasons there.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: TJACK on December 31, 2002, 08:35:13 PM
Ron,

I may have spoken to soon, it was 50 here today.  Now I can see grass on the road sides.  It was refreshing as I drove with the window part way down. As far as pictures, I don't have a digital camera although, I do have a friend that will let me use his.  I will see what I can do.

Take care and have a happy new year,

TJACK
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 01, 2003, 11:16:00 AM
I don't have a digital camera either. Just a plain 35 mm and use a scanner.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on January 01, 2003, 06:27:34 PM
Hey Ron, how come the trucks you show always have so many axles? Seems like more than is needed.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 01, 2003, 06:45:51 PM
The heavy loads that they are allowed to carry here in Michigan require the multi-axels. The gross weights that these mult-axels carry run 154,000 - 157,000 pounds. They can only run in Michigan as most states only allow single axel rigs.

The State has been trying to stop the multi-axels, but the logging industry has prevailed in their use so far.

They may run the multi-axels into Ohio some by special permit only
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on January 02, 2003, 01:19:15 PM
 Thats pretty interesting Ron. Are the multi axles only used in the hardwood or does the softwood loads weigh alot too? Around here trailers usually only have 2 or 3 axles on log trailers and the B-train chip vans have 2, not very exciting but it works i guess.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 02, 2003, 06:57:09 PM
The mult-axel rigs are used for both hardwoods and softwoods. Double axels trailers are used also. That's what the chip vans are.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 03, 2003, 06:29:36 PM
Log Hauler Wears Christmas Wreath. Roadside loading during December's snow (now gone). Note the multi-axels with 42 tires. Kendziorski Timber Harvest; December 2002.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/log_hauler_wears_wreath.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on January 04, 2003, 06:58:20 AM
 Thats a nice tough looking truck Ron. I don't know much about trucking so i can't really carry on  a conversation about them. I see you have a lot of forwarder pictures. Do you have any expirience with the boogie tracks used on them sometimes?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 04, 2003, 02:02:29 PM
Not much experience with the tracks of the forwarders since they aren't used much in this area. Mostly just just the rubber tires.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on January 05, 2003, 09:21:33 AM
 Do the forwarders do as much rutting as the skidders Ron? In my area i've seen a lot of skidder action and i'm quite disgusted with them. I'm sure if the operators actually cared about what they were doing things would be better. Around here not many operators run a CTL operation so i don't really know much about them, it seems like a better system in a lot of cases though.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 05, 2003, 02:45:37 PM
Valmet 544X Forwarder. Picking up sawlogs and pulpwood behind the cutter. Kendziorski Hardwood Sale; December 2002.

Yes, the rubber tired forwarders compared to skidders are usually easier on the landscape with less disturbance and resulting damage on selection harvest areas.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/valmet_544X forwarder_and_cutter.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on January 06, 2003, 02:31:03 PM
 Hi Ron. I notice you were listing truck names awhile back. I rember seeing one called the Bacon Maker. Once when i was visiting my relitives in Nova Scotia I saw a tow truck called the happy hooker :o. :D.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 07, 2003, 06:00:49 PM
Timbco Tracked Processor Stuck. A logger's day takes a turn for the worse when the productive Timbco tracked processor broke through a "spring hole". The unit was stuck for a better part of two days."Heavy armor" had to be called in to retreive it.

Harris Hardwood Sale; December 2002.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/timbco_stuck.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tillaway on January 07, 2003, 06:13:50 PM
Oops...I did that with a pickup once... took me a week to get it back.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 08, 2003, 02:24:29 PM
Timbco Tracked Proccessor Still Stuck. A Komatsu Crawler (D7 size) with winch frame is called in to assist in removal of the Timbco from "spring hole". Harris Hardwood Sale; working aspen clear cut area near head waters of Wheeler Creek; December 2002.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/timco_winched_with _crawler.jpg )

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on January 08, 2003, 05:35:50 PM
 Those pictures reminded me of something that happened up here a couple years back. The contractor was working behind a Fabteck FT133 in a cedar swamp skidding cedar (naturally). at the beginning of the swamp was a very steep hill, maybe 30 feet. Anyway the skidders were in after a good rain and when they went to go back up the hill with a grapple full of wood they got mired down. The mud was the nice black stuff cedar swamps are known for. The timberjack 560 and 450 were burried about 2 feet up the arch. the 560 was in worst and it was lop sided the mud on the side farthest in was up to the window on the door. The loggers got a hitachi EX200 in but it got stuck too. The front of the tracks were sticking out of the mud a few inches but in the back the engine compartment was litterally level with the ground. Interestingly enough it started right back up. Words can't descride how bad these guys were stuck. I wish i had a camera with me. Nice timbco Ron.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 10, 2003, 07:47:36 AM
Timbco Still Stuck. More heavy equipment is called in to work on freeing the tracked Timbco from the "sink hole" while workers place aspen logs under the tracks to "jump it out". Harris Harfdwood Sale; December 2002.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/timbco_in_sink_hole.jpg )

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 12, 2003, 07:39:27 AM
Timbco Back On Firm Ground. It now needs to be taken in for a "steam cleaning". Harris Hardwood Sale; December 2002.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/timbco_on_firm_ground.jpg )


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on January 12, 2003, 08:16:14 AM
Ron it's good to see you guys got the processor un stuck,your right it looks like it could use a bath  ::)


                Later Rob.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: chet on January 12, 2003, 11:47:18 AM
Ron do you happen to know if that Timbco was put together in Iron River. It looks like one of the models they build at the Lakeshore Plant.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 12, 2003, 03:14:21 PM
Chet,

I don't know if this one was an Iron River product. It is owned by Sam Fahl, Fahl Forest Products, Mancelona. I never did get a "clean" look at it as it was already "sunk" when I came on the job.

I'll check the Timbcos out closer in the future to see if they're from Iron River though.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 13, 2003, 05:14:42 PM
Timberjack 380B Grapple Skidder Harris Hardwood Sale; December 2002.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/timberjack_380B_ grapple_skidder.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 15, 2003, 05:22:11 PM
Timberjack 1010B Double Bunk Forwarder Harris Hardwood Sale; December 2002.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/timberjack_1010B_forwarder.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 17, 2003, 07:42:43 PM
John Deere 540C Cable Skidder. Used for logging the hillside terrain on the Harris Hardwood Sale; December 2002.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/j.deere_540C_cable_skidder.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 19, 2003, 09:24:57 AM
John Deere 540C Cable Skidder. Rolls down hillside skid trail to remove selectively marked sawlog and pulpwood trees.

The hillside skid trail was waterbarred with round wood and slash upon completion to prevent any possible future erosion.
Harris Hardwood Sale; December 2002.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/j.deere_cable_skidder_down_hill.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on January 19, 2003, 09:26:40 AM
Nice work Ron I see it's kinda muddy out your way also..
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 21, 2003, 06:29:09 PM
Falling and Bucking Black Oak Sawlogs The cutter uses a Husky 395XP chainsaw. Kendziorski Hardwood Sale; December 2002.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/sawing_black_oak_sawlogs.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 29, 2003, 06:37:05 PM
More wood hauler truck names noted in my travels.

"Blue Ox"
"Patchwork"
"Spud" (Again)
"Dog Train"
"Boo"
"Polar"
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 30, 2003, 06:56:06 PM
An informal survey of the number of wood hauler semi's traveling Michigan highways was made during a recent trip from Cadillac, Michigan to Iron River, Michigan to Hancock, Michigan and return.

Miles Traveled: 974 miles
Number of Days enroute: 3 days
Number of Wood Haulers counted enroute: 82 semi's

Results:
1 log hauler /11.9 miles of highway
27 log haulers per day on highways

A good way to pass the time; "counting logging trucks" and observing their "handles".
 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bro. Noble on January 30, 2003, 08:00:06 PM
Ron,

I'm with you , but I doubt it'll ever replace "a hunnart boddles uf beer on da wall"

Noble
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on January 31, 2003, 02:09:09 PM
 Take a look.(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/stuckex22.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: hawby on January 31, 2003, 03:27:20 PM
There has just got to be one heck of a story to go with this picture!!! :o

Sure would like to hear it. This guy had a badder day than I did today ;D

klh
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 31, 2003, 04:37:09 PM
Yes, lets hear more. More pictures also??
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on January 31, 2003, 06:04:39 PM
 Unfortunatly i don't know the story. I found them on a local university site. I'll email them and see if anyone knows anything.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/stuckex12.jpg )
This one isn't as bad.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 31, 2003, 06:13:19 PM
Is this a road building job, pipeline construction, or a timber harvest??
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on January 31, 2003, 06:44:30 PM
Here's some more goodies.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/excaps.jpg )
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/hows_your_day32.jpg )
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/were_logging_now2.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on January 31, 2003, 06:46:53 PM
Ron, i found it on the university's forestry section so i assume it was a logging road they were building. I have no clue why the guy drove on the pond or whatever he's on.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on January 31, 2003, 06:51:04 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/158_s.jpg )

What do you guys think of this rig?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tillaway on January 31, 2003, 08:20:11 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/optiside.jpg )
John Deere 740 Skidgine.  900 gallon water capacity, 300 gallon foam tank, front water monitor, full plumbing of a conventional fire engine and an angle blade.

A new life for an old skidder.  This is a fully functional fire engine that saw service in Colorado and other fires during the summer of 2002.  It's back at the shop for upgrades.  

Fire fighting is has always been a side business for western logging contractors.  Some take it more seriously than others.

We have the Firetrack here as well.  It is owned by another contractor.  It is a converted Army missile carrier that now sports a blade,  fire engine capabilies and a flame thrower for back fires and slash burns.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/optifront.jpg )

Fornt view of monitor.

A $8000 dollar addition.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/optijoystick.jpg )

The controls, notice the joystick in the upper right corner.  This is used to control the monitors spray direction and foaming capabilty.  The foam is used to prevent structures from ignition during wild fires.




Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Mark M on January 31, 2003, 10:16:35 PM
Hi Scott

What is that thing? Looks like at cross between a Treefarmer and an IHC Quadratrack farm tracktor with heavy duty tracks. I'll bet it really pulls!

Mark
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on February 01, 2003, 01:48:39 PM
 It must be a custom kit. I've only saw 2 pictures of such machines on the web and both were from Canada. i think the base machine is a Timberjack 480B or C.

Make: Timberjack
Model: 480 4-track
Year:  
Price: $$30,000.00 CD
Condition: good
Hours: 6955
Serial: CK2316
Description: D5H running gear, winch and grapple U/C good condition; Cummins 6BT motor; 11'8" wide weight 53000 lbs. steep slope skidder
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on February 09, 2003, 02:24:22 PM
 Ron, lets see some more pictures.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on February 09, 2003, 02:59:06 PM
I don't want to bore everyone, but will have some more pictures as the logging picks up some with improvements in the weather. Hopefully others will post some also.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: DanG on February 09, 2003, 05:16:42 PM
I DonT think you gotta worry about boring anyone, Ron. :)  You've posted some fantastic pictures on this thread. Just keep'em coming.  You really should look into a digital camera, though. You must be spending a fortune in film developing. :o
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on February 14, 2003, 05:22:33 PM
Iron Mule 5010 Forwarder. Carries a "bunk" of aspen pulpwood. Harris Hardwood Sale 1/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/iron_mule_5010.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on February 15, 2003, 12:39:23 PM
 Thas a funny looking forwarder. Is there any reason for the short bunk and the front axle being back so far?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on February 15, 2003, 05:27:55 PM
Iron Mule 5010 Forwarder. A closer look. The Gafner, Iron Mule, first built in 1957, went through several improved models and was one of the most successful pulpwood forwarders ever made. It was very popular during the mid 1960's an 70's.

In 1988, the Gafner family of Escanaba, Michigan sold their Michigan-based operation to the Finnish state-owned Valmet corporation.

A number of Iron Mules still operate in selective managed timber stands where they can articulate in and around trees doing "short-wood" harvesting with minimum impact and least damage to the residual stand and remaining crop trees.

I'm always pleased to have an Iron Mule working on my managed timber harvests.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/iron_mile 5010.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on February 16, 2003, 09:45:49 AM
Winter Logging Can Be Tough. Here the 230A Timberjack forwarder is being used to clear the "knee deep" snow away from the selectively marked trees to allow for low stump cutting by the chainsaw faller. Jaynes Hardwood Sale, Kalkaska County, 2/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/winter_logging_is_tough.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on February 17, 2003, 11:50:43 AM
Timberjack 230A Forwarder With Chains. This forwarder has its front tires chained-up for working in the heavy snow of Kalkaska County. Jaynes Hardwood Sale 2/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/timberjack_230A_uses_chains.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on February 18, 2003, 09:28:52 AM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/timberjack_230A_in_snowy_woods.jpg )
Timberjack 230A Forwarder. Decking pulpwood in a snowy woods. Kalkaska County; Jaynes Hardwood Sale 2/03.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on February 19, 2003, 08:20:47 AM
Black Cherry Sawlogs . Falling & bucking in heavy snow. The 2084 Jonsered chain saw sits on the end of a log. Jaynes Hardwood Sale 2/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/black_cherry_logs_in_snow.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 04, 2003, 05:56:38 PM
Caterpillar End Loader. Being used to open the access road into the timber sale area and to clear the landing and decking area of snow before starting the timber harvest.
Piotrowski Timber Sale 2/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/caterpillar_end_loader.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on March 05, 2003, 07:21:17 AM
 Any specific reason for using the loader with a bucket? I've found that buckets are a little slow for clearing snow, I think angle blades work a lot better. How deep is the snow there Ron?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 05, 2003, 08:22:46 AM
Yes an angle blade or dozer would be faster, but this timber operator doesn't have such equipment so he just brought out his own end loader from the mill to do the snow removal job.

They often make use of what they have. The snow  depth there is about 18".
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on March 05, 2003, 01:59:24 PM
 I never thought of that Ron. I think we have more than18 inches right now. I'm guessing we had 3 feet before the rain so its probably about 2 now. Makes for good skidding but digging out around all the stumps is a pain.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 05, 2003, 04:05:02 PM
"Lumber Jill". Assists "lumber jack" (husband) in falling white pine sawlog trees. Piotrowski timber harvest 2/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/lumber_jill_in_white_pine.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 06, 2003, 04:19:20 PM
Vintage Machine. 1968 Tree Farmer cable skidder with a "dray" hook-up for short wood logging. Tree length skidding is no permitted on this selection harvest. Piotrowski timber harvest; 2/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/vintage_machine_1989_tree_farmer.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on March 06, 2003, 04:37:15 PM
 Theres a nice setup. Are those old TreeFarmers reliable Ron? I see ones like that for sale around here a lot for good prices but always figured they were junkers. The tires are a little skinny, can you get tires for them? I've never seen them with wide tires before.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 06, 2003, 05:25:51 PM
I don't see many of them in use here at present. This has been the first recently on any of my jobs. Its reliable, but just very slow. I expect to see this unit replaced with a faster unit soon as the skidder owner is out looking for another machine.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on March 06, 2003, 05:54:41 PM
 A few years back there was a C5 working around here. I remeber it being a slow machine. Interestingly enough the owner did a whole bunch of illegal cutting and when the landowner found out how little he would get out of a court action he burned the machine. Or at least thats what I herd :).
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 07, 2003, 04:33:04 PM
Timberjack 290D Cable Skidder. Front tires chained-up for winter work. Used on timber harvest areas to dispatch "hangers", move trees on hillsides to safe bucking area, support the rubber tired forwarders as necessary, work around the log landing, etc. Piotrowski timber harvest 2/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/timberjack_290D_cable-skidder.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Mark M on March 07, 2003, 06:04:30 PM
Boy seeing all this old equipment, snow, and trees really makes me home sick :'(.

Sometimes I really hate being stuck out here on the DanG prairie where you have to rummage through the dump to find trees. :(

Next time someone goes into Fabco in Green Bay or Michigan Cat in Novi tell them you know where there's a lab manager who wants to move east. Heck I'd even consider Fabick!

Mark
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: ElectricAl on March 07, 2003, 06:22:55 PM
Ron,

Clean looking Timberjack 290D.

We have one logger who has a Timberjack 208. I get to run it in the spring for a couple of weeks. It's great on the side hills, because of the low center of gravity. But it lacks a few ponies.

Our other loggers run JD 540's and a JD640 cable skidders.
Great for long and big hitches.

Around here the crews use Tiger paw chains all the way around.


ElectricAl
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 08, 2003, 06:44:32 AM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/valmet_544X_forwarder_tire_chains.jpg )
Valmet 544X Forwarder. Decking oak sawlogs on the landing. Used in short-wood logging. Again chained-up on the front tires only. Loggers seem to economize on the cost of chains as occasionally needed during a winter such as this one.

More care is needed in their use as chains will cause more damage to the selected "leave trees" if bumped hard by a careless operator. Piotrowski timber harvest 2/03.





Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Minnesota_boy on March 09, 2003, 05:32:14 AM
As I was sawing on Friday, I watched as a truckload of logs came in.  The guy was driving a bit slower than most.  When he climbed up on the loader, he seemed to be taking his time and his unloading took longer than most.  As he left I could see that he was probably in his mid seventies.  The name one his truck?

Geritol Express
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 09, 2003, 08:18:49 AM
Great name for the "older" trucker. A few more truck names noted this past week are:

Grumpy
Gear Jammer
Dyer's Tonka Toy
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: chet on March 09, 2003, 10:05:26 AM
A few more:   Lost Cause
                    Wooden Nickles
                    Little Devil
                    and my favorite,  Makin Payments
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 09, 2003, 01:31:31 PM
Timberjack 230A Forwarder. Working "tightly" among crop trees in a hardwood selection harvest. A. Jaynes timber harvest 2/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/timberjack_230A_working_selection_harvest.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: TJACK on March 10, 2003, 09:33:22 AM
Ron,

How long is the deck on a forwarder?  Most of the saw logs in your pictures look like they are around 8 to 10 feet.  I know the length cut is requested by the buying mill, but can they manage a load of 16' saw logs?

Thanks,

TJACK
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 10, 2003, 01:45:56 PM
The single bunk units vary some, 5 - 6 feet maybe, depending upon make and size of unit. I'll measure some up to check for sure. Most of the sawlogs are cut at 8 foot (100"), but lengths will vary. I usually don't allow forwarding of logs longer than 17 feet to prevent any damage or skinning of the residuals and crop trees in a selectiveyl marked northern hardwood stand.

They will usually place the longer length logs in the center of the bunk with the 8 footers around the sides.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 10, 2003, 01:59:09 PM
Jonsereds at Work. A 2065 and 2054 are "rested" on a hard maple crutch block. Most fallers have at least two saws in their "arsenal". Usually both of the same manufacturer.
A. Jaynes hardwood harvest 2/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/jonsered_chainsaws_on_block.jpg )

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 11, 2003, 02:32:41 PM
Logger's Pick-up A nice Dodge. Piotrowski timber harvest 2/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/3_10_03/logger::s_pick-up_new_dodge.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 12, 2003, 02:14:29 PM
 
Quote
How long is the deck on a forwarder?  Most of the saw logs in your pictures look like they are around 8 to 10 feet.


The bunk length on the Timberjack 230A is 10 feet from the "headache" cage to the back-end frame.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on March 12, 2003, 04:14:52 PM
Around here most forwarders are setup as a "double bunk". they can carry two lenths of 8' or one of 16'. Most bunks measure 16 feet alought some are up to 24 i think.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 12, 2003, 04:59:18 PM
"Lumberjill" Operating the 1968 Franklin Tree Farmer Cable Skidder. Piotrowski timber harvest 3/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/3_10_03/lumberjill_operates_tree_farmer.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 13, 2003, 04:46:26 PM
Dray Attachment. Attachment for the 1968 Franklin Tree Farmer Cable Skidder to allow "short wood" forwarding. 10 foot bunk frame with 5 feet between stakes. Piotrowski timber harvest 3/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/3_10_03/dray_attachment_for_frankilin_skidder.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 14, 2003, 05:11:58 PM
"Timber" The faller harvests a selectively marked oak sawlog tree with a "husky" chainsaw. Piotrowski timber harvest; 3/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/3_10_03/timber_falling_oak_sawlog_tree.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 15, 2003, 04:25:48 PM
Bucking Oak Sawlogs. The slash is layed down for an aesthetic appearance. The Valmet 544X forwarder will also run over it to break it up further. Piotrowoski timber harvest; 3/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/3_10_03/bucking_oak_sawlogs.jpg )


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: dail_h on March 15, 2003, 09:58:25 PM
Hey Ron,
  Wonder if any of those dray attachments ever made it down south- N C? pretty neat piece of equipmeny ,what price range,availability? Are you sure the Tree Farmer was made by Franklin? I thought they were two different co.s .I only live about 50 -60 miles from Franklin factory.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 16, 2003, 05:29:53 PM
I don't know about the availability of the dray for this unit. I think that it was more of a "home" built unit customized for this cable skidder. The current owner bought it all as a unit.

Yes, Tree Farmer and Franklin were two different companies. Tree Farmer was introduced in 1958 in Enumclaw, Washington as a west coast skidder and the Franklin skidder by the Drake Family in 1962 in Franklin Virginia.

The Drake family took over the Tree Farmer operation and merged the operation with their Frankiln line of equipment, retaining the Tree Farmer name. In 1990 Tree Farmer was sold to Franklin.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 17, 2003, 04:55:46 PM
Pinched "Husky". One faller helps another release his pinched "Husky" from the white oak sawlog tree. Piotrowski timber harvest; 3/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/3_10_03/pinched_husky.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tillaway on March 17, 2003, 05:04:00 PM
I think that costs at least a six pack out here.  "That old familiar sound of my partner hung up again".
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 19, 2003, 06:04:39 PM
Valmet 544X Forwarder. Grabs a white oak sawlog.
Piotrowski timber harvest; 3/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/3_10_03/valmet_544X_grabs_oak_sawlog.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 21, 2003, 04:50:35 PM
Valmet 544X. Lifts a white oak sawlog.
Piotrowski timber harvest; 3/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/3_10_03/valmet_544X_lifts_oak_sawlog.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: mapleveneer on March 22, 2003, 10:34:50 AM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/3_10_03/wdlot2.jpg )
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/3_10_03/wdlot1.jpg )

Two photos of my pine cutting operations this winter in Massachusetts.  although the snow was deep it packed well and skidding was relatively easy.  At least no mud!!
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on March 22, 2003, 10:49:50 AM
Nice pics Maple I myself cut alot of pine up here in NH also,but we don't load the log trucks that high..man thats a load  ;D

                         Later Rob.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: mapleveneer on March 22, 2003, 12:18:27 PM
Yeah, the trucker took one 16 ft'r off when he realized he had too much on.  That one went with the shorter stuff in the next load.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on March 22, 2003, 01:01:21 PM
Yeah I figured he must have taken atleast a few logs back off of that load..Nice logs though,what type of machine is that in the second pic??I'm glad most of the snow is finally melted but now it's getting pretty muddy man I hate mud season  :-/Where in Mass are you located? if you don't mind me asking.

                              Later Rob..
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: mapleveneer on March 22, 2003, 03:59:44 PM
The "machine" is an Allis Chalmers 5050 FWD with a Farmi Winch.  Yeah, I kinda work it to the limit.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/3_10_03/AC5050.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on March 22, 2003, 05:23:57 PM
Yeah I guess you do use it to it's optimum potential.. ;DSo how do you like the Farmi winch??I though it was small for a skidder..

                            Later Rob.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 23, 2003, 05:42:55 PM
Loading Sawlogs. The trucker loads the sawlog rig for a trip to the mill. Piotrowski timber harvest; 3/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/3_10_03/loading_sawlogs.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 25, 2003, 04:37:55 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/3_10_03/almost_loaded.jpg )

Rig Almost Loaded. A full load of sawlogs for Wheelers Wolf Lake Sawmill. Piotrowski timber harvest; 03/03.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Cedar Eater on April 02, 2003, 06:01:11 PM
The logger on my red oak sawlog sale works alone except for his log dog.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/LogDog.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 08, 2003, 05:19:16 PM
Pulp Hauler. Getting underway on snow covered access road. Note that there is no "pup" trailer due to the tight turn around at the landing, heavy snow, and the first day of the "frost law" in effect. A. Jaynes timber harvest; 3/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/pulp_hauler_Fahl::s.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 09, 2003, 08:04:56 PM
More Wood Hauler Names Noted On the Road

"Wild Man"
"Lone Wolf"
"Night Ware"
"Move It"

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 10, 2003, 07:51:29 PM
Pulpwood Hauler. Heads out from the landing with a "pay load" of hardwood pulp. A. Jaynes timber harvest 3/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/pulpwood_hauler_heads_out.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 12, 2003, 05:50:20 PM
Bucking White Oak Sawlogs. This faller uses a 395XP Husky.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/bucking_w_oak_sawlogs.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 15, 2003, 07:59:56 PM
Fueling the Husky. Fueling is needed to continue bucking the white oak into sawlogs to be forwarded to the log landing. The sawyer earns his pay.

Piotrowski timber harvest; 4/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/fueling_the_husky.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Cedar Eater on April 24, 2003, 09:52:18 PM
Old TreeFarmer Forwarder: The logger on my red oak sawlog sale uses this old beast like it was attached from birth.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/TreeFarmer3.jpg )

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/TreeFarmer4.jpg )

Cedar Eater
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on April 25, 2003, 05:06:53 AM
C.E,

    Forwarders from what I see are a great way to keep from tearing up the land compared to tree length skidding but I have'nt really seen many forwarders out this way in NH mostly just skidders.That is a nice old TreeFarmer though I sometimes wish I had one for some of the work I do.

                                       Later Rob.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 27, 2003, 11:07:21 AM
Valmet 544X Forwarder. Loading white oak sawlogs for forwarding from the cutting area to the landing. Piotrowski timber harvest, 4/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/valmet_544X_piotrowski_harvest.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 29, 2003, 07:06:53 PM
Wood Hauler Names Noted on recent trip across U.P.

"Ahloa"
"Best Buy"
"Taz Toy"
"Bear Paw"
"Wood-n-Nickle"
"Big Guy"
"Daddy"
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 30, 2003, 07:13:13 PM
A Log Hauler's Mud Flaps. Wheeler's Wolf Lake Sawmill Log Hauler; 4/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/log_hauler::s_mud_flaps.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 02, 2003, 07:32:21 PM
Faller Delimbing Large White Oak Tree. Before bucking it into the desired sawlog lengths. Piotrowski timber harvest 4/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/faller_delimbs_white_oak.jpg )


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on May 03, 2003, 04:26:10 AM
Ron,

      Nice pics as always,those mud flaps look familar the Northeastern Loggers' Association sells something like those to it's members..That is a very nice White Oak  the faller is delimbing..

                                   Rob.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 04, 2003, 10:01:38 AM
"Lumber Jill" Trims Limbs with Chain Saw. On harvested white oak tree. Slash is cut low and "looped and scattered" for aesthetics. "Lumber Jill" team works with her husband on the timber harvest work. Piotrowski timber harvest 4/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/lumber_jill_ trims_branches.jpg )






Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 08, 2003, 07:54:34 PM
Timberjack 230A Forwarder. Working in an oak thinning. Witte timber harvest 4/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/timberjack_230A_works_oak_thinning.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 12, 2003, 06:46:17 PM
Northern Hardwood Thinning. A. Jaynes timber harvest; 4/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/northern_hardwood_thinning.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on May 12, 2003, 06:52:32 PM
Ron,


       Looks like another excellent job very nice timber stand,keep on improving the woodlands your doing a great job.

                            Rob.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 20, 2003, 10:34:08 AM
Wood Hauler names noted "on the road" during recent U.P. trip.

"Stretch"
"Country Boy"
"Boo"
"Doc"
"Spud"
"Knucklehead"
"PaPa Toad"


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 22, 2003, 09:05:12 AM
Chaining Down the Load. Oak sawlogs ready for hauling to Wheelers' Wolf Lake Sawmill. Piotrowski timber harvest 4/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/chaining_down_the _load_wheelers.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 26, 2003, 09:02:29 AM
Safety Signing. Logging operations often need to sign their accerss roads for public safety. Brown/Krantz timber harvest 5/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/safety_signing.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on May 26, 2003, 09:07:03 AM
Ron,
Where can those signs be purchased and how much are they?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 26, 2003, 09:28:06 AM
Jeff,

They can be purchased at any of the sign companies or made up yourself. I'm not sure on price as there are different sizes etc.

This particular signing is used by Cook's Forest Products, Inc. down your way and placed by Jake Smith's step son who is running the operation for Cooks. Have Jake check for their source of the signs. It may be locally there somewhere.

Also, ask Jake if he looked at the Sweet timber sale there off Maple Grove Road in Farwell. Have him give me a call since its in his neighborhood. It may be a good Billsby/ Cooks operation since it has sawlogs, pulpwood, chipping, clear cutting, selection marking etc.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on May 26, 2003, 10:21:28 AM
I never thought, I'll bet they have them at Running Gears. Miller's logging Store. Its right acrossthe highway from Cooks Log yard there off of Mansiding rd and 127
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on May 26, 2003, 12:22:26 PM
 Jeff, check out the Forest Resourses Association, web site.
They have some kool signage.
Ed K
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 28, 2003, 05:48:06 PM
Hydro-Ax 511B with Boom Processor. Thinning a red pine plantation. Krantz red pine harvest; 5/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/hydr_ax_with_boom_processor.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on May 28, 2003, 05:51:34 PM
Wow Ron,

       I have run and seen my share of bunchers but never a Hydro-Ax with a boom,thats a strange machine..How do it compare to using a 445 Timco or something to that effect?

                                Thanks Rob.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on May 29, 2003, 04:12:01 AM
 Ah I just noticed it's a processor not just a buncher wow now thats really weird.. :oWhoever owns it how do they like it??
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 29, 2003, 07:19:36 PM
Cook's Forest Products, Harrison, MI owns the Hydro-Ax processor. Its ok for the job intended, red pine plantation, first thinning.

It can process different product lengths and sizes to readily satisfy current market demand. Its wood utilization and slash removal is good. I'll get more photos of it in action.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 30, 2003, 04:59:17 PM
Timberjack 1010 Double Bunk Forwarder. Krantz pine thinning; 5/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/timberjack_1010_forwarder.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on June 01, 2003, 03:04:07 PM
Last fall there was a TJ 1010 working on a woodlot next to ours. The land is very wet  and soft but he didn't do much rutting, he didn't have chains or those track chains on it either. Nice working machine.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 01, 2003, 08:54:56 PM
Western Star Wood Hauler. Comes for a load of oak sawlogs. Witte timber harvest 5/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/western_star_wood_hauler.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 03, 2003, 07:19:03 PM
Lokomo FMG 347 Processor with Sawhead (Swedish mfg.) Nelson's Sawmill Inc. harvesting aspen. Witte timber harvest; 5/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/lokomo_fmg347_processor.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 04, 2003, 04:03:46 AM
 Another piece of forestry equipment I have never seen before,that is a weird looking little machine,kinda reminds me of the Bobcats they put tracks and a saw head on but a little bigger..

                                             Rob.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 04, 2003, 07:11:58 PM
Lokomo FMG 347 Processor (Swedish MFG.). Yes, very similar to the Bobcat processor.

Harvesting aspen pulpwood. Witte timber harvest 5/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/lokomo_fmg347_processor_in _aspen.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on June 05, 2003, 03:28:44 PM
Looks a lot like the cab and engine off the 1010
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: BW_Williams on June 07, 2003, 09:58:07 AM
1 redneck, 1 ATV, 1 homemade logging arch.  Thinning Doug fir.  Doesn't really show, but this was a fair grade up and out to the skid road.  This area was horse logged in the 1920's and hasn't had any management since.  Unfortunatley, the pine beetles are killing all the big Ponderosas, but they make nice timbers if you get to 'em quick enough. BWW
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/redneckskidder.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: BW_Williams on June 07, 2003, 10:43:22 AM
Better view of arch.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/logarch.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 18, 2003, 10:45:01 AM
Picking Up the Chains. The log hauler operator picks up his "tie down" chains for placement with the loader's clam. This "trick" and "skill" saves time and unnecessary labor. Witte timber harvest 6/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/picking_up_the_chains_witte.jpg )

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on June 19, 2003, 06:49:39 PM
This is my part homemade and part bought, TSI trailer. I've already decided that the 4/wheeler isn't going to be heavy enough for any hills. But its a good excuse to get a bigger 4x4 - 30hp tractor.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/tsi6 (3).jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 20, 2003, 05:42:58 AM
As promised here are a ton of pics my girlfriend took while I was at work on a lot clearing job..I'll have some before and after shots in a week or so.Hope you guys like.




(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/bore cuttin::.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 20, 2003, 05:43:57 AM
a little pine clearing



(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/Cleared Pines.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 20, 2003, 05:50:52 AM
a down log view



(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/down log view.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 20, 2003, 05:51:49 AM
a view towards the pile of 4 foot firewood



(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/firewood view.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 20, 2003, 05:52:37 AM
me hookin some chokers


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/hookin:: chokers.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 20, 2003, 05:54:00 AM
Here's a shot of the big Oak stump me and fellow Forum member Chris Girard felled last Saturday



(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/huge Oak stump.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 20, 2003, 05:54:49 AM
Knot bumpin'


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/limbing.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 20, 2003, 05:56:35 AM
some more bore cutting


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/more bore cuttin::.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 20, 2003, 05:57:42 AM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/more timber.jpg )
A view of the Stand


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 20, 2003, 05:58:31 AM
A view of the larger Oaks



(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/Oaks 2.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 20, 2003, 05:59:13 AM
and another


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/Oaks.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 20, 2003, 06:00:24 AM
a little skidding with the Treefarmer


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/Pullin:: turn 2.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 20, 2003, 06:01:30 AM
Doing some decking at the landing



(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/stackin::.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 20, 2003, 06:02:19 AM
Here I'am starting the bore cut on the Pine



(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/startin:: the bore.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 20, 2003, 06:03:07 AM
Here I'am on the phone  ::)(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/talkin::.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 20, 2003, 06:03:58 AM
here's another view of the stand being left,it does need a few trees removed in certain areas though


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/Timberstand.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 20, 2003, 06:05:17 AM
Here's a rear shot of the Farmer



(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/Treefarmer 2.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 20, 2003, 06:05:55 AM
and another


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/Treefarmer.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 20, 2003, 06:07:06 AM
Here I'am winchin in a turn,well thats all I have for now I hope you liked them  ;D


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/winchin.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on June 20, 2003, 09:06:50 AM
 Great pictures Rob. I'll snap some pictures of the stuff going on around here, its been really busy lately but i don't have a scanner :'(. The local contractor has all his equipment within a few miles of my place. last month his 3 year old fabteck ft133 burned so he just bought a used deere 690d with an ulitmate disc saw harvester head. other equipment includes a tanguay slasher, kenworth dump truck, 2 TJ 450's (one blue/green one orange), komatsu d85 dozer and a deere 690d excavator.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 20, 2003, 09:59:17 AM
 Thanks Scott I figured everyone would like to see some pics from the East Coast Loggers.. ;DI would definetly like to see some pics of that equipment when you get a chance.

                                  Rob.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Frickman on June 21, 2003, 08:41:57 AM
Thanks for the pictures Rob. I'll dream tonight about logging. It's raining again here, so no logging for awhile.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 22, 2003, 07:58:53 AM
Lokomo FMG 347. A small tracked processor with sawhead being used to harvest the aspen pulpwood stand within an oak sawlog harvest area. Witte timber harvest 6/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/lokomo_fmg347_nelson::s.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 25, 2003, 05:20:45 PM
Hydro-Ax 511 B With Boom Processor. Thinning red pine in a plantation. Krantz pine harvest; 6/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/hydro_ax_511B_processor.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 28, 2003, 07:11:50 PM
Timberjack 1010 Double Bunk Forwarder. Krantz pine harvest; 6/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/timberjack_1010_double_bunk_forwarder.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 30, 2003, 06:16:12 PM
Loading Red Pine Cordwood. Loading the "pup" trailer of the Western Star wood hauler. Brown pine harvest; 6/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/loading_red_pine_cordwood.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on July 03, 2003, 01:48:38 PM
 A very nice clean looking operation. One benefit of CTL.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 16, 2003, 06:56:21 PM
"Soft Wood"; Peterbuilt Wood Hauler. Parades in July 4, 2003 celebration.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/peterbuilt_wood_hauler_soft_wood.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 20, 2003, 07:02:07 PM
Timber Cutter & Timberjack Forwarder. Working sawlogs and pulpwood around cabin and lake area. Witte timber harvest 7/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/timber_cutter_&_timberjack.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 22, 2003, 07:59:34 PM
Forwarder Picks Up Aspen. Sawlogs and Pulpwood.
Witte timber harvest 7/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/forwarder_picks_up_aspen.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on August 07, 2003, 07:08:47 PM
Truck/logger names

Snow Ball
Puddle Jumper
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 08, 2003, 05:48:52 PM
Some more named rigs noted "on the road".

Pony
Rufus
PaPa Todd

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 17, 2003, 11:06:41 AM
John Deere 548D. Rubber tired forwarder outfitted for forest fire supprerssion. It is outfitted with a 750 gallon water tank (carries "wet water"), side spray nozzles, and a Michigan fire plow.

This unit was demonstrated by the Michigan DNR at Da Picnic, August 8, 2003.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/j_deere_548D_firefighting.jpg )


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on September 10, 2003, 07:35:37 AM
i think you guys missed one peice of equipment granted it is low tec and takes alot of man power but when theres no other way i'm clearing 5 acers cant afford clearing saw so all the saplings are coming down with the use of loppers. ::) ::) and i can tell you its no fun but gotta do what you gotta do.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on September 10, 2003, 01:57:05 PM
 Loppers? Neat looking rig Ron, for more wildfire fighting pictures visit www.wildlandfire.com theres some nice equipment photos in there.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on September 10, 2003, 10:53:12 PM
like i said not fancy. but when you have alot of saplins and no clearing saw and not alot of money, loppers work. not fun but i've done 3 acers with them so far. but i'd give my right arm for the right equipment. :D :D i'll tell you though i'd love to have some of the equipment i've seen. :) if i had it my land would already be cleared. 8) 8) but since i dont i'll have to make do..
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Cedar Eater on September 12, 2003, 06:55:27 AM
Loppers? Can you show us a picture? :D :D :D

Seriously, what are you gonna do with five acres of sapling stumps that start to resprout? I generally use a bush hog, but my father has a 5' mower that goes on the front of a skid steer (aka skip loader aka Bobcat). It'll cut up to 4" trees. I'll try to get a picture.

Cedar Eater
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on September 12, 2003, 07:45:32 AM
well i plan on opening up the whole 5 acers all the trees that are big enough i will turn into cordwood for sale. ;D the saplins i will just burn or get someone in here with a chipper. the girls want horses ::) so thats were they'll go. i hope to remove all stumps and make it look nice sick of looking at just trees part of it i plan to plant some kind of greenery like clover for deer and other wildlife and i'm sure they'll like it. 8) becuase like i've said eariler not much open space around here. but your right it does grow back real quick around here.  :'(
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: IndyIan on September 15, 2003, 10:09:13 AM
David_p,
To keep those stumps from resprouting, paint the top with round up just after you cut them.  It will go down into the root system and prevent any new growth.  

Might be a good way for the girls to help earn their horses  :), they could follow you around and paint the stumps.  Just make sure they have some rubber gloves on.  

Another good tool for what your doing is a brush axe:
http://www.leevalley.com/garden/page.asp?SID=&ccurrency=1&page=10246&category=2,45794

Good luck,
Ian
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on September 15, 2003, 09:20:06 PM
thanks indy i will definatly check out the round up and it would be nice to put the girls to work :D the axe might be nice for clearing trails but i can get lower to the ground with the loppers. thanks though what i really need (want) is a cearing saw.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: ksu_chainsaw on September 16, 2003, 09:46:15 AM
 go through the area and spray "Crossbow"  it is a brush killer, and will not kill the grass around the stump, allowing it to sbe applied with a sprayer.  our horse pastures always grow up in cedars and hedge trees.  we just run the bush-hog through there to clear it out.

charles
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on September 16, 2003, 03:25:43 PM
thanks charles where can i get that? like agway or something
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: ksu_chainsaw on September 19, 2003, 10:47:51 AM
we go to the county noxious weed department.  in KS it is considered a controlled chemical and you have to have a applicators liscence for it.  there are several other brush killers out that stores like TSC and Orschlens have that do the same job.  Just make sure that you read the label as to what types of vegetation it kills

Charles
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 01, 2003, 08:25:17 AM
More "log hauler" names noted.

*Nose cone
*Getty-Up & Go
*Big Bird
*One-Of-Seven
*Dog Train
*No...You

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 01, 2003, 06:26:55 PM
Forwarding Oak. Forwarding oak sawlogs and pulpwood through an oak thinning area. Witte timber harvest 8/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/forwarding_oak.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on October 01, 2003, 06:56:09 PM
nice pic Ron lets see some more.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 02, 2003, 03:30:54 PM
Classic Log Hauler. 1946 Chev carries load of white pine logs. Note modern day log hauler behind. Logging Congress, Escanaba, MI 9/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/classic_log_hauler_1946_chev.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on October 02, 2003, 03:59:54 PM
nice old truck. now theres a man that gets every bit of use out of a peice of equipment.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: RMay on October 02, 2003, 08:09:18 PM
Good to see old logging trucks like that , There becoming a thing of the past  ::)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: isawlogs on October 02, 2003, 09:31:01 PM
  What is or are Loppers  ??? ???
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on October 02, 2003, 09:39:46 PM
like pruners for your garden but bigger i can lop a 2" tree with them. a clearing saw would be better but......
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: isawlogs on October 02, 2003, 09:43:58 PM
  Thanks ...  ;)  now I can go to bed smarter.... ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 03, 2003, 09:32:07 AM
"Big Bird". This new Kenworth was just being delivered to Lutke Forest Products, Manton, MI and was on display at the Logging Congress, 9/03.

Owner Jason Lutke lets his drivers pick their truck color, thus the name "Big Bird". Jason must have found someone to drive it home as it can now be easily spotted "on the road" at work.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/lutke::s_new_wood_hauler_big_bird.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 07, 2003, 07:25:42 PM
Western Log Hauler. parked along the roadside waiting for a "loaded hauler" to come out of the timber harvest area's single lane haul road before it enters for its load of logs.

Note its "piggy backed"extended log trailer when traveling empty.

Tahoe National Forest, CA; 9/03

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/western_log_hauler_tahoe_nf.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 14, 2003, 06:00:57 PM
Timber Harvest; Regeneration Cut. Tahoe National Forest, CA; 9/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/timber_harvest_regeneration_cut.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Kevin on October 14, 2003, 06:11:43 PM
Ron, I would think the erosion on a slope like that would be significant, what's your experience?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 15, 2003, 06:10:24 PM
Yes, erosion can be a problem if the resource management doesn't continue with post harvest management. Water bars are placed, vegetative seeding is done or trees are planted, survival counts are completed the 1st and 5th years with regeneration to be insured within 5 years after the harvest.

With proper management planning, implemention, monitoring, and evaluation the erosion is controlled.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on October 28, 2003, 07:44:44 PM
There is a tree service in Jacksonville, quite a lucrative one, that has all new equipment.  Each of the crews was allowed to name his truck and the owner, Ben, had someone do the artwork for each one.  They were doing the job where I was sawing Live Oak at the Church in Mandarin, Fl. and I wish I had gotten pictures of each truck.  there were 5 or 6 on site.  The are emerald green with yellow art work on each one.  This one is the "The Hulk" and the driver has even stuck a hulk toy (red) in the radiator grill.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/tombigbenhulk01a.jpg )
The owner of the company came wheeling in this afternoon in his brand new emerald green  three quarter ton with fancy wheels, radios, and aluminum tool boxes.  Emblazoned across the front of his hood in big Yellow letters it read, "BOSS". :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 29, 2003, 11:03:36 AM
Some really appreciate their equipment with a "personal interest" and take pride in it. Such care and "colors" soon becomes their trade mark as well as good advertising.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 05, 2003, 05:25:43 PM
Some more Truck Names.

  • Hello Darling
  • PaPa's Ride
  • The Buzzard


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 07, 2003, 02:28:11 PM
Husky 372 XP. This sawyer is happy with his new 372 XP as he breaks it in on some white oak sawlogs. Witte timber harvest 10/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/husky_ 372_ XP.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Kevin on November 08, 2003, 01:58:54 PM
Home brew skidder I stumbled across in a right of way.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/skidder1.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/skidder2.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Kevin on November 08, 2003, 03:53:12 PM
My best side...

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/lookingback.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on November 08, 2003, 05:25:53 PM
 Ron, the quality of the hardwood in your area really impresses me, most of the stuff around here is chipper or firewood quality. How much does a cord of that nice oak go for?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawman on November 09, 2003, 05:53:53 AM
 Here is our '58 Ford. (http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/trucks 001opt01.jpg )
 

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 10, 2003, 06:18:10 PM
Oak stumpage prices in this area run as follows depending upon quality and logging costs:

Red Oak Sawlogs:  $307.00 - $475.00 per MBF
White Oak Sawlogs: $70.00/MBF
Red Oak Pulpwood: $7.35 - $9.60/cord
White Oak Pulpwood: $7.25 - $15.85/cord
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 12, 2003, 09:23:00 AM
Timberjack Forwarder. Loads an oak sawlog from an oak thinning. Witte timber harvest 10/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/timberjack_forwarder_loads_oak.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: swampwhiteoak on November 13, 2003, 12:35:45 PM
Wow.  You must have really really poor white oak.  Ours probably isn't wonderful but brings significantly higher prices (300-600 MBF).
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 14, 2003, 06:24:07 AM
Yes, we don't have much white oak of quality. Mostly northern red oak which brings a much higher price on the stump.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: slowzuki on November 18, 2003, 12:50:39 PM
I read this entire post, that took a while! I'm in New Brunswick and cable skidders are the unit of choice for medium guys. Unfortunately they are rough on remaining trees and terrain with them and really give loggers a bad name.  Driving them through streams while skidding, knocking over unharvested trees.

Small guys use tractors and things like Bombardier Bombi's.(http://www.chameleoninc.com/snowcats/Bombi/SideFSm.JPG)
Generally the cab is not fitted, only a roll cage. A tracked pulp trailer is pulled behind and a winch is fitted front or rear.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 18, 2003, 04:28:35 PM
Timberjack Forwarder Picks Its Way. The operator carefully picks his way through the oak thinning to pick up sawlogs and pulpwood behind the cutter.

Care is needed so as not to damage any residual trees. Cable skidding was not permitted on this harvest. Witte timber harvest 10/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/timberjack_forwarder_picks_its_way.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Keltic on November 22, 2003, 04:06:42 PM
Outstanding bunch of photos, I just spent 2 hours going through them and enjoyed them greatly. Thanks to all, FMK
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Stump Jumper on November 22, 2003, 05:13:30 PM
WELCOME KELTIC. I ENJOY THE PICS ALSO BUT I HAVENT  SEEN THEM ALL YET . IM NEW HERE ALSO AND THERES A  LOT TO CATCH UP ON. HOPE YOU ENJOY THE INFO AND FUN :D :D :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 24, 2003, 01:07:24 PM
Timberjack Forwarder. Picks up another load of oak along the cutters falling lane. The oak thinning is now completed and the sale closed. Witte timber harvest 10/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/timberjack_forwarder_loading_another_bunk_of_oak.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Viking on November 25, 2003, 11:28:09 AM
Quote
The boots are from Husqvarna, my local dealer stocks a pretty good supply.
These are kevlar, steel toes and paks.

(http://www.usa.husqvarna.com/files/UserImages/1020-241x120.jpg)


i've got a pair that look like those, but they are made by Viking. they have ice spikes too. good boots, ive had them for 3 years and they take a lickin' and keep on kickin' ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: etat on November 26, 2003, 08:55:57 PM
WOW, I can't imagine seeing a tree that large, much less trying to figure out how to cut it up for lumber!  Was there really sawmills that were large enough to cut something like that?  Are there any douglas fir still living today that are that large?  I had heard of the big redwoods but I didn't know that the douglas fir could be that size.  I would like to imagine myself walking through a forrest of trees this large.  Only in my dreams probably.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Viking on November 26, 2003, 09:25:43 PM
yeah i wasa trying to picture them my self last night, apparently i would have to be a smurf haha... i wonder how tall that 22 footer was.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Stan on November 27, 2003, 12:16:48 AM
I can see some folks need an all expenses paid trip to "Mystery Trees".  8) Seein' a 300 footer growin' on another tree's branch is quite a treat.   :o
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Sawyerfortyish on November 27, 2003, 09:17:08 AM
I don't think they sawed logs that big although there may have been a couple mills that could handle logs that big. I think they blew them apart with explosives and sawed the pieces
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: etat on November 27, 2003, 10:38:05 AM
Explosives huh!  That is so cool..  I put that's how the egyptians built those pyramids too!!!!!!  
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Stephen_Wiley on November 27, 2003, 11:42:14 AM
Large trees.......yes they are still here in the NW.

This is Washington's current coastal DF

http://www.americanforests.org/resources/bigtrees/register.php?details=1956

Oregon has one 36 feet 6 inch circumference........329 feet in height.

The biggest are probably still not located in either state. 8)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on November 27, 2003, 05:30:56 PM
Vinking, I had to delete your photos. They must be under 15k and be on our server. I had some complaints about these pages loading so slow with your photos. Please format and repost only those that belong to you. Photos from other sites are NOT allowed. They MUST belong to the person uploading or you MUST have explicit permission to use them.

I don't want to dampen your enthusiasm, its great, but we have to follow some set guidelines here.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Viking on November 27, 2003, 07:35:12 PM
all of the pics were mine, and they were hosted on my own webspace,.but i know most of them were just over 22kb. ill convert them into gif, and insure they are under 15kb, then repost them, i purchased them from my friends for 1cent, now I own them, so I will post them agian :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on November 27, 2003, 07:53:42 PM
Gif will never get under 15, and they must be on our server. I wont take the chance that a month from now our forum is full of little red x's.  Purchased photos of other peoples equipment is of little interest here. If you have photos of equipment you run or deal with and can tell us something about it thats great.

Go to tools/uploading photos to get instructions.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Viking on November 27, 2003, 07:59:39 PM
Ok, I only worked with two of those.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on November 27, 2003, 08:03:06 PM
Let us know if you need help formatting the pictures and we will give you some help or point you the right way for answers.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Viking on November 27, 2003, 08:04:06 PM
Timberjack 1410 Forwarder

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/viking-tj1410v-forwarder.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/viking-tj1410-forwarder.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/viking-tj1410a-forwarder.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on November 27, 2003, 08:05:18 PM
Perfect! Thank-you.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 19, 2003, 08:20:56 AM
A couple more "log hauler" names noted on the road.

"Tree Hugger"
"Fast Forward II"
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 17, 2004, 07:30:59 AM
C-4 Tree Farmer Cable Skidder; 1960 Vintage. Parked next to a Case 600/800 forwarder with Barko loader.

The C-4 originally had a gas engine but was converted to diesel with a 128 Ford 4 cylinder diesel engine which they tell me fits right in to it. Lee hardwoods timber harvest, 1/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/C-4_treefarmer_1960.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: ScottAR on January 17, 2004, 09:32:36 AM
Got any shots of the Case?  I had no idea they made skidders...
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 17, 2004, 09:36:00 AM
C-4 Tree Farmer Cable Skidder. At the landing with a Valmet forwarder decking wood and loading logs on the log hauler. Lee timber harvest; 1/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/C-4_treefarmer_at_landing.jpg )




Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Swede on January 17, 2004, 11:02:59 AM
http://www.hypro.se/welcome/welcome.htm

The girls says, -It´s not the size........ 8)

Swede
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 18, 2004, 08:08:17 AM
I'll get some photos of the Case when I visit the job again. The weather hasn't been very good for picture taking larely, mostly "survival".

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: ScottAR on January 18, 2004, 10:30:55 AM
I hear ya on the survival..  Many thanks...
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Keltic on January 19, 2004, 07:43:10 AM
That C 4 is very similar to my old honey, mine was made by Can Car in Ontario. Good pics thanks!
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 19, 2004, 03:29:38 PM
Hardwood Thinning; Selective Harvest. Valmet forwarder and Timberjack cable skidder parked near loggers pick-up; "lunch break"! Lee timber harvest; 12/03.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/hardwood_thinning_seletion_ harvest.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 21, 2004, 02:28:55 PM
We got "blown off" this job today. Just too much snow and wind; now over two feet of snow on the hill sides. Loggers moved equipment out to other jobs further south with flatter ground and less snow.

We hope to return in March to finish this one.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on January 21, 2004, 05:16:56 PM
 Well its nice to see, I'm not the only one battling the wind. yesterday I had tops swaying 8' to 10'. today was great, no wind even got out of the hooded sweatshirt. The biggest suprise was the skidder starting at 12*  8).
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Swede on January 23, 2004, 09:44:52 AM
Just an old swede
< http://www.elmia.se/wood/woodnews/2001/eng/torsdag/bamse.asp >
and another some years younger
< http://user.tninet.se/~irs543h/volvobm/400band.html >

Most farmers in Sweden have small areas with both woodland  and fields. With accessories like "halvband"  and using the same tractor everywhere he could save some money.
It was before the 4WD:s came and now they can hire a Timberjack to do a whole winter job in a week or two. But a Timberjack don´t leave anything, most forest here looks like fields.
I can drive many miles without facing two trees at a time thats time to harvest.  Most areas with 5-40 y.o. coniferous trees that should be thinned out years ago. Government´s and big companys behave more badly than small/private. Money, money, moey.........


Swede.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 26, 2004, 08:38:28 AM
Case 600/800 Forwarder. Old unit, re-manufactured unit with Barko loader. Parked at the landing. Lee hardwood timber harvest; 1/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/case_600_800_forwarder_old.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: ScottAR on January 26, 2004, 06:47:38 PM
Many thanks!  I didn't know Case made skidders/forwarders.  Anyone have any info on them?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 27, 2004, 11:38:52 AM
1970 Timberjack Cable Skidder. This well maintained unit skids tree lengths off the hill side for bucking below. Lee timber harvest;1/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/1970_timber jack_cable_skidder.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 28, 2004, 02:11:32 PM
1970 Timberjack Cable Skidder. Cleaning snow from a spot at the base of the steep slope to buck up the tree lengths harvested off the hill side. Lee timber harvest; 1/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/1970_ timberjack_cable_skidder_cleans_snow.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: UNCLEBUCK on January 28, 2004, 09:42:56 PM
just wanting to say thanks for all the great logging pictures. I hauled 4 loads one summer from palco lumber in scotia california up at the humboldt redwoods to a little place in dalton ohio where they made little backyard sheds out of those huge beautiful redwood trees   :'(, I had never seen trees or equipment that big and probably never will but the redwoods out there are something to see, back to lookin at these great loggin photos !
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 30, 2004, 08:59:34 AM
Bucking the Tree Lengths. Tree lengths cable skidded off the cleared ski slope area are bucked up on the flats below the slope. Lee timber harvest; 1/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/bucking_tree_lengths.jpg )


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 31, 2004, 10:05:56 AM
The Valmet Forwarder takes a load of hard maple out to the landing for decking. Lee timber harvest; 1/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/valmet_forwarder_lee_hdwds.jpg )

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on February 02, 2004, 08:17:41 AM
Valmet Forwarder. Sorts its product load at the roadside landing for trucking. Lee timber harvest; 1/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/valmet_sorts_wood_at_landing.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Keltic on February 02, 2004, 02:16:37 PM
Wicked looking wood!
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on February 03, 2004, 11:28:28 AM
Getting a Load Out. The Valmet forwarder assists the "wood hauler" in loading for its 150+ mile trip to the paper mill on a blizzardy day. Lee timber harvest; 1/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/getting_a_load_out.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on February 04, 2004, 05:19:09 PM
4501 Iron Mule. Working in the winters heavy snow. Flint timber hatvest; 1/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/4501_iron_mule_working _in_snow.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Swede on February 04, 2004, 10:11:46 PM
Have You heard about oxen logging? 8)
http://www.myreback.com

http://www.myreback.com/Oxen1.jpg
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on February 05, 2004, 09:53:48 AM
No, other than the "live oxens" discussed and shown elsewhere on the Forum. Is that an engined powered bunk unit and does it need another prime mover??
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Swede on February 06, 2004, 01:40:13 AM
Ron.

As any oxen the "iron" oxen is moving itselfe........slowly.
There is an Iron horse  ( JÄRNHÄST) to.

http://www.se.jonsered.com/index.asp

Swede.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on February 07, 2004, 02:40:28 PM
4501 Iron Mule. Picks up a snow covered sawlog. Flint timber harvest 1/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/4501_iron_mule_flint_sale.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Kevin on February 07, 2004, 04:19:36 PM
I tried hock'n a stick or two out today but the trail is still too --Photos MUST be in the Forestry Forum gallery!!!!!--.com/photo/74882584/116791060CJRumT
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on February 14, 2004, 12:00:41 PM
4501 Iron Mule. Parked at the landing for the day. This was a "snow day" for the loggers with all schools in the area  closed due to the heavy snow. Travel was to a minimum. Flint timber harvest; 2/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/4501_iron_mule_parked, snow_day.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on February 15, 2004, 12:02:40 PM
4501 Iron Mule. A good "work horse" in a "tight" hardwood thinning area. Flint timber harvest; 2/04

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/4501_iron_mule_works_well.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on February 16, 2004, 12:41:19 PM
Thinning Northern Hardwoods. Winter logging; Flint timber harvest; 2/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/thinning_northern_hardwoods_winter_logging.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on February 18, 2004, 02:37:22 PM
4501 Iron Mule Works in Northern Hardwood Thinning. Loading firewood bolts from the topwood. A good winter for firewood sales as well as sawlogs and pulpwood. Good wood utilization; Flint timber harvest; 2/04.  

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/4501_iron_mule_loads_firewood.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on February 25, 2004, 09:18:39 AM
Some "wood-hauler" names recently noted on the road to and from the western UP.

"Fast Forward II"
"Killing Time"
"Unbelievable"
"Never Satisfied"
"Brute"
"Big Woody"

Over a 785 mile round trip, 83 "wood-haulers" were noted in route. Stretched out, that would be a few at 9.5 rigs/mile.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: mrelmertoots on March 08, 2004, 08:02:55 AM
I have not seen a crawer skidding logs on this site. I use a Cat D5B with a winch. I skid tree lenth and skid usally 2 or 3 large trees in good conditions. The crawer don't cut ruts like a skidder in soft ground.
(http://URL)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on March 08, 2004, 05:01:08 PM
 Hi mrelmertoots. I'd like to get a little dozer for skidding some day. Our woodlot is soft in places and needs roads put in. A D5 might be a little big for my needs but its still a nice size for sure. I agree with you on the rutting thing and thats one of the reasons I like dozers. They may not be as productive as a skidder and they may cost more to run but you can do more types of work and if you use it right you'll  leave the land in nice shape. I've seen a few operators who can steer clutch brake almost as well as one of those new hydrostatic/ differential steering machine. I'd love to see some pictures of your D5 at work.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 08, 2004, 05:10:57 PM
The rubber tired skidders and forwarders have pretty much replaced the crawlers for production logging. They are more efficient and effective on most jobs producing more board feet output per day.

Loggers that have crawlers here use them mostly for road construction, reconstruction, leveling and grading roads and landings, moving snow, etc. They then park them for the rubber tired units to do the tree and log moving.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on March 08, 2004, 05:37:55 PM
 A lot of loggers here do most of thier road builing with junker excavators to get a rough grade built up then back drag the road with a skidder blade. The roads are usually more damaging to the environment than a old dozer road but I guess they get the added grade they want by digging deep ditches. If you want production then skidders win hands down in most situations. The ground froze up real nice here this winter and the skidders aren't doing much damage.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 11, 2004, 04:09:10 PM
Here is a road side 8 ' slasher.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/slasher.jpg )

slashing hardwood, aspen and softwood from treelength


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on March 14, 2004, 02:20:31 PM
The guy working around here has a slasher something like that except its an older Tanguay. The things pretty slow and it breaks down a lot but i guess it gets the job done. I think they cut 8 and 16 foot logs (mostly cedar) with it plus they use it for loading trucks.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 14, 2004, 03:12:13 PM
Yeah this slasher can cut to any length you want. I'm not sure of the model. The contractor uses it mostly on his crown land operations. We had to use this slasher because of the small diameter hardwood we were thinning in. Helped speed up production.  And it came in handy to trim up the butt rot in the fir and it also did a good job on the veneer aspen. For some reason, all my photos where from the yards. Should have taken some pictures of the job. :-/
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on March 14, 2004, 03:51:58 PM
 SwampDonkey I think that slaher is a HOOD machine. The Tanguay has its saw on a slider rail and can be adjusted to most lengths. I'll try to get some pictures of the operation within this week but the film will be awhile. I'll probably be posting a bunch of snowy pictures in july  :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on March 14, 2004, 03:58:30 PM
 I just watched a movie on the Quadco site with their Levesque processor in it. Pretty slick unit. Doesn't need to make a cut on the butt of the log to know where to start measuring from like a harvester head would and it doesn't need a butt plate either.

http://www.quadco.com/site/english/home.html
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 14, 2004, 05:06:20 PM
I had a look at the Quadco site also. Its quite slick at that small diameter wood. By the looks of the tops it must have been mainly white birch because the crowns were small. I wonder how it handles mature hardwood with big twisty tops like yellow birch. I guess its mostly for pulp processing. But I don't see it being used for other than clearcut jobs. In stands where thinning is required there would be a lot of mechanical damage to residuals and regeneration I suspect. I don't know that it would be more productive than a feller buncher and short wood processor/forwarder (3 machines versus 2 hmmm). I've seen those types of machines used on sites with thick softwood regen underneath and the regen gets a major pounding. Because the tree gets jerked back and forth to delimb and the head reaches for the wood often times grabbing a bunch of regen in its grip. In order to be productive the operator looses contact with the leave trees and focuses on that tree he's processing.

I'de like a short wood forwarder and manual felling/bucking and limbing on thinning sites. You have to cut that wood up where it falls, and fall it in such a way that the forwarder can reach the piece. But your trail system will assure you can reach every piece anyway.  Of course use directional felling, can't fall trees every which way if your going to do a good job. You'll end up passing over the same ground at different times because you can't buck the wood if its all criss-crossed either.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on March 14, 2004, 07:02:58 PM
Hey!  Git that Skidder outa my way. :D
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/tom-skidder.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on March 15, 2004, 05:58:20 PM
SwampDonkey, I see quite a few Hornet/ Target processors for sale around here so i'm guessing they handle most of the stuff we'd come up against. I think theyre rated for a 24 inch log. I think most guys use them for in woods delimbing (follows the buncher around) For processing felled trees i'd think them to be more efficient than a regular dangle head harvester because you don't have to cut a slab off the butt to start measuring.Maybe they aren't all like that but any I've seen have to make that cut. I agree with you on the chainsaw thing. the machines may e fast but they can sure make a mess pretty easy.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 16, 2004, 03:51:28 AM
Scott:

Yes I agree with the efficiency of that head, but you still need that forwarder to pickup the pieces, load'em and transport. Plus the extra cost of that 3rd machine to buy and maintain. There is also an increased chance that wood is wasted unless care is taken to keep the short wood together and not scattered all over. Although, not a problem in most cases.

What I doen't like about some whole tree operations is the fact that your road side has a mountain of tops. What we've both mentioned for harvesting systems eleviates that problem somewhat and your tops break down quicker on site when scattered. Athough, they aren't quite as scattered as with manual felling and topping. Doing pre-commercial thinning has proven this, there's hardly a tree top that hasn't pretty well rotted out by 12 years. Those road side slash piles just stick around a long time on whole tree operations.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Frickman on March 16, 2004, 06:27:23 AM
Tom, what's that contraption for on front? Looks to me it's for piling up logs or brush.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on March 16, 2004, 09:38:43 AM
It's a root rake.   It's used for general cleanup around the landng and on the skid trails and roads.  Practically a subsoiler, it will push out stumps and roots that bother trucks and other road vehicles using the woods roads and landing.  It comes in real handy when piling wind-rows or burn piles.  You'll notice that one tooth is missing.  curt lost it on the last job when the bolts loosened.   He means to put it back on soon.  



Makes the front of that skidder look real mean, doesn't it?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Frickman on March 16, 2004, 09:50:37 AM
Thanks for the explanation Tom. You'all must have sandy soild there and no rocks. Around here in our rocks and heavy clay I'd have all the teeth ripped off before the day was done.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 16, 2004, 10:13:45 AM
We've used those root rakes up here on abandoned farmland to clear off alder and brush. Then later, plant white spruce on the site. Been 100's of acres prepared with those. Sometimes they are on dozers. We only had limited success because some operators cleared off duff and all, which cause frost heaving problems with the planted trees.

DanG it why does water expand when frozen? :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on March 16, 2004, 10:52:47 AM
It really doesn't expand, Swamp Donkey.  It's an old wives tale.  Actually what happens is that it becomes very stable and the rest of the world shrinks in the cold.  I know all about that shrinking in the cold.........don't ask. :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 16, 2004, 11:36:21 AM
Errmmm :-/     I won't  ::)  :o
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: beenthere on March 16, 2004, 12:14:41 PM
Yep, Tom .....my belt shrinks too, even when it isn't cold.  ;D

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 20, 2004, 03:46:45 PM
Delimber & Slasher. Processing wood at the landing and decking area. Ski Brule Mountain timber harvest 2/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/04_01_03/delimber_and_slasher.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 21, 2004, 10:23:15 AM
690 E John Deere Delimber. Works at the landing. Yooper Timber Cutting; Ski Brule Mt. timber harvest; 2/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/delimber_john_deere_690E.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 22, 2004, 06:11:45 AM
Prentice Slasher. Processes wood products at the landing. Ski Brule Mt. timber harvest 2/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/prentice_slasher.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 23, 2004, 04:52:55 PM
John Deere 850B Crawler with Angle Blade. Being used for road construction and building site clearing. Ski Brule Mt. timber harvest; 2/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/john_deere_850B_crawler_with_angle_blade.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 23, 2004, 06:29:16 PM
I was wondering what folks would recommend for a small forwarder. One with a 2 cord capacity bunk and a loader, 6 feet wide bunk, closed in cab. Is there one for around $35,000 USD? I was thinking about using one in commercial thinning operations with average piece size at 6 inches. My production would be 0.75 cord/hr after trail wood is cut. I remember seeing a demo on a woodlot field day and I think they wanted $80,000 CDN, which was too pricey for the production it could muster. We are starting to see a trend up this way where the price of replacing old equipment is gone too crazy, so there are very few younger folks attempting to get into the woods business after their fathers retire. I was told by someone today that he knew a fellow that would have to dish out $1.5 million to upgrade and he's now 57 years old. He says the guy is going to work with what he has and then he's done. He's even laying off 19 people and retaining his top 3 men.

cheers
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on March 24, 2004, 03:38:07 PM
 1.5 million isn't actually that bad now. I saw a 455 timbco leveling buncher with a Keto 500 harvesting head for 500 thousand. I'd imagine 2 new skidders, a buncher, a delimber and a log loader would run 1.5 to 2 million easy.
Nice looking dozer Ron, seems to be well equiped for woods work.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 24, 2004, 04:33:14 PM
The small timberjack and valmet forwarders are popular here along with the vintage iron mules. Most of the timber producers work with "used" pieces but they keep them maintained and in good shape.

The large producers have "big bucks" in their logging equipment and the payments don't stop during spring break-up.  :-[

The higher their costs, the more they have to produce /day.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 24, 2004, 04:38:12 PM
Its quite a chunk of change, just the same, when you consider that pulp and softwood sawlogs have only increased by 15% in 15 years, while machinery cost has increased 100% and trucking costs are 30 % of your gross. I wouldn't want that bill over my head. ;) You have to have alot of ground to work to pay them bills. Just to reflect a little bit. Most farms including buildings, land and equipment is barely worth that. I know first hand, we sold 850 acres (450 acres woods) 3 years ago and we had a 160 foot by 120 foot potato storage shed with 20 foot ceilings, 10 years old.  We sold the potato shed for less than half its value.

cheers
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 24, 2004, 05:43:16 PM
Timberjack Feller-Buncher. A tracked unit works well in heavy snow. Ski Brule Mt. timber harvest; 2/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/timberjack_feller_buncher.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on March 25, 2004, 12:15:43 PM
 There's a lot of 6 and 8 wheel forwarders around the maritimes with those wheel tracks on, they must work well.
SwampDonkey, a TJ 215 forwarder is a nice smaller machine, prices are decent too.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 25, 2004, 03:12:46 PM
Scott

Do you have a link to the 215?  I can only find the 810D or larger.

http://www.timberjack.com/products/forwarders/810D.htm
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on March 25, 2004, 04:00:48 PM
 The 215 is an older machine, see them in the equipment trader now and then. Rotobec makes a nice small forwarder but I'd bet theyre pricey.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 25, 2004, 05:15:08 PM
The Logger's Pick-Up. The spare saw on the tail gate is a Husky 254 XP. Flint timber harvest; 2/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/logger::s_pick-up_husky 254xp.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 26, 2004, 04:44:25 PM
Sharpening Saws. The chain saws are checked over and sharpened before starting out on a days cutting. Flint timber harvest; 2/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/sharpening_the_saws.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 28, 2004, 07:44:41 AM
Iron Mule Forwarder. Decking wood at the landing. Flint timber harvest; 2/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/iron_mule_decking_wood.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 29, 2004, 04:49:20 PM
Northern Hardwood Thinning. Selection Harvest. Flint timber harvest; 3/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/northern_hardwood_thinning_flint.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 30, 2004, 08:45:14 PM
The "Boss" and His Cutter. They ponder as to how to  best buck the large sugar maple for its best grade, Corey timber harvest; 3/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/boss_&_his_cutter.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 31, 2004, 05:39:41 PM
The Timberjack Forwarder Assists the Cutter. The large sugar maple log is rolled out of the cutter's way in the deep snow. Corey timber harvest; 3/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/timberjack_forwarder_moves_log.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 02, 2004, 05:12:25 PM
Measuring the Cuts. The cutter makes measurements on the sugar maple prior to making his sawlog cuts. Corey timber harvest; 3/04. His saw is a Husky 385XP.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/cutter_measures_for_the_cuts.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on April 02, 2004, 08:59:53 PM
I had a yard full of maple like that, but they had birds eye figure in the sapwood, not all the way to the pith. So what happened was the veneer buyer rejected them for defect and the figure buyer said the figures didn't go deep enough for his market. So, St. Anne made Kraft pulp out of'em for Eastman Kodak.  ::)

cheers
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 04, 2004, 08:58:12 AM
Equipment Repairs. A "moble welding unit" visits the timber harvest area for on site repairs to the iron mule forwarder. A fatiue crack needs welding. Flint timber harvest; 3/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/equipment_repairs_iron_mule.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Noront on April 04, 2004, 10:57:18 AM
How do you go about posting photos here. We have a bunch you might be interested in, it's at yahoo groups and is called loaderlarrys. It has pics of some forestry stuff here in north western ont.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 04, 2004, 03:50:55 PM
Norant,

Go to the Forum Tools bar above and Uploading Pictures.  Instuctions there should help.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 05, 2004, 09:03:02 AM
Vintage Crawler This D-6 Caterpillar was being used for snow removal and road and landing grading. I'm told that it is a 1946 model. The steering was "a little loose". Corey timber harvest; 3/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/vintage_crawler.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 06, 2004, 05:19:59 PM
Timberjack 230A Forwarder.  Working in a northern hardwood selection harvest. Short wood, variable length logging. Corey timber harvest; 3/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/timberjack_230A_short_wood_harvest.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 08, 2004, 09:50:55 AM
Timberjack 230A Forwarder. Sorts wood into products at the landing/decking area. Corey timber harvest; 3/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/timberjack_230A_sorts_products.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 09, 2004, 05:17:47 PM
Western Star Wood Hauler. The wood hauler gets prepared to leave the landing with a load of pulpwood during a "spring break-up" morning. The 230A  timberjack forwarder stands by for assistance. Corey timber harvest; 3/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/western_star_at_landing.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 11, 2004, 04:49:02 PM
Western Star Wood Hauler. Starts to leave the timber sale area with a load of pulpwood during spring break-up. Corey timber harvest; 3/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/western_star_leaves_landing.jpg )


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 18, 2004, 10:18:41 AM
Western Star Wood Hauler. Assistance is needed from the 230 A Timberjack forwarder to get underway for the hill climb ahead. Spring break-up; Corey timber harvest 3/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/western_star_wood_hauler_with 230A_push.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: beenthere on April 18, 2004, 11:24:19 AM
Could there be something wrong with my computer settings (monitor) because I don't see the 'forwarder' in Ron's picture at all (only an outline of the boom) unless I download the pic to photo software, and adjust the brightness considerably. Then the green forwarder stands out very clearly.
Should I adjust the monitor?  The brightness is set as 'bright' as it will go, as well as the contrast.
Not complaining, but seems I am missing details of pics with what I have set up now.
Any ideas?  Thanks
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 18, 2004, 12:24:37 PM
Beenthere,

I see the green timberjack ok, but I have monitor on Max brightness. Photo is a little dark though due to weather at the time and darker at the rear end of the wood hauler where forwarder is pushing.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: beenthere on April 18, 2004, 01:08:54 PM
I'm at max brightness on the monitor.
Here is how I brightened up the pic (at least I'll see if it comes out any different) by adding 'brightener'.   ;D

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wood_hauler1.JPG )

Sorry to clutter up your thread here, and will delete if helpful to do so.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on April 19, 2004, 08:05:04 PM
 Red pine thinning western Ma. 04-19-04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/hauling red pine.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 20, 2004, 12:41:48 PM
Good to see some logging photos from other parts of the country!!!  :P
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on May 01, 2004, 06:47:26 PM
 New forwarder at the Northeast Expo.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/forwarder at expo.jpg )
I need $$$  ;D.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Dom on May 06, 2004, 04:58:04 PM
 :)

I was wondering when someone would post a Rottne! I work for Rocan Forestry in Dieppe NB.  8) We are the distributor for Rottne in Canada.

http://www.rocan.com/
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on May 06, 2004, 06:24:32 PM
theres a rottne forwarder working a red pine thinning up the road. i'll try and get a picture of it to post.

i saw that one at the expo 215k with tracks and chains, thats some serious money.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Dom on May 06, 2004, 06:39:15 PM
http://www.rocan.com/equipment.htm

There are videos of Rottnes on this site, if some of you are interested.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on May 07, 2004, 05:37:33 PM
how the heck am i supposed to get this picture i wanterd to show to get on here? every time i do it it just winds up in the archive.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on May 07, 2004, 09:38:27 PM
You almost had it. Read the instructions in Forum Tools at the top of the page.

The Picture was very small.  You  must have shrunk it to the 15k rather than optimizing it.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/Rottne rapid forwarder.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: beenthere on May 07, 2004, 10:18:27 PM
Tom said ""You  must have shrunk it to the 15k rather than optimizing it.  ""  

Looks like that is a clue to what I am doing wrong to. I will try to work on that.  I have one site that only takes 10k, and seems the only way I can get to 10k is shrink it. Now I will need to look into optimizing it.  I will head for the instructions tomorrow. Going to postpone taking down a windmill, as the wind is to be 20 - 25 mph and chance of thunderstorms. I'll stick to the ground and try to not become the "ground" for any lightnin bolts.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on May 08, 2004, 04:47:47 AM
Dom:

Welcome to the forum.

cheers  :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on May 08, 2004, 03:54:27 PM
Thanks Tom but i cant seem to make them any bigger and still get them in here ::) i dont know what else to do so it looks like i wont be posting any pics. i just aint that smart i quess.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on May 09, 2004, 04:07:59 AM
Dave:

If your using photoshop, I find that it encodes some extras into the jpg image files and its hard to optimize the photo. I use fireworks and it doesn't seem to stuff the image with 'filler'.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Swede on May 09, 2004, 04:42:54 AM
I live ~30 miles from Rotte so I have seen some of them.   :) Most machines working in the forrests here are Rottne and Timberjack.

Swede.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Fla._Deadheader on May 09, 2004, 05:25:16 AM
  I use Photoshop 5.0.  Once I get the image brightness and to 100%, I just click "Image size" and change the width to 300 or less. Nearly every time, it will be under 15K. I rarely use optimizer anymore ?????????
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on May 09, 2004, 07:27:40 AM
Honest truth is, I dont use it any more either. I bought adobe photoshop 7.0 for my web graphic work and it has a save for web function with an awsome compresion tool. Bought it on Amazon but it was still pretty pricey.  It is an awsome chuck of software if you can justify it.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/stores/offering/list/-/B000063EMG/all/103-1082702-0939024
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on May 09, 2004, 10:00:02 AM
It makes it kinda hard to offer instructions when there is no baselline. I recommend that Everybody is on their own. :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on May 09, 2004, 10:10:12 AM
Tom why is there no baseline? The baseline is still the instructions we  have always given at http://www.forestryforum.com/upload.htm
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on May 09, 2004, 10:13:45 AM
I just find that when Xat come into the conversation more folks than not talk about not using it.  If I were a just getting started, I wojld try to follow the experts, not some "outmoded piece of software.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on May 09, 2004, 11:01:00 AM
I think Photoshop is a fine piece of programming but its a bit of overkill for most folks probably and the price will likely turn most off. Just us folks that do web publishing and some commercial art works will likely want to dish out the $$ doh $$. I use photoshop for matching aerial photography for my GIS work. You can take two images and match them to your GIS Layers by stretching, rotating, rubbersheeting and adjusting the aspect within Photoshop and you can also create an Annotation Layer for your GIS. You can only do this fancy photomatching in Photoshop format( PSD or PDF). They are treated as layers and once you get the photos corrected you flatten the image to reduce the file size. Also, if your using it in a GIS it will be saved as MrSID or TIFF. I use TIFF, which also has LZW or jpeg compression. The compression isn't supported by some GIS programs as it takes a bit of CPU power and VM when your scrolling around in a Aerial photo layer  and having to decompress it for display on your GIS. I can think of one GIS program that it would be a nightmare on, and that is ArcGIS. Every pan of a layer and the HD goes screeching. In Maptitude it pans much more efficiently and your not sitting and waiting for screen updates. Plus working with aerial photography in ArcGIS costs as much money for the extension as the entire Maptitude program suite. :D ArcGIS, definately has some nice pluses over Maptitude, don't get me wrong there. But, for what I need to do, and most natural resource management folks, it doesn't justify the price. Hmm $500 for Maptitude, versus $1600 for ArcGIS? Same scenario between Photoshop and the current available freebies or shareware online. ;)

Have a look at my crafty work with aerial photography on Photoshop and Maptitude GIS

http://www.klondikekonsulting.com/orthographic.htm

The scale is 1: 12,500 (m). The black thin lines outline property boundaries and the black circles are cruise sample locations. Looking at the photo along the International boundary you might thing the line is shifted. But, no there is a narrow and long property there. I just have not included the outline of the properties south of the Meduxnekeag Stream. I don't think ArcGIS even has sign shields for N.B. highways as I've used on route 540. You should be able to see the splice between the photos. ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on May 09, 2004, 01:51:20 PM
trying again(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/IMG_0001.JPG )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on May 09, 2004, 02:02:47 PM

heres a picture of my work truck

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/F350.JPG )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on May 09, 2004, 02:21:10 PM
heres another picture of the rottne from the otherside


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/IMG_0018.JPG )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on May 09, 2004, 02:28:43 PM
heres a load of logs fromthe yale forest.






(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/load of logs.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on May 09, 2004, 02:36:30 PM
heres a picture of the job

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/redpine thinning.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 09, 2004, 08:31:51 PM
Good to see some Rottne's pictured. We don't have any being used locally here that I know of.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on May 10, 2004, 02:52:27 AM
David_c

Nice work and nice pictures ta boot. :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on May 10, 2004, 05:32:03 AM
thanks for the compliment swampdonky but i can only take credit for the pics.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on May 10, 2004, 06:14:40 AM
here are a few pics of the last job we did.. Heres a pic of the 648E skid(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/648E Grapple ff.jpg )
der
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on May 10, 2004, 03:34:04 PM
here are some better pictures now that they are resized thanks Jim.   Heres the back of my friends work truck .. thats my 385xp on the gate , generator,fuel cans etc..

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/auburn3.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on May 10, 2004, 03:36:08 PM
heres a pic of me skidding up over the hill before the landing(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/auburn1.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on May 10, 2004, 03:39:08 PM
heres another pic of me skidding

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/auburn2.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on May 10, 2004, 03:41:28 PM
same pic as before pushing leaners over (http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/auburn4.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on May 10, 2004, 03:42:56 PM
herea a pic of us skidding on top of the sandpit cliff(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/auburn8.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on May 10, 2004, 03:44:32 PM
Well I have more to come soon..stay tuned  for more timber harvesting pictures from the Northeast..

                             Rob
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on May 10, 2004, 04:05:08 PM
heres a pic of part of the select cut we did(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/auburn10.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on May 10, 2004, 04:07:02 PM
heres anotehr pic(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/auburn11.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on May 10, 2004, 04:08:12 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/auburn12.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on May 10, 2004, 04:12:11 PM
heres a picture of rob on his skidder i took today.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/IMG_0002.JPG )
heres another one

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/robs c4.JPG )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 10, 2004, 05:42:43 PM
The "Cutter's Stump". The large stump of a recently harvested beech tree serves as a work place for the faller working nearby. He leaves an extra bar and chain for his 385XP, sharpening file, gas & oil, and a pair of gloves for further use as needed. Corey timber harvest; 4/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/cutter::s_stump.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on May 11, 2004, 05:12:15 AM
on (http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/auburn16.jpg )
the skid road 3/04
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 12, 2004, 05:27:25 PM
Timberjack 230A Forwarder. Decking hardwood sawlogs at the landing. Corey timber harvest 4/04.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/timberjack_230A_corey_harvest.jpg )

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Dom on May 13, 2004, 05:14:43 PM
Quote
Dom:

Welcome to the forum.

cheers  :)


Thanks ! Its a nice forum.  :)


I'll have to take pics of the machines at work. We have a bunch of different harvesters and forwarders, mostly what we sell though.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on May 13, 2004, 05:56:08 PM
DOM:

Did ya happen to notice how many times this thread has been read?

We except pics of any make of machinery, I'm sure. ;)

From all the Forest Forums I've came across on the web so far, this is the best maintained one and a super bunch of folks.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 13, 2004, 07:35:30 PM
Western Star Wood Hauler. Prepares to leave the landing with a load of aspen sawlogs. Doyle Logging; 4/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/western_star_wood_hauler_doyle_logging.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 14, 2004, 05:29:35 PM
Western Star Log Train. A load of aspen sawlogs slowly gets underway from the landing. Doyle Logging job next to one I'm currently preparing for sale; 5/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/western_star_log_train.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on May 14, 2004, 07:14:21 PM
MAC Trucks. Husby Forest Products, truck no 8 with a load of hemlock and cedar from the Nadin watershed (Graham Island) on the Queen Charlotte Islands. On the way to the dry land sort for scaling , then to be loaded and barged to Vancouver Island.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/husby-mac.jpg )


Canadian Air Sky Crane used in heli-logging operations in sensitive areas on the Queeen Charlottes. The engineers do maintenance on the huge engine. 20,000 lb lift capacity.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/skycrane.jpg )

Vancouver Island Helicopters taxi the crew to a landing on top of Sommerville Island in NW BC, just east of Porcher Canal and near the mouth of the Khutzeymateen Grizzly Bear Sanctuary on the main land. 45 minutes return flight from Prince Rupert,BC.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/VIH.jpg )

The crew get ready to descend down slope to the work site to mark out stands for heli-logging on Sommerville Island in BC. Near Porcher Canal.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/swampdonkey.jpg )

Wait don't leave me here on this deserted island with these guys :D :D ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on May 14, 2004, 07:54:17 PM
Ron, did you ask where those aspen logs were going? We have been buying 10's from Doyle lately. Seeing is is is a whole load of ten's I bet they are coming here. Looks like what they been hauling. Some of them a little on the small side. :(

Nice pics there Donk
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 15, 2004, 02:12:23 PM
Jeff,
No I don't know just where Doyle was taking the aspen sawlogs to other than were he was getting "top dollar" for them. If Ray is paying "top dollar" that may be where they are going. They're coming from the Lazy Lake Gun Club property in Fork Township, Mecosta county. Doyle is using the access across the Mike Austin property which we are currently prepairing for sale. 400 acres of oak, aspen etc to work over there.

Do you know when Jake plans to get started on the Dean Sale here north of Cadillac? The landowner is getting anxious.

I'm also working on a small sawlog sale down near Temple north of the Trevino Sale that Billsby done for me a few years ago so Jake might be interested in this one when I get it out on the bid market. This constant wet weather and UP trips has put things behind some.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on May 15, 2004, 02:44:29 PM
Close-up view of the sky crane engine and the maintenance engineers.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/SkycraneE.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on May 15, 2004, 02:55:05 PM
Its us then. Hes paying more then anybody.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 15, 2004, 06:11:10 PM
Timberjack 230A Forwarder; Proctor Logging The forwarder transports hardwood sawlogs to the landing. Corey timber harvest; 5/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/Timberjack_ 230A_forwarder_proctor_logging.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 16, 2004, 05:09:29 PM
More Wood Hauler Names Noted:

* Dyer's Tonka Toy
* Polish Express
* Brute
* Big Woody
* Alecia Taylor
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tillaway on May 17, 2004, 08:27:01 AM
The Truck naming must be regional.  I have seen only one area in Eastern Oregon where this was done.  Everybody else just uses numbers, sometimes the drivers name is on the door just under the window.  I passed "Grumpy" the other day, the name looked fitting. ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 17, 2004, 06:30:19 PM
Truck naming seems to be most popular with the wood haulers here. The company or truck owner's name is often panted on a plate on top of the cab and on the cab doors.

The truck's name (not all are named) is usually painted on the nose over the grill. Where there's a stainless grill as many of the newer ones are, the name may be on the side panels behind the cab doors.

The trucks are usually named by the owner or the owner allows his hired driver to name it. It's just a fun thing with me to note the different truck names and then note where I may see that truck again. Some put a lot of miles between places.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Swede on May 18, 2004, 01:49:17 AM
That Timberjack 230A Forwarder on the picture from Jeff.........For me it looks too short. Has anyone cut one axle and 9' off or is it how they make them for US market? ::)

Most logs here is 10 to 20', Just small thinning out logs and pulp wood is 8' 4"

Swede.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Swede on May 18, 2004, 01:53:20 AM
Sorry! :o that picture was sent from Ron!  ::)

Blind Swede.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gary_C on May 18, 2004, 01:10:51 PM
Swede,
That is what we call a single bunk forwarder. It is just like my Valmet 644 and is used for shortwood (100 inch long) wood, although I have hauled some 10',12', and even 16 footers. It is very useful in close quarters because the axles are the same distance from the center pivot and so the rear wheels follow exactly in the tracks of the front wheels.
I don't think any manufacturer is selling the single bunks anymore as everyone wants to get bigger and go to a 6 or even 8 wheel double bunk with 4 uprights. Even though I can out manuever a double bunk any day, I wish I had a double bunk so I could sort more while loading and I sometimes need the bogey wheels and tracks under the load for flotation.
The other problem with single bunks is most manufacturers are now mounting the loader on the rear section and a single bunk does not have enough weight to keep from tipping over when you reach out to the side with the loader. They must compensate with shorter loaders and automatic pivot locks but that has not been enough.

Gary
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 18, 2004, 05:16:03 PM
The single bunks are very popular here for "short wood" operations, though they will carry variable lengths up to 17 feet as max. Many private land owners just don't want the "big stuff" in their woods.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Swede on May 19, 2004, 06:15:37 AM
I think many people here use to big forest machies and tractors. One with 80 acre, stands in every ages, have an old vreck, Volvo 868. If he had a 4-WD tractor with half the power + loging trailer with 4-WD it could make the same job as that old vreck. + a lot more than just hauling logs less than 50 hours a year.
I also know one with more than 100 acres using a Fordson Dexta or a Volvo 400. That´s a little crazy too but he use them much more  for harvesting hay.

Many  people here just looks for tractors with 80-130HP, doesn´t matter how small areas they have, forest or agriculture. ::)

I DO understand the need for them short forwarders!  :) Think I could see them here if we had some hardwood and cut short logs. But the loader at rear end at a forwarder ..... :o and  why? ???

About sorting during loading, I´ve seen some trailers with 2  uprights in the middle for easyer sorting. Sometimes they load much more on one side than the other........Then it doesn´t work!  ;D

Swede.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 19, 2004, 06:08:55 PM
Bucking Sugar Maple Sawlogs. The Husky 385 XP is the saw of choice by this feller. Corey timber harvest; 5/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/bucking_sugar_maple_sawlogs.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on May 19, 2004, 06:24:49 PM
That's where the infamous "bow-saw" would make for an easier day.  .......if it were used properly...... :P :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gary_C on May 19, 2004, 10:20:16 PM
Swede,
The first forwarders had the loader mounted on the rear of the front section just in front of the pivot. Some even had the loader mounted on the cab roof. When it came time to drive ahead, you had to find a level place on the load to set the grapple and put the swing, graple rotate, and up-down controls in the float position so the loader would follow the rear section as you turned or drove over humps. If you did not find a good level spot, the graple would fall off the side of the load, usually taking all 4 hoses off quicker than you could say "Aw Shucks."   :'(

Been there.  Sometimes you get lucky and only lose 1 hose. Incidentally in MN if you spill over 5 gallons of hydraulic fluid, you are required to call the Duty Officer and report the spill.

The newer models now have the loader mounted on the front of the rear section, just behind the pivot. You can just leave the loader over the middle of the load, no float needed,  This way you do not need 4 spare hoses, wrenches, and extra hydraulic fluid.  8)

The problem with the loader on the rear section is most of the weight when empty is in the front section. However they have added a hydraulic swivel lock between the front and rear that is automatically locked except when you are driving. Some adventurous operators will swing the grapple and manually unlock the swivel to grab that log that is just out of reach.

Gary

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Swede on May 20, 2004, 08:53:06 AM
Eric;
"The newer models now have the loader mounted on the front of the rear section, just behind the pivot"

That´s where we have placed the loaders the last 40 years and I think it´s what You ment earlier.
On tractors with forest equipments from the -50 and -60´s some loaders here too was placed on the roof. Have never seen a forwarder built that way.

Swedish log trucks have their loaders on the rear end of the bed so they can load even the trailer. They also have a cab on the loader!
I have never seen a semi truck with logs here. Driving off the asphalt they should be in the mud for ever.  :D

http://www.vemservice.se/0245160.htm

-50 and -60´s:  http://hem.passagen.se/vaxjobilfrakt/gast/gastbilder1.htm
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on May 20, 2004, 11:22:03 AM
hey swede heres a picture i copied from an ad by lakeshore equipment and truck sales in lumberman's equipment digest.
i hope this is o.k Jeff
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/roof mount forwarder.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 20, 2004, 03:06:54 PM
Timberjack 230A Loading Sugar Maple Sawlog. Corey timber harvest; 5/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/timberjack_230A_loads_.sugar_maple_sawlog.jpg )


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on May 21, 2004, 04:39:57 PM
It doesn't have to be fancy :)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/tom-chas-supermajor.jpg )

It's an old Super Major with a front end loader and an attached backhoe.  
The skid hook was being used on the loader to pick up logs to carry
to the sawmill.  The backhoe was used to get logs out of the woods.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on May 21, 2004, 07:49:19 PM
Gary_C or Ron Scott:

Does anyone use 'Spill Check' on their hydrologics down that way. It comes in handy with busted hydrolic hoses.

www.spillcheck.ca
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 22, 2004, 10:37:41 AM
Not that I know of. Not sure anyone has heard of it here.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 23, 2004, 08:46:36 AM
Cutter Trims His Tops. Tops are trimmed so as to lie within 4 feet of the ground in this hardwood selection harvest. The saw in use is also a Husky 385XP. Corey timber harvest; 5/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/cutter_trims_tops.jpg )


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 25, 2004, 01:27:15 PM
Sawyer Starts Cut on Large Sugar Maple. The saw in use is a Husky 372XP. Squires timber harvest; 5/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/sawyer_starts_cut.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 27, 2004, 04:41:57 PM
Timber! The faller exits to a safe distance with his Husky 372XP in hand as the sugar maple starts its directional fall. Squires timber harvest; 5/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/timber_falling_sugar_maple.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on May 27, 2004, 07:31:12 PM
Dont see no chaps.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: chet on May 27, 2004, 07:46:29 PM
A lot of guys wear saw pants that have the chaps sewn on the inside. There is another variation, where the chaps snap on the inside of the pants and tuck into pockets located further down the leg. Thats the style I prefer. I use the same chaps inside my carhart bibs,blue jeans or whatever.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 28, 2004, 07:36:20 PM
Chet,

Thanks for the explanation on some of the chap types. That's what this faller is wearing. The chaps are in the pants, a nice looking jean type pant held up by heavy duty suspenders (I'd like to have a set of these myself). He's also wearing a carhart padded jacket, kevlar gloves, new helmet with ear muffs and face screen, kevlar boots etc.

He's one of our better fallers and one of the "best" dressed though not all is visible in the photo.

I haven't seen a faller without chaps or armored pants in ages though I've seen some well worn chaps.

Another photo will show a close up when I can get to it to see the PPE closer while he's bucking the tree.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on May 29, 2004, 04:21:52 AM
I've seen lotsa of people here without protection. But, they tend to be the weekend cutter or people working their own ground. Anyone working for a contractor has protection, but if WCB wasn't on their case there would be a few not bother. That's just human nature. My father would be one of those working his own ground without any kind of protection. One of them live for ever types who's now half deaf of course. ;)

One should always be geared up for the woods, especially if he/she is working alone. You can do alot of personal injury in a short time.  ::)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 29, 2004, 06:01:36 PM
Feller Bucks the Sugar Maple into Sawlogs He is wearing safety pants, padded carhart jacket, hard hat with hearing and eye protection, gloves, and safety boots.

His saw is a Husky 372XP. Squires timber harvest; 5/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/feller_wears_his_ppe.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 02, 2004, 06:28:48 PM
Teamwork.l The forwarder operator helps the tree faller with bucking the heavy sugar maple tree. The tree is lifted to assist the tree faller with bucking the tree into sawlog lengths and prevent possible "pinching" of the saw.

Squires timber harvest; 5/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/teamwork_treefaller_forwarder.jpg )


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on June 03, 2004, 02:35:28 AM
That's big stuff. On crown land last week I was in a maple stand and those big ones are all dead with just big pecker pole stubs left. The average diameter was 10 inches and this stand had never been logged.  Its just that the old trees have lived their life. So the short of it is, you might as well use those big trees in pulp or logs or maybe veneer cause they don't live forever. But, they have value as wildlife trees too, for owls, pileated wood peckers and such. Depends on what your values are. ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 06, 2004, 03:00:02 PM
230A Timberjack Forwarder Loads Large Sugar Maple Sawlog. Squires timber harvest; 5/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/timberjack_230A_forwarder_loads_large_sugar_maple.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: swampwhiteoak on June 15, 2004, 07:33:39 PM
Here's a harvest we did at one of the forests I work at last fall.  Salvage Harvest on steep terrain, we decided to do something different.  Carson Helicopters was the contractor.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/s61.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: swampwhiteoak on June 15, 2004, 07:38:17 PM
Carson uses a modified Sikorsky S-61.  The max lift is a little over 5 tons, a typical turn weighed 4 tons, or somewhere around 600MBF Doyle.  Logs were bucked in the woods prior to lifting.  Turns on this job took 45secs-2mins.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/howbig.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: swampwhiteoak on June 15, 2004, 07:44:31 PM
Organization on this type of harvest is important.  When a turn lands, the co-pilot of the chopper releases the chokers.  These guys hurry out and unhook the chokers and recoil them.  Once every 2-3 turns they attach more chokers to the long line at the landing and take more chokers to the "hookers" in the woods.  Our staff got excited when we heard the "hooker crew" was coming only to be disappointed when they all turned out to be middle-aged men  :D
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/chokerpullers.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: swampwhiteoak on June 15, 2004, 07:49:32 PM
Large choppers use a lot of fuel.  Typical refuels were once every 1.5-2hrs.  Weight is also an issue so they usually wouldn't fill up completely.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/fueltrucks.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on June 15, 2004, 07:49:34 PM
That's cool swampwhite. On the BC coast they used the sikorsky as support helicopter to bundle the wood for the sky crane which had 20,000 lb lift. Didn't know it was cost effective to use'm in the east. Were you cutting veneer logs?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: swampwhiteoak on June 15, 2004, 07:53:26 PM
Carson is nearly full-service, they provide their own loader.  Not sure the model but it's a cat track loader, can work effeciently even in a wet landing.  This harvest produced 680MBF Doyle, I had cruised it at 1MMBF International (for all grades).  Low grade and pulpwood had to be left in the woods due to economics.  I was pleased at the utilization, I had feared that it would be much worse.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/loading.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: swampwhiteoak on June 15, 2004, 07:59:00 PM
Quote
That's cool swampwhite. On the BC coast they used the sikorsky as support helicopter to bundle the wood for the sky crane which had 20,000 lb lift. Didn't know it was cost effective to use'm in the east. Were you cutting veneer logs?


It's borderline cost-effective.  It can make money but compared to conventional it isn't even close.  The advantages were speed, being low impact, and being able to reach areas that would have been near impossible with conventional equipment.  Disadvantages were that it's expensive so we get less utilization, lower stumpage prices, and the stand has to be good to even consider it.  It also cut out the local loggers.

A sawmill bought the job so I couldn't say the entire breakdown of what the wood went for.  There was a lot of large diameter trees -white oak, black oak, yellow-poplar, and some cherry, walnut, and red oak.  I'm certain a lot of it went veneer but it was mainly just nice sawlogs.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on June 15, 2004, 08:08:09 PM
None of us would expect ya to give that private info about total $$, but price per thousand by species and grade would be nice. If nothing else, its nice to know what mill delivered prices are in different areas. ;)

Thanks for the photos and the scoop.

Cheers :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: swampwhiteoak on June 15, 2004, 09:02:01 PM
well I can tell you this much:

This type of harvest will cost between 300-500/MBF for logging and loading.  Total cost depends on many factors and I don't want to go into the exact numbers.  It also takes a buyer that can handle 20-30 tractor trailers of sawlogs per day.  

This stand would have probably gone for 350-400 MBF when it was standing for conventional harvest.  After our ice storm which higher logging costs it would have probably been around 250/mbf.  We got 51/MBF for the total 1MMBF stumpage, which they probably took 80%.  Conventional Logging costs in this area were roughly 180-200MBF before the ice storm, and are now 225-260.  You can run the math and figure out how much a log needs to be worth to maximize return on a lump sum basis.

Mill delivered state-wide averages are available on the web, let me search for that link.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: swampwhiteoak on June 15, 2004, 09:04:33 PM
http://www.dnr.state.oh.us/forestry/Landownerasst/TPR0104.htm
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on June 16, 2004, 05:46:01 AM
Swampwhite, nice link to the prices. I was surprised to see red oak was worth more than white oak, cause around here it goes for pulp unless someone gathers it up for a small saw mill operator to mill some lumber. Its not real common here is the main reason, and they tend to be quite limby. I'm glad to see black cherry prime is fetching big bucks. Again only small quantities here and its diseased, so a small mill owner will save some out for sawing. Mostly ends up as pulp or left standing. They can get it from the NE states here for around $900-$1200/th in log form for veneer, its sometimes in the loads with oak so it gets separated out.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on June 23, 2004, 06:34:58 AM
Here  (http://www.forestnet.com/archives/March_04/contractor_profile2.htm) is a profile from the Logging and Sawmilling Journal on using the Ergo harvester and Buffalo forwarder. I know both the owner and the Forest Tech in the article. (March 2004 issue)

cheers
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on June 29, 2004, 10:32:26 AM
 I see on Paul_H's site it says his company does shovel logging. This is one method I've yet to see mentioned on this thread. Maybe someone can shed some light on the topic. From what I gather its getting really popular in the west.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 29, 2004, 04:23:35 PM
Scott,

There are several photos of "shovel logging" machines in the thread. The harvesting and skidding is performed by swing machines successively moving trees or stems from one pile to another in the direction of the skid. They are typically track machines.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on June 29, 2004, 05:32:08 PM
Its usually called hoe chucking with excavator type equipment. Then there is the super snorkler used in grapple yarding to yard up to a road landing and a mobile back spar/tower is used along the lower cut block boundary to clear the ground with the load. If your yarding down hill you usually use spar trees to anchor the line, especially on slopes over 50 %. The coutour maps were so poor or too small a scale we had to run deflection lines all over the cut block to make our own contour maps. (the last link below has a PPT presentation to explain this) We didn't want to lay out road that would have blind spots to the yarders and create deep gouges in the hillside. This is what we called the side hill gouger. On them side hills with damage you could always expect slope failures during or after the site was logged. As we layed out the logging blocks we also assessed any gullies (gully assessment procedure) for potential risk of slope failure from slash and large wody debris loads in the gully systems. Some of our blocks had to be defered from logging because of this risk.

ere's an Article on hoe chucking  (http://www.forestnet.com/archives/Dec_Jan_03/bc_coastal_logging.htm)

Article on Grapple Yarding  (http://www.forestnet.com/archives/april_00/alberta.htm)

Photo set of different Yarders  (http://www.cnr.vt.edu/visser/cable_logging/Yarders.htm)  

Here's a Power Point Presentation  (http://www.cnr.vt.edu/visser/cable_logging/How it works.ppt)  from VT.EDU to explain the cable yarding system.

Enjoy. :)



Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on June 30, 2004, 07:00:55 AM
 So it sounds like shovel logging is best suited to heavier cutting. It doesn't sound like it would work really good in select cuts or for the private woodlot owner who just wants to take a few sticks out. From what gather it's usually used on ground too wet or steep for skidders. In Canada it seems to be mostly a BC thing. How would a shovel compare to a grapple skidder for productivity?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on June 30, 2004, 06:47:17 PM
I haven't any numbers Scot on productivity but the Grapple Skidder would be more productive. We layed out ground inland from the coast up in the Nass River country in BC for grapple skidder. There where alot of natural benches in the hills to break the long slopes. SOme sites where borderline though and we always had the option of the grapple yarder. As you have read or researched, the hoe chuck system is used in the rain belt of the coast where a skidder wouldn't have a chance in all that goose goo soil and slopes. I'de like to call it something else but this being family oriented. errm ;) Walk ahead 2 steps slide back 1. :D :D You  could find info published by FERIC on productivity of these machines. UNBSJ must have some reports in their library, you could browse Ferics website for the specific reports and go search them at the library. Irving probably has a subscription as does Fraser/Nexfor to FERIC, so you might find a report through them.

FERIC website  (http://www.feric.ca/en/mempartner/reports/index.php?year=2003)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 30, 2004, 06:54:23 PM
I guess there may be differences as to what we call "shovel logging" in different parts of the country. Here, it is a cutting head on an excavator  or "shovel" type machine with an arm and turnbuckel. Usually a tracked machine that does the cutting and processing into variable lengths.

It is usually supported by a rubber tired forwarder to remove the cut products.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on June 30, 2004, 07:20:14 PM
Ron:

Sounds like a feller buncher and a separate forwarder.

We used to be menaced by the Koering Feller Forward that would cut the tree at the stump and pile it on behind whole. It would be forwarded to a landing where a flail debarker was used on the tree, limbs and all and then passed through a chipper and into a van destined to the hardwood pulpmill. What those monsters didn't cut was simply pushed over and mauled over.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bruce_A on June 30, 2004, 09:07:24 PM
Crawler, high lead, rubber tired skidder, or shovel yarding.  Done them all at least once.  No buncher involved,  there is no way anything else can keep up with a shovel on slightly sloping ground.  Some places a buncher will make you puke with the steepness of the ground it will cover.  And the operators are as  near to crazy as one person can get.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on July 01, 2004, 04:24:41 AM
Bruce_A

They use them feller bunchers up and down our hardwood hills here if they are rolling, and if they are steep pitched and bouldery, no way. I think Fraser's has used some high lead logging with spar trees around Clear water and Stanley mountains, which didn't get logged back in the 70's and early 80's conventionally. Now those ridge tops are all scalped down to the bed rock. Growing back to white birch, black spruce and fir mainly, just like after a forest fire.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on July 02, 2004, 12:50:25 PM
 Swamp Donkey, from what I've seen on the internet it seems like they use shovels a lot more than track skidders on steep slopes out there. Is this because the shovels can tackle a steeper slope or just bcause most companies already have a shovel around?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on July 02, 2004, 12:52:47 PM
Swamp Donkey, i think this is what you mean.
http://www.unb.ca/web/standint/nbcc/machine/forwarders/kff_a.html
The one at the woodsmans museum is a bit different, I believe it has a delimber and is set up for shortwood. I think i have a pic of it around somewhere.
http://www.stthomasu.ca/~pmacdona/tresearch/ffh.htm
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on July 02, 2004, 02:14:30 PM
Yup that's the beast and Valley Forest didn't use a delimber or slasher for their hardwood rape and pillage. They just unloaded the trees road side off the Koering and the debarker crammed limbs and all into it and the chipper spurt the chips into the van. I know the debarkers had to convert from gas engine to diesels. I think Valley burnt more than one engine up before the switch.

The site that Zundel has was probably a Fraser operation, they were always colaberating with UNB on studies with machines and processes. Zundel was a new professor at UNB when I graduated. Didn't care for'em too much as a professor or for chat. I think the position went to his head. He could have lightened up a bit since those days. ;)

I remember Frasers using them in hardwood to chase softwood, so alot of hardwood was wasted on crown lands, and no one was allowed to utilize it for firewood. The roadsides had thousands of cord rotting and some was burnt in fall. Everyone used to spray the white birch on the boreal sites, or if it was left after the softwood was cherry picked it died from sun scald within 3 years.

Your right about the Koering at the museum, now that I think about it. Its been 15 years since I've been there. ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawmillsi on July 10, 2004, 06:40:06 AM
whats with all the axels on the log truacks over your way??? ???

In Australia, standard log trucks have either single or double steer axels, bogie drives and tri trailor axels

simon
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: slowzuki on July 14, 2004, 12:24:59 PM
Quote
Zundel  


Zundel as in Dr. Pierre?  Did some work for him on a  horse drawn grapple skidder project.  Usually dealt with his grad student though.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on July 14, 2004, 05:40:06 PM
SwampDonkey nods  ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 15, 2004, 06:49:29 PM
Some more log hauler names noted "on the road".

"Double vision
"Hello Darling"
"I Love The Money"
"Double Trouble"
"Who's Next?"
"Money Pit"
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Cedar Eater on July 23, 2004, 09:31:43 PM
Quote
whats with all the axels on the log truacks over your way??? ???

In Australia, standard log trucks have either single or double steer axels, bogie drives and tri trailor axels

simon


I don't know which picture you're looking at, but I would guess the trucks with lots of axles travel on roads with a low peraxle weight limit. Most likely, that would be due to steep slopes or Winter and Spring road conditions. That's the case with gravel haulers, so I'm assuming it applies to logging trucks.

Cedar Eater
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 29, 2004, 10:52:12 PM
Logger's Pickup. Tailgate up.

Lee timber harvest; 7/04.
[(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/logger::s_pick_up_tail_gate_up1.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sprucebunny on July 30, 2004, 05:13:58 AM
That's one a them fancy loggers pick-ups. Round here the loggers all got oil and dents painted on the tailgate.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 30, 2004, 05:39:35 PM
Logger's Pick-up. Tailgate down.

Lee timber harvest; 7/04

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/logger::s_pick-up_tail_gate_down2.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 11, 2004, 06:02:16 PM
Timberjack 230A Turbo Forwarder. Loading pulpwood and firewood. Dean timber harvest; 7/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/timberjack_230A_j_budd.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 13, 2004, 06:25:59 PM
Loading the Wood Hauler With Sawlogs For Jeff's Mill.
Dean timber harvest; 7/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/loading_sawlogs_dean_sale.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: redpowerd on August 13, 2004, 09:25:23 PM
so those logs are goin to jeff_b?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 16, 2004, 07:52:04 PM
Tightening The Binders Before "Hitting the Road". Yes, the logs will be going to the mill where Jeff is sawyer.
Dean timber harvest; 7/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/tightening_the_binders_j_budd.jpg )


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: RMay on August 16, 2004, 08:24:50 PM
Ron what length is the logs on the truck , dose the log trucks have to have a wide load permit . ???
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Cedar Eater on August 16, 2004, 09:31:56 PM
Quote
Ron what length is the logs on the truck , dose the log trucks have to have a wide load permit . ???


I can answer that. In Michigan, the limit is 8' for not needing a wide load permit, but for logs stacked sideways, they allow 100" (8' 4"). That gives the mill a tolerance.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on August 17, 2004, 04:41:59 PM
I believe The actual width limit here is 102 inches but may be wrong.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 23, 2004, 06:37:08 PM
Leaving The Landing For The Mill. On its way to the mill with a sawlog load. The sawlogs are in 100" lengths and within the 9 foot width limit. A wide load permit is not necessary. They must be loaded properly without excess overhang.

Dean timber harvest; 7/04

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/leaving_the_landing_j_budd.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 28, 2004, 07:53:18 AM
Bucking Sugar Maple Sawlogs. Working in heavy foliage and ground cover. Can you see the "two" cutters at work? Lee timber harvest; 8/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/bucking_sugar_maple.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: beenthere on August 28, 2004, 09:00:48 AM
One on the right has an orange hard hat and the one on the left has an orange saw.  Had to brighten up the image to find them.  Looks like fun.  :)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/buckingsugarmaple.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: DanManofStihl on August 29, 2004, 05:39:05 AM
That is a problem with heavy folage it does not make that safe of a working environment but as long as your care ful I had one guy that put his saw down next to him the chain still had alittle speed and it cut this other guys boot you have to be real careful. You can never have enough orange
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 29, 2004, 06:25:54 PM
Working in Heavy Foliage. Heavy foliage makes hard work for the cutters with added safety concerns. Often, all that can be seen is their "orange" hard hats and "orange" chain saws. The hill side work here also has added risks. Lee timber harvest; 8/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/cutting_in_heavy_foliage1.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on August 30, 2004, 03:42:39 AM
I can imagine those thickets are shrubs and young hardwood. Add some balsam fir undergrowth to that and its like working in the closet with no view to the crowns of the harvest trees. A person has to take time and cut that stuff out for safety exits. I hope them trees are worth it. ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 30, 2004, 07:43:53 PM
Yes, the sugar maple sawlogs in this area are worth it, but some tough logging.

This is still in the same area where we cleared a ski slope on last winter until we were "blown out " by the constant heavy snow. Earlier photos on this tread show the ski slope harvest and winter conditions.

Hopefully we will be done in this area in another month.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on August 31, 2004, 07:30:05 AM
Yup, I've been following your posts and pictures Ron. :) Hardwood on most ski hills above 400 meters in this area are nothing but shrubby short pulpwood. Look nice from a distance and in fall colors, but that's about it. Crabbe mountain has better hardwood, but its not that high in elevation. It juts up from the fringe of the New Brunswick lowlands.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: timberjack_teen on August 31, 2004, 04:51:49 PM
I found this website a couple days ago... its very very interesting to see the different kinds of operations that are around. I was lookin through all the pages of the different kinds of methods, n i taught to myself, "i sure would like to show these guys the equipment i run and work around" well... a couple pages later i see a picture with a 690stroke delimber and a prentice 210 slasher sittin on a landin. I found it very odd considering we have both them machines... i then scroll down and sure enough there is a couple more picutres... THen i realize THAT IS OUR EQUIPMENT!!! lol... funny how that worked. We have an interesting operation. 5 brothers and me a nephew. We run a CTL operation and what we call a "full tree" operation, what involves the slasher delimber fellerbuncher n skidder. I'm the forwarder operation. I run a 1110d Jack. I run behind a 1270d(there is a picutre of it one this site a couple pages back) Any body have questions?... i'd love to answer em...

Scott
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on August 31, 2004, 05:02:22 PM
timberjack_teen, who do you work for? Maybe I know of them if they work in Michigan.  Was it one of your guys that is on here too that posted the pictures? Thats pretty interesting about finding your own equipment on here!  :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on August 31, 2004, 05:24:25 PM
Yup, that sure makes for an interesting conversation finding out your equipment is posted in a forum and not knowing it. ;)  Timberjack_teen, stick around and I'm sure someone will throw a question or two your way. Just one thing, we kinda gotta know which page in the thread to look for that equipment before we start sling'n them questions, she's a purdy long thread ya know. ;)

This thread is probably one of the most popular threads of the forum, thanks to all the find folks that contributed and posted pictures.  8)

cheers
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: timberjack_teen on August 31, 2004, 09:09:04 PM
I work for Piwarski Brothers Logging. and no it was none of them that posted the pictures on this site. The pictures are one page 31 of this thread. there is 4 pictures i believe, one of the delimber and slasher, one of the delimber, one of our 850 and one of our 1270.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 01, 2004, 04:05:51 PM
Timberjack_teen,

Piwarski Brothers Logging is well known there in Iron River and some good people. I was visiting Ski Brule Mt. and my friend Steve Polich there last winter and noted your logging operation going on there near the chalet area parking lot.
It had a good diversity of equipment in a small area so it made for some good logging equipment photos. I was never able to catch someone on site though. Were you working there then?

I'm from Iron River also. I'd like to get out on a "big job" with you some time when I'm back up that way.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 02, 2004, 07:49:28 AM
The Noon Lunch-Break. The "boss" checks in with the mill office with his cell phone while his cutter sharpens the 395 Husky's for the afternoon's work. Lee timber harvest; 8/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/noon_lunch_break.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: DanManofStihl on September 02, 2004, 06:20:32 PM
I always like to keep five or six spare chains so I do not have to sharpen them in the field I think that is a pain in the butt. Nice looking truck though f250 or f350. I have to wait for my dakota to die to get a truck like that.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 08, 2004, 08:17:52 AM
Repairs Are Needed. The harvest crew work to repair the Valmet forwarder. Its' boom doesn't work due to a worn "O ring" in the control box. A large hex wrench  is needed for the job which they don't have in their tool box. They try to improvise. Lee timber harvest; 8/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/repairs_needed_valmet_544X_forwarder.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 15, 2004, 05:20:54 PM
A Load of Quality Sawlogs. Ready for delivery to Wheelers Wolf Lake Sawmill. Lee timber harvest; 8/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/a_load_of_quality_hardwoods.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: CosmoPack on September 16, 2004, 09:52:03 AM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/pren384c.jpg )

Finally figured out how to post an image!

This is a Prentice 384 in North Carolina processing Loblolly pine - largest butts 26"
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on September 16, 2004, 02:58:53 PM
Welcome, CosmoPack!

You're a pretty quick study to get it on the first post.  :D :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: CosmoPack on September 17, 2004, 09:26:49 AM
I had to make several attempts before I figured it out!  I've got a lot of photos of logging in the south and overseas too!  I've got to scan a few of them in and add to the gallery.  
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 17, 2004, 04:16:16 PM
As always, It's great to see some other region timber harvest methods & equipment.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 19, 2004, 05:58:57 PM
A Load of Veneer Logs Heads North on the Freeway.
H-131 north; 8/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/veneer_logs_head_north.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 20, 2004, 05:35:32 PM
FabTech FT-133 Processor. Working in red pine. Deschermeir timber harvest; 8/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/fabtech_ft-133_working_red_pine.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 22, 2004, 06:07:15 PM
FabTec FT-133 Processor. Moves through the landing and decking area on to the next timber stand for processing. Deschermeir timber harvest; 8/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/fabtech_ft-133_moves_thru_landing.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on September 24, 2004, 04:05:00 PM
Here is some work a college of mine is doing near Miramichi Lake, 10 miles south of Juniper, NB. The harvesting is being done for Fraser Sawmills in Juniper, NB.  I've been helping with trail layout this week for a couple days. We are in mixedwood stands of balsam fir, red spruce, maple and birch species. The prescription is to remove the mature fir. Any softwood in the trails, except white pine are also taken. Its a challenge on some sites working with the terrain. I forgot to snap a shot of one of the rocky peeks I encountered today. 20-30 % of the volume is being harvested.

The Timber Jack 608B processor out on the yard. The crew has gone home for the weekend. Its Moose season. ;D
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/processor1.jpg )

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/processor2.jpg )

Felling head, close-up
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/processor3.jpg )

TimberJack 230A forwarder, idle on the yard. It rests against the toolshed truck to secure the tools against theft. An all too common occurance in the woods.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/forwarder.jpg )

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/forwarder2.jpg )
6 foot tall, high flotation tires.

Here's some wood, red spruce and balsam fir sawlogs.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/processed2.jpg )

Here are some views of the trail network. The orange-black striped ribbon mark the trail network. Well, I guess they're not possible to see at this scale, sorry.

Main Trail used by the processor and forwarder, leading to the yard.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/main.jpg )

Side trail: trails are running parrallel to the camp roadway. There are several camps on in the road on Miramachi Lake.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/trail.jpg )

Trails are spaced 15 meters apart. All watercourses and wet areas are flagged and buffered from machine travel.

Here's a couple views of the Miramichi Lake, autumn colors are beginning to show on the surrounding hillsides.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/miramichilake2.jpg )

Some camps on the lake
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/miramichilake1.jpg )


Its been a warm and  beautiful week to be in the bush, 75 deg today.

Cheers :)

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on September 26, 2004, 07:29:45 AM
 Ron, there was a little FT-133 that worked around here for a few years. They used it for final felling, up to 20 inch logs and almost all tree length. Also they had him working on some pretty mean hills. I posted some pictures of it awhile back when it burned.
Swamp Donkey, looks like a really nice job theyre doing there. Those haul paths look more like nature trails.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on September 26, 2004, 10:07:48 AM
There were some large spruce in there the operator couldn't get the felling head around, so had to go around them ones. :D  There were even some fir that where very close to being too big for it. At one point awhile back my college was told to take more wood. :D We are treating this area real special because of the camps on in beyond the harvesting. And them big overmature fir will stap off real easy in high winds. I seen on the leeward side of the site the snow has been mauling down the softwood regen, but them red spruce are pretty tough customers. I hate that when snow drifts and packs down on the regen.  >:(

Them trails look like nature trails in person to. ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 04, 2004, 06:23:21 PM
Fabtech FT 1-33 Processor. Harvesting aspen. Deshermeir timber harvest; 8/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/fabtech_FT-133_processor.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 07, 2004, 05:14:08 PM
Fabtech FT-133 Processor. Working in hardwoods.
Deshermeir timber harvest; 8/04

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/fabtech_FT-133_processor_in_hdwds.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 15, 2004, 05:17:55 PM
Wood Hauler "All Show". Lee timber harvest 9/04

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wood_hauler_all_show.jpg )

More Wood Hauler names noted:

"All Show"
"Finndian Outlaw"
"Out of Work"
"Bill's B Train"
"Power Stroke"
"Last Ride"
"Should Have Been Home"
"Dog Train"
"Big Guy" (Gee Jeff has a truck named after him)
"Scare Crow"
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on October 15, 2004, 06:13:41 PM
I'll know that I have finally arrived if one of the mill manufactures ever name a model "Big Guy"  :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on October 15, 2004, 06:35:35 PM
 :D :D

Jeff, where ya headed? ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: muledriver on October 16, 2004, 07:34:51 PM
I have some pics of our operation here in the U.P. Not quite sure how to get them on here. We have a valmet 544h harvester and a 5010 ltx iron mule. I would like to share them with everyone so any help gettin them on here will be appreciated. thanks
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jeff on October 16, 2004, 07:39:22 PM
Here is a couple of links for information on posting pictures.

http://www.forestryforum.com/upload.htm

http://www.forestryforum.com/posting_images_to_forum.htm
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 17, 2004, 07:43:19 AM
Good to hear from an Iron Mule user. There are a few pictures at work here. I favor them as a "low impact" and "light on the land" machine due to their small size.

It's getting harder and harder to find them and the existing ones are kept working.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 24, 2004, 06:50:49 PM
Tree Faller Prepares to Buck Sugar Maple Tree. The sugar maple tree has been fallen and limbed. It is now ready to be bucked into sawlogs. Lee timber harvest; 10/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/tree_faller_r_wheeler.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 31, 2004, 08:57:11 AM
Tree Faller Limbing Another Sugar MapleTree. The tree is on the downside of a steep hill. It will be cabled tree length up hill to the flat on top for bucking with use of a 230A Timberjack cable skidder. Lee timber harvest; 10/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/tree_faller_limbing_on_ hillside.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 04, 2004, 07:00:25 AM
Skidding Sawlogs Up Hill. The Timberjack cable skidder is backed up against some standing trees on the hill top. The standing trees will hold the skidder in place while it is used to winch the sawlog trees up the hillside. The trees will then be skidded to and bucked in the flat field on the hill top. Lee timber harvest 10/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/skidding_up_hill.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bruce_A on November 05, 2004, 03:08:46 PM
I also drop my blade and set the brake when druming in a turn.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 11, 2004, 05:36:40 PM
Valmet Forwarder & Timberjack Cable Skidder. The Valmet forwarder picks up the "cut to length" products from the tree lengths pulled to the hill top by the Timberjack cable skidder. The forwarder will carry the wood products to the landing/decking area across the field where they will be trucked to the saw and pulp mill. Lee timber harvest; 10/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/valmet_forwarder & timberjack_skidder.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: mapleveneer on November 23, 2004, 03:49:43 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/Image2opt.jpg )


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/Image4opt.jpg )


These photos are of a New England Central RR train passing the station in St. Albans VT on its way to the McNeil Station Generating plant in Burlington, VT.  A 55 Mw wood chip fired generating station.  Chips are delivered to a yard in Swanton, VT where they are loaded onto hopper cars for the trip to McNeil.  This keeps the neighbors happy without the truck traffic.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on November 23, 2004, 06:18:19 PM
I like the fact that there are still trains being used to move forest products. In my local area it was common place to have trains move wood chips, pulp and paper products. The train is no longer operating in the upper Saint John River Valley as they were removed in the 1980's because of declining business and increasing demand for trucks. At the time some serious flooding had removed older bridges, which the railway companies seized as a way out of the area. The old rail ways are now part of New Brunswick Trail system. They will only remain that way as long as the politics of the day allows it.

cheers
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: mapleveneer on November 23, 2004, 06:35:11 PM
Interesting information about the generating plant and where the wood chips come from:

http://www.burlingtonelectric.com/SpecialTopics/Mcneil.htm
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on November 24, 2004, 02:51:03 AM
I wasn't surprised to see the cost of the chips off the train were higher becasue the trucking rate is probably fixed by the trucking association in the area. Add that to the train freight cost and it's got to be 1/3 more, at least.

There is a wood fired generating plant in Fort Fairfield, Maine. It is owned and operated by a Canadian company, Boralex Inc of Quebec. Sawmills in New Brunswick close to the plant will send hog fuel and other waste residue they can't use as pulp. The source of most of this residue from New Brunswick is from crown lands and a smaller percentage from purchased private woodlot wood.

Click here  (http://www.recyclingtoday.com/articles/article.asp?Id=4280&SubCatID=29&CatID=7)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 27, 2004, 08:30:58 AM
Working Over The Timber Access Road. Final repairs and maintenance is made to the access road that needed to be build to access the timber sale area. The access road must be left in a suitable condition for future use by 2 wheel drive vehicles. Lee timber harvest 10/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/access_road_repair.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on November 28, 2004, 03:20:35 PM
nothing like getting to the job site and finding out your batt. won't work in the camera  >:( :( :'(.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on November 28, 2004, 03:35:36 PM
Ed :D Do you use rechargeables. Them regular lithiums are expensive when ya use the onscreen display often :(
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 28, 2004, 04:52:05 PM
Murphy's Law with the batteries. I now always carry extra batteries and/or a second camera since this happened to me when some photos where very important as evidence in a timber trespass and damage case.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 04, 2004, 04:32:36 PM
Final Grading of the Access Road. The cable skidder is used to make a final grading of the constructed access road prior to closure of the timber sale. The loggers leave the landowner with a good access road to the back end of his property.

The constructed access road will serve the landowner's continued land management needs and increase future timber values. Lee timber harvest; 10/04.

[(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/grading_the_access_road.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on December 16, 2004, 06:48:28 AM
 Here's a few shots from around here.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/harvester.jpg )
690E excavator converted to tree harvester.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/skidder450.jpg )
450 skidder hauling through the old field.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/landing2.jpg )
equipment at the landing
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/landing1.jpg )
truck getting ready to leave the field.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on December 19, 2004, 04:35:26 PM
Hmmm, the most recent post musta been deleted cause I received notice through email and I don't see it on here. Oh well, I missed it. ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 19, 2004, 04:46:33 PM
Forwarder & Cable Skidder. Parked at the landing waiting to be "hauled off" to the logging contractor's next job. Lee timber harvest; 9/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/forwarder_&_cable_skidder.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on December 19, 2004, 05:05:36 PM
Ron's playing hide and go seek the skidders tonight. ;)

Nice bunch of wood there. Now here's a man that puts the pictures before his words. :)

Well as they say a picture is worth a thousand of'm. ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 27, 2004, 09:27:03 AM
"All Show"  Is Ready To Move The Forwarder and Cable Skidder Off To Another Timber Harvest Job. Lee timber harvest 10/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/ready_to_be_haulled_off.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 02, 2005, 01:57:05 PM
Tree Length Skidding. This older Timberjack cable skidder is being used to pull tree lengths off a hill side timber harvest. The sawlog, pulpwood, and firewood products are then cut to length for trucking from the top and bottom of the hillside. Jakielek timber harvest 11/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/tree_length_cable_skidding.jpg )



Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 07, 2005, 04:58:04 PM
Harvesting From a Lowland Area. The Timberjack cable skidder sets up at the edge of the lowland area which is too soft for the forwarder to work in. The fallen tree lengths will be cabled out to drier ground for bucking. Sportsman's Port, LLC timber harvest; 12/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/harvesting_from_lowland.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 09, 2005, 01:20:10 PM
Harvesting From a Lowland Area. The Timberjack cable skidder pulls tree lengths from the included lowland hardwood area. The large hardwood tree tops have been removed and trees limbed by the  cutters before skidding so as to prevent any damage or skinning to the remaining trees. The trees will then be bucked into variable lengths by chainsaw on higher ground. Sportsman's Port, LLC timber harvest; 12/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/harvesting_from_lowland_2.jpg )


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on January 09, 2005, 05:48:49 PM
 Anyone out there still using a dozer for their skidding? Our land is fairly wet and I'm thinking of getting a track machine for hauling in the wetter areas. A small dozer seems like a good choice as I could could use it for skidding and making small roads. Any thoughts?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: slowzuki on January 11, 2005, 05:20:56 AM
Scott, I don't know of anyone using a dozer for logging.  A neighbour has one for roads and uses the winch to rescue other stuck equipment from the woods.

The thought of putting new undercarriage or tracks on a bulldozer scares the $$$ out of me :D  Nothing on them seems to be cheap!

You mention your land is pretty wet, do you mean swamp?  I'm just thinking little dozers don't do real well in swamp, and are harder to get out.

One of those J-5's with a tracked forwarder trailer and winch are pretty neat.  Up in north nb they drive em on the peat bogs.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: OneWithWood on January 11, 2005, 06:55:47 AM
Scott,
I use an old John Deere 450CA crawler/loader to skid with on my property.  I have a pair of log forks that replace the bucket when I need them and a nice big timber winch on the back.  There are times I wish it was a dozer with a 6way blade and the wider tracks but more times I am glad to have the versatility of the bucket or forks.  When the ground is wet I pay the cable in and out to move the logs.  Before I figured this out I buried the critter up to its belly pan when I hit a soft spot skidding up a slope.  Pulled myself out with the winch.
Parts aren't cheap but then parts aren't cheap for a skidder either.  the major drawback is the time it takes to skid a long distance.  The trade off is that the impact to the woods is far less than the big wheeled skidders.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: slowzuki on January 11, 2005, 12:33:46 PM
OWW when you say the impact is lower than a skidder, do you mena cause you're going slower and don't smash into things or are you strickly talking footprint on the ground?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: OneWithWood on January 11, 2005, 07:11:00 PM
Both.  A crawler or dozer spreads the weight accross a much wider area than a skidder so compaction of the soil is lessened.  Newer tire designs I believe have improved the soil compaction of skidders but I think they still compact more than a tracked vehicle.  Wheeled skidders came into being for speed.  That same speed can cause some serious rutting on damp soils.  I am not an authority on the subject of wheeled versus tracked vehicles but this is my understanding of the impact difference.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on January 12, 2005, 02:07:59 PM
 My family's land has some swamp on it but is most just wet and soft. Right now we have a MF 1040 tractor, its about 33 horse power. The tractor is to light for heavy pulling and its very narrow, making it tippy even on fairly tame ground. Also those skinny little 4x4 front tires slice pretty bad. Most likely we'll end up getting a larger tractor (50 to 60 HP) with wider tires on it. We've also looked at the J5's with winches and trailers. The dozer seemed like a well rounded tool for the woodlot. Travel speed isn't a big deal for us. Undercarriages are expensive but we wouldn't be running it alot so it would probably last a long time (an average dozer UC lasts 2 years around here if run daily) .  Maybe I could do some work on the side to help pay for it? Dad wants a machine that can work in tight spots and not rip things up in the woods. Right now we're still just weighing out our options.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: slowzuki on January 13, 2005, 05:17:43 AM
I think I know the MF you mean, its a compact model made by Iseki or something like that?  They do have tiny tires up front!

If you do go tractor, they make tires now called R1W's that have a wide footprint and run at low pressures.  Kubota have em on the M6800-9000's as options at most of the good dealers in NB.  New Holland have em too, I think some of the bigger dealers of other brands carry them too.

Compared to a standard tire they more than double the footprint.

I've seen some of those powered forestry trailers lately that use ground speed pto (only some tractors have this), seems this would make a nice combo in the woods.

My concern on the crawler is many older ones have narrow tracks and seem to get stuck in wet spots, but this may be only if they are trying to push dirt.
Ken
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on January 13, 2005, 08:16:24 AM
Back before my time, father sold stumpage to loggers that used crawlers. They didn't use skidders in those days. Our woodlands were all nice and flat, no side hills. And the ground had gravelly knowls and wet narrow slews where springs come out of the gravel mounds. They used to yard wood quite a long way to the fields and didn't rut the ground up. In later years they used skidders with decent tires on the woodland we owned and didn't rut the ground like what you'd think, we just worked around the wet runs. When I got old enough to cut with dad we left the woods with hardly any evidence we were there. The trails always seemed to seed in with spruce, cedar, white ash or fir. In my plantations there is more ground disruption with C&H plough than any skidder we used cutting wood.

cheers
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on January 13, 2005, 12:58:47 PM
 Slowzuki, yeah the tractor is made by some weird Japanese company, it doesn't run nearly as smooth as the larger Perkins powered Masseys. If we went the tractor route we'd be using the wider flat profile tires that you were talking about, we also thought of using those industrial tires. We would put a farmi winch on the tractor and not a trailer. The trailers are a bit pricey for us and also they probably wouldn't work really well on our land. Those powered trailers are pretty cool though. I'd like to get a machine that can be used to for more than just logging. We could use the tractor for plowing snow, bush hogging, yard work and launching the boat in the river. A dozer could be used for road building, stumping and other such work. A J5 is really handy for getting way back in the woods especially if your taking some cargo. I'm not sure whered youd get parts for those old rigs though. We have a mixed woodlot with mixed terrian. Some of it is fairly solid and flat. There are some decent hills and there are some real wet areas. The timber consists mostly of old growth spruce. there's also birch and maple and a fair bit of cedar.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: JN68 on January 13, 2005, 05:16:28 PM
Hi Scott; i use a 70 hp 4x4 massey/ 8800lbs winch,405 patu log loder with home made power trailer( older masseys have ground speed match up too a two speed rearend 10-20 tires) no trans and pto running at a fast speed.I have a 420 case dozer ,used it some for yarding ::)all i can say is slow,rufffffff rideand watch out for wood in the tracks( they like too come off ).Hall's has a nice IH winch,chains roll bars for the woods.Oh about that cedar?? ;Dhow much? JN
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: slowzuki on January 14, 2005, 08:37:00 AM
If you go tractor, I've had great luck driving through swamps on our property in the colder months, they freeze up ok and with snow packed down they bridge the wet holes ok too.

I wouldn't get the regular industrials, they don't work well in mud.  Michillen makes a wide style radial industrial carcas with the R1W tread on it.  This gives the deeper lugs and sharper V.  
http://www.michelinag.com/agx/en-US/products/product_detail_pages/XM27UI.jsp

There was a Kubota M4900 (45 hp) 4x4 tractor for sale in Moncton with a winch and dozer blade on it, FOPS on tops and full skid plating recently.  I'll try to dig up a link.

Quote
 we also thought of using those industrial tires. We would put a farmi winch on the tractor and not a trailer.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on January 15, 2005, 06:35:46 AM
 I've seen the tractors that you guys mentioned. I'd probably want to set the tractor up a lot like that, except i wouldn't want that little skidder blade. I'd want a decent loader on it instead, theyre just too handy not to have one. JN, if ya like I can show you around the woodlot, your proabably only a 10 minute drive from here.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on January 15, 2005, 06:46:33 AM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/IHtractor.jpg )
JN, is this the machine you were talking about?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: buck5611 on January 15, 2005, 08:28:54 AM
Check this link:   http://www.payeur.com/
look for "The Forester" A medium 4WD Kioti tractor especially rigged for forestry work. they sell a lot of it and they are very reliable tractor. Carol
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 15, 2005, 12:45:23 PM
Sawyer Cuts Variable Lengths The tree lengths skidded from the lowland area are bucked into product lengths on high ground to prevent excessive rutting in the lowland. They will then be forwarded to the landing for trucking. Sportsman's Port, LLC timber harvest; 12/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/sawyer_cutting_variable_ lengths.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on January 15, 2005, 04:11:32 PM
 The problem we have with smaller tractors is that they don't have enough weight for skidding some of the large trees on our land. The Forester tractor is a really good setup, i got to look at one a couple years ago at the forestry show. Do they come any bigger then the one they show?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: JN68 on January 15, 2005, 07:59:12 PM
HI SCOTT; yes that is the one, not a bad setup other then it being a  IH they don't like the cold. The massey that i use has the rear tires loaded chains on all four, we have steep hills and then your in the wet ground.We haul five trees (soft wood) most of the time. No problems, i don't like to make too much of a mess thier needs too be a future? Like to take you up on the tour someday always wanting to learn.  ;D JN
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: buck5611 on January 15, 2005, 08:12:26 PM
Yes you can have a bigger one rigged like the forester.Carol
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawguy21 on January 15, 2005, 10:21:38 PM
I have been glued to this thread for over two hours and have learned a lot. Really enjoyed the heli pics as I was involved in it for five years. Hanks Truck Pictures has a lot of terrific logging truck shots. Swamp Donkey and Paul will feel right at home.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on January 16, 2005, 07:06:27 AM
 Hanks is a great page, there's some good shot from up on the oilfields. Check out the Ron Grieve collection.
 I'd like to get a New Holland TN 65 or 75 and put one of those forester packages on it.
 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on January 16, 2005, 06:20:25 PM
 Tractor finally came in, we traded a 33 hp MF for a 5860 Landini.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/5860 landini.jpg )

Here the whole package.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/TSI 1.jpg )

I'm hoping this tractor will be heavy enough to handle 1/2 cord of wood. The massy was a great upgrade from a 350 big bear 4x4. But just didn't have the weight to move wood.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 16, 2005, 07:48:00 PM
The 230A Timberjack Forwarder. The variable lengths are picked up on high ground and forwarded to the landing and decking area. Sportsman's Port, LLC timber harvest; 12/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/timberjack_forwarder_sportsmans port.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on January 17, 2005, 04:37:10 AM
I was wondering how a system of manual felling and bucking along with a 230A forwarder wood work. If ya have the operator/owner of the machine participate in the bucking process, I think you could put up quite  a bit of wood in a day. The quality of the wood would be higher than if machine cut I would think, no pull-out and such. Problem might be when the owner/operator gets too comfy in that seat. Both fallers would have to have good experience with directional felling. Too often I see in the woods are guys that let'r fall where ever. That doesn't matter much when clearcutting, but with reagards to improving the woodlot one has to use directional felling. If the odd tree got hung the forwarder could be called in to give the butt a quick jerk. Any soft ground could be buffered from the harvest with ribbons, which possibly may be part of wetlands anyway. Buffers on wetlands here start at their outter edges, not measured from stream-side.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on January 17, 2005, 05:23:41 AM
 I've been told that a manual chopper and a forwarder, will have all the work they could possibby do. This is why I upgraded to the equipment shown above. Last week with the addition of this equipment, I signed a contract for a thinning & logging job that will keep it busy for the next 2 yrs. A lot of the thinning I do, the land owner is looking for minimal signs of equipment. With a 230 forwarder, you could work both sides of the low impact idea. Manual cutting or work behind a processor. Work either way you look at it.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Frickman on January 17, 2005, 07:33:43 AM
Swampdonkey,

As to your question, it depends on the terrain. Most of the ground I work on in the mountains I do like the loggers Ron Scott showed did, I skid the logs out to an in-woods landing and then forward them to the roadside. It would be nice to take the forwarder to the stump, as you suggested, but it is pretty near impossible for me to do. Of course, their are places in the upper-midwest where this is a common practice.

When skidding the logs to my in-woods landing I rarely pull them tree length. Most logs are cut apart into mill-ready lengths right at the stump, and only short, sixteen foot maximum, logs are skidded. This gives me the advantages that a forwarder has in that I'm not causing alot of damage to residual trees. The logs are going to be cut-to-length anyway, so I might as well do it at the stump.

I don't need a large area for an in-woods landing either. Any wide spot along a woods road that will hold a thousand or so board feet will do.

By using the skidder and forwarder together, and adapting to the terrain at hand, I can harvest timber efficiently and still keep the foresters happy.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on January 17, 2005, 08:57:36 AM
 Nice tractor Ed! We have an older version of your MF that you traded and we're having the same problem with it (not enough weight) I think i'm going to have to look at the Landinis before i do any buying  :). your tractor is pretty much exactly what my dad and I are looking for.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on January 17, 2005, 10:53:42 AM
Frickman:

I could see the advantages of the skidder in that situation and I like the idea of bucking to length in the bush to reduce damage. I'm just on the edge of the Appalachian range here and the land is farely flat for logging, but rolling. I've seen some folks try to fight the terrain and skid long length and bulldoze skid trails all over the side hills. What an erosion mess they make. The ground is either gravelly or shaly, at any rate, makes a real mess. They should either avoid using that method on that ground or find an alternative. The environment doesn't seem to make waves over it, which is surprising since that silts up the streams below in a heavy rain. ::) Sometimes we don't have the luxury of picking and choosing our job sites I guess, especially with high equipment lease payments. Oh, if everything was perfect. ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Frickman on January 17, 2005, 03:39:41 PM
Swampdonkey,

You mentioned high-lease payments. My method of logging will not work profitably if you have high payments. It does work real well if you care about the land however. The way I log is alot slower than tree-length logging for several reasons. I care about what I'm doing, and take my time doing it. I'm obviously pulling out less footage per trip than a large skidder dragging tree length. And I'm moving alot of work that I'd be doing at the landing or mill back to the stump. This saves some time down the line though, especially at clean-up time. I leave most of the loose bark, sawdust, knots, end trims, etc. back in the woods where they belong, instead of hauling them to the landing or mill yard. It helps keep the landing and mill yard neat and tidy.

The one thing that I've learned over the years about logging is you have to be adaptable. Just as one prescription for harvest will not work on every tract you mark, one certain method of logging will not be feasible on every job I work. All my equipment is paid for, so it works for me, I don't work for it. Since I don't have a loan payment bearing down on me every month I'm able to do things a little different than some other outfits.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on January 17, 2005, 04:18:10 PM
Frickman,

I think that is great that you own your equipment and have no lease payments to worry about. I'm sure there are plenty of other worries, like with any business. You can certainly see that not everyone has the luxury of a large bank roll to purchase their harvest equipment. Alot of the guys working on private buy big equipment to work on public forest land as their main source of employment. On public forest land you have supervisors who stand over ya and harp on production, but also want what's best for the land. Sometimes hard to find that balance.  Some guys end up, part time, hiring out to contractors on private so they tend to bring some old habits along. But, also it comes back to the high cost of equipment which they can't afford to have sit idle. As another senario to the side hills, add some boulder fields and rock outcroppings to the harvest area and I think even you would be left thinking, 'what am I doing here'. Dang glaciers eh?

cheers ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 17, 2005, 05:56:42 PM
The Forwarder Leaves the Landing After Delivering and Decking a Load of Sawlogs. Only a small landing is needed for the variable length (short wood) logging method. The product lengths are cut at the stump as stated above.
Sportsman's Port, LLC selective timber harvest; 12/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/fowarder_leaves_landing.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on January 18, 2005, 04:13:29 AM
This method works especially well if you don't have to turn a tractor trailor on the yard, but it means more road building is involved if you need a road to loop around. Works fine with straight trucks. I know one guy in our area who uses a skidder converted as a forwarder and a tracked Dion forwarder he uses to cut to length at the stump and forward to a small landing. His problem is that his equipment is old and spends alot of time fixing it. It's not a high production operation, but he's always busy.

Converted C4 Forwarder

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/convforwarder.jpg )
C-4 Tree Farmer skidder and mounted  Patu log loader on the rear frame with hitched Patu tandem log trailer. Makes for an efficient, low-cost forwarder that is well suited for sites that are not too steep.

Dion Forwarder

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/dionforwarder.jpg )
F-4 Dion tracked short wood forwarder loading 100 inch pulpwood ona  straight truck. It has a low centre of gravity and can work on steeper slopes than most forwarders.

The machine comes with a fully enclosed cab for winter operation, with windows for good visibility. The forwarder uses a hydraulically-powered stick steering system. The hydraulics also control the stabilizers that make contact with the ground to keep the forwarder steady while the operator loads logs, as well as the boom. Everything else is mechanically driven through the transmission and differentials.

The forwarder has facing seats, so that after being driven in one direction, the operator can simply change seats and drive it back in the opposite direction. Although it has a five-speed transmission, He operates the forwarder primarily in third gear, slowing down in particularly muddy or rocky areas to avoid both ground and track damage.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 19, 2005, 04:56:18 PM
A Happy Landowner. The landowner watches as a load of grade hardwood sawlogs leaves the landing enroute to the mill that purchased her timber. Sportsman's Port, LLC timber harvest; 12/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/happy_landowner_marylou.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: isawlogs on January 21, 2005, 11:26:30 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/mcwestern1n.jpg )

This is where I worked in 2001 , hauling off road to the Tembec mill yard in Tee lake Témiscamingue Québec....A load of spruce for pulp mill The saw logs will be cut out at the mill yard with a slasher

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/mc275barkon.jpg )

275 B Barko loading us at Two Rivers , Témiscamingue Québec... White pine , again will be cut to logs at the yard

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/mc2rivieren.jpg )
 
 Heading down to the yard with a load of pine ... It was all off road hauling , two meter radio system ... about 140 kilometers of off road driving to get to the yard in Tee Lake ...




Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on January 22, 2005, 03:50:20 AM
isawlogs,

Lotsa snow eh? :) I see they plow the roads like here, when you meet another truck one of ya have to turn out in the snow bank. They have wide roads, but plow narrow. I never invested in a radio so I stay off them roads in winter. I see those are some nice white pine logs. Looks like your picking them from hardwood or mixed stands. Sure is a long trek to the mill.  :o
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: isawlogs on January 22, 2005, 07:22:16 AM
Swomp..   I got myself a scanner ....

When you met a truck if it was loaded .. you took the snowbank , it was kinda hard to stop these once they got rolling ... priority was to the loaded truck at all times ... Next on the priority list was the empty truck coming back up then the sanders .... anything else on the road was low in the priority list  ;D ;)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/mcgrader1.jpg )

The grader that was used to open the roads ... he is on a mission , going to try and pull and push a truck up a hill ...


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/mc644G1.jpg )

644G John Deer loader with log clamp , he's getting the dozer blade and turning around to come and push the truck up the hill

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/mcpush2riviere1.jpg )

All together ... Sander spreading sand , grader pulling and loader pushing , made it up on second try ....
We had lots of fun .... Had to put the chains on the truck ....
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Buzz-sawyer on January 22, 2005, 07:27:36 AM
Nice pics, sounds like a day of fun and games!
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Kevin on January 22, 2005, 12:12:42 PM
Isaw are they not using chains on those truck tires?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: isawlogs on January 22, 2005, 12:34:55 PM
  We never put the chaines on ... only if we did not make the climb the first time .. then we would try being pushed by the loader ... if that didn't work we would put the chains and deep lock up , and try her again ... in this case we had to get more help thats why the grader was called in and the sander ....
If it snowed I would put the chains on .... other then that there was so much wheight on the drives to get you going anywhere if it was not at the botom  of a hole like this ....
We where hauling 60,000 kilos to 75,000 kilos net ... there was weight on the tires only needed a little sand
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on January 22, 2005, 01:18:56 PM
WOW  :o 45,000 kilos isn't even allowed here on the highways. I can't imagine hauling that on off-road and rough roads.

Do you folks use BWS trailors? They make'm here in town, and most around here use'm for logging. I know they use'm in Ontario and Quebec in some places.

http://www.bwstrailers.com/logger.php
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: isawlogs on January 22, 2005, 01:45:00 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/mctemis.jpg )

Most used these Témisko trailers they are built at Notre Dame du Nord . Témiscamingue Qué.
We had one truck that had three axle drive I'll get some pictures of ti later on and post them .. it had the extend a bunk on his trailer ... I beleive that it would extend 20" it would make a big difference in the center of gravety ....
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on January 22, 2005, 02:22:21 PM
isawlogs,

Looks like a nice heavy duty trailor.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: isawlogs on January 22, 2005, 02:35:51 PM
 Swamp....
they had to be .. not that I want to put them in a better quality , it just happened that they where built not far from where we worked ...
Some of the trucks would be hauling at over 100,000 kilos crosse ,  
we had little loads on at 60,000kilo net .... Most of it being placed on the front of the trailer so that the weight would be on the drives ....
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on January 22, 2005, 02:47:02 PM
I'm stay'n outta those woods in winter. ;) :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: isawlogs on January 22, 2005, 03:05:59 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/mcsableuse.jpg )

international paystar with heated sander , exhaust would go through the box of the sander , it being double walled and keep the sand from freezing .... most of the time ....
We had three of these on the road at all times , one would be at the main camp at Tee Lake for a back-up...
This one had a 400 cummins with 15 speed fuller , it had full lock on rear end ...
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 22, 2005, 03:29:31 PM
A Load of Sawlogs Is On Its Way To The Mill. The trip will take approximately 2 hours. The trucker will then make a return trip for another load. Sportsman's Port LLC timber harvest; 12/04.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/sawlogs_leave_for_mill.jpg )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: WV_hillbilly on January 22, 2005, 06:29:19 PM
 Marcel
   those pictures of your 's show some extreme  log hauling .  It looks like it was a chore just to keep the roads passable . I have to agree with Swampdonkey  on stayin away from those woods . I thought we had  some problems dealing with coal haulers on our roads  .  Do I understand  that these roads where for the logging activities only .

Ron  
That looks like a pretty heavy load of sawlogs on that truck also .  How many Bd/Ft can they haul in a load like that ?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: isawlogs on January 22, 2005, 09:48:47 PM
 It was for hauling only .... had signs up at the begining of road and every 10 kilo.  ... but people dont know how to read  wether it be french or english or chinese for that matter . Made for some hair rising times at times ...
It was not that hard to keep the road open the trucks would do it most of the time , at the speed we traveled the trailers would sweep the roads , only during major storms that the grader would be called to grade the road , or when there would be to much ice build up. the sanders wher out 24 hrs , two 12 hr shifts... We had 18 trucks and would haul 24 hrs ...
I'll put more pic on when I dig them up ....
Forgot to metion that we had 10 pickets on the trailers , the 8' where to short ...
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 23, 2005, 05:58:57 AM
10-12 MBF on our loads or about 50 tons.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Norm on January 23, 2005, 06:21:56 AM
I really enjoy this thread it's one I always check. Thanks Ron for all the great pictures. :)

Marcel what kinds of logs were you guys hauling?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 23, 2005, 07:34:15 AM
Thanks Norm. The Thread seems to get a lot of interest. I enjoy the posts and photos of others here also. Marcel is now showing some of the hard work and effort that goes into winter logging and trucking.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: isawlogs on January 23, 2005, 08:32:30 PM
  Norm ...
  Depending on which sector we were in . We had a login radius of give or take 175 kilometers from the log yard which was at Tee Lake , small logging town 20 kilometers from Témiscamingue in Québec .
We would haule pine , spruce and balsam , poplar , and mixed hard wood .
The pine was tree lenght so was the pulp , but the hard wood would of been cut by slasher in the bush , had 2 slashers going at it 24 hours .
I'll go back on the photos that I put on and write down what type of wood was being drawn out ...
 I worked for this logging  outfit for 5 winters , it was at the time one of the largest privatly owned and operated logging companie in the province .
  We had during the peak winter months over 175 people on the payroll . Went from goffer , cooks, kitchen helper , mecanics , want to be mecanics , operaters, dozer, shovel ,skidder,back hoe, front loader, slasher , log loaders ,maintenance crew, welder , grader operator , truck drivers , and then all the office folks ... we had 2 foresters on and all the crew for the marking and blazing of the roads and trees to be cut down ...
All this in three different camps that where spreads out the logging terrotory...
all the camps had sleeping quarters , full kitchen dinning area
One camp we had for the trucks to have a home base and had the garage
The other two where ... one for the cutting crew , the other was for the road maintenance crew ... Sanders grader loaders the shovels once the cutters where done in one sector we would move into there camp and they would take ours ....
 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 25, 2005, 06:04:17 PM
Some more wood hauler names noted on the road.

"Blackfoot"
"Tree Hugger"
"Red Hot And Rolling"
"Doc"
"Big Woody"
"Waxy"
"Scooby Duty"
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: 1953greg on January 25, 2005, 09:31:57 PM
i use a f-250 pu and 16' utility trailer w/ front mounted 4 ton winch. i fabricated a quad pod that attaches to rear of trailer that supports a pully bout 5' above trailer floor. i back trailer to big end of log, run cable through pully and attach to log bout 1' from near end then detach truck and begin winching. trailer will rear up til tail hits ground then log and trailer will come together then log wil raise onto trailer. then remove quad pod and reattach cable to log couple times to bring log farther onto trailer. as log is winched/loaded trailer will come down slowly. better have trailer chucked!  works really easy, kinda like a rollback wrecker.  i can haul up to a single 36" 17' log. thats about 5000lbs and thats all i need.  not much for production but for a hobbist/weekend warrior its great.  small potatoes compared to you guys.  1953greg  
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: isawlogs on January 26, 2005, 12:14:18 AM
1953greg
 Its not the amount of potatoes thats in the plate that counts .... trust me I would of being a lot less stressed out hauling your load .... ;)  And having a lot more fun ...
 Its what you get to do with whats in the plate ....
Feel free to put some pictures on , we love to see what others do ....
Oh and by the way welcome aboard , it is the first time I see you here ...
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on January 30, 2005, 03:42:10 PM
I have a question for Ron S and those up in the area. I ahve been seeing alot of posts in here of thinning red pine. I was wondering if the natural red pine stands are growing in soil that tend to be reddish (iron rich). In New Brunswick the natural red pine grows on iron rich podzols. Of course we have red pine planted on darker soils of farmlands but I'm not counting those sites. I'm just curious.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 30, 2005, 05:43:34 PM
Swamp,

Much of our red pine here is on a well drained sandy soil. a lot of it is rubicon sand which is quite a sterile sand. If you have ever read the book, "The Lands That Nobody Wanted" that's where a lot of our red pine was planted, especially during the CCC era. Much of this is on National Forest and State Forest system lands.

There is also a lot growing on abandoned farm lands  which may be a darker sandy loam or loam soil.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on January 30, 2005, 06:27:55 PM
These soils are sandy clay loams with a clay dominated C (compact) horizon. They tend to be real snotty in the rainy season. The soil on the farm here is more sand dominated sandy-clay loam and dries fast after a heavy rain.Our sandy soils are dominated by jackpine-black spruce boreal-like forests.

As I said earlier I was most curious. I find it curious as to why our red pine prefer those soils over the more fertile humo-ferric or brunisols in our area. Well I have the answer, partially, those richer soils where dominated by hardwood which are more shade tolerant and longer lived than red pine. I never seen a red pine in a hardwood stand. ;)

BTW, I never heard of that book. Sounds interesting if not just for its historical content.

What is the CCC era? clear-cut carve and concrete? Remember I'm just a pour old northern hick not that well versed in the local abbreviations. :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Minnesota_boy on January 30, 2005, 07:37:21 PM
Red pine will tolerate a lot of different soils, from sand to clay to mostly rock, but they do like sunshine.  We planted a few seedlings in our grove.  The ones on the south side against a field are 20+ feet tall, but one that was planted the same day but near some aspen that partially shaded it is only about 4 feet tall.  Same soil type.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: BW_Williams on January 31, 2005, 12:18:17 AM
Just trying to post a pic, load of English Walnut I got the other day.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on January 31, 2005, 07:45:02 AM
Minnesota Boy:

I've also noticed red pine growing on rock cut faces along highways. You'd wonder how a tree can grow from solid rock. I suppose there is soil washed down into crevasses and the rock would be impermiable to water so it would hold there as well.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: slowzuki on January 31, 2005, 04:32:55 PM
Have few pictures of a harvest taking place on my old stomping grounds growing up.  The land was sold by all the local farmers to Crabbe Lumber who is contracting the harvesting to RA Pheeny Logging and Trucking Company.

The harvesters are mounted on 2 escavators and a pair of huge JD grapple skidders are dragging all the bunches back.  A cable skidder crew is working the area next to the stream as it is too steep.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: slowzuki on January 31, 2005, 04:34:09 PM
The hill they are working the cable skidder on and the dozer for road repair.  The skidder sits outside the stream buffer area and drags cut trees out of the buffer area to the skid road.  The clearcut part is about 1000 acres or so now and growing.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on January 31, 2005, 04:48:13 PM
Slowzuki,
Was just wondering if you see Gary Goodwin or Marc Blanchard superviing the job. I don't know if they travel that far south. Just curious. I worked with Marc a few years before he went to Crabbe Lumber.

cheers
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Frickman on January 31, 2005, 07:24:55 PM
SwampDonkey,

CCC stood for Civilian Conservation Corps. It was a "make-work" program run by the government here in the states to put out-of-work men to work during the Depression. They lived in camps and planted trees, built roads and campgrounds, and other did other things to improve government land holdings.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: slowzuki on February 01, 2005, 08:37:04 AM
I have not met either but Marc Blanchard has a connection.  Our property has a Crown Reserve Road beside it.  The reserve was trimmed from our property back in the day but has alway remained with our land.  Our fields extend onto it and there is a 200 year old fence on the far side of it.

As a note for others, a Crown Reserve Road is a 66ft wide right of way owned by the Crown / Goverment for potential development.  People can apply to develop it but it is public land and can't be gated.

Crabbe built a road next to the reserve so they could gate it.  The problem is they hit a swamp and needed to divert onto what was part of our property at least on paper.  Marc came to visit our friend who owned the land at the time said sure but he didn't think he owned back that far.  A trip to the registry office showed he had been paying tax on it since 1946 when he bought the front parcel.  St. Anne Nackawic came to visit him and did a boundary adjustment.  He agreed they could have the land back if the taxes where paid back.  Well the lawyer came and they got the land back, but he never got his taxes back.  We bought the front part of the land after that and he passed away this spring.

So now St Anne is in bankruptcy, he never got his taxes back, we don't have as much land as what was described to us when we bought it and that is it!

I'm thinking about tracking down the history on it to see who really should have title to it.

Slowzuki,
Was just wondering if you see Gary Goodwin or Marc Blanchard superviing the job. I don't know if they travel that far south. Just curious. I worked with Marc a few years before he went to Crabbe Lumber.

cheers
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on February 01, 2005, 10:46:59 AM
Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC)

http://www.cccalumni.org/history1.html
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: racer9 on February 01, 2005, 02:56:03 PM
A couple of log hauler names around here,
"unchained"
"termite"
"toad"
"grumpy" ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: tnlogger on February 02, 2005, 02:48:13 PM
well lets see if this works  :D this is the HD6E we've used for years. this thing will go places a billy would be scared to  gene
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on February 16, 2005, 06:40:11 PM

An Icy Day In The Woods The logger's pick-up towing the Iron Mule forwarder on its flat bed trailer spins out during a "freezing rain" on an icy hill top on the way to start a new timber harvest.

The entire unit slides backwards down the hill off the road and is luckily caught and held up by some trees to prevent rolling over in the swamp area below.

A "large wrecker" was called to winch the unit back on the road for delivery to the landing. An exciting and new experience for a new logger just starting out in the "life of a logger".
 
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/iron_mule_off_road.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on February 17, 2005, 09:35:33 PM
I finally got some batt. for the camera, here are a few picts of our current job. This is some of the 30mbf of hardwood, we have a few sticks of veneer.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10257/black%20birch%20%26%20hard%20%26%20soft%20maple%201.jpg)

 This is some nice whitepine.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10257/%231%20%26%20%232%20white%20pine%201.jpg)

 This on is a 17ft whitepine we had a time with getting up the hill, ground is still froze, and it was a winch in and unreel and winch again, and it was one of the farthest tree down.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10257/x27in%201.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on February 17, 2005, 10:09:03 PM
 This is starting to get easier putting in picts.
 Here we are starting up with a hitch.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10257/bottom%20of%20the%20hill%201.jpg)

This is the last hill to the top, it a 40 deg slope.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10257/last%20hill%20to%20top%201.JPG)

 This is Marty J s husband cutting a nice whitepine, he's getting his workout.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10257/Chopper%20get%20a%20workout%201.jpg)

 This is the noisy beast we're pulling in the wood with 453 detroit             (2 mufflers) earmuffs are required.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10257/taylor%20skidder%201%7E0.jpg)

 This is our model 30 MF with loader,forks and grapple, to sort and stack.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10257/graple%20loader%201%7E0.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sprucebunny on February 18, 2005, 08:58:00 PM
They are cutting some large trees along the road north of North Conway , NH for a bigger road and intersection. They had a whole tree chipper there as well as straight trucks removing saw logs. Took a picture of the shear.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11412/jmlargeshearOP.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: isawlogs on February 20, 2005, 08:12:24 PM
 Got a few more pictures of the log hauling that was done up in Témiscamingue , Québec .
 Barko 275B loader , Spruce and balsam for pulp  and sawlogs . The logs will be taken out at the yard with a slasher . These trees where taken down to make way for new road .

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10487/mcbarko275B.jpg)

Western Star tri-axle with a load of popler logs and tree lenght

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10487/mcWesternstar3axle.jpg)

Western Star , with a load of white birch and maple , the saw logs will be taken out at the yard these tree where cut to make way for a new hauling road .

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10487/mcWesternstar.jpg)



Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on February 21, 2005, 07:13:37 AM
Hey Ron, I bet that was fun on the ice. ;)


Ohio Bill, you can scale your images to 400 pixels wide and compress the image to get under 20 k. That's the nice thing about jpeg format. ;) I think DougInUtah had a link to a nice image processing program for free. Then there is also www.xat.com

Doug's Link  (http://www.picasa.com/)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: timberjack_teen on February 22, 2005, 12:49:29 AM
hey ron where are you based out of??? i would love to get you out on one of our operations this summer.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on February 22, 2005, 07:56:45 PM
Timberjack_teen

I'm based in northwestern Lower Michigan and do travel across the UP some and elsewhere.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: spencerhenry on February 25, 2005, 09:56:54 PM
ohio bill, only 500 made! i saw one on ebay a few months back, only 900 hrs on it, but the winch was gone. is also one a mile west of crawford colorado, he also has a 220 both are parts machines i believe. i have a massey ferguson 220, my first skidder. old and abused, but just keeps going. for the small selective cuts that i do it is an awsome machine.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 06, 2005, 10:37:29 AM
Iron Mule Forwarder Enters the Landing. Treais timber harvest; 2/05

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/iron_mule_treais_sale.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 06, 2005, 01:02:38 PM
Iron Mule Forwards Hardwood Sawlogs. Treais timber harvest; 2/05

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/iron_mule2_treais_sale.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sprucebunny on March 10, 2005, 10:28:41 PM
I ran into this very interesting harvester when hunting for something...
Claims it can go over 5' high obstructions and work on side hill

http://www.voelkerequipment.com/a91pics.html
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Mike_P. on March 11, 2005, 08:51:37 AM
Joan:

That is an interesting machine.  It appears to change wheel positioning or stance, based on the work that it is doing.  It either involves a challenge for the operator or the unit's electronics, or both.

Thanks,

Mike
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Dom on March 11, 2005, 04:56:37 PM
That is an interesting machine. Rottne has a harverster that will rise and lower. I beleive one of the reason which they make it so you change the ride is so that you can lower the center of gravity while harversting, and rise the machine when traveling on rough terrain. Its the Rottne 5005. There are a few videos on this site: http://www.rottne.com/uk/Movies/movie.htm.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 14, 2005, 06:37:14 PM
Two Iron Mule Forwarders At Work. Two Iron Mule forwarders are being used on this timber harvest. Treais Timber harvest; 2/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/iron_mules_two_decking_at_landing.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 17, 2005, 05:42:23 PM
Iron Mule Forwarder Works Aspen Area; Treais timber harvest; 3/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/iron_mule_forwarder_works_aspen.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 19, 2005, 12:40:11 PM
Iron Mule At the Aspen Landing/Decking Area. The logger's pick-up with snowplow is used to keep the access roads open. Treais timber harvest; 3/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/iron_mule_at_nw_landing.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 28, 2005, 02:42:13 PM
Western Star Log Hauler. Hardwood sawlogs are being loaded for trucking to the purchaser's mill some distance away. Treais timber harvest; 2/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/western_star_log_hauler.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: slowzuki on March 29, 2005, 08:50:09 AM
Figured I'd post a pic of the logging winch we are using.  It is an old school Farmi with no butt plate and a self releasing snatch block worth its hefty weight in gold.

The owner has a Ford 7610 2wd with cab he uses it on which has a front mount snowblower that extends to the rear through the winch legs.

We are using it on a 4wd, 50 hp Kubota.  It does well but not quite enough weight for my taste.  It will pull 2 50-60ft, 16" diameter butt trees from the tops with tractor and trees in snow.  3 if on the flat or going a bit downhill.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10897/DSC08238.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 01, 2005, 08:07:50 PM
Kenworth Pulpwood Hauler. Hardwood pulpwood is being loaded for trucking to a pulp mill some distance away; Treais timber harvest; 2/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/kenworth_pulpwood_hauler.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Minnesota_boy on April 01, 2005, 08:46:51 PM
You have too many wheels on that log truck.  In Minnesota you rarely see more than 2 sets of duals on the back of the trailer.  Of course, the loads are smaller too, but that has to do with the upper limit of the license allowed here.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 02, 2005, 12:13:26 AM
Not here in Michigan. They are even considering allowing longer lengths.  :( There's a "pup trailer" in the rear.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Furby on April 02, 2005, 12:27:01 AM
How long are they looking to go?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on April 02, 2005, 06:02:22 AM
They have 3 to 4 axels on trailors here and haul 32 to 46 tonne (that's a metric tonne which is 10 % larger than a short ton). This time of year we have 80 % restrictions on secondary roads.

Most folks are using these trailors

http://www.bwstrailers.com/logger.php
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: thecfarm on April 02, 2005, 07:03:50 AM
Maine is the same with their trailers.Our pup trailers are alot shorter,when we do see them.There are some good size trailers up north on the paper companies roads,but I don't see big loads on state or towns roads down at my neck of the woods.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 02, 2005, 01:54:20 PM
Approximately 120 miles trucking to the pulpmill in Muskegon, MI
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gary_C on April 02, 2005, 06:25:00 PM
I think in Michigan they will allow weights up to 140,000 lbs if you have enough axles.  In Minnesota you are allowed 80,000 max with 5% over for forest products. In the winter you are allowed 10% over when the roads are frozen or 88,000 plus the 5% tolerance.  Last year in Minnesota they started allowing trucks with 6 axles to be licensed for 90,000 but not many have added a third axle on their trailers.

You have to be very careful with that 5% tolerance because if you exceed the tolerance by any amount, the overweight goes back to the max weight allowed. Since many of the pulp mills are now weight scaling, the DOT can and will go to the mills and check all weight tickets back 30 days and send you a ticket for any loads that are overweight. So just because you are not stopped with a heavy load, it does not mean that you got away with an overload.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 02, 2005, 07:13:49 PM
Multi-axel trucks can be used in Michigan only; maybe in Ohio by special permit.

The pulpwood hauler pictured above will have a gross weight including truck weight of 154,000 - 157,000 lbs carrying a payload of 22 - 25 cords under good road conditions.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: loghlr16 on April 02, 2005, 08:00:14 PM
In Michigan we use the federal weight limit which is 160,001 lbs.  But you can only get it with 11 axles and 1 having a 9' spread.  It's all in the axle spreads to get the weight.  My truck weighs 55,000 empty w/ the pup legal for 154,000. They are talking about extending the legal lengths for "gravel trains" and construction trucks on nondesignated routes.  Log truck are already allowed to be 9' wide and up to 70' long loaded.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Furby on April 02, 2005, 09:31:47 PM
I spoke with a hauler here last fall that said he does 160,000#.
I don't recall how many axels he had though.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: babylogger on April 04, 2005, 01:34:43 AM
hey ed k that looks like the skidder i drive (when im able to) lol great pictures everyone!!! and also whoever posted the first pictures on this thread...id give anything to drive that machine!!!
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 11, 2005, 08:51:39 PM
More Wood Hauler Names Noted:

"Timber Taz"
"Doc"
"I Love The Money"
"Fast Forward II"
"Big Boz"
"Chapter II"
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 18, 2005, 08:26:24 PM
Pulpwood Load Crosses "Big Mac"

This load is headed south from "Yooper Land" to a pulp mill in northern lower, Michigan; 3/05. Numerous loads of forest products cross the Mackinaw Bridge each day.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/pulpwood_load_crosses_big_mac.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 29, 2005, 08:25:59 PM
A Load of Aspen Pulpwood. A load of aspen pulpwood leaves the harvest area for the mill approximately 100 miles north. Treais timber harvest; 3/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/aspen_pulpload.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 03, 2005, 08:19:07 PM
Iron Mule Forwarder. This machine works cautiously along the edge of the wetland. Treais timber harvest; 3/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/iron_mule_works_along_wetland%7E0.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 14, 2005, 06:12:00 PM
The Iron Mule Forwarder Needs A New Tire. The left rear tire on the forwarder is replaced "on the job" with a new one. Treais timber harvest; 3/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/iron_mule_tire_change.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: tnlogger on May 14, 2005, 09:04:23 PM
ron it'a a joy to come in this thread and see what new you have posted  thanks gene
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 14, 2005, 11:30:19 PM
Thanks tnlogger. The interest is very much appreciated.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ernie on May 15, 2005, 12:10:20 AM
As a Kiwi, I hate to admit that the Aussies have another one up on us but I came across this record for an Aussie "Road Train"  79 trailers, length 1018 meters GVW 1072.3 metric tonnes
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Timburr on May 15, 2005, 08:09:06 AM
Ernie, must take them weeks to load and hook up all their trailers!!
 At a kilometre long, how does the driver see their rear trailers in the mirrors?  ??? They must pale into insignificance.
When making a turn, they must need at least 1/2km clear inside radius, otherwise it's total wipe-out of anything in their path. :o
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 19, 2005, 08:18:13 PM
Iron Mule Forwarder Back on The Job. With a new left rear tire and chains on the front tires, the Iron Mule continues its work in the northern hardwood thinning. Treais timber harvest; 4/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/iron_mule_forwarder_back_to_work.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Mrforestry on May 24, 2005, 07:52:54 PM
very nice equipment, wish i had a camera to take some we work with, oh well
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 27, 2005, 03:49:14 PM
Small Timberjack Cable Skidder. Parked at the landing. Outfitted with new paint job, new tires, and new chains on front tires. Osterlund Road timber harvest; 3/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/small_timberjack_cable_skidder.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Robert R on May 27, 2005, 06:02:32 PM
Ok, this thread is driving me insane.  I need someone to pm me their snail mail address that would scan and post a picture or 2 of my skidders.  I am becoming insanely jealous.  Thanks.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: tnlogger on May 27, 2005, 06:06:46 PM
robert take um to walmart and they'll put them on a disc for you   ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Robert R on May 27, 2005, 06:33:30 PM
Thank you.  Will do.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 30, 2005, 05:18:43 PM
A Wack of Quality Sawlogs.These sawlogs are laid out on the landing for sale to the "highest bidder". Osterlund Road timber harvest; 3/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/wack_of_sawlogs.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 02, 2005, 02:54:27 PM
Here are some pics of a house lot we cut in Late May a few weeks ago ..

              Heres a back view of the 525B I run

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10398/Logging%20Pictures%20007.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 02, 2005, 03:13:14 PM
another pic of the 525B

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10398/Logging%20Pictures%20008.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 02, 2005, 03:15:17 PM
and another.. finally got my digital cam going :)
Heres the 525 a lil dirty not bad though considering I had it in the mud to door level last week at that lot , amazing what a little rain can do

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10398/Logging%20Pictures%20025.jpg)

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 02, 2005, 03:16:16 PM
Heres a pic of the Model 30 Morbark chipper we run

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10398/Logging%20Pictures%20011.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 02, 2005, 03:16:59 PM
and another one

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10398/Logging%20Pictures%20021.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 02, 2005, 03:17:57 PM
heres a lil action shot from the top pile getting chipped up

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10398/Logging%20Pictures%20020.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 02, 2005, 03:19:08 PM
here a few pics of the hitches I was grabbing

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10398/Logging%20Pictures%20010.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 02, 2005, 03:19:37 PM
and another view

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10398/Logging%20Pictures%20004.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 02, 2005, 03:20:25 PM
Heres a view of the lot from inside the machine

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10398/Logging%20Pictures%20012.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 02, 2005, 03:22:42 PM
and well heres a look when we moved out of there , place had over a foot of standing water on the ground , 4 land clearing companies tried but could not get the wood cut and out cause of the mud  , so they called the company I work for and well , we got 'er done ..

       Well hope you enjoy my pics , I 'll have a lot more in the upcoming weeks .



                                                 Rob
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on June 02, 2005, 03:25:21 PM
sorry heres a last pic ..

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10398/Logging%20Pictures%20026.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Robert R on June 03, 2005, 07:43:21 PM
Ok, I am going to try to stick my skidder picture in here real quick.  But I am supposed to be working.  I hope to post more shortly.  This, if it works, is Molly and Ginger pulling a pinoak pallet log this winter.

http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-11404

Hope it works!!
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Robert R on June 03, 2005, 07:46:10 PM
I want the image, not the link.  What did I do wrong?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Robert R on June 03, 2005, 08:40:38 PM
Ok, got some advice.  I'll try again.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12348/palate.JPG)


Wish me luck. 

Wahoo!!  It works on the preview--here goes the real deal.  (Thanks Ed).  Yall are going to be sorry I learned this!
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Robert R on June 03, 2005, 09:12:26 PM
The near horse is a 1992 model.  She is a Belgian.  The far horse, which you can't see well, is a 1998 model.  She is the daughter of the other horse, half Belgian and half sneaky little fence jumper.  But they work great together as a team.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Robert R on June 04, 2005, 01:26:50 AM
Here are some pictures of Molly and Ginger and I on a walnut job we did this spring.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12348/walnut1.JPG)


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12348/walnut4.JPG)


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12348/walnut6.JPG)


And one of us mowing hay last summer

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12348/mowing.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on June 04, 2005, 02:08:35 AM
Glad you got them posted Robert.They were worth the wait!
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Norm on June 04, 2005, 03:23:35 AM
Now that's a great looking team you have there Robert, thanks for taking the effort to show us. :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Teri on June 04, 2005, 06:00:44 AM
You've got some beautiful horses there. Thanks for the pictures.  :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: hosslog on June 04, 2005, 06:35:52 AM
Nice team!!!!
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on June 04, 2005, 07:24:47 AM
 Way to go  8). Nice team, hope to fence jumper isn't into chicken plucking  ;D.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ernie on June 04, 2005, 04:42:53 PM
Great pics and looks like a good life too, way to go, no pollution and keeping the old ways alive.

Are you going to pit saw the log ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on June 05, 2005, 07:39:24 AM
Nice team Robert. My uncle had a team of Belgians, they were twins he raised from colts. Bud and Sailor. Had them 16 years until one died and then he sold the other. One was as wild as the wind and the other was quiet. They worked well together. But, get the wild one alone and hooked to a log, get out of the way. :D He used to use them to yard logs, haul stovewood, cut hey and haul the hey wagon. I don't remember him ploughing with them. It was more of a hobby for him as they never were worked too hard because my uncle never did. ;D

cheers
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 07, 2005, 07:24:07 PM
Timberjack Forwarder. Working an area of aspen removal and oak thinning, Austin timber harvest; 5/05

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/s%7E0.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on June 10, 2005, 09:21:16 PM
 Here's the new trailer used to bring out cordwood & some sawlogs
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10257/new%20forestry%20trailer.jpg)
 Eve - Cowl lot
 6/10/05
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on June 11, 2005, 06:02:21 AM
Ed_K,

How do ya like the trailor? Looks like a good setup for thinning plantations.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on June 11, 2005, 05:00:49 PM
 S.D. the trailer is nice, holds about 3/4 of a cord. The loader could use more reach, only 9.5'. I have to be careful with the controls, yesterday I picked a log off and it swung up to the knuckle and broke the fitting off the hydro line  >:(. I'm running a 7000# tractor, and coming down hill with ledges it will slide some with the trailer loaded full. If it keeps happening, I'll put the ice chains on.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: isawlogs on June 11, 2005, 07:17:16 PM
Ed ,
   Is that the tractor you where telling me about at the Bangor show ...
  Very nice set up , I would not mind having one of those trailers .  Sometimes the skidder is a little big and only have a few logs to go get . That trailer would be ideal behind the pick-up .
 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on June 13, 2005, 07:32:12 AM
 Isawlogs, it is. Only thing I changed, was to move the wheels out to 7' so it's not tippy.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on June 20, 2005, 03:41:06 PM
Nashwaak Lake Area

Road maintenance
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11009/SD_rocky-road.jpg)

This road was constructed approximately 8 years ago and was in need of grading and brushing before trucks and equipment are brought into the site.

Red Spruce Stand
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11009/SD_red-spruce.jpg)

Harvest block of red spruce and over-mature balsma fir. Lots of blow down around the block perimeter, not seen.

Porter
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11009/SD_Porter-004.jpg)
Porter on the way out to the landing

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11009/SD_Porter-005.jpg)
Almost there
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11009/SD_Porter-006.jpg)
Sorting the wood by species on the yard
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 30, 2005, 08:47:13 PM
Some more "wood hauler"names noted while "on the road".

"Animal"
"Gordy"
"Deno"
"Just Logging"
"The Girls" Think My Truck Is Sexy"
"4-Play"
"Get R Down"
"Lone Wolf"
"Big Red One"
"Brow"
"Big Boz"
"Money Pit"
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 08, 2005, 02:10:23 PM
Timberjack 1010 Forwarder. Double bunk forwarder with tracks. Mansfield timber harvest; 5/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/timberjack_1010_forwarder_with_tracks.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on July 09, 2005, 06:17:27 PM
Nice rig. There was one just like that on the lot beside ours a couple years back. It didn't have the blade or the half tracks and it was a a 6 wheeled one. Worked good though  :)
Title: Pics of 545 Cat and Hood 24000
Post by: Rob on July 24, 2005, 09:54:51 AM
Here are a few pics of the 545 Cat I run and the Hood 24000 Loader/Slasher set up..hope you guys enjoy (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10398/Logging%20Pictures%202%20006.jpg)
Title: Re: Pics of 545 Cat and Hood 24000
Post by: Rob on July 24, 2005, 09:55:40 AM
Heres a shot of the Hood itself

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10398/Logging%20Pictures%202%20009.jpg)
Title: Re: Pics of 545 Cat and Hood 24000
Post by: Rob on July 24, 2005, 09:56:53 AM
Heres is a shot of me going through the muddy part of the job...it's a lil deep in spots


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10398/Logging%20Pictures%202%20015.jpg)
Title: Re: Pics of 545 Cat and Hood 24000
Post by: Rob on July 24, 2005, 09:57:53 AM
here is a better view

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10398/Logging%20Pictures%202%20019.jpg)
Title: Re: Pics of 545 Cat and Hood 24000
Post by: Rob on July 24, 2005, 09:59:06 AM
Here is a shot from the inside of the skidder , Hood slashing and stacking tops getting ready to move in the chipper to process..

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10398/Logging%20Pictures%202%20021.jpg)
Title: Re: Pics of 545 Cat and Hood 24000
Post by: Rob on July 24, 2005, 10:00:31 AM
Hope you enjoy the pics there will be lots more to come throughout the next few months..

                                                           Rob
Title: Re: Pics of 545 Cat and Hood 24000
Post by: OLD_ JD on July 24, 2005, 11:46:27 AM
nice pic Rob ;) thank's
Title: Re: Pics of 545 Cat and Hood 24000
Post by: Rob on July 24, 2005, 12:24:11 PM
No problem .. I will be taking some more this coming week so stay tuned
Title: Re: Pics of 545 Cat and Hood 24000
Post by: pasbuild on July 24, 2005, 03:03:55 PM
NICE PICS ROB
Is this a clear cut job
Title: Re: Pics of 545 Cat and Hood 24000
Post by: Ernie on July 24, 2005, 04:29:14 PM
Great pics, great machines--- envy is a sin right?
Title: Re: Pics of 545 Cat and Hood 24000
Post by: David_c on July 24, 2005, 05:36:04 PM
Heres is a shot of me going through the muddy part of the job...it's a lil deep in spots


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10398/Logging%20Pictures%202%20015.jpg)

Bit of an understatment ;) nice pics keep'em comming
Title: Re: Pics of 545 Cat and Hood 24000
Post by: jgoodhart on July 24, 2005, 07:03:51 PM
Keep the pictures coming I'll look at them ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 24, 2005, 07:47:05 PM
Rob,

What's the reason for working in the mud?? Working a wetland, spring break up, drainage ???  :-[
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on July 24, 2005, 08:12:14 PM
Ron i'm not certain it is necessarily a wetland. everything in these parts is just saturated from all the rain we have had this spring & summer. but either way it is still a bit to wet. nothing has had a chance to dry out since winter. we still have small springs that only run after winter melt and in spring that are still going quit heavely.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on July 24, 2005, 08:20:31 PM
David and Rob,

Does working in a spring or pond and making a mud hole impair your relationship with the land-owner?  Is that something that a consulting forestor would rather not happen or is some of it condoned?   

we have a lot of wet land (not wetlands) that a skidder can do irrepairable damage to down here.  I've seen skidders working in  mud where you couldn't see the tires, just a swirl in the mud.  Usually a deep hole like that can be worked around but some of the skidder operators will go through them anyway.   Some of the Hammocks or small Cypress heads that are damaged by ruts can get a consulting forester in a lot of trouble.   I'm not famiiar with the ground up there or the ramifications of rutting, but sure would like to know.  It could be that the awareness is more stringent down here because of the number of swamps we have. 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on July 24, 2005, 08:33:25 PM
Tom i think in this area it is more common than elsewhere. especially if there isn't a forester involved. like i said though chances are thats not even a wetland just wet land. personally i hate seeing the woods all rutted up like that (pet peeve of mine). but in some cases it really is unavoidable (didn't look so in this case though) unless you work the area when the ground is frozen. but i'm not there so i honestly cant pass judgement. i'm sure Rob is only doing what he's told to do.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 24, 2005, 09:03:03 PM
Best Management Practices (BMP's) would not allow us to "run through mud" areas. We would need to wait for the "dry season"; properly road and drain it, cable the wood across to high and dry ground, or not harvest the area.

We are working one such area of included hydric soil right now as its the first time we've been able to get in to it in three years since it is finally dry enough due the current dry season. We are cabling selected trees out over temporary "slashed over" routes to high ground then cutting into short wood lengths on site to be forwarded out to the landing. Skidding is kept to a minimum to prevent rutting.



Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: tnlogger on July 24, 2005, 10:51:30 PM
first rob welcome to the forum and good looking equipment too
As i read you operate the skidder so i have a couple of questions  being a logger in Maine and tenn for over 30yrs.i wonder are you the contractor or just run the skidder for wages.(2) is this a clearcut on company land or a private landowner. The reason i ask and i am in no way placing blame here is the impact of logging practice like this on the forest that is the reason i quit the big companys and started on my own. i value land management more the profit.
now this is just my 2cents worth and in am i judging you. i just feel that land management and soil conservation is more important.  :P again welcome gene

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on July 24, 2005, 11:18:07 PM
hey TNlogger Rob has been a member here for quit some time. also he is just a hired hand. side note he posted some pics awhile back and mentioned that they where logging a patch that no else could becuase of the mud. so i tend to think this is common practice for this company. just an fyi i didn't post this to pass judgement on Rob i've meet him and he seems a decent enough guy.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: OneWithWood on July 25, 2005, 08:58:48 AM
Rob,
Thanks for the pics. 

How will the damage to the soils be mitigated?  I would really like to see pics of the repair work.  Many years ago a skidder harvesting my woods left ruts like that on the side of a ravine.  They put water bars in at the top but those were soon washed out.  I ended up grading the shoulders down, using the dirt to fill the ruts and then I rocked it all over using spoils from one to the local quarries.  I now use this as my main woods acces road.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: tnlogger on July 25, 2005, 02:47:30 PM
dave  sorry bout that and i wasn't trying to get on to anyone it's just when i see something like that i sorta let my heart take over instead of my brain.  :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on July 25, 2005, 03:11:39 PM
The worst rutting I see occurs at heads of gullies with steeper sloped gully walls. So the guy runs his skidder up the gully which 99 % of the time have springs seeping out that feed streams below. The gully walls are too steep to keep out of the wetter gully trough. But, sometimes the gully is not even deep and the skidder runs up the trough of the gully because it's a wide gradual path, making an easier trek to the yard. This practice is shunned by the best intended folks, but often gets forgotten when their chasing wood for machine payments. On the family farm we were always fortunate that we never had gullies or steep side hills to work. Nice and flat with gentle running streams and wet runs. I've seen some pretty dramatic erosion on farm fields though untill folks changed their farming practices in the 1980's. It was amazing the erosion on gentle slopes, you could burry a tractor in the erosion ditch. There is still some serious erosion in the New Denmark area from farming practices, even though steps have been made to reduce it by terracing and green belts, but some fields are just too steep.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on July 25, 2005, 05:13:35 PM
tnlogger there is no reason to appoligize. like you i also hate to see things like that. i was just letting you know Rob has been a member here and that he is just a hired hand.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 26, 2005, 04:09:55 PM
Load of Quality Sawlogs. This load of quality sawlogs is moving across "Big Mac" from Lower Michigan into Upper Michigan.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/sawlogs_crossing_big_mac.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on July 26, 2005, 04:46:35 PM
I did that one time.  ;D    Go across the Mac from lower Michigan into Upper Michigan, I mean.  Jeff took me.   Man!  What a bridge.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: OLD_ JD on July 26, 2005, 05:37:29 PM
we can hardly see the shore on they other side.... :o
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Furby on July 26, 2005, 06:50:33 PM
I'm looking forward to walking across the "Big Mac" come Labor Day.........if I can find a way.

Ron, why are the logs going North?
Are there no mills closer?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Robert R on July 26, 2005, 07:53:06 PM
That above mud job looks a perfect place for horses to show their worth, snaking through the timber around the edge of the mud to the other side but I am biased.  Got to do some of that this summer for a real logger.  Had a ball.  Took the logs across a golf course--he set them on my wagon running gears with his piece of equipment and we hauled them across the course and then he off-loaded directly onto his trailer with a hydraulic arm.  We took several semi loads out and you couldn't even tell we had been there--except for the occassional "horse hazard"!
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on July 27, 2005, 07:23:17 AM
Tom, there must be some fairly long bridges down on the Keys aren't there? We have Confederation Bridge here between New Brunswick and PEI, which is 8 miles long.

Link to Live Bridge Cam  (http://www.confederationbridge.com/en/media_gallery/bridge_cam.html)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 27, 2005, 01:59:23 PM
"Big Mac" is 5 miles long, but the largest suspension bridge in the world.

There are a number of saw and veneer mills here in northern Lower Michigan, but these logs must have found a better market in the UP. There are also UP and Wisconsin buyers buying here so the laod may be going to one of these clients.

Loads also come from the UP into northern Lower Michigan, so it depends wherever the quality and price is best I guess.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on July 27, 2005, 02:26:26 PM
We have the overseas highway from the mainland to Key West that has one link that is 7 miles long.  There are two bridges there now, the old and new.  It's quite a trip,but, nothing like the bridge over Lake Ponchartrain in louisianna.  It's 24 miles long.

A breathtaking a bridge is The New River Bridge on US-19 in W.V.   You happen up on that bridge, unsuspectingly, and all of a sudden your vehicle is suspended half-way to the moon.  "How'd I get here?" is how I feel everytime I cross it. :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 27, 2005, 02:35:48 PM
That's Arden Cogar, jr country, a new FF member.  I know its high enough to sky dive off of. ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on July 27, 2005, 03:47:00 PM
Yikes, I don't like them high bridges. Just get me as fast as possible to the other end.  :D  I've never even crossed the Confederation Bridge, which spans the icy cold Northumberland Straight. They sometimes shut it down because of high cross winds. I've been over to the Island many times by ferry. For me personally, it's kind of like the phrase 'been there done that' as far as going over there. I've been to the New River on the Virginia side, near Radford where I stayed with friends. Wow  :o 24 miles is a long trek on a bridge, hope no one is forced to walk it. ;D If I'm ever on a bridge, it won't be to skydive, unless someone with a vengence is trying to do me in.  ::)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on July 31, 2005, 07:28:04 AM
Well first and foremost I have been a member here for close to 3 years now , have not posted nearly as much as i use too because I have been too busy working to get on here , but thanks for welcoming me anyway.

 As for the job in question Iam just the skidder operator for the company , they tell me to pull the wood and well that what I do , I myself know how to avoid rutting but on this job in was inevitable to avoid plus the old operator pretty much destroyed that part of the job before they removed him from the skidder permanetly. Yes the job is a clear cut it is a 165 home development & golf course , the pictures where you see the mud is the big cultasac and there was a foot of standing water there apparently before I got to the job  and the old op just twisted and turned through the whole area causing it a too turn to mud. So when i got there I had no choice or chance to avoid the area as the was roughly 60 hitches of bunched wood on the other side of it so i was forced to go through the area.
  We are a landclearing company not select cut loggers , we come in cut , skid , chip , stump and grind with tub grinders , we can not leave slash anywhere on the jobs must all be picked up. As for any repair work the area will be filled in as the road will be going there and that is up to the site workers not us. Like I said we are not a timber harvesting operation. If I was to start that job before the old operator I probably could have avoided the rutting , but its hard to avoid when the damage is done before.

    Well I hope this answered any conflicts and questions and if you would like me to stop posting pictures then I will do so , but please dont make me out to be the bad guy or bad operator as there was no way to avoid what happened...We do alot of muddy jobs that other companies can not do , this part just got rained on and it stayed there , we usually use swamp mats but the contractor told us there was no need as they would be digging and filling that area. Now I have been running skidders for the past 11 or so years and consider myself a decent operator who does not bounce and scar up "save trees" , avoid  rutting and going through muddy areas if possible,this cut was just impossible to avoid rutting it was mud treeline to treeline  so there was no choice.

                                                              Rob
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: beenthere on July 31, 2005, 09:05:56 AM
Rob
Thanks for the good explanation of what you were doing. It makes sense that way. I don't think anyone meant to be pointing a finger at you specifically, but more pointing to what it looked like was happening. Who of us wouldn't enjoy a trip or two through the mud hole if we had a chance.  :D  I would!  But I wouldn't want to run my own equipment through it and get 'mud' on it.  :)

I suspect that often posts are answered, such as yours, just because of stirring up the mud and leaving the ruts, in what appeared to be a logging job, and really was mentioned for what others could learn from it (as well as to let others know that 'we' know better than to do that).  So it, to me, was just a 'good' example of what not to do, and others were using it to point out that they knew better than to do that.

So, thanks for posting the picture that so many used to stomp on the 'muddy' skidder practice, as without it, that subject of mudding up a logging trail would probably not have come up. I hope you consider it in the light that it was a good example, and that others didn't know all the facts as to why it was being done that way.   Sure hope you don't back away, as you can offer a lot to the 'logging' discussions, IMO.

Thanks for posting and bringing this up to date. It would have been easy to just have your feelings hurt and disappeared.
(and DanG, running that rig looks like fun, but expect it could get like work some days too  :)  )
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Buzz-sawyer on July 31, 2005, 11:38:56 AM
Rob I see your points and think on the internet.....a feeding frenzie developes on a topic.and people just chim in as if what they are discussing is the gospel.....when in fact it is comment on a comment about an idea someone posted about an assumption about a picture a guy posted for others to enjoy.
I dont think you have any reason to explain yourself or any such thing. Neither does the owner of the company.
You are doing a tough job the best and most practical way possible.
What diffeece are 1000 ruts gonna make when the D-9 cat gets done re shaping that entire parcel into something nice for people to enjoy ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on July 31, 2005, 12:26:27 PM
HI Rob,

I agree with beenthere in the fact that we weren't pouncing on your job. In fact my post about rutting was just an example I've seen going on. We were on the subject of rutting so..... ;) I don't attack people's work without knowing the before and after conditions. I'll often here these sunday driver types drive by a piece and say what a mess. It's mostly because of the brush that's left, and there is nothing economical we can do to remove it. Or someone will look at a select cut and call it high grading without being there before hand to see that the lot was mostly pulpwood and the guy was trying to leave at least something for seed. Just because a tree has a fork 20 feet up and a bunch of rot on the trunk doesn't mean the seed produced from that tree will produce trash trees.  ::) If that were the case than we'de never get a smooth beech resistant to beech scale growing in a stand of severely diseased beech.  I've seen some nice second growth sugar maple stands previously harvested for firewood. In fact they look better than alot of stands not worked at all.

cheers
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: tnlogger on July 31, 2005, 04:29:29 PM
 rob glad to see you show up  :) after reading your explanation it all makes sence. and i am one that gets over excited when i see stuff like that and nope i wasn't getting on to you just was trying to find out some facts  ;D
 And shoot stick around more as the sawyers out number us poor loggers way to much. :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: OneWithWood on August 01, 2005, 03:36:43 PM
Rob,
Thanks for the follow-up.  I understand about coming up on a job after someone else has butchered the place.  I am working on cleaning up a site right now where the loggers did not use any BMPs or even pretend to.  A lot of what I am doing is pulling tops out of the washes for the landowner so limbs do not end up down stream when it rains.  I am reducing the tops for firewood and when I am done I will put in water bars on all the skid trails.  Any pics of the site in its current state would raise a lot of questions too.
Keep up the good work and post when you can.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on August 06, 2005, 06:47:08 AM
Hi Guys ,

           Well first off thanks for understanding were I was coming from with my post I made recently , when I posted the pics I had a feeling it would stir up some controversy but I did it anyway . Sometimes there are just no ways around the mud and usually we will use swamp mats for that issue but like I said contractor so do it so thats what went on , I will be going back to that job in the next couple months to when we have to make the second cut for the golf course after the shaper comes in and I will get some more pics of that area for everyone. Well again thank you for hearing my explanation on this topic .

           Oh a lil off topic news guys my Fiancee' is pregnant so Im gonna be a daddy !! Just found out last night..

                                                 Rob
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on August 06, 2005, 09:42:17 AM
Congrats Rob.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on August 06, 2005, 07:58:45 PM
Thanks David Im hoping it will be a boy , of course she wants a girl but hey thanks ... Another Timber Industry kid will be in the world
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on August 06, 2005, 08:29:13 PM
 8) Way to go Rob  8).
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: OLD_ JD on August 07, 2005, 09:18:33 AM
congrat Rob ;)...
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on August 07, 2005, 05:09:37 PM
Thanks fellas Im sure it will be fun  ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 07, 2005, 08:26:40 PM
Timberjack 608 B Tracked Harvester; Mansfield, MI 5/05

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/timberjack_608b_tracked_harvester.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on August 08, 2005, 04:11:53 PM
 Nice big undercarriage on that rig, must be pretty stable  ???
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: OLD_ JD on August 08, 2005, 05:17:23 PM
. Another Timber Industry kid will be in the world
that one prob we are facing here ..there no young folk's who whante's to work in the forest anymore.I read one's,the average age of forest worker is some like 45 years old :o
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on August 09, 2005, 04:43:13 PM
I see alot of father and son crews around here.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: OLD_ JD on August 09, 2005, 07:22:01 PM
SD how old is the son ???
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on August 10, 2005, 06:59:05 AM
OLD_JD

20's and 30's and I know a couple brother crews in their 40's. But your probably right with your avarage. It just costs so much to enter this business, just like farming. Most new entrants into farming are dutch immigrants around here, they get so many government subsidies that your son will never see.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 10, 2005, 05:42:08 PM
Loggers Are Often Families. Here, older brother, Jim Jr. (age 32) bucks aspen sawlogs and pulpwood while his younger brother John (mid-twenties) is off picking up wood with the forwarder. Dad, Jim Sr. does the trucking. Johnson aspen timber harvest; 7/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/bucking_aspen_j_budd_jr.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: OLD_ JD on August 13, 2005, 08:59:48 PM
good link about forest equip  ;)
http://perso.wanadoo.fr/laurent.guillot/English%20real%20model%20links.html
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Timburr on August 14, 2005, 07:34:20 AM
Brilliant link OLD_JD.

I particularly like the Menzi Muck steep terrain harvester....similar principle to an Austrian Kaiser?? I used to repair.

Another good one is the innovative Konrad from Austria, ideal for poor traction situations.

THanks for that Tim
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 14, 2005, 06:20:59 PM
Family Logging Business. "Dad" loads aspen pulpwood on the Western Star wood hauler "Get R Dun". Johnson Aspen timber harvest; 7/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/family_logging_business_j_budd.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 16, 2005, 02:49:55 PM
Family Logging Business. The youngest son forwards aspen pulpwood harvested from the sawlog tops. Johnson Aspen timber harvest; 7/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/family_logging_j_budd_forwarder.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 19, 2005, 11:17:49 AM
Timberjack Cable Skidder. Getting in position to pull tree lengths from lowland area of hemlock/lowland hardwoods thinning. Mosher timber harvest; 7/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/timberjack_cable_skidder_wheeler.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 27, 2005, 11:51:31 AM
Timberjack Cable Skidder. Pulls red maple tree lengths to firm ground for product length cutting with chainsaw. Hemlock/Lowland Hardwoods; Mosher Hardwoods timber harvest; 7/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/timberjack_cable_skidder_wheeler1.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 30, 2005, 03:40:15 PM
Valmet 544X Forwarder. This machine has performed well under a diversity of conditions. It is currently working in a hemlock/lowland hardwoods stand forwarding cut to length products bucked from tree lengths moved from the wetter areas by the Timberjack cable skidder. Mosher hardwoods timber harvest; 8/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/valmet_544X-forwarder.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 02, 2005, 07:56:28 PM
Hemlock/Lowland Hardwoods Stand. Trees are selectively marked for harvest. Mosher timber harvest; 8/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/hemlock_lowland_hardwoods-marking.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 06, 2005, 07:14:34 PM
"Checking The Pull Down". Pulling down hardwood tree lengths with cable skidder in thick hemlock/ hardwoods stand. Effort needs to be made so as not to damage any standing trees. Mosher hardwoods timber harvest; 8/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/checking_the_pull_down.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 16, 2005, 04:42:48 PM
More "Wood Hauler" names noted while "on the road"

"Short Stuff"
"Power Stroke"
"Finnlandian Outlaw"
"Against the Grain"
"Unbelievable"
"Nose Cone"
"Dirty Hog"
"Hammer"
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 20, 2005, 07:56:27 PM
Pulling A Cut Tree Down. The Timberjack cable skidder is being used to remove the selectively marked cut trees within the thick hemlock/lowland hardwoods stand on hydric soils. Mosher timber harvest; 8/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/pulling_tree_down.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 26, 2005, 04:39:37 PM
Skidding A Tree Length. The timberjack cable skidder pulls the basswood tree length from the hemlock/lowland hardwoods stand to high ground where it is "cut to length". Mosher timber harvest; 8/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/timberjack_cable_skidder_mosher_hdwds.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Clark 666 C on October 03, 2005, 01:43:23 PM
Some vidéo about timber harvest method :
http://www.afm-forest.fi/movies/80.mpg
http://www.afm-forest.fi/movies/60.mpg
http://www.afm-forest.fi/movies/55.mpg
http://www.afm-forest.fi/movies/50.mpg
http://www.afm-forest.fi/movies/45.mpg
http://www.deereforestry.com/flv/index.htm#
http://www.forstmaschinen-profi.de/downloads/johndeere.wmv
http://www.forstmaschinen-profi.de/downloads/ecologforwardermittel.wmv
http://www.forstmaschinen-profi.de/downloads/ecologharvestermittel.wmv
http://www.forstmaschinen-profi.de/downloads/hannibal.wmv
http://www.hytecmfg.com/HTMLobj-218/RS5500clip1-high.mp4
http://www.hytecmfg.com/HTMLobj-222/RS6000clip1-high.mp4
http://www.hittner.hr/documents/Akcija55V.mpg
http://www.hittner.hr/documents/Akcija120V.mpg
http://www.komatsuforest.com/default.asp?id=1374
http://www.forsttechnik.at/movies/KONRAD-modern-times-mini.mov
http://www.menzimuck.com/forst/video/durchforst.MPG
http://www.menzimuck.com/forst/video/fahren.mpg
http://www.menzimuck.com/forst/video/fo-steil1.MPG
http://www.menzimuck.com/forst/video/fo-sturm1.MPG
http://www.menzimuck.com/forst/video/fo-sturm2.MPG
javascript:openvideo('video13VFB.htm');
http://www.quadco.com/english/videos/TG470_2.mov
http://www.quadco.com/english/videos/5600_samsung250.wmv
http://www.quadco.com/english/videos/240_softwood.wmv
http://www.quadco.com/english/videos/240_hardwood.wmv
http://www.quadco.com/english/videos/daewoo-L240_2.mov
http://www.quadco.com/english/videos/TG370_L220_2.mov
http://www.rottneusa.com/video/wh20.htm
http://www.rottneusa.com/video/backings/video1_03.gif
http://www.forstmaschinen-profi.de/downloads/silvatecharvester8266th.wmv
http://www.teleforest.com/fre/video2.html
http://timberpro.com/video/TS%20620%20low1.wmv
http://timberpro.com/video/TF%20820%20CB%20low.wmv
http://timberpro.com/video/TF%20820%20Combo%20low.wmv
http://timberpro.com/video/TF%20820%20forw%20low.wmv
http://timberpro.com/video/TB%20620%20logmax%20low.wmv
http://timberpro.com/video/TB%20620%20Saw%20low.wmv
http://timberpro.com/video/2005%20tour_reduced.wmv
http://timberpro.com/video/630%20w%20Rolly.wmv
http://timberpro.com/video/TF%20830%20Features.wmv
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 03, 2005, 06:01:35 PM
Great info! Some good showings of mechanical harvesters in action.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on October 03, 2005, 06:25:49 PM
that should keep me busy for a little while. :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: OneWithWood on October 04, 2005, 11:00:26 AM
Thank-you, Clark!  :P
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Octoman on October 04, 2005, 12:20:13 PM
Great collection of videos! :)

The Komatsu design of a combined harvester and forwarder seemed very impressive!  Is it more efficient to use the two separate machines rather than the combined design? ???
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on October 04, 2005, 12:44:05 PM
Ever see those old Koering Feller Forwarders?? They were monsters especially with a ful load of treelength hardwood laying on the bunk behind.

Some info and pictures on the beast  (http://www.stthomasu.ca/~pmacdona/tresearch/ffh.htm)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Timburr on October 04, 2005, 01:10:00 PM
Clark,
you've been busy  :o    Do you collect forestry machine videos as well as FM models.

Octoman,
Combination machines are more of an issue of economics than efficiency, usually driven by small time owner/operator contractors.
There is a father/son team 10 miles from us, who have 1½ harvester and forwarder combos.....1 is full time, the other on standby when needed
They have no intention of joining the big boys.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 05, 2005, 10:55:54 AM
Tree Lengths Are "Cut To Length". Short wood logging in a hemlock/lowland hardwoods stand. Mosher timber harvest; 8/05,

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/cuttiing_to_length.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Oregon Engineer on October 05, 2005, 07:21:20 PM
Check out the attachments, a pic of the Koering tree length and short wood machine.

Look at all the moving heads on the short wood machine!!!

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SYOUNG on October 05, 2005, 09:35:27 PM
Many of our engineers and our President designed most of those Koehring machines.  They were innovative concepts in those early days of mechanized harvesting.  That philosphy and innovation has been passed on to our equipment today.  Thanks for all of the great old pictures.  Over and out from the Koehring home town!

Regards,
Steve Young
Tigercat Industries
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 11, 2005, 07:54:57 PM
Valmet Forwarder. Picks up and removes "cut to length" products hand cut from tree lengths pulled to dry ground by the timberjack cable skidder from the wetter soils of the hemlock/lowland hardwoods stand. Mosher timber harvest; 8/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/valmet_forwarder.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on November 08, 2005, 05:52:48 PM
Ron ,

        How have you been ? Suprised not too see any new pics on the thread from you in almost a month ??? Im gonna try and get some from the 100 acre cut were doing , hopefully before weeks end .

             Rob
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: tiny3 on November 09, 2005, 02:43:47 AM
hi
hey syoung we still have a 618 koehring feller buncher,very reliable machine.still gets used as a back up machine must have 20000+ hrs on it 8)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 13, 2005, 11:05:22 AM
Our logging jobs have slowed down some due to current market conditions so the pictures have slowed down also. Hopefully it will pick up after the rifle deer season and as winter comes on.

We have a lot of oak standing on the stump, but markets are poor at present, so the loggers are "sitting" on it hoping for better prices.  :'(
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: thecfarm on November 13, 2005, 02:03:53 PM
Oak prices are down here in Maine too. Forestys are telling the land owners to wait until the market goes up.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 13, 2005, 04:24:26 PM
Ponsse Caribou Forwarder. With tracked rear wheels, it works in a northern hardwood thinning. Cleveland Cliff's timber harvest in Michigan's U.P.; 11/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/ponsee_carabou_forwarder.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on November 14, 2005, 05:36:53 PM
The oak market is down here in Southern NH also , we are on a 100 acre select cut for wildlife , mainly deer as the property is soon to be a deer hunting camp . The are some very large red oaks and it's a shame we have to cut them now with the price being nearly $500 per mbf less than it was 6 months ago .. The lot looks very nice almost nothing standing but Red Oak , with some mixed in Hemlock , Pine .. The deer are loving it . I'll try and get some pics as we will be done by weeks end.

              Rob
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 11, 2005, 01:36:05 PM
Logger's Service & Supply Truck. This used mobile welder's truck makes a good service and supply truck for the logging company. Mosher lowland hardwoods timber harvest; 9/05.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/s_supply_%26_service_truck.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on December 11, 2005, 01:50:13 PM
Yes that's a dandy. Alot of fellas around here have panel trucks where they can get inside out of the cold, hot sun or bugs and file the saws and fix things for their machines. There's a post up there of mine someplace with one and a forwarder braced against the door for extra security. People like to steal tools on the weekends.  ::)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 03, 2006, 03:57:55 PM
Some more Wood Hauler names noted while on the road.

"Hooter Patrol"
"Chapter II"
"Pedlar"
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Reddog on January 04, 2006, 05:54:04 PM
Nice Thread Ron. Thanks for the time you put into all the pictures. And the same to everone else that has posted. Great Forum here lots of good info. 8)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on January 06, 2006, 01:43:07 PM
here is a picture of my BIL cutting aspen on the landing. He's a mechanical engineer  for Bell helicopter down in Fort Worth, TX.  He and my sister were up for christmas, and he wanted to help me out for a few days.  So, after a short trainig period ( he'd never ran a chainsaw before) I put him to work cutting on the landing. He did pretty good too, especially considering the mess I made of the landing( I never ran a skidder before.  Aspen pulp is at $102/cord at the ainsworth osb plant in Grand Rapids.  Lot of money for pulp.  $102/cord-$16/cord= $86/cord on the landing, and this is wood off of our property, so no stumpage.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/landingopt.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on January 06, 2006, 02:51:01 PM
That's a good price barbender, it's more than the Burla Group is gonna pay here. They dropped the price to mid 80's pricing. (~$75/cord). No private producer is going to be selling there unless they just like excercise and giving wood away. I'de rather make worm food and pecker poles out of it. Their mill yard is going to be pretty empty for awhile.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: timberjack240 on January 11, 2006, 09:29:09 PM
"pecker poles out of it" we cut a lot of them  ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Woodhog on January 12, 2006, 05:34:04 PM
Wow, 75.00 per cord is that landed at the mill...

Here it is the grand price of 47.00 (CDN) on my landing....what a joke!!! :-[
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on January 12, 2006, 06:17:16 PM
No, roadside price Woodhog. We were getting $110 a cord a couple years ago. According to the news tonight UPM in Miramachi is faultering. UPM puts the blame on the inefficiencies of it's labour force, which has caused the mill to be unprofitable for the last 10 years.  And another contributing factor I beleive (and this is speculative) is Irving undercut them on a contract for pulp deliveries by $20/m^3 with cheap crown wood (180,000 m^3). A contract that UPM made with a Quebec company for wood from private sources, but it was never signed.  ::) But, apparently Irving had to obtain wood later from Fraser/Nexfor to overcome a shortfall, because of closed deliveries of private wood.  I got that info from 'Atlantic Forestry Review'. ::) All kinds of fun stuff.  :-\
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: bwalker on January 13, 2006, 07:29:38 PM
Ron, Where was that CCI harvest located?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 13, 2006, 07:44:34 PM
bwalker,

The harvest was being done in the area behind the Iron River water tank and the old Bates mine.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: DanG on February 15, 2006, 10:27:56 PM
Had a good time watching this little skidder working in my back yard today.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10074/bigskid01.jpg)
 
They're finally getting underway with the power line I've been whining about for the past 2 years.  This guy is helping to clear the right of way.  Here he is delimbing a twitch by driving over them with the blade.  It's amazing how quickly a good operator can clean up a whack of logs this way.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10074/bigskid03.jpg)


Headed for the landing with a half-truckload behind.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10074/bigskid02.jpg)

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Paul_H on February 15, 2006, 10:35:18 PM
That is some skidder!
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on February 16, 2006, 07:59:10 AM
She looks like she could swim, logs and all. ;)

That's quite a whack of wood.  :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: DoubleD on February 16, 2006, 08:11:40 AM
That is not a skidder is a SKIDDDEEEEEER
smiley_eek_dropjaw smiley_eek_dropjaw smiley_eek_dropjaw
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SteveB on February 17, 2006, 02:53:09 PM
I guess if you want a big skidder you have to buy Canadian eh?

(Tigercat)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawguy21 on February 17, 2006, 05:05:07 PM
Biggest skidder I have ever seen. Paul, I have to wonder how it might work in your part of the woods although doing endo's probably is not an issue. ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on February 17, 2006, 05:24:45 PM
I've seen them use skidders up on the Nass River, BC. We laid out most harvest blocks up there for skidder. In the area we were at, the ground was more rolling and not steep mountains. Although we were in full view of coast mountains with snow on their peeks.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on February 19, 2006, 12:30:23 AM
 Was out riding with a buddy of mine yesterday who runs a Ponsse harvester.  He is working on a black spruce clear cut right now, I'll try and post the pics I took.  I love watching those machines- they are amazing.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on February 19, 2006, 12:39:49 AM
I'll try that again(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/black%20spruce%20opt.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on February 19, 2006, 12:42:56 AM
 and again                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/falling%20another%20stem%20opt.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on February 19, 2006, 12:49:45 AM
some more                                                                                                                           (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/come%20here%20opt.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/processing%20black%20spruce%20opt.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/long%20reach%20opt.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on February 19, 2006, 12:52:32 AM
and one more                                                        (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/row%20by%20row%20opt.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawguy21 on February 19, 2006, 10:33:13 AM
I have watched skidders a lot and driven them a couple of times, to move them around the yard, but never one 6 wheels. It looks like it might be clumsy to turn and maybe tough to back up.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: DanG on February 19, 2006, 11:32:06 AM
He didn't seem to have any trouble maneuvering, Sawguy.  The thing did seem a bit slow moving around, though.  There was a more normal looking Franklin skidder working with him, and it would run circles around the big guy, but only drag about a fourth as much wood.  That seemed to be more of a traction issue.  He had 4 tires on the ground, and the big'un had 12.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on February 19, 2006, 11:48:52 AM
barbender, where you at? The wood doesn't look much bigger than plantation black spruce, although that doesn't look like plantation. Should have maybe been thinned a long time ago though. Nice peice of equipment. ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on February 20, 2006, 08:13:53 PM
Swampdonkey- I am in north- central minnesota. That is just wild grown black spruce in a peat swamp, they never really thin the black spruce around here. All I have seen on black spruce is clear cuts.  The management plan called for aerial reseeding, which they do a lot of around here with both white and black spruce.  Something I thought was cool was my buddy would take a stem and run it into the ground to measure the frost, and keep it going down through the peat until it hit something hard- about twelve feet down.  It's been so unusually mild this winter that there is hardly any frost in the ground, so the loggers have been having a hard time getting at the winter timber in the swamps. The day I took those pictures we had just got a cold snap with lows in the -20 to -30F range, so the job they were working was just freezing enough that the forwarder wasn't breaking through anymore.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on February 20, 2006, 08:35:19 PM
Alot of those black spruce bogs are layered here. The lower branches of a black spruce gets trained by snowload over a period of years and eventually takes root. Often you'll see a taller tree in the middle of little ones circling it. Never had any personal experience with aerial seeding, but I would think it would be fairly successful in moss. They don't do it here, they just plant by hand. Often times, if the logging is timed right in a good seed year there is all kinds of regen in 3 years and alot of those are advanced seedlings from before logging if the stand isn't too dense. The overwintering semi serotinus cones open up in the slash in the heat of the sun during spring and early summer. Terrible slow growing sites though. ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on February 21, 2006, 04:27:34 PM
swampdonkey- I didn't check any of these trees but our black spruce grows real slow here. It wouldn't surprise me if those trees in the pics were 75-100 years old.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on March 01, 2006, 06:00:14 PM
Here are a few pics I snapped while at work..select cutting 160 acres in New Hampshire

                             Rob

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10398/skid%20road.jpg)

here is one of the skid roads
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on March 01, 2006, 06:01:37 PM
Here is a downhill view of another skid road

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10398/skid%20road%202.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on March 01, 2006, 06:03:20 PM
Here is a pic of our landing thats our 460D skidder and 384 TMS Prentice delimber/slasher and in the back in the 280 Prentice used for feeding chipper and loading trucks

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10398/landing1.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on March 01, 2006, 06:04:18 PM
Here is a pic of our 425 Timbco heading thru the woods

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10398/Timbco1.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on March 01, 2006, 06:05:17 PM
here is a pic of the timbco with a fresh cut beech in the head

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10398/timbco2.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on March 01, 2006, 06:05:58 PM
another pic of the 460D

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10398/460D.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 01, 2006, 07:06:22 PM
Great pictures Rob, thanks. Your settup was similar to a fellow I cruised wood and layed trails out for. He and his partner headed west after the big down turn in the industry and do trucking out there in the northern part of the praries. Alot of outfits had to leave NB in the last couple of years.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on March 18, 2006, 10:20:24 PM
 I'm back cutting the last couple of loads of aspen off of our place, I've been cutting this stuff for the last 5 winters whenever we needed a few bucks. I think I've taken about 140 cords of aspen off our ten acres, almost paid for the property so that worked out pretty good.      (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/felled%20aspen%20opt.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/felled%20aspen%202%20opt.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/our%20woods%20opt.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/our%20woods%20II%20opt.jpg)

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on March 18, 2006, 10:23:04 PM
  There is birch mixed in that stand too, but I'm not cutting that. Here's the beast I'm skidding with   (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/skid%20trail%20opt.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/the%20beast%20opt.jpg)
 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 19, 2006, 06:30:27 AM
Aspen sure can yield alot of volume per acre if it's healthy and large stuff. We cut over 300 cords of just aspen on 10 acres in 1983, that was besides the hardwood and softwood that wasn't cut. Only thing was, the rest should have been taken because the stand was too open and the maples died and alot of the softwood blew over and made fertilizer. If your not careful with the amount of basal area you remove around the birch they will start to die back in 3 years, and if you cut one with symptoms it will be full of pocket rot.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on March 22, 2006, 09:40:09 AM
Here goes a load of pulp off of our property  (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/Load%20out%201%20opt.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/load%20out%202%20opt.jpg)
These trucks are running about 100,000lbs. in the winter now, with the third axle they can license for around 90,000lbs and in the winter they can hual 10% over that. The 90,000lb license is new in MN in the last year.  I don't think you'll see as many center mount loaders anywhere as you do in MN, I'd say 90% of the woodhualers have a center mount. What's it like in other areas? I've been a few place out west, and they use those pole trailers that load up onto the truck when they are empty. I have a buddy that worked for a cut to length logger in georgia, they had bunk trailers that they loaded out with the forwarder.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 22, 2006, 04:23:08 PM
There are many of them here in Michigan also. Some are pictures in above photos.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 22, 2006, 04:38:03 PM
Looks just like here in Carleton county ;)

What is it BWS or EZ-Load stamped on the mud flaps? ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawguy21 on March 22, 2006, 10:57:26 PM
barbender, you are right, tree length loads are the norm out here. Some operators process in the bush and haul short logs on b-train, particularily to specialty mills. Paul H, Frank Pender, Tillaway and others probably have some pics that would give you grey hairs and religion :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on March 22, 2006, 11:09:50 PM
Serco? Not sure if I understand what you meant swampdonkey  ??? I was out cutting again today- heres some pics     (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/landing%20opt.jpg)
Mess in the back of the truck  (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/back%20of%20the%20truck%20opt.jpg)
Homebrew skidsteer grapple I use for stacking on the landing   (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/grapple%20opt.jpg)
I'm getting pretty attached to this old borrowed Timberjack  (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/veiw%20from%20the%20jack%20opt.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on March 22, 2006, 11:21:51 PM
There's a lot of small white pine in here I'm trying to save, you ever notice how a falling tree is attracted to leave trees, like a magnetic force ::)  (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/white%20pine%20opt.jpg)
More of the cut area  (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/skid%20trail%20opt%7E0.jpg)
Real loggers see my methods and shake their heads- is that a skidder or a forwarder?  (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/new%20method%20opt.jpg)
A dandy barber chair, this tree was leaned over at about 45degrees right over some white pines, so I cut it a little at a time while lifting on it with the skidder. Ended up snapping anyways, but I missed the pines for once  (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/barberchair%20opt.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on March 22, 2006, 11:24:27 PM
Here's the snag that ended up on top of the skidder in the previous picture   (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/hung%20up%20opt.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 23, 2006, 04:39:08 AM
barbender, EZ-Load or BWS is a company that makes logging trailors to sell all over the country. Everyone here has them. There used to be alot of self laoders here a few years ago, but they have gone to trailors without loaders for the most part. I prefer the self loader guys when I buy firewood because it's not a hassle to get the firewood hauled and unloaded.

You sure you haven't got any DeMerchant blood in ya? The Demerchant boys are always in those scrapes with trees falling on the skidder and such and the old man tells me 'I can't learn them boys nuthin'. :D :D :D ;) I get a kick out of it. I gotta go out and see the old feller one of these days. He was one of the original guys that set up our marketing system in our area.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on March 23, 2006, 12:35:58 PM
  Swampdonkey- no Demerchant blood here, though I'm sure there's folks that would tell you they "couldn't learn me nuthin' " either  :D. I didn't actually drop that tree on the skidder, it was a snag I was pushing over and it somehow ended up on top of of the machine- same difference maybe ::)  Most of the trailers you see around here are Sta-Lite and Savage, one is made in Cook,Mn and the other in Wisconsin I think. Then they usually have a Serco or Lemco loader on them, which are both made pretty close to here. Shop at home, I guess.  I am starting to see a few more bunk trailers without loaders now, probably haul another 1 1/2 cords without one.  You still see a few pole length trailers around here to, a few with front mount loader (those guys can throw on a load quick! I've had a fellow with that set-up haul house logs for me a couple of times)  The main reason I think there are still so many center-mounts is the way people log around here. The big outfits go in and hammer the wood down, and it may be 2 weeks after the woods crew is gone before the trucks even show up to start hauling. A buddy that works for one of them said that they had a couple thousand cords out ahead of the trucks at one point. I guess  it just makes the logistics a lot easier.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 23, 2006, 01:50:48 PM
  I didn't actually drop that tree on the skidder, it was a snag I was pushing over and it somehow ended up on top of of the machine- same difference maybe.

 :-X :-X
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SteveB on March 24, 2006, 12:02:49 PM
Trailer configurations are an interesting subject.  It really depends on overall logging systems used.  I've seen setups where bunk trailers are loaded by forwarder, which requires a spare trailer to be left to load at the block while the truck's hauling the full trailer.  In a jam the forwarder piles the wood roadside to load the trailer later, but that's lots of handling for an expensive forwarder to do when it should be movign wood.  This setup is usually more popular with smaller stump-to-dump operations. 

If you need to move alot of wood from one place, ie. 800ha clearcut in Northern Ontario, it's worthwhile to float a dedicated loader in to make loading of the trailers fast (for either tree length or CTL).  A loader can usually support a fleet of 6-8 trucks, so when you move one in, you better have the inventory / hot logging production to keep all the trucks and loader going.  In these situations, when trucks get stuck, broken down, etc. you're not just wasting the $ tied up in the trucks not producting but also a loader at a high $/scheduled hour cost.  In additon to quick loading times, loaderless trailers legally haul more wood per trip.

In situations where small volumes are beign produced, ie. small blocks or a single team of gear picking away at a large block, it makes sense to send in a self loader truck in sporadically to move fresh wood, rather than having to build up a big enough inventory of wood to justify floating in a loader.
Self loaders are also good in multiproduct sort CTL operations that demand flexibility to supply a varitey of mills with the right products just in time.  For example, a fleat of self loaders might have to haul from  three or four different blocks simultaneously in order to supply seperate pulp mill, osb, veneer, softwood and hardwood mills with their requirements just-in-time.  If one road goes to @#$ becuase of bad weather you don't have a loader trapped in there and have the flexibility to go somewhere drier if you can with a self loader. Self loaders are often used to "clean up" the last few loads in blocks primairly hauled with straight (loaderless) trailers.  Another advantage of self loaders is they can unload themselves in a pinch at the mill if there are lineups for the loader or it's down.

I am surprised swamp donkey hasn't mentioned detach-loader tucks.  They're prety popular in the Canadian Maratime provinces, but I haven't seen many anywhere else.  They've got a heay duty self loader that's center mounted that gives the trucker flexibility similar to a self loader to move his own loader around from block to block, but the mount enables the trucker to leave his loader at the block to decrease his tare weight, and increase payload.  The detach loaders are a bit more robust and have a bit longer reach than the more permanently mounted self loaders so they can load faster, but you'e got to go back to the same block again to make them worth it.  Basically they are a hybrid of the two other systems.

Loading cross-ways seems to be a reigonal thing too.  Obvioulsy, you can only do it if you're moving 8' wood.  I know in some regions you're not allowed to load this way any more.  For instance, in new brunswick I dont' think you'r eallowed to sell trailers set up for this any more, but you can still load this way if you already have a trailer set up this way.  The load aligning drums that the trucks drive through to straighten the load out are quite the sight to see in action.  Somone should put up a picture of them.

Combination trailers are interesting too.  They can convert to haul chips or logs.  They're kind of an experimental thing here but are used in europe.  They are good if you're route is condusive to hauling chips in one general direction and logs in another, minimizing the amount of travel done empty.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 24, 2006, 12:49:26 PM
Steve, I havn't seen many detached loaders around private woodlots. Possibly used more on crown lands. Alot of guys do have a dedicated loader truck with Prentice loaders and load trailors without self loaders. Those guys usually don't own trucks, they hire the trucking. It's funny the guys trucking off private get way more than off crownlands. The industrial land barons keep beating the rates down. So, if your atually a trucker and making money, it's best to keep it to yourself. But, some of those guys don't know enough not to brag. ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SteveB on March 24, 2006, 02:11:18 PM
I've always wondered about those loader trucks.  I've seen a few of them in the woods but never acutally watched them work.  Seems like you'd need to have a road wide enough for the loader and trailer side by side?  Do these loadertruck setups limit themselves compared to a tracked loader that can sit off to the side of the road?  Do you have to build wider in-block roads for them?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 24, 2006, 03:00:11 PM
The loader truck sits behind the trailor and loads over the back if they have treelength. If it's 100" wood then they may have to sit side by side. Alot of guys use straight trucks in small operations and close to mills, so they load over the back if it's 100" wood.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Coon on March 25, 2006, 11:42:47 AM
For any of you Canadian's here have you read the article called "Working Double time"  in the latest copy of Canadian Forest Industries?  It tells alot about the new fad of multi-use trailers in Canada.  Although it is commonly used in Europe it is in the beginning works of becoming very popular here in western Canada.  They claim that the best way to make money with one of these is to use it on a triangular shaped route and hauling on atleast two legs of the route.  It is also considerably more to get set up with one of these trailers at being about $40,000 more than a conventional chip van.  I feel that one of the biggest downfalls to these trailers is the downtime to convert from chips to logs or vise versa.  2.5 hours each time you need to convert is an awefull lot of time to be down if you ask me.

Read this article if you haven't already.  It may just open your eyes a little at what some of the logging operations are trying to achieve these days.

Brad.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: slowzuki on April 03, 2006, 12:00:02 PM
Here is a set of pulp rollers, they are about 45 min west of Miramichi on the way to Little Sheephouse Falls (waterfall)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10897/DSC03876.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on April 03, 2006, 01:08:54 PM
slozuki, are they the ones over by McGraw Brook? They've been there for 25 years I think, I remember them as a kid. There used to be a zoo and park and ranger office near there.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: slowzuki on April 03, 2006, 01:40:11 PM
Swampy I don't know, I've only ever been there once and it seemed to be in the middle of nowhere on the road to the old mines.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: slowzuki on April 03, 2006, 01:44:09 PM
"Reserve of spruce fir and white pine forest, spring-fed brooks and waterfalls, interpretative signing looped trails with walking bridge, steep rock cliffs. Entrance is accessed off the Fraser Burchill road from Rte 430 approx. 48 km (30 mi.) northwest of Newcastle(Miramichi). A specific interest is the trunk of a 350 years old white pine displayed at the trail head. Dry groomed trail"
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on April 03, 2006, 02:19:55 PM
McGraw Brook dumps into the Renous river off route 108, SW of Miramichi. Probably a different area than you suggested. Your description sounds like Heath Steel country over on the Nepisiquit License, or the Sevogle License. But, I believe it's Nepisiquit, quite certain. That's not far from Popple Depot in one direction and Heath Steel back toward bathurst. 'The Big South' it's called near Big Bald Mountain. Any of that sound familiar? ;D There ain't anyplace much I haven't been to in NB by hoof or by wheel. :D :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: slowzuki on April 03, 2006, 03:20:22 PM
Big baldy sounds familier, the falls that I grabbed the directions from is located in the REPAP nature park the rollers are about 10 k or less from there.  Was 4 years ago that I was there, and before I owned a GPS.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on April 03, 2006, 03:59:22 PM
Yeah, Heath Steel is kind of at the divide between the North West Br of the Mirimachi/Sevogle and the Nepisiquit. Since you mentioned RePAP, that would lean more toward the Mirimachi/Sevogle R drainage. But seems to me it was Repap that had the logging camp up along the Nepisiquit River where I stayed during forestry fall camp. The bridge crossing the river was named after Heath Steel. Anyway a fella could toss a wooden coin in the air up there and if the wind was blowing right, it would float down the Mirimachi or down the Nepisiquit. :D :D :D

I never walked the nature trail up there, but the woodlands manager (might even been higher up then that) at the time put that park together during the 1995 blow down up there to appease the protestors who where making a fuss about the logging companies cleaning up the mess. I remember old Sunny, who ran the half way inn on the 108, he had to take a bunch of them do gooders out for a ride to show them some old growth. Opened up a few eyes as I recall. I recall a website they put up and who ever took the photos of the area, didn't know where they were. I know the area like my own woodlot and when I seen a photo of Lake Serpentine mislabled I emailed the guy responsible. Surprisingly, I did get a reply, but he played dumb at the time and didn't even recall what he had on his site. Anyway, the site has disappeared into oblivian since, and the fuss has all subsided. I've been in that country, pretty much since they opened it up with forestry roads and have been to every lake and stream 3 m wide or more. Alot of times we walked for at least an hour to get to them, sometimes took 3 hours to walk out though. :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: slowzuki on April 03, 2006, 04:10:14 PM
Heath Steel, yes that name was on a sign very near the gravel road we turned onto on our way there.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 24, 2006, 08:27:11 PM
Northern Hardwood Thinning. Selective harvest thinning to 70-90 sq. ft. basal area with gap openings. Wittke timber harvest; 4/06.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/hardwood_thinning_witkke_sale.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 25, 2006, 06:03:34 PM
"Tailgate" Safety Session. The Michigan Association of Timbermen (MATSIF) Safety Officer travels around to active timber harvests, inspects their safety performances and provides required "tailgate" safety sessions.

Here the "experienced" tree fallers are paying attention as the Safety Officer provides the required safety training session on chain saw use and tree falling. A "Timber Jill" is on the right. Wittke timber harvest; 1/06.
 
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/chain_saw_safety.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on April 26, 2006, 06:18:30 AM
They are suppose to come around our thinning crews, but in all the years I've been in this business I've never seen a soul. We leave DNR and the Marketing Board maps and photos. Up here we are required to have work permits from DNR to be in the woods as well as fire suppression equipment.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SteveB on April 26, 2006, 09:23:15 AM
Swampdonkey,

When I was in New Brunswick a government occupational safety (WSB?) guy used to come around periodically to check on us.  I never actually saw the guy, but several of the mechanical operations I looked after were visited by him.  He would sometimes call me up and ask where the gear was working, and I know he would also go out and check on the brushsaw thinners periodically.  This was all on crown land though, not sure about private.  From what I could tell from talking to him on the phone and from what people said after they were inspected he was a prety good guy.  I remeber having to get a work permit from DNR and giving them a list of fire suppression stuff on site whenever we strated a new block on freehold land.  It was kind of an archaic system, filling out a paper form, while the system for notifying the DNR of Crown acrivities was all computerized (due to the electronic scaling, more intensive monitoring, etc. on crown).  On crown land in New Brunswick, Alberta and Ontario fire equipement inspections are done by both government and supervisors from the private company that holds the forest licence.  One interesting thing i came across in Southern new brunswick was the prevelance of water pump theft.  Since there is a water tank and pump kept on site wherever there's a forwarder working, people would steal the pump off the tank and supposedly use them to watter pot plantations.  Ah yes...  weird thefts on forestry operations, there's enough for another thread.  Sad that people target harvest contractors,with the theives incorrectly thinking that the stuff is the property of the big bad forestry company or that the contractor can afford to be a theft victim because he (really the bank until the machine's scrap) owns a $400 000 machine.

Muffler Modifications:
I notice people on this forum talking about modifing chainsaw mufflers.  With the work I have done in both Alberta and New Brunswick, anyone who modiffied the muffler and specifically the spark arrestor on a brush saw or chainsaw would definitly have to imediately stop working with that equipment due to fire risk and writen warning given.  Repeat "offenders" would definitly be fired or loose their contract, and I imagine if a fire strated near silvictural or chiansaw operatins, investigators would be checking for muffler modficatins on any equipment, and I wouldn't want to be the one that had the muffler drilled.  I would just guess that in the age of litigation, the same probably holds true in the US.  If the forest burns, right or wrong someone's going to be looking for a forest worker to pin the blame to (and possibly send the bill for the fire fighting).
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 26, 2006, 03:58:22 PM
Another jobber on another of my timber harvests was visited by the Michigan Association of Timbermen's  (MAT) insurance inspector this morning. The falling crew was individually checked for safe tree falling operations and a good chain saw use safety session was provided.

The safety inspector said that he had checked another of my jobbers yesterday and all went well there also. All have been passing and are receiving their certificates with increased safety aweareness to tree falling.

Most cutters have years of experience falling trees, but I'm glad that MAT is taking the "game of logging" methods right out on the jobs to reach many of the loggers who probably wouldn't get the specific safety training.

After 45 years "in the woods", I'm finding that tree falling is a real science and skill to be learned correctly. I appreciate the effort being made by the MAT in this regard and feel better about the skills of our loggers.  smiley_hardhat


 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 26, 2006, 07:44:17 PM
Chainsaw Safety Training. The MATSIF safety officer looks over 3 aspen sawlog trees for "testing" the tree fallers on for their chain saw certification. Wittke timber harvest; 1/06.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/chainsaw_safety_session.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SteveB on April 27, 2006, 08:39:21 AM
Ron,

Is there mandatory chainsaw training for workers in your parts, or are these checkups, etc. voluntary? 

In canada there are several types of chainsaw certification required for anyone getting paid to use a chainsaw.  The most basic mandatory course is two days, and then you need to take a refresher 1 day course every few years.  The requirements are slightly different between different provinces. 

In Ontario you need the basic chiansaw course to work with one, and then if you are logging you need to do  a more specific cut and skid course, that requires that an experinced certified supervisor sign off on an on-the-job component once you've put in some time.  New Brunswick also has a similar two tiered system for general chiansaw use and logging.  I can't remember the details, but this is generally how it works.  In New Brunswick you're not allowed to use a chiansaw alone eaither, so technically there's no need to have a chiansaw in your pickup as you drive to work unless you've got a passenger.
 

Supervisors from the forest products companies are required to make sure all employes of any logging contractor working for them are properly trained and certified.  I was always worried that the 50 yr old loggers would be opposed to a 28 year old kid supervisor telling them they need their mandatory refresher course in the spring before they can start work again, but most are prety good about it saying that a safety refresher is good and they learn alot even after many years of experince.  I guess you can kill yourself or co-worker as easily logging as you can driving, so that's why there's training and licencing for both.  In Ontario they are also bringing in mechaized logging safe work practices certification along the lines of the chainsaw courses, with a work experince component.  As most logging in most areas is now strictly mechanized, very few loggers have the safety course, so they are actually not allowed to pull out a chiansaw to cut a tree from across a road, etc.  It sounds crazy as all the older guys on mechanized jobs worked for years doing cut and skid work, and even did horse logging before the skidders, but without the course they can't use a saw in any type of work setting.  In this day and age, if a freak accident happened to an uncertified chainsaw user and the supervisor couldn't prove that he did everything to prevent it he could be fined, jailed, etc.  About this time a year ago I had to have a buncher on a float remove a tree from across a road because no-one has chainsaws or is certified. 

Crazy how lawyers have so much influence in the most unlikely places.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawguy21 on April 27, 2006, 10:20:29 AM
I wonder if I need the course to legally start and demo a saw for a customer. We don't have a test log or a place to put one. I'm being serious, the employer liability issue is huge and the regulations here are mind boggling ::)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 27, 2006, 10:31:58 AM
If the logging companies are insured through the Michigan Timbermen's self insurance program, their cutters then need to be certified in proper chain saw use and tree falling and safe other logging practices.

They are having their own inspector, trainer actually going out on the jobs to make it easier for the loggers to obtain their certifications since most don't have or take the time to attend specific formal classroom sessions. They are reaching more of the woodsworkers this way.

It's fun to hear the dialogs between the "oldtimers" who have been falling trees for years and the relatively young trainer who  provides the certifications. All do appreciate the safety updates, new information, methods etc. however.  A great benefit to the "new workers".
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 27, 2006, 07:35:20 PM
Chainsaw Safety. The MATSIF Safety Officer demonstrates proper and acceptable cutting for safe falling of the aspen tree to the "working"loggers. Each must then demonstrate the proper technique to receive their certification in chainsaw safety. Wittke timber harvest 1/06.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/chainsaw_safety_training.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 28, 2006, 07:24:27 PM
Falling Large American Beech Tree. The cutter prepares to fall a large American Beech Tree for bucking into sawlogs and pulpwood. Wittke timber harvest 4/06.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/falling_beech_tree.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on April 28, 2006, 08:01:35 PM
That is a brute. It's amazing that beech stays so smooth even when old growth. Unless it's diseased of course.  :)

I remember having a call for beech saw timber from some outfit in NS. I said you'd have to high grade all our good disease resistant beech in New Brunswick to find enough decent saw material for your mill.  ::)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: OLD_ JD on April 28, 2006, 09:58:44 PM
at what we get for beech sawlog :(....here they all go in firewood ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on April 29, 2006, 05:43:38 PM
I think we get up to $350/th for the good stuff, and not all the bucking and handling involved as with firewood. I gotta wonder how many people never figure in the bucking and extra time to process firewood. I know I've heard my uncle say several times, that his time isn't work much or the government would be taxing it. :D :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: OLD_ JD on April 29, 2006, 09:34:16 PM
we avrage aroud $275 mbf here if you  take 70$ for transport and split by 2 for the land owner = 102.5$ each......now if i do 5 to 6 face corde at $75 each less the $10 for stump fee and i do local transport...$325 to $390 all in cash money ;D..
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 30, 2006, 10:10:13 PM
"Timber". The cutter makes his final cut and the large American Beech tree starts its fall. Note the stump rot and seam that the cutter had to deal with in making a safe fall.

The butt portion of this tree will be bucked off and useable sawlogs, pulpwood, and firewood will be harvested from the remainder of the tree. Wittke timber harvest; 4/06.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/beech_tree_falling_.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 06, 2006, 02:16:25 PM
Artic Cat ATV, "Little Timberjack"; Parked next to the timberjack cable skidder. The  on the job foreman uses the Artic Cat ATV to scout out the harvest area and run between cutting units as needed to check on cutters, haul chainsaws,fuel, lunches etc.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/artic_cat_atv_timberjack.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on May 06, 2006, 08:15:21 PM
we avrage aroud $275 mbf here if you  take 70$ for transport and split by 2 for the land owner = 102.5$ each......now if i do 5 to 6 face corde at $75 each less the $10 for stump fee and i do local transport...$325 to $390 all in cash money ;D..

I only pay $190/cord this year. Stumped, bucked, split, delivered to my yard. Of course I have mostly rock maple and yellow birch, and I pay by cheque. If it were a sawlog beech, it would be more profitable to sell as logs depending on quantity unless your labour and machine hours mean nothing. No purchase tax here anyway on primary forest products, only income tax if selling. ;)  ::)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gary_C on May 06, 2006, 09:56:06 PM
If the logging companies are insured through the Michigan Timbermen's self insurance program, their cutters then need to be certified in proper chain saw use and tree falling and safe other logging practices.


Ron

Can you explain this self insurance program?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 07, 2006, 12:06:51 PM
Gary, See their web site for full information.

http://www.matsif.com/
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 09, 2006, 04:58:24 PM
The Old Iron Mule. An older forwarder that continues to perform well, especially in selection harvests. Austin timber harvest; 4/06.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/iron_mule_older_forwarder.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 29, 2006, 06:53:14 PM
More names noted on the woodhauler trucks. 

"Timber Wolf"
"Attitude"
"Smoking Joe"
"One Olf"
"Low Rider"
"Woody"
"Just Dew It"
"Lucky"
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: bitternut on May 29, 2006, 10:17:08 PM
UUUMMMMM.........Ron it looks like maybe the Mat safety officer was not in the vicinity of the guy felling that big beech tree. From the picture it looks like he did not move away from the tree at least 15' and at a 45 deg angle from the direction of fall. What do you think?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 30, 2006, 04:21:50 PM
Yes, The MAT Safety Officer made a point of discussing that with him and the other fallers observing, especially the 45 degree angle from direction of fall. A good refresher for all in attendance.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gary_C on June 03, 2006, 01:51:42 AM
Here are some pictures of my cut to length equipment.

Valmet 546 Harvester
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11467/Valmet-546H.jpg)

Valmet 840 Forwarder Filled with fuel for the next day. Just traded a single bunk Valmet 644 for this machine this winter. I needed the extra capacity and the 6 wheel machine with tracks.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11467/Valmet-840.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11467/Valmet-840-2.jpg)


Load of Aspen Pulp  All tied down and ready to roll. Jan 26, 05
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11467/Load-of-Aspen-Pulp.jpg)


Unloading Pulp wood at the mill This was taken July 8, 05

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11467/Unloading-Pulp.jpg)
 

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on June 04, 2006, 10:52:03 PM
Nice looking equipment there Gary. What mill is that?  If you don't mind me asking, what do you have invested in your team? I'm just curious cause I dream about having a team someday too, but I know it won't be new Ponsse's. Way too much dinero $$$. 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: UNCLEBUCK on June 16, 2006, 01:53:54 AM
Very cool equipment everyone has ! I will be thinking of all these pictures when I go to the woods soon with my old tractor and a 5 gallon can of gas and chainsaw .  You all could yank out more logs in one day than I will in 2 months.  But it sure is fun to see the pictures . 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 19, 2006, 06:09:33 PM
High Stumps Stump heights for sawlog size trees are to be cut to 12 inches. Here the sawyer recuts a "high stump" for contract compliance. Austin timber harvest; 6/06.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/cutting_high_stumps1.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on June 20, 2006, 04:15:59 AM
Ron, here is a link to procedures used to report residue and waste on crownlands in BC. I remember doing some of those surveys and you were partly doing forensics to piece together or reason certain situations. If you didn't you were constantly digging the logger even if he was following regulations in his logging practice especially when it came to WHSCC. In your pic, it almost looks like defect at the butt so the cut was made high. But, I
assume they are harsh on compliance with the contract.

http://www.for.gov.bc.ca/hva/manuals/rwprocedures/

[Furgott the link] ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 20, 2006, 08:15:43 AM
Yes, in defective trees and in large multi-stem trunks such as oak the trees may be cut high, but then the high stump must be lowered to 12 inches or less.

We will allow some designated high stumps for wildlife purposes, etc. but not many excessive high stumps.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Raphael on June 23, 2006, 10:20:23 AM
Great thread!!!

Last time our property was logged (we are on a 20-25yr cycle) it was one man and his cable skidder.  He was excellent, a far better operator than the fellows who were here in the late 60s who managed to hit every tree within 15ft of the main skid road.



I do some very limited selective timber harvesting for my own use and need to up the capacity of my "skidder".
Here are a couple pictures from the other end of the spectrum:

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12870/GtLS-loading.jpg)
Here's Dad securing a small Hickory log.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12870/GtLS.jpg)
A long maple on it's way to the mill.

Anyone skidding with less than 12hp.    :D ;D :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 27, 2006, 05:37:19 PM
Trimming Slash. Aesthetics of the harvest area is always a concern. The feller trims the slash to lie within 4 feet of the ground or less concurently with cutting. Austin timber harvest; 6/06.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/trimming_slash.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: timberjack240 on June 27, 2006, 09:16:07 PM
Trimming Slash.
round here we call that "lop the tops" ...

 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on June 27, 2006, 09:39:23 PM
Around here, it is trimming slash too if it is big enough.  There was a time when it was justs as good a pulpwood as the logs, but, they've done away with the short-wood pulpwooder.

Now, instead of sawing a lot of it up with a chainsaw, it is run over with skidders or other big forest equipment to mash it close to the ground, where it will rot.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 27, 2006, 11:52:44 PM
The contract wording for handling slash is "lop and scatter". It is cut with chain saw and or run over with forwarder, skidder, feller buncher, etc. to lie as close to the ground as possible.

Some high slash may be designated for leaving during the operation for wildlife purposes and firewood removal by the forester administering the harvest.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on June 28, 2006, 05:10:28 AM
Trimming Slash. Aesthetics of the harvest area is always a concern. The feller trims the slash to lie within 4 feet of the ground or less concurently with cutting. Austin timber harvest; 6/06.

A local logger told me this spring if he can look out across his cut block and see a big top stuck up there 12 feet in the air he knows someone in his crew has wasted wood. He told me he has to lean hard on his crew to always use all the wood.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 28, 2006, 10:53:15 AM
That's what we want, good wood utilization of all commercial wood. Our standard "rule of thumb" is that "everything is left straight with the world". "All uncut trees are left straight up and down and all slash is left horizontal with the ground so we can see across the stand".
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 03, 2006, 12:54:27 PM
Iron Mule Forwarder. At work; Austin timber harvest; 6/06.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/iron_mule_j_budd.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on July 03, 2006, 05:44:53 PM
Ron how much wood do those Irion mules hual out at once?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 03, 2006, 07:38:18 PM
Approximately 1.5 cords or about 750 bd. ft. average when carrying mostly 8 foot lenghts.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on July 04, 2006, 01:47:15 AM
Thanks thougt it was something like that.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: mugford1 on July 04, 2006, 12:07:26 PM
Rubberboots with kevlar are safty but they are egendering  perspiring feet.  Against this drawback are special fleecesocks helping. If you wear this socks, you can work the whole day and in the evening when you put off the rubberboots, your feet are dry.

The same is being valid for leather boots with kevlar.



 8)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Woodhog on July 04, 2006, 08:30:14 PM
Would you have an internet link that describes the above mentioned socks...my feet need all the help they can get in those rubber caskets...Thanks
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on July 05, 2006, 04:42:06 AM
You can also get a kind of slipper from Mark's Work Warehouse, Zellers used to carry them also. They are blue-gray in color and only ride up to ankle hieght. I find them and some good polymer insoles make my feet comfy in those safety chaulk (we call'm cork) boots. I'm like you Woodhog, my feet need to be in comfort or I feel like a crippled old man by 5 pm.  Now if they could just make those boots so they don't chaiffe the hair of your legs. :(
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: mugford1 on July 05, 2006, 06:43:06 AM
Hello Woodhog,

got to this link: http://www.hellyhansen.com. Helly Hansen . An other pic is here:http://www.wobestellen.de/td-socken+heavy+navy-833964-2945.htm

Helly Hansen produces the best workwear for logging. In Germany all men who are working in the forest wearing this clothes.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on July 05, 2006, 07:08:09 AM
I've never had any better luck with HH than I have with Viking or Husqy. A pair of those boots will barely last a season when working in thinnings. The sides and edges that are thin rubber always break down. The best set of rain gear I had was from a supplier in BC with double lined bibs and coat. Don't waste your good money on Gortex garments, you can buy that stuff for $2-3 a square foot and these big name brands stick an outrageous price on them. The best Gortex boot I ever had and still use is made by Red Wing in the US. I've had others and they break down before a year. My current boots are 3 years old.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on July 05, 2006, 07:44:02 PM
I have a pair of Rocky boots with goretex that have lasted about 3 years now. They do need to be resoled, but the goretex is none the worse for wear.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 09, 2006, 10:47:33 PM
Woodhauler, "Get R Dun". Loads Sawlogs from along the two track access road through the timber harvest area. Austin timber harvest; 6/06.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/woodhauler_get_r_dun.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tom on July 11, 2006, 10:24:02 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10026/tom-spencers-6-11-007.JPG)
CTL Chain Saw

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10026/tom-spencers-6-11-009.JPG)
Barko 225

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10026/tom-spencers-6-11-003.JPG)
Sorting cypress with a Barko 225

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10026/tom-spencers-6-11-005.JPG)
Curt's Barko 225
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on July 12, 2006, 06:39:23 PM
Looks like you have some sawing to do, for sure. Looks like an off bearer sitten back waiting for some boards to tale. Can't disappoint him. ;D

{tried posting early this morning but the server was down or something}  :'(
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 30, 2006, 07:58:10 PM
Woodhauler "Get R Dun" leaves the harvest area with another load of hardwood sawlogs. Austin timber harvest; 5/06

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/woodhauler_get_r_dun%7E0.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawguy21 on July 30, 2006, 09:50:27 PM
That is interesting, four drive axles on a shortlog truck. Must be tough on tires. ???
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: ScottAR on July 31, 2006, 12:40:47 AM
Just guessing, but I bet two of those axles are air up cheaters...  I'd say the front one and the back one...   
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 03, 2006, 07:33:24 PM
Woodhauler Get R Dun; "picks up steam" as it moves a load of sawlogs out over the two-track access road. Austin timber harverst 5/06.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/woodhauler_get_r_dun1.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: isawlogs on August 09, 2006, 10:57:14 AM
 
For those of you who ever wundered how they got the chips out of the trucks when they got to the mills ..   

                       
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10487/t%E9mis025.jpg)
 
 
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10487/T%E9mis032.jpg)

This was taken at the Tembec mill in Témiscamingue Québec . Both wear being unloaded at the same time .

 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on August 09, 2006, 02:18:26 PM
Great pictures Marcel. I was surprised no one had posted similar before. I've seen them do the same at Nackawick. It is also a Tembec mill, co-owned by Burla in India, where they make Rayon for clothing.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: thecfarm on August 12, 2006, 07:31:28 PM
No equipement on my land as yet.They just came in to cut for a few days to try to get ahead of the forwarder.Here's a white pine that is a 3 footer.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10436/log2.jpg)

This tree is about 80 years old.There are many more trees of this size to be cut.I have more pictures in my gallery if you want to view them.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on August 12, 2006, 07:40:05 PM
I'm sure those are pine, right? I was curious if you folks have some good sized white ash in your area. The big ones have been harvested in my area, as there is a mill that buys ash exclusively. For my inquiry, a big one is over 24 inches on the butt. We'll have some nice ash again if folks don't keep pulping it along with aspen.  ::)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: thecfarm on August 12, 2006, 08:03:01 PM
Yes, I said they were white pine.There's been a logger about 10 minutes from me that has been hauling out big white ash,as you say,all summer.I know there are some bigger than 2 feet on the butt.I'm surprized to see it that big.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on August 12, 2006, 08:08:53 PM
Had to go back and read a second time, as I missed it on the first read. ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on August 12, 2006, 08:11:39 PM
Now , if we can keep the emerald ash borer out of here.  ::)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: thecfarm on August 28, 2006, 09:32:02 PM
Here's a few pictures of what they are doing on my land.
all loaded,ready to go
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10436/log25.jpg)
 
Picking up another log.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10436/log7%7E0.jpg)
A big log.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10436/log23.jpg)

More pictures will be coming of the forwader.Our new camera don't do all that great with the bright sun.Check out my gallery for more pictures.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: adirondack harvester on August 29, 2006, 10:58:50 AM
Nice Pictures!  A few questions though.  What equipment are they using to harvest your pine other than the forwarder?  Are they taking pulp out as well?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: thecfarm on August 29, 2006, 08:54:02 PM
They are using 2 brand new Husky 372 with 20 inch bars.The pulp will be coming out at a later time.The forwarder operator pulls the pulp out by his roads and when they feel they have enough,out it comes.They really push the logs.Really no money in pine pulp here,just cleans up the woods.They will also bring out the cedar and hemlock too.The cedar and hemlock is for me to cut on my mill.They only cut what is in the way as far as anything besides white pine.They was in a small stand of cedar and pine.No sense in knocking it down and get nothing for it.They are leaving pine that is 2 feet through.I can handle that size myself.I've been watching this guy cut for more than 20 years.He always does a real nice job on the lots I've walked on.He knows that I am real picker with my land.It would not bother me one bit to kick him off my land if it wasn't coming out the way I feel it should be.So far it coming out good.Sure does look alot differant now.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: mapleveneer on September 25, 2006, 04:25:37 AM
I have spent last week and this on work in New Zealand.  Lots of timbering both on the north island and the south island.  Most of it I believe is Douglas fir but someone from the west coast would be much more authoritative on the subject  ;).  Trucking is done almost exclusively on  a straight rig hauling a pup trailer.  Return trip (empty) the pup is loaded on the back of the truck.  Stakes on the truck fold down, on some units the pup stakes fold down also.  I don't see anything like this on the east coast US so I found it quite interesting.  Happened to see one trucker loading the pup onto the back of his rig at the port in Lyttleton.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10444/untitled1.jpg)


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10444/untitled2.jpg)

I took a tourist tour in Rotorua on the north island and learned that they introduced a variety of species a number of years ago as an experiment and found that Douglas fir did quite well.  So most everything is now planted to that.  He said that they could grow a commercial tree in 25 years.

Interesting, I am on the forum at 3:59 am ET and there are still 2 members on, and 9 guests. 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawguy21 on September 25, 2006, 04:36:10 AM
I can't sleep either :D Those are interesting pics from NZ. We don't see truck and pup setups like that here. Pole trailers for hauling tree length are piggy backed like that though. Short logs are usually hauled on a single semi trailer or b-train.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ianab on September 25, 2006, 04:46:07 AM
Hi Maple

The logs you saw are likely to be Doug Fir, there is a fair bit of that grown here, especially in the South Island. But most of the plantations (90%) are Radiata pine. They will produce good (2-3ft+) dia sawlogs in around 25 years. The Doug fir takes a bit longer, although is a better construction timber.

The truckers haul the trailers piggyback mostly to reduce the road tax they have to pay. All the trucks and trailers have hub meters, so if the trailer ones aren't spinning on the return trip it saves them 25% off the tax.  ;)

They have also recently changed the regulations to allow longer traliers, allows them to carry 2 smalller bunks of logs at a reduced height. Makes the trailer more stable, there were a couple of messy crashes involving overturning trailers.

Cheers

Ian
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: mapleveneer on September 25, 2006, 04:52:46 AM
I met some of these trucks hauling logs on the north island last week.  If they didn't break the truck into two units it would never make it around the curves on the highways.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10444/Coromandel%20005.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawguy21 on September 25, 2006, 11:01:21 AM
Ian, charging tax by the mile or km on the truck AND trailer is a nasty concept. :o I hope our politicians don't catch onto that one. Here, the trailers are piggy backed to save fuel and time on the return trip and space while turning around at the logging site. The trailer also adds weight to the drivers for badly needed traction on our steep logging roads.
Interesting about the Douglas fir being grown in NZ. I expect the climate is similar to our west coast so it should do well.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on September 30, 2006, 12:14:26 AM
Few pics from job I am subbing on 1,300 acers.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10745/P9150018ff.jpg)


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10745/P9150019ff.jpg)


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10745/P9260034ff.jpg)


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10745/P9260036ff.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on September 30, 2006, 12:20:45 AM
Couple more.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10745/P9270042ff.jpg)


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10745/P9270041ff.jpg)


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10745/P9270043ff.jpg)


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10745/P9270044ff.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on September 30, 2006, 10:30:48 AM
Couple more.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10745/P9160020ff.jpg)


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10745/P9160021ff2.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on September 30, 2006, 04:33:30 PM
Nice looking older Timbco there your working with David , Rolly II head ..I have always liked those processing heads . So who did you get hooked up with out there anyway ? CTL crew by the looks of it , it's not Jon is it ?

Well glad to see your busy working anyway that is always a plus :) Did you ever get rid of your 380 or you still have that also with your 518 ? I assume your hand cutting and yarding with your skidder on this job . Well hey keep intouch and keep the pictures coming . We just had a job in your home town to harvest in Richmond , we subbed it out not sure to whom though , too far for us to travel .

                                             Later Rob
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawguy21 on September 30, 2006, 11:22:26 PM
I love this thread  8) 8)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on October 01, 2006, 09:25:58 AM
Yea Rob I am subbing out to Jon. Still have the 380 :'( Yup all I do is cut and skid to where forwarder can come get it to bring to main landing. The forwarder I call the devourer. It just devours wood, 16 ton capacity.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: adirondack harvester on October 02, 2006, 01:37:18 PM
Great pictures David!  Keep 'em coming.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rob on October 02, 2006, 06:04:32 PM
Thats cool , see Jon upgraded his equipment line up , from the Bell and cat cable skidder to Timbco and forwarder... How does he like the CTL so far ? Chadwick & BaRoss are done with the Timberjack lineup since Deere takeover and was talking with one of the Mechanics the other week and now they are going to be the New England Ponsee dealer ... Dont know how it's gonna work for them as not many CTL guys here in Southern NH ..well yet anyway

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on October 02, 2006, 07:34:59 PM
Rob I think it is kind of a love it and hate it kinda thing. Loves it when it is up and cutting wood. Hates it when it is broke down again.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on October 02, 2006, 09:06:06 PM
 Kool set up David, are you still working after yesterdays 3+" of rain? Only productive thing I did today was change pins & bushing on the steering pistons on the taylor  ;D .

 Rob, I like the ponsee line, just wish they were priced lower. I'm thinking of going CTL for the improvement cuts.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 05, 2006, 08:31:19 PM
John Deere 643H Feller Buncher with saw head. MDNR State Forest timber harvest; 9/06.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/j_deere_643h_feller_buncher.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Phorester on November 06, 2006, 08:10:41 PM
MARCEL, the chip truck being unloaded reminds me of the story an old pulpwood cutter told me years ago.  This is just about word for word from him. When they first started using these at the mill down here, the first time he ever backed his truck on one he just sat there in the cab. 

He said, "Well, the operator comes over and says, 'ain't you gonna git out?"  He said, "nope, I'll just go along for the ride".  The operator says, "well, oookay......"  (I doubt they would let anybody do this now. And this is the point in his story telling where his eyes got real wide).  He said "well..., everything was fine until they got it about halfway up.  I thought they was gonna stop but it kept going up and up an up..."  "All I could see was clear blue sky!"

"Directly all the stuff I had on my dashboard came crashing down into the floorboard.  About that time everything I had up over the visors came crashing down, a'hitting me in the face, along with - musta been a bushel of dust off'en each visor! Came down in my eyes so I couldn't see nothing!" "I sucked in a big wad of it and couldn't even breathe! "The truck was a'groaning and a'straining.  It still kept a'going up and up!  I thought it was just gonna keep going and turn slam over upside down head over tail!"  "It musta been straight up in the ARR!" (He's now standing up with his arms stretched as far as they would go above his head, his eyes still big as dinner plates.)

"Directly it stopped.  I was pinned in the seat, couldn't move, couldn't see, gagging on that dust".  "It was quiet for about 2 seconds, then them chips let go with a great big WHOOOOOOOOOOSH that scared the sh*t right out of me!  Made the whole truck shake like it was a'gonna come apart!  "Then the truck jumped up and down a couple times, and everything got realllllll still....."  "That was scarier than before!" 

"Then it finally starting a'coming down!  "I tell you, my stomach came up in my throat and I thought Lordy Lordy, it's a'coming down too fast and it's a'gonna flatten me and this here truck like a pancake!"

"When it finally stopped, I opened the door, got out and crawled around on the ground for 5 minutes".  "All them fellers was rolling on the ground laughing at me". 

"Ever since then I let one'a THEM back the truck on that dang thing!"

I was on the ground laughing myself for about 10 minutes. 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on November 06, 2006, 08:31:14 PM
Me Toooooo  :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D Air!

Hope Patty, or anyone with a swaller of their morning coffee for that matter, don't let loose all over the 'puter screen.

I woulda loved to be one of the guys laugh'n.  ;D

:D :D :D :D :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 08, 2006, 08:17:54 PM
John Deere 648G Grapple Skidder.Working on State forest timber harvest 9/06.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/j_deere_648G_grapple_skidder.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawguy21 on November 08, 2006, 11:20:01 PM
Phorester, I rode shotgun on a truck hauling chips to a rail dump north of Wenatchee. They made us get out of the cab and there was no way I was riding that thing anyway. :D :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: jph on November 10, 2006, 12:13:43 PM
And on a smaller scale:

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12304/woodlands5%20006opt3.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 13, 2006, 06:46:08 PM
Serco 170-A Processor. The slasher bucks aspen and red maple products at the landing from tree lengths skidded by the grapple skidder.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/serco_170-A_processor.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 22, 2006, 12:06:19 PM
John Deere Feller Buncher & Grapple Skidder. Parked at the landing. These units are common to a tree length clear-cut operation. State forest timber harverst; 9/06.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/feller_buncher_%26_grapple_skidder.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SteveB on November 23, 2006, 07:31:35 PM
Ron,

How does the productivity of those drive-to-tree machines compare to a conventional buncher on tracks with a boom?  I've always wondered about them as I've never seen one used anywhere in Canada.  I would imagine that the wheeled machine would have a hard time if the ground was rought at all?  I guess they'd be ok if you don't need to protect regen. or select from between residauls.  Are they cheaper than a tracked machine?  I would imagine they are easier to maintain?  The common saying with tracked gera if "every meter you travel with those thinkgs is one day closer to their death". 

I'd really like to see one of those wheeled bunchers work. The other two pieces of gear that I've only seen in pictures are bar saw slashers and pull through delimbers.  What area thier advantages?  In the pictures it always looks like they're in the southern US.  We have lots processors, stroke delimbers, and circular saw slashers, but I've never seen the others in real life.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on November 23, 2006, 08:08:18 PM
I've never seen one of those type of bunchers here either. All tracked and boomed. They are especially suited to work in mixed woods, softwood and on rocky terrain. Less compaction, less travel, a boom is much narrower to reach between trees. But, if you get the wrong operator on those boomed machines, I've seen them destroy advanced regen. You have to lift the tree clear and bring out to the trail to slash on the trail and not try to work over head of the regen. Now that ain't so easy with big heavy hardwood, if not impossible. I could see more traveling and such with Ron's machine but if your in big hardwood your doing less damage to residual trees even though your reach path is probably wider to get the trees out. A boomed outfit would work on most hardwood sites here because the average piece size is under 10 inches. You get wood 20 or 40 inches, I don't think I want a boom trying to reach and cherry pick your trees. You might end up over on your side.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 23, 2006, 08:27:05 PM
A lot depends upon how firm the soil is, timber types, size, and type of harvest. The rubber tired feller bunches make good production on firm soils and smaller tree diameters of especially pine and aspen. They are also used more on "clear-cut" harvests rather than selective harvests.

More tracked machines with processing heads on a boom are used in Michigan's UP on the wetter soils and more for cut to length harvests where the tree lengths are processed at the stump. They do more processing rather than just total tree falling and bunching prior to skidding.

I have one tracked processor working on a job right now. I'll put on photos of it soon.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 26, 2006, 07:56:22 PM
Hitacchi Tracked Processor With Issusu Engine. Working in an oak, aspen, and mixed hardwoods stand. Gothard timber harvest; 10/06.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/hitacchi_tracked_processor.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sprucebunny on November 26, 2006, 08:28:55 PM
This harvester was working just down the road from me recently.The land owners cut some individual w.pine and expanded a field.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11412/jmharvesterfryOP.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SteveB on November 27, 2006, 11:11:34 PM
Ron,

That looks like a slingshot processor.  I've seen them work in softwoods and boreal hardwoods, but they were really too slow to be productive enough in those conditions.  I always thought they'd make up for there speed with limbing force in hardwoods like you'd have in Michigan?  Does this guy cut off the stump or process behind a buncher?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 28, 2006, 08:43:15 PM
The operator cuts at the stump and then processes and piles the product lengths for forwarding.

On large sawlog trees they will delimb the tree, cut the smaller diameter products from above and leave the larger sawlog diameter section standing for the chainsaw faller to take down at the stump.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on November 28, 2006, 09:24:47 PM
On large sawlog trees they will delimb the tree, cut the smaller diameter products from above and leave the larger sawlog diameter section standing for the chainsaw faller to take down at the stump.

That's a time saver 8) 8)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 01, 2006, 06:51:42 PM
Valmet Forwarder. Picking up the "cut to length" products behind the tracked processor. Gothard timber harvest; 10/06.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/s%7E1.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 04, 2006, 05:43:17 PM
Time To Sharpen The "Husky". The faller takes time to sharpen his saw while cutting oak and cherry saw logs. He makes use of the vice provided on the tool truck.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/saw_sharpening.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SteveB on December 04, 2006, 11:45:03 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/13439/buncher%20%28small%29.jpg)

Hopefully I did it right and attached to this post ther'll be a picture of a buncher working in a mixed poplar, white pine shelterwood cut.

Regrading cutting big trees with a boomed feller-buncher:  they cut a bit from one side of the tree and then move the carrier a bit and cut from the other side to get the big ones down with a buncher.  (commonly refered to as "double cutting") It takes some skill and experince to do it well (and safely).  The operator pushes the tree and lets it fall, instead of really guiding it down the whole way like they do with the smaller ones.  The way they do it is similar to the way a single grip harvester (dangle head) fells trees.  It's important to make sure trees that are borderline too big for a singel cut with the buncher head are cut using this two-cut method.  Bunchers trying to cut trees that are too big in one cut, will "barberchair" them, causing a strip of wood to tear off the side of the lower portion of the cut stem.  This greatly reduces the size/quality of the part of the tree with the most value.  Barberchairing can also happen on smaller stems, if the buncher doesn't cut parrallel with the ground, and instead angles the head into the tree, pushing it more from above before it can create a clean cut.  As swampdonkey said earleir, a good buncher operator can do a great job of protecting regen. by lifting small and medium sized trees that they cut up and over regen, but obviously can't do the same with a tree that's too big to do anything with, other than guide it down in the direction they want.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SteveB on December 04, 2006, 11:54:50 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/13439/new%20skidder%20%28small%29.jpg)

New cable skidder.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on December 06, 2006, 03:47:07 PM
Very nice machine 8). You don't see many new cable skidders around anymore. What model is it?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SteveB on December 06, 2006, 09:56:18 PM
It's a 540G III.  It's a very popular model around here. 

Bunchers and grapple skidders probably cut about 60% of the wood around here though.  In the pine shelterwood and hardwood selection cuts of central Ontario, full tree harvesting isn't allowed, so everything is done tree-length.  Because of the size of the pine and limbs of the tolerant hardwoods there is concern about the limbs causign too much damage to residual trees, so everything has to be delimbed with chainsaws in the bush, even if you're using a buncher-grapple skidder system.  Cut-to-lenght systems are almost non-existant aroudn here, although I think processors behind bunchers, then frowarders might hold promise.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on December 06, 2006, 11:07:13 PM
SteveB, what is the difference between the terms "full tree" and "tree length"? Is full tree just tree length with the limbs on?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: David_c on December 07, 2006, 09:15:36 AM
Full tree or whole tree is more acurate meens just that. The tree is cut and skidded to landing with branches and crown. Tree lenght is tree cut limbed and topped, then skidded to landing.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on December 07, 2006, 09:55:31 AM
Yup, that's my understanding of the terms as well. Whole tree also can include the stump and roots. Some time ago some university type did some experimenting with whole tree harvesting, which included stump and root extraction. Very expensive way to get fibre in my opinion. It really went against the grain, so to speak, because the university was teaching it's students of the day how to get wood out the cheapest. Since, I graduated they changed the faculty name at the local university to 'Forestry and Environmental Management'. More emphasis placed on environmentalism, although we had courses on ecology, soils, fire, stand dynamics, hydrology, meteorology.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SteveB on December 07, 2006, 07:39:26 PM
You're all right.

Generally, in Canada, "logging method" refers to the form in which trees are moved to roadside/landing.  Full tree = stem with limbs and tops skidded roadside for all processing, tree length =  delimbed at the stump and entire stems skidded roadside, and cut-to-length = delimbed and bucked to log lengths at the stump for forwarders.  As I understand, the U.S. definition of "whole tree" is what a canadian would refer to as "full-tree".  As Swampdonkey explained, in Canada (and internationally) academics define "whole tree" as harvesting trees with stumps and all, and "complete tree" refers to the tree, stump AND major roots.  I dont' think anyone in North America harvests stumps and roots on a large scale, although aboriginal people traditionally harvested several types of roots for tying things together, medicines, etc.  I beleive there are places in scandinavia where stumps are harvested for energywood, and I imagine in a place like africa it'd be harvested for fuelwood, so I think that's where our textbook definitions came from (I could easily be wrong on this part).
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 14, 2006, 08:15:46 PM
5010 Iron Mule Forwarder. A load of pulpwood and sawlogs is carried out to the landing. Gothard timber harvest; 12/06.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/5010_iron_mule.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SteveB on December 14, 2006, 10:21:19 PM
Ron,

Can you fit 16' wood on those small size forwarders? 

Also, do you have any experince with using large (18tonne) 8 wheel forwarders in selection cuts?  I've worked with them alot before, but always on flatter ground and mostly in clearcuts.  Now I'm working with more hilly ground and exclusively (95%) in selection and shelterwood cuts.  Wondering if anyone has experince with these big machines in rougher partial harvests?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Reddog on December 14, 2006, 10:35:09 PM
Yes you put the 16's on the bottom and stack some 8-12's on top to hold them. You just have to be carful not to ding up other trees on your way out.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 15, 2006, 11:54:47 AM
Yes, we carry up to 17 feet if necessary, but with care. The shorter logs are placed on top as Reddog said.

We haven't had many 8 wheelers in the woods here. The smaller units are preferred in the selection harvests, esspecially by the land owner's for less tree and regeneration damage.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 15, 2006, 01:11:04 PM
Tracked Processor. Processor cuts tree, delimbs it, cuts product lengths and piles them for forwarder removal to the landing/decking area. Gothard timber harvest, 12/06.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/tracked_processor.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 16, 2006, 07:17:26 PM
Forwarder Operator Unloads A Large Oak Log. Such large heavy logs can damage or break a forwarders boom if the operator is not careful. Gothard timber harvest; 12/06

The Valmet forwarder operator backs up to the landing/decking area and gently slides the large 8 foot oak log to the back of the bunk with the boom without lifting the log.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/unloading_large_log1.JPG)

The operator then drops the large oak log off the back of the forwarder bunk in position on the landing/decking area.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/unloading_large_log2.JPG)

The operator then drives the forwarder away from the landing/decking area dropping the large log on the ground beside some similar large oak logs unloaded the same way without any damage to the Valmet's boom.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/unloading_large_log3.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 18, 2006, 04:49:01 PM
Valmet Forwarder Assists Faller. The Valmet forwarder picks up the oak sawlog tree to assist the faller in bucking it in a heavy jack pine slash area. Gothard timber harvest; 12/06.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/valmet_assists_faller.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: OneWithWood on December 18, 2006, 05:58:06 PM
I really want one of those!  I bet they cost a few dinero. . .
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: farmerdoug on December 18, 2006, 06:18:59 PM
OWW,

Why don't you ask about how to built one.  You never know. ;D

Farmerdoug
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Samuel on January 15, 2007, 11:41:04 PM
Full tree or whole tree is more accurate means just that. The tree is cut and skidded to landing with branches and crown. Tree length is tree cut limbed and topped, then skidded to landing.

Our operations harvest and process full tree as we use the Peterson Pacific 5000 G Portable Chippers.  We currently have 10 working for us and we estimate with the chipping of the tops and large diameter branches we are gaining approximately 12-17 % uplift on our utilization which in turn spills over onto our AAC.  Also if the blocks are close enough to the mill (100 km radius) we will send in our hog procurement contractor to grind the hog fuel and haul it to the mill for power generation as our facility is 100 % run from hog fuel, plus the extra power is then pumped to the grid for distribution.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14756/All%20Wood%20Action%20Shot.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bill Johnson on February 15, 2007, 12:27:09 PM
 
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10003/terre.jpg)

If I've followed the directions correctly my image should be here when I hit post.

I wonder what they do with this big guy during the rut?? This photo is attributed to an operation in Newfoundland.

Thanks for the help SD
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on February 15, 2007, 12:38:31 PM
Bill here's the code, you can hit the modify button in your post.

Code: [Select]
[img]http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10003/terre.jpg[/img]
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bill Johnson on February 16, 2007, 03:04:58 PM
Last winter this happened.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10003/Copy%20of%20Copy%20of%20IMGP0713%20A.jpg)

Now this winter we have this.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10003/100_0524.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10003/100_0525.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10003/100_0527.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10003/100_0528.JPG)

I'm pretty sure someone had some pretty mean explaining to do after this was all said and done with.

These pictures are attributed to logging operations in the central part of Ontario, say Bancroft-South River area or so I've been told.



 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on February 16, 2007, 04:53:18 PM
What kind of a lame brainer would take a piece of heavy equipment out into that soup swamp. Any man with intelligence could see that wouldn't be a good idea.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: stonebroke on February 16, 2007, 07:21:48 PM
I guess they don't float so well do they. I bet the owner was not the one who did it.

stonebroke
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SteveB on February 16, 2007, 10:36:13 PM
It's easy to look at that picture and wonder why anyone would venture into that area with equipment, but soft spots can sometimes be deceptive.  I've seen guys with many years of experince get in a pickle in areas that didn't look bad at all before-hand (never seen anything in real life go out of sight quite this bad, other than the odd picture floating around the internet)  A tracked machine like a buncher has a lot more flotation on their first pass through an area, and I've worked with them on ground that seems almost too soft to walk on.  It's the forwarders, or especially wheeled skidders that usually get into the trouble on the multiple passes over wet trails.  If the buncher's getting stuck you're prety much ... we lets just say good luck getting the wood out.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: logger on February 16, 2007, 11:17:13 PM
Did you ever get it out bill? :o :(
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on February 17, 2007, 07:15:50 AM
Well I guess you could also blame the guy doing the layout of the harvest. That would be considered wetland area and be buffered if the layout man was worth his weight. They normally running machinery through wetland and spring holes?  ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Woodhog on February 17, 2007, 09:41:26 AM
Just another day in the woods...!!!

Are we having fun yet????
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: leweee on February 17, 2007, 12:11:24 PM
Muskeg & Tea Berrie swamps have a way of letting you down :o ::) in that part of the country. Don't freeze even in the coldest winters....Trappers will walk around them. ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: thecfarm on February 17, 2007, 04:42:51 PM
He's back.Here's a piece of euipment he's added since he was here last Aug.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10436/grapple%7E0.jpg)


It's a John Deere grapple with a winch.It's not a big one,but this is what he wanted.He's been doing a real fine job with it.He's been going after the one's that are all over the lot.He's keeping one stand of white pine just in case we get a lot of snow again.He's ricking them up in the woods for the forwarder to pick up.Seems odd to see pine and hardwood mixed up in a pile.But that is what the forwarder is for,to sort out the logs at the landing.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bill Johnson on February 19, 2007, 07:53:55 AM
They were able to fish both these machines out eventually.  The one from last winter required them to corduroy the wet hole and using 4 excavators and a skidder they were finally able to get it out. 

Sorry I don't have any photos of the extraction process.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: stonebroke on February 19, 2007, 08:00:03 AM
What did they have to do to get them running again? I bet that was an involved process.

Stonebroke
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Stephen Alford on February 22, 2007, 07:39:10 AM
HI ya ! Took these pictures of a new (to me) creature in the woods awhile back. ::)(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12754/Picture%20093.jpg)
/img]
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Stephen Alford on February 22, 2007, 07:42:51 AM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12754/Picture%20092.jpg)
[/img]
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Stephen Alford on February 22, 2007, 07:46:18 AM
It also had a grapple attachment  as well as a brush mower for trail and road maintenance.(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12754/Picture%20092.jpg)
/img]
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Greenedive on February 22, 2007, 07:40:00 PM
Is that a JD, Stephen? Colors look like it.
Looks like a all-around do-everything machine...are those rubber tracks?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Stephen Alford on February 22, 2007, 08:23:40 PM
Hi ya!  It was a cat. Rubber tracks. It was doing trials and I was just there to watch. The drivers seat was bidirectional which was neat.  The trees were felled but the head was not a buncher style.  The clam was then put on and the trees dragged to a modified porter with an inch-worm on the front bunk.  I have seen big bunnies make deeper ruts.  Stephen
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on February 22, 2007, 08:33:15 PM
What kills a lot of these machine ideas is the fact they cost more than I can get out of the wood if I cut every stick, and that's not the way I want to manage my woods. ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on February 27, 2007, 07:51:02 PM
"Chaining" The Iron Mule. Chains are now needed on the Iron Mule forwarder so that it can negotiate the hills in the harvest area. The logging crew assists the "boss" laying on the cold ground under the mule with the task. Austin timber harvest, 1/07.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/iron_mule_chains.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 02, 2007, 05:50:36 PM
Iron Mule Forwarder Works On Hillside. Pulpwood is being loaded on the Iron Mule for forwarding to the landing. Chains on the front tires provides the traction needed on the snow covered slope. Austin timber harvest, 2/07.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/iron_mule_works%20_on_slope.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 05, 2007, 07:31:53 PM
Timberjack Forwarder. Unloading and sorting oak sawlogs at the landing. Austin timber harvest; 2/07.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/timberjack_forwarder_jim_budd.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gary_C on March 05, 2007, 09:09:49 PM
But that is what the forwarder is for,to sort out the logs at the landing.

All of my jobs have a variety of species of pulp along with red oak and maple sawlogs. I have found that it's easier to forward only one species at a time. It probably takes more driving thru the woods, but not more trips to the landing. But it saves a lot of time and trouble sorting at the landing. And it is much faster and a lot less trouble loading trucks with only one species in a pile.

Of course with a cut to length harvester, I try to keep each species piled separately in the woods. It just seems faster to keep the species sorted, rather than mixing and then resorting. Plus, I just hate to sort!

How does every else handle sorting?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on March 06, 2007, 09:48:46 AM
I was hauling everything out in mixed loads but it was taking forever at the landing to sort it.  Now I haul out one species of sawlogs and bolts per load and sort them at the landing.  It saves a lot of time, handling, and moving to different piles.  While loading in the woods I short stack the firewood so I can pick it up faster when I get back to it
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: thecfarm on March 06, 2007, 04:03:45 PM
Gary,this guy has been here 3 weeks and at least 20 trailer truck loads of white pine has been hauled out of here.This is really all that he is cutting unless a hardwood tree gets in his way.I've cut most of the hardwood that will make any good size logs.Out of the 20 and more loads,he hasn't cut enough hardwood to make a trailer load of pulp yet.That's what I meant by using the forwarder to sort logs.Wouldn't make sense to mix everything up and than sort it.He only has a few hardwood trees per each load of pine logs.Probaly knowing this guy he's pulling the small hardwood out first,than cuts the pine tree down.Once these pine goes down,it burys everything under the brush and you never see whats under it.This time he cutting alot of the scrub pine.Some crotch out 4 times,but are big at the butt for about 6-12 feet.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 06, 2007, 04:55:47 PM
You sure have a lot of pine on that lot. Does Irving buy it?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: thecfarm on March 06, 2007, 06:03:39 PM
Yes,swampdockey,your beloved Irving is buying it.They are begging for some pallet pine,just the stuff he is cutting.They cut out all the knots out,than dovetail it,and make a fortune on it.If they need it that bad,raise the price on it.  :D  :D  :D Irving in Dixfield will not be buying any good pine in about 2 weeks.Everyone is being shut off.I've been selling to them for 15 years or whenever they bought the plant from Dixfield Lumber.I always felt I got a good price from them.They will buy anything which was good when I was doing the cutting.If a hardwood tree was in the way,I could sell them a few logs and not have it sitting aroung going bad.I hope to get a tour of the plant coming up this spring.He should be able to come back about 2 more times and that will be it for about 20 years.I will let the rest grow.Need some for my sawmill.  ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 06, 2007, 06:52:44 PM
Figured.  ;D But, don't get too comfortable. They are just as likely to turn a 180 as bull in a ring. ;)

They were looking for pine in my area one time back in 1998 or so. But they got discouraged when it was explained that we might have 1 mature pine every 100 acres. They're 200 years too late, since it's mostly been cut and just the ones nobody wanted left standing. ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Craig on March 06, 2007, 07:15:30 PM
I just got the letter from Irving last week. Try Hancock Lumber, their specs are identical to Irvings and the prices are similar too! My biggest problem lately has been getting trailers down here in MA because they aren't sending any finished product down this way. They won't just send a trailer down empty.

Craig
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: thecfarm on March 06, 2007, 08:22:06 PM
I know about Hancock.In fact the logger I have use to sell to them,now he mostly deals with Irving.Just as well he is getting done,the scrub pine will buy us some time.I don't want him on mine land making any ruts.And he knows that.Mud season will be here soon.I would hate to tell him to leave.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 06, 2007, 08:23:17 PM
They will usually forward only one species to the landing at a time, but then sort the species by products and lengths such as veneer, grade logs, scrag logs, pulpwood, pellet stock, firewood, etc.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: thecfarm on March 08, 2007, 04:51:41 PM
This is what you don't want to see at your sawmill,hemlock shake

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10436/thecfarm14.jpg)


The straight line down the center is done by a chainsaw.Was bigger than 28 inches so it had to be split.The forwarder will split it the rest of the way.The other end of this 8 foot log looked a lot better.I would guess it's at least 70 years old,may even be up to 100.There were a few other trees,but the rest did not look like this.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10436/thecfarm7.jpg)


Winching a white pine up to the skidder.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 08, 2007, 04:57:41 PM
A 28 " (DBH) hemlock would be over 200 years up here.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: thecfarm on March 08, 2007, 09:27:00 PM
This tree was only 24"at DBH.I counted 110 rings.I could of missed a few.I know that hemlock grow slow.I only guessed and I was a little low.Some of the rings almost tounched in most years.Good thing I had a pen with me to keep track.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 09, 2007, 05:57:31 AM
What about the first 60 years, growing on top of one another, within an inch around the pith?  ;D ;)

j/k They will do well if growing in good conditions. I don't doubt your ring count.  ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on March 09, 2007, 09:44:45 AM
Here's some pictures I took while in Pictou NS last winter. The first pictures are a Timberjack 1010 forwarder and the last one is a 1270 harvester.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10408/ff-1.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10408/ff-3.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10408/ff-2.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10408/ff-4.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 16, 2007, 07:25:19 PM
4510 Iron Mule Forwarder. Waiting to start its forwarding job. Malmborg timber harvest, 2/07 & 3/07.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/4510%20iron_mule_forwarder.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/iron_mule_4510_forwarder.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on March 18, 2007, 08:36:12 AM
 Ron, I noticed that the centers of the machine and the loader not the same. does the loader have to hang on the front half somewhere when turning the machine?
 Can someone (PLEASE) let me borrow/give me ones of these. My skidder broke a drive U and did something to my transfer case so it chatters when pushed going down hill.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 18, 2007, 09:52:47 AM
Ed,
The loader sits on top of the bunk load and just pivots with the machine when turning.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 18, 2007, 10:06:07 AM
5010 Iron Mule Forwarder. This is a larger size iron mule forwarder recently seen along the roadside in Michigan's U.P. Note that the boom is pivoted and down on its opposite side.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/5010%20Iron_mule_forwarder.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: dail_h on March 18, 2007, 06:38:45 PM
   I agree with Ed K,"Will someone please give me an iron Mule?" Hear small spoiled brat boy voice. Dosen'thave to be pretty,well painted,old derelick ,abandoned ,ugly as me,,,,,,well ,not quite that bad,would be perfect. If you could deliver it for free would be even better ;D ;D ;D
   Dail,head down running for cover :D :D :D :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gary_C on March 19, 2007, 10:18:19 AM
Most of the early forwarders including Gafner's Iron Mules had the loader's mounted on the front half with the cab, some (not Gafner's) even had roof top mounted loaders. After Gafner was bought out by Valmet (Partek Forest Products) the 500 series and the 600 series Valmets had the loaders mounted on the front. Finally the Valmet 800 series machines had the loaders mounted on the bunk section where they belong.

Those early machines with the loader on the front were a pain for sure, but they are still very productive machines and many are still working daily in the woods. However if you have a lot of pulp wood to move, especially behind a harvester cutting 50-100 cords per day, you need a newer double bunk forwarder with six or eight wheels, mini joysticks, a loader with an extend a boom on the rear half, and an automatic transmission.

Yes, there are some older machines they are practically giving away.  :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 20, 2007, 02:48:13 PM
Woodhauler's are often given a personal name by their owners. Her "Sexy Lady" is being loaded with pulpwood at the landing. Gothard timber harvest; 11/06.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/wood_hauler_scott_renwick.JPG)

Some other owner named woodhauler's recently noted at work were:

"Pine Marten"
"Shorty"
"Mad Dog"
"Hooter Patrol"
"Hog Tied"
"Big Wolf"
"Attitude"
"Carpenter"

 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Kevin_H. on March 20, 2007, 03:47:31 PM
Hooter patrol...That cracks me up,
But hey, anyone giving of their time to watch out over owl's is ok in my book.  ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: farmerdoug on March 20, 2007, 09:13:51 PM
KevinH,

You crack me up. :D

Farmerdoug
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: olyman on March 25, 2007, 07:54:14 PM
good thread--but jeezz--took three nights to get thru it all!!!!!!! continue
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 17, 2007, 04:28:24 PM
John Deere 440-B Cable Skidder. This small cable skidder provides support for cabling trees out of wet areas and up hill sides where selectively cut trees can not be reached directly by the iron-mule forwarder. Malmborg timber harvest; 3/07. 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/john_deere_440-b_cable_skidder.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: logger on April 17, 2007, 06:42:12 PM
That's a nice looking/clean 440 there. 8) :) ;) ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Greenedive on April 17, 2007, 07:01:47 PM
Wow!!  :o
That early 70's machine looks brand new. I had one of those in the A-model many moons ago....
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 17, 2007, 11:00:49 PM
Yes, this logger takes exceptionally good care of his equipment. The best that I've seen with older equipment. The 4010 Iron Mule shown earlier is also his.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on April 18, 2007, 10:47:03 AM
 Just bought a 40A Tajfun 3pt winch. Pictures coming soon as I get it a little dirty  ;D . It'll be easier pulling 7/16s cable than 3/4 plus it comes with 200' of cable I shouldn't be pulling the end off so much.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 18, 2007, 05:03:48 PM
4510 Iron Mule Forwarder. The iron mule forwarder pulls a load of aspen pulpwood uphill on its way to the landing/decking area during a break in the weather. Malmborg timber harvest; 3/07.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/iron_mule_4510_forwarder1.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: thecfarm on April 18, 2007, 07:54:21 PM
Good luck pulling out 100 feet in a straight line through the woods.   :D   Looking forward to the pictures.That is a hyd winch,right?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on April 19, 2007, 08:05:29 PM
 thecfarm, no it doesn't have the hydraulics.When I went to look at the different sizes I found that the hydraulic ones still have a pto shaft to the winch and the price is almost double for the hydro-remote control. I started by looking for a fully hydraulic winch and couldn't find any that would pull more than 63' per min and theres no production in that.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on April 19, 2007, 10:03:49 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/5.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/3.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/2.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/1.jpg)
Pile of 10' grade and 100" sugar maple saw bolts.  Pile was started with a little seed on March 12 before the frost laws went on.  They went off yesterday at 8AM 8) 8) 8)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/4.jpg)
Winter's production of firewood.  Rough estimate is there's 140 cords in the two piles.  I've probably got another 30 cords or so to pick up  8)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/10.jpg)
Pile of 10 and 12' basswood grade logs.  Too bad they aren't worth more :(

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/11.jpg)
Beech sawbolts.  I'll have a train load to go out next week  :)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/12.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/13.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/14.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/15.jpg)
1st train of the day  8).  The 1st in five weeks actually :)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/16.jpg)
2nd train of the day  8) 8)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/17.jpg)
3rd train  8) 8) 8)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/23.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/21.jpg)
5th train  8) 8) 8) 8) 8) loaded with maple on the lead and 12' basswood on the pup.  We were just a bit short of maple grade for a full load.  I got to BSing with Mark as he was binding down the 4th load and forgot the picture ::) ;) ;D

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/22.jpg)
100" maple sawbolts and a few maple grade logs are all that's left of the big pile.  Mark'll be in tomorrow or Monday for them.  Shouldn't miss a train load by much if he comes in tomorrow and it'll be over that if he comes in next week.


Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on April 19, 2007, 10:12:40 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/18.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/19.jpg)
1975 Model 5000 Iron Mule with a load of maple saw timber

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/20.jpg)
Pic taken earlier when there was still snow and the tire chains were still on.  The load is hardwood firewood. 

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Norm on April 20, 2007, 07:30:01 AM
Holy cow you've been busy!

Great pictures Greg, thanks for showing us. :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on April 20, 2007, 08:25:53 AM
Looks like you need to subcontract some sawing.  ;) Wouldn't want them logs spoiling.  :( Looks like some fine saw logs there. To bad I'm so far away or I'd be over with the trailer after some bass carving stock and some beech turning stock. I'd love to have a banister and spools made of beech.  :) I never tried beech before but it has beautiful grain.  8)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on April 20, 2007, 12:12:51 PM
I'm not sawin em  ;D  The maple and basswood grade logs go to Baumgarten's Mill in Tower, Mi.  The maple sawbolts go to Robbins Flooring mill  http://www.robbinsfloor.com/  in Millersburg, Mi. and the beech and other hardwood sawbolts go to Bunker's Mill in Vanderbilt, Mi.  We cut quite a few beech this morning and talked about what nice logs they make but couldn't come up with any reason to saw any for our own use  ;) ;D  The plan is to run for another month then knock off for haying season, sawmill moving season, and barn repairing season then go back to the woods the end of August or so.  That's the plan anyway  ;) ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 20, 2007, 07:53:50 PM
Iron Mule 4510 Forwarder. Packs a load of aspen sawlogs to the landing/decking area. Malmborg timber harvest; 3/07.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/iron_mule_4510_forwarder2.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on April 21, 2007, 04:45:29 AM
What price are the aspen sawlogs? We were getting 280 mfbm for aspen veneer at one time. Not sure of the price now. Had to be chalk white, but knots didn't matter.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on April 21, 2007, 08:15:52 AM
125 bucks a cord for 10' logs with at least a 10" top. 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Stephen Alford on April 21, 2007, 07:04:09 PM
Started a new hardwood thinning. (RM 4 SM2 WB2 14m 81-90% CC ) In this part of the world I think we forest influence more than we forest manage. A personal goal is to try to maintain as much forest land base as possible. Whatever can be done to accomplish this is a good thing. The second objective is to meet the needs of the landowner. Offer the options however landowner rights still matter. If a landowner's choice is not something I can agree with then that is the time to move on.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12754/Fairview.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12754/Fairview%201.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12754/Rocky%20pt%204.jpg)
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12754/Ford_winch_grapple_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on April 21, 2007, 07:06:45 PM
One picture will probably suffice unless your trying to post 3 different ones. ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Stephen Alford on April 21, 2007, 07:14:28 PM
Ya ,goofed  somehow was trying to post 3 different pics,  had the before and after thing.  Stephen
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on April 21, 2007, 07:22:29 PM
You can use the 'Modify' button in the original post and place the other photo names from your gallery. Use the code by copy and paste from here into your modify post above. ;)

Maybe these are the photos ???

Code: [Select]
[img]http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12754/Thinning.jpg [/img]
Code: [Select]
[img]http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12754/Fairview%201.jpg [/img]
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Stephen Alford on April 21, 2007, 07:56:24 PM
Thanks SD  :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 23, 2007, 06:55:18 PM
Iron Mule 4000 Forwarder. Parked at the landing/decking area and ready to start a days work. This is an older and "somewhat used" machine, but performed well on this timber harvest with no down time. I'll be closing the job out tomorrow. Anderson timber harvest; 3/07.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/iron_mule_4000_forwarder.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on April 24, 2007, 05:21:03 AM
This is an older and "somewhat used" machine, but performed well on this timber harvest with no down time.

Yeah, looks like 'broken down bronco Bruce'  ;D :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: thecfarm on April 24, 2007, 08:01:37 PM
This is an old Timber Jack with some beech logs.Logs was nothing to brag about,but better than pulp prices.Was about 15 minutes from my house.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10436/thecfarmtj8.jpg)


This is the young guy helping out the old guy,John Deere 440G.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10436/thecfarm7jd.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 24, 2007, 08:06:50 PM
Iron Mule 4000 Forwarder. The "Old Girl" had her oil changed today and will now be moved out to another job. Her forwarded wood is now in waiting for the trucker.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/iron_mule_4000_forwarder1.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 26, 2007, 04:51:38 PM
Woodhauler "Fox #3" is preparing to leave with a load of oak sawlogs as the owner/driver climbs down off the loader. Anderson timber harvest; 3/07.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/woodhauler_elwood_fox.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on April 29, 2007, 09:23:54 PM
Logger's Pickup. Anderson timber harvest; 3/07

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/s_pickuo_hankins.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: arojay on May 01, 2007, 12:09:07 AM
 Logging in beetle killed spruce.
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/13930/skidding_spruce.jpg)

Head of Woods Operations
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/13930/woods_foreman.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: fury50 on May 11, 2007, 11:35:12 AM
Here is our home built, excavator based, combo forwarder/harvester. Used only as forwarder for now, we will install a Patu stroke harvester on it next week. It has a huge lifting capacity and fast loading speed due to is rotating cab. On 1000 hrs test, we had no major problem. We want to start production of this machine in 2008. More details on the tests and pics in harvesting mode soon.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/15631/003.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on May 13, 2007, 11:42:19 AM
I finally got a picture of the new winch on a clearing job. (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10257/tajfun%20winch%20at%20work.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawguy21 on May 13, 2007, 04:12:06 PM
Can you resize so we can see it? ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 14, 2007, 07:59:48 PM
Load of Oak Sawlogs. The Peterbuilt leaves the landing/decking area with a load of oak sawlogs. The 18 and 20 footers will be milled into crane decking material.
Austin timber harvest; 3/07.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/peterbuilt_trucks_oak_sawlogs.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawguy21 on May 15, 2007, 09:08:01 AM
I have never seen an axle setup like that. The first and fourth ones appear to be tags.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on May 17, 2007, 07:49:14 PM
 I down loaded a Hewett Packard photo program but I having problems making the photos to the 44 kb's when its small enough to be loaded into my folder it to blurry.
 Guess I need to look for a different free photo fix prog.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: beenthere on May 17, 2007, 09:30:41 PM
Ed
Regards the pic.
Did ya follow the good Help guidelines?

Resize to 450 pixels longest side first
Yer photo posted is way down to 99 pixels on the longest side. The file size then might take care of itself. Give it another good shot. 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: grassfed on May 18, 2007, 01:58:13 PM
Hi folks, I am posting some photos of some harvesting work that I did on my farm this winter.

Kingdom Hill Farm Aspen Harvest 2007
 
Aspen stand prior to felling note red arrow indicates where hard hat is for reference (note windthrow in backround)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14177/Christmas%202006%20012.jpg) (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14177/Christmas%202006%20014.jpg)
Aspen stand after felling red arrow is where hard hat was
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14177/Logging%202007%20013.jpg) (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14177/Logging%202007%20002.jpg)
 and some shots of the skid trail after harvest
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14177/Logging%202007%20003.jpg) (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14177/Logging%202007%20006.jpg)
aspen pulp by road waiting for mud season to end and some 20-24inch dbh 16 foot aspen saw logs
  (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14177/Logging%202007%20012.jpg) (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14177/Logging%202007%200.jpg)

I did most of the felling and skidding in 3-4 feet of heavy snow I did not take any pics while I was working because I was afraid that the camera would get smashed.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: isawlogs on May 18, 2007, 09:49:35 PM
 
  Nice , we did get a good load of that white stuff this winter , we have to meet up some day ... maybe later this summer when I get back from the Arctic ,  :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on May 19, 2007, 11:50:08 AM
  (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10257/tajfun%204.jpg)

 Thanks Marcel, I ended up doing the side pixels to 450 then used another photo shop to crop it and it worked.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: thecfarm on May 19, 2007, 09:03:39 PM
Nice set up you have there.I myself would like to see the front of the log up off the ground some.I have twitched out some good size ones with what I have and I've always have the front off the ground,not much at times.Now that I look at your winch I can see why.When my winch is raised like yours,my mast,the top pulley is a good 5 feet from the ground.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on May 20, 2007, 06:43:07 PM
 That was a posed picture. I usually have the butt up on the plate.I've found that I like this arrangement as there seems to be less pull on the cable and the butt can slide around on the plate when cornering.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 22, 2007, 07:41:44 PM
Logger's Pickup; GMC Diesel. Note large tool box, forwarder and skidder fuel supply tank, extra chain saw, chainsaw fuel supply tanks, oil supply container, and small tool box.  Malmborg timber harvest; 3/07
 
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/s%7E2.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gary_C on May 22, 2007, 09:42:42 PM
Yep, that's a logger's pickup, bent tailgate and all.  :D

Most of the loggers here have gone to cargo trailers at the landings. Some are pretty well equiped with generators, welders, air compressors, fuel, hydraulic oil, spare hydraulic hoses, spare parts, etc.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: leweee on May 22, 2007, 11:35:22 PM
Yep, that's a logger's pickup, bent tailgate and all.  :D
That's called a "Smileing" tailgate in the trade.. ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: grassfed on May 25, 2007, 09:50:46 AM
Hey Marcel,
Man the spring snow was tuff this year. I wound up working on the skidder through most of the winter (outside and on the snow) I did not start cutting untill the third week in March and by then we had a good 3-4 feet of very heavy snow. I got a set of ring chains for the front and the 440 would slowly chug through most of it but man it sure sucked fuel till I got the trail packed. All in all the three loads of pulp that I sold covered about 75%of what I spent on chains, parts, fuel and oil ::) The good news is that things should be ready for next year ;D.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 29, 2007, 08:19:22 PM
Some more Woodhauler Names noted while on the road.

* Low Bidder II
* Heart Beat
* Slow Ride
* Snatcher
* Coca Cola Kid
* Big Red
* Golden Comet
* Dakota Shane
* Half Breed
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 02, 2007, 05:32:28 PM
Ponsee "Buffalo" Forwarder. New Page red pine timber harvest; 5/07.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/ponsee_buffalo_forwarder.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 15, 2007, 06:42:26 PM
Chipping Red Pine Tops. New Page red pine timber harvest; 5/07.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/chipping_red_pine.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on June 16, 2007, 05:55:11 AM
Ron, I feel we need to do something like this with a lot of our red pine plantations as soon as the crown begins to lift (lower limbs die off). 6' x 6' spacing is pretty close for pines after 25 years.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: TeaW on June 16, 2007, 05:19:19 PM
What do they do with those Red Pine chips Ron ?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 16, 2007, 08:06:25 PM
Dumping a Load Of Chips. Chips are being dumped at the New Page pulp mill in Escanaba, Michigan. Chips are being used for boiler fuel at the mill, cogeneration plants, and for heating local schools depending upon the quality produced.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/dumping_chips.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on June 17, 2007, 11:54:18 PM
Looks like a pretty high dollar chipping operation! Do those drivers have the option of staying in the cab? :) One of my co-workers hauled grain for a while, dumping in Superior, Wisconsin. He had his wife along for a ride one day, they got to the dump and he gets out of the truck, thinking she will follow. She says she will just stay in the truck, so he tells her its a pretty extreme angle and she needs to get out. Well she makes a pretty big fuss so he let her stay. When she came back down she had her chips and coffee spilled all over her and her eyes were bugged out pretty good. They are divorced now
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawguy21 on June 18, 2007, 10:23:04 AM
This was discussed on another thread where the chip truck had slipped backward on the ramp. No one should be allowed to stay in the truck.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 18, 2007, 04:49:39 PM
Ponsee Delimber. Yes, this is a high dollar red pine timber harvest and chipping operation for biomass fuel. New Page red pine harvest; 5/07.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/ponsee_delimber.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: inspectorwoody on June 18, 2007, 08:45:53 PM
Information told to me: Red/White Pine clearing WI DNR is having done to reduce fire risk. Muscoda,WI 6/07

First time I've seen equipment like this up close and personal. Pretty neat.  :)

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10494/DSCN0789.JPG) (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10494/DSCN0790.JPG) (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10494/DSCN0791.JPG) (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10494/DSCN0792.JPG) (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10494/DSCN0794.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 22, 2007, 11:05:16 AM
Loading Chip Hauler. New Page red pine harvest; 5/07.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/loading_chip_hauler.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawguy21 on June 23, 2007, 12:58:44 AM
That is a serious chip trailer  :o Here that would be a B-train load.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 24, 2007, 08:14:47 PM
Biomass Baling Machine. Red pine biomass is being baled and tied into bundles for transport and use as biofuel at the mill. New Page red pine harvest; 5/07.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/bailing_biomass.JPG) [img]
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: thecfarm on June 24, 2007, 09:03:00 PM
Very interesting Ron.Any  more pictures of that baler?I had read a few articles about this,but have not seen a machine like that one to bale the biomass.Do have pictures of  the bales piles up,being hauled.How much does each one weigh?Biomass around here is not a big deal for a land onwer even though there is one plant about 15 minutes and another one about a hour away.Seems to be more up north.IP went though their woodlots around here and I don't think any went for biomass,all logs and pulp.How are they getting the bales out,with a forwarder?Who made that baler?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 25, 2007, 10:10:00 AM
This is a John Deere machine. They were working in a partnership with the timber producer for the biomass operatrion part of the harvest and demonstration for the machine.

The bales were moved around by a forwarder stacked on site and then transported by truck to the mill site for cogeneration fuel. I believe they said that the pine bales weighed around 300 pounds.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: stonebroke on June 25, 2007, 02:07:24 PM
Is that more efficient than just chipping them?

Stonebroke
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 25, 2007, 06:12:45 PM
The "slash bundler" machine allows for removal of addditional biomass fuel in the form of baled limbs, needles and tops which doesn't make for the "clean chips" normally required by the large boiler heating sytems, pellet manufacturing, etc. where  less green needles, leaves etc. is acceeptable.

This operation had 3  biomass fuel source operations going on at one time in addition to harvesting the pine pulpwood. One chipper was chipping the smaller delimbed roundwood for "clean chips" another chipper was chipping and tops and limbs with needles, "dirty chips", and the "slash bundler" machine was bundling the left over small limbs and leftover woody debris.

This was a "full tree utilization" harvest but with about 1/3 of the small slash, woody debris, and  fines retained on site for retention of soil productivity. 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 26, 2007, 01:41:01 PM
Slash Bundler. A bundle of red pine biomass leaves the machine. Also note processed bundles on the ground. New Page red pine harverst; 5/07.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/slash_bundler.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 27, 2007, 06:00:12 PM
Slash Bundler. A slash bundle is cut to bale size and dropped from the bundling machine to be forwarded to the landing/decking area. New Page red pine harvest; 5/07. 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/slash_bundle_is_finished.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on June 27, 2007, 06:24:53 PM
It's hard for me to see profit with the dirty chips, when I know from talking with local chippers that the profit is around $3 a ton for biomass in my kneck of the woods. Currently, there is one main chipper supplying the plant in Fort Fairfield, Maine at 200 loads a week and the marketing board had a small contract where an operator was sending 3 or 4 loads a week in. I think that small contract expired. Some of the stands the small operator was operating in would have been softwood sawlogs in 15 years and some were just pasture grown spruce or pulpwood potential sites. The purchase price of the fibre is fixed and the location of the next block is known well ahead for the large operator, he's on crown land. He also has access to a mountain of wood. For the small operator he has to haggle on price from every land owner for that fibre and go knocking on doors to find it.

My experience with red pine tells me it's not profitable in small diameter wood and we have no big demand for red pine pulp. Practically non existent. It's hit and miss at best. We have thousands of acres that are 2 to 50 year old plantations, most around 20 years old. Not quite big enough to do anything with, but needing thinning real soon and not with a brush saw. You can't even get near a red pine after 10 years with all those low, long reaching, branches. I'm going to thin a small section of red pine with brush saws and it's not going to be as easy as thinning spruce or hardwood.  ::)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 15, 2007, 09:56:28 PM
John Deere Grapple Skidder. A workhorse for tree length skidding on this red pine timber harvest. New Page red pine timber harvest; 5/07.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/j_deere_grapple_skidder.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 17, 2007, 06:01:54 PM
Chipping Red Pine Tops. The John Deere grapple skidder carries red pine tops to the chipper. Processed chips are then blown into the chip van.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/chipping_pine_tops.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Mr Mom on July 17, 2007, 07:30:27 PM
Ron...I think that trailer need more axles under it :D :D :D.

Thanks Alot Mr Mom
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawguy21 on July 17, 2007, 11:26:02 PM
I have to wonder why a chip trailer needs that many. ???
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: stonebroke on July 18, 2007, 07:26:30 AM
Maybe lotsa weight

Stonebroke
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawguy21 on July 18, 2007, 10:14:42 AM
The chips must be very wet. ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: OneWithWood on July 18, 2007, 10:15:36 AM
It must be a real drag cornering with that trailer  ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: isawlogs on July 19, 2007, 09:13:13 PM
It must be a real drag cornering with that trailer ;)

 Well not really ....  there is a switchs one can use in da dash to lift dem front and back drop axles .  ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Reddog on July 29, 2007, 02:12:06 PM
Flying some CATS into work. And a few trees going out also.

Flying Cats (http://youtube.com/watch?v=Ex_PJCPI49w)

http://www.youtube.com/v/Ex_PJCPI49w

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: farmerdoug on July 29, 2007, 09:06:43 PM
Michigan allows a really high loaded truck weight here but a lower weight per axle than other states.  That is why you will see so many axles on trucks here in Michigan. 

Farmerdoug
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 31, 2007, 12:20:43 PM
Yes, that is why and the weigh master really checks out that axel weight.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on August 02, 2007, 08:17:56 PM
Working at the marketing board I've seen as much as 45 tonne of green hardwood per load, a normal load would be around 34 tonne. Some of these little stream bridges out on country roads are only 20 tonne bridges.  ::)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on August 02, 2007, 08:33:52 PM
The whole truck isn't all on a short bridge at the same time  ;) ;D ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on August 03, 2007, 06:03:25 AM
It would be on the Shikatehawk. They gotta go around the other way I guess. No bridges there, 'cept down at the mouth where there is a heavier bridge on the 'Hawk'. Our bridge up on the farm, no it wouldn't span the whole bridge. But tater trucks are shorter and haul about 16 ton of taters during harvest, fertilizer the same during planting.  ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Dave Shepard on September 02, 2007, 07:06:00 PM
Kubota L48 with Farmi winch.  Small scale selective logging. I can harvest small quantities of logs with this setup without damaging the woodlot provided I wait for dry conditions. Here I am skidding full length, 40' to 48' stems. My skid trail allows this, but I will buck to length when it doesn't.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14240/logs.JPG)


Dave
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawguy21 on September 02, 2007, 11:03:32 PM
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11763/booming%20ground.jpg) (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11763/tug%20boom.jpg)
These were taken on Arrow Lake (Columbia River). The logs are decked then hauled down and dumped in the water as needed. The boom boat is busy organizing and securing the logs. Too far away to get a good picture of the tug but the ferry was held up over two hours while he passed with a huge boom. If he traveled any faster he would lose logs. A round trip with a truck would take a day.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 11, 2007, 08:49:27 PM
Iron Mule Forwarder. The old Iron Mule is slow and steady carrying a load of aspen pulpwood along the hillside. Anderson timber harvest; 4/07.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/iron_mule_anderson_sale.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 18, 2007, 11:46:05 AM
Some more Woodhauler Truck Names noted while on the road.

"Guard Dog"
"Chip"
"Snapper"
"Miss Elizabeth"
"Fetchin Sticks"
"Bearly Making It"
"Spoiled Rotten"
"Road Runner"
"Tree Hugger"
"Black Foot"

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 18, 2007, 05:08:18 PM
Timberjack Forwarder. Sorting oak sawlogs at the roadside landing. Austin timber harvest; 5/07.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/timberjacjk_forwarder_jim_budd.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Dave Shepard on October 18, 2007, 06:54:02 PM
When I first found this thread, I read through the whole thing, it was a little smaller, only 63 pages I think. :D Now that it's back, I'm going to read it all over again. 8)


Dave
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Dave Shepard on October 18, 2007, 07:39:46 PM
A good ending to this Thread as it dies for lack of interest!  :'(

Anything but dead, eh?


Dave
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 19, 2007, 01:09:19 PM
Timberjack 380B Grapple Skidder. Pulls a grapple of aspen tree lengths out to the landing for delimbing and chipping. State, Wheeler Creek timber harvest; 8/07.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/timberjack_380B_grapple_skidder.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Dave Shepard on October 19, 2007, 10:06:04 PM
I noticed there are some pictures that are no longer visable. In particular, I was looking for one that was at the front of this thread. It was some kind of forwarder, and possible a harvester, with two axles on the front and two on the back. It was huge, just slightly larger than Rhode Island.


Dave
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Furby on October 19, 2007, 10:14:10 PM
Dave, do you have a reply # for the post the missing pics are in, or maybe a link to the posts ???
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Dave Shepard on October 19, 2007, 11:44:23 PM
Furby, I went back through the first 12 pages and I found these: #24-Ron Scott, #94-Jeff, #174-Ron Scott. I think there might have been about a dozen throughout the entire thread. I know Jeff kept finding folders full of photos, didn't know if there were any more missing.


Dave
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Furby on October 19, 2007, 11:52:03 PM
#25 and #94 are off site links and serves as an example of what can happen if we allow them here.
They were used waaaaaaay back then, but we don't allow them now.
Basicly they are broken links.

#174 is a different issue.

If you right click on the red X and then click properties, it will tell you what the adress is for that item.
Try it on a forum pic and you'll get an idea of what it should look like.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on October 20, 2007, 07:45:55 AM
Wow, holly Toledo. I was just looking at the number of posts in this thread. And Ron was worried way back that the thread would sink. Not in this crowd.  ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 23, 2007, 11:53:08 AM
Timberjack Grapple Skidder. Taking "a break" at the landing of the total tree chipping operation. State timber harvest; 8/07.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/timberjack_grapple_skidder_malmborg.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawguy21 on October 23, 2007, 11:30:27 PM
Wow, holly Toledo. I was just looking at the number of posts in this thread. And Ron was worried way back that the thread would sink. Not in this crowd.  ;D
Don't stop now Ron, this is one of my favourites. ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: semologger on October 24, 2007, 11:18:46 PM
ron what size motor does that Timberjack have in it is it a 450? i have a 450 and it has a darn 453 detriot in it. it would never pull a bunch of wood with that size grapple.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 25, 2007, 10:35:26 AM
I don't know the specific size engines on these, but they will grapple a "bunch" of aspen tree lenghts in a pull with no problem.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 25, 2007, 10:58:59 AM
Aspen "Tree Length Bunch". One of the grapple skidders will move the "bunch" to the landing for chipping. State timber harvest; 9/07.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/aspen_tree_length_bunch.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: semologger on October 25, 2007, 10:59:10 PM
ron i have looked thru this forum alot. how do you get so many pitchures of equipment?
you have alot.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 26, 2007, 08:42:42 PM
I'm a consulting forester and usually take photos when I'm out administering  logging jobs, attending workshops, logging events etc.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 27, 2007, 11:51:39 AM
Prentice 325 Delimber. Set up at the landing to delimb tree lengths prior to chipping. State timber harvest; 8/07.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/prentice_delimber.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: semologger on October 28, 2007, 10:27:43 PM
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/15209/my%20cutter%20forest%20forum.jpg) (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/15209/skidder.jpg) (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/15209/IMG_2447%20loader2.jpg) (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/15209/IMG_2905.JPG) (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/15209/logging%20trailer.jpg) (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/15209/cab%20over.jpg) (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/15209/delimbing%20gate1.jpg) (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/15209/IMG_2883.JPG)

thats all folks
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawguy21 on October 28, 2007, 10:33:30 PM
The last pictures could have been in the B.C. interior. Very typical, except for the Freightliner cab over with the sleeper but a lot of guys are hungry right now.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 29, 2007, 09:59:48 PM
Trelan Chipper 233. The chipping unit for this chipping operation. State timber harvest; 8/07

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/trelan_chipper_233.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on October 31, 2007, 09:05:21 PM
Finally got around to taking some pict's of a current job thats taken more than 2yrs to complete due to being very wet.
Foley lot 10/07. This was before cutting.
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10257/before_cutting.JPG)
 Then after, its not the exact same placing by 50 odd ft.
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10257/after_cutting.JPG)
 Here's the Taylor pulling a turn.
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10257/bringing_out_a_turn_foley_lot.JPG)
 When we started this job 20mbf of beech were nice trees,2yrs later its all diseased.
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10257/beech_bark_disease.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 02, 2007, 09:36:15 PM
Loaded Chip Van. Ready to leave the chipping area with a load of chips. State timber harvest; 8/07.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/chip_van_malmborg.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: thecfarm on November 02, 2007, 09:45:29 PM
That critters got some tires under it.Around here they just use a regular 2 axle trailer.I have seen some special trailer boxes that dip down in front of the tires.If I ever have a camera by one that is parked I will take a picture.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Woodhog on November 03, 2007, 12:11:50 PM
I also noted the large amount of axles on that trailer, around here the max is 3, for a tri axle trailer with one having an airlift that you raise when empty
.
How do they make enough money to pay for the scuffed out tires on that thing when it is turning.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on November 03, 2007, 04:58:02 PM
Use these chip vans around here. Built in town.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11009/SD_BWS_CHIP.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 05, 2007, 07:27:19 PM
The Service & Support Vehicle. An important unit for every logging job. State timber harvest; 8/07.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/logger_service_truck%7E0.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 08, 2007, 08:33:56 PM
A "true" clear cut. This was primarily an over mature aspen stand. All trees were removed and chipped. State timber harvest; 9/07.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/clear_cut.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 19, 2007, 05:24:12 PM
4510 Iron mule Forwarder. Parked on the harvest area with a load to be forwarded to the landing while the operator takes his lunch break. Sheffer timber harvest; 10/07.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/4510_iron_mule.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: twobears on December 05, 2007, 02:10:32 PM

 i love this post..  ;D i also like seeing how every other logger does things.

 delbert
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bill Johnson on December 07, 2007, 10:22:07 AM
We seem to have lots of photos of equipment used to harvest, process, and transport wood but not a lot of shots of equipmnet used for silvicultural purposes.

This is the bracke (Bracke Kultivatorn) which I believe was designed and originally built in Sweden. It is a patch scarifier though the model used in parts of Canada had a seeding mechanism built into it just by the rear mattock wheels.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10003/Picture_025_trimmed.jpg)

My experience using the seeder was that this design would have been better served if it were left on the shelf. The seeder plates were alway jamming up with the aluminum latex used to coat the seed, and slightest amount of humidity caused the seed to clump up.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10003/Picture_024_trimmed.jpg)

This particular bracke is beginning used a patch scarifier this site will be hand planted next spring.  In this instance the prime mover used is a John Deere 648G.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 11, 2007, 03:57:28 PM
A few more "woodhauler names" noted while on the road.

"Logger's Limo"
"Got Wood"
"Sporting Wood"
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on December 11, 2007, 04:16:06 PM
I wanted to comment on what was used for scarification here on local private woodlots. That is the C&H plow. Unless you have dry ground your working on, this machine should never be allowed off the float. It will ruin a sensitive site in a hurry, then those rows fill with water like ditches. If you have a good dry site, it still is best to scarify in the fall and plant in spring so the loose air pockets get worked out by the natural elements (rain, snow, thawing). Still have to be careful of pockets of duff that got turned over, prone to drying out in the summer heat. On old fields we have good luck with plowing and then spray 2 or 3 years later.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Sunfield Hardwood on December 20, 2007, 06:57:56 PM
Here's my service truck I just assembled from a 1991 chevy 3/4 ton 4/4 that I bought new in 1990. I had the cab freshened up, it's just like new, then put the boxes on. it has a fuel tank for loaders and such,air compressor all kinds of tools, jacks, saws, shovel, fire ext, big first aid kit, extra clothes, oils, grease and grease gun, ropes, chains and lots of other stuff you could need on a logging job. It will be so much nicer than crawling over and digging through all that stuff in the old pickup bed. :) (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12782/91_chevy_servicetruck_after.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on December 20, 2007, 07:02:51 PM
Looks like a dandy. Secure enough to keep the tool thieves out.  ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawguy21 on December 20, 2007, 10:52:34 PM
That set up really does make the job easier.  8)  I have wanted something like it but then I would have to go back to work to justify it.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 21, 2007, 09:04:57 PM
Well done! Looks like a very good service vehicle with items available in time of need.
Title: 1270D Cut to Length
Post by: Bicboro on January 12, 2008, 08:38:44 PM
I currently run a 1270D doing mountain sides.  I've got 7000hrs on it so its alittle more work.  But come March 1st, I'll be getting my new 1470d.  I can't wait.  I've started posting stuff about it on my site...http://www.TheTreeHarvester.com.
Check it out.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/16513/e12.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: semologger on January 12, 2008, 10:09:33 PM
i liked your pitchure of the head and sun set/rise. put it on as a background.
good job nice one you dont see many like that perfect
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gary_C on January 13, 2008, 12:06:59 AM
That's a nice looking harvester. Tell us more about your operation and the kind of wood you are cutting. What kind of forwarder is that you have?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sleepy on January 14, 2008, 08:13:16 PM
Sometimes you have to use what you have. :D
Yea thats a FORD!  8)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/15831/0201071740a.JPG)


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/15831/0201071745.JPG)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zA9lJx7DaiA
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Scott on January 15, 2008, 04:36:53 PM
Oh come on! At least get a Chev  :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Furby on January 15, 2008, 05:06:52 PM
But he'd need the Ford to drag the Chev out. ;) :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on January 15, 2008, 05:57:29 PM
Once upon a time I got my old Chevy stuck but it was OK because it took TWO Fords to pull it out.  A full size Bronco and a Ranger.  My Ford owning friends couldn't rib me about that one  :) ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: semologger on January 15, 2008, 07:58:07 PM
i had my john deere 648E skidder pull out my chevy tracker yesterday. ;D wasnt much a pull though.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on January 15, 2008, 10:04:14 PM
 I ended up replacing the clutch on my ford ranger clearing for my log cabin thats now 22 yrs old, the ranger lasted 10. I've had every brand up pickup, always liked the one I'm driving now  ;D .
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on January 15, 2008, 10:07:14 PM
Toyota eh?  yikes_smiley  :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on January 16, 2008, 07:58:37 PM
 GMC  ;) . who knows what the next will be. Crummies I buy Crummies.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 04, 2008, 07:27:06 PM
Iron Mule 4510 Forwarder.Forwarding aspen pulpwood; Sheffer timber harvest; 12/07

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/iron_mule_4510.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rick Alger on March 05, 2008, 07:39:13 AM
Ron,

A few questions about the Iron Mule if you please. Are the bunks long enough for 16 foot logs? Can you load spotted trailers with the boom on the Mule? Is there a winch aboard for getting unstuck?

Rick
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Reddog on March 05, 2008, 11:44:40 AM
Rick,
Here is a good thread with lots of Mule info.

http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,21155.40.html (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,21155.40.html)
Post 50 covers long logs.
Short answer to your questions are, Yes stack 12's or less on top to hold them, Yes you can load a trailer and No winch from the factory, I have not seen one with a winch.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 05, 2008, 06:18:05 PM
Pretty much as Reddog said. We allow a maximum of a 17 foot log which they will carry on a topload. I haven't seen any with a winch either. Some have asked about the articulation joint between the operator cab and the wood bunk. He is a photo of the 4510. 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/4510_iron_mule_joint.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Rick Alger on March 05, 2008, 08:09:25 PM
Reddog and Ron,

Thanks for the info. 

Rick
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 06, 2008, 05:46:04 PM
Working in Deep Snow. Falling a hard maple in deep snow takes some extra effort. The sawyer must clean out to the base of the tree prior to starting his tree falling task in this selection harvest of northern hardwoods. Nixon timber harvest; 2/08.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/falling_hard_maple_deep_snow.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on March 06, 2008, 07:33:58 PM
 No fun limbing out either, one min the bole was up to my knees next it was at my chest. Took me a min, just to get back up on top of the snow. Makes for a real long day  >:( .
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 07, 2008, 07:39:30 PM
Winter Harvest. White ash sawlogs bucked to length with hard maple sawlogs laying in the background waiting to be picked up by the forwarder. The sawyer's saw oil and gas containers sit on the cut stump as he works on another tree nearby. Nixon timber harvest; 2/08.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/white_ash_logs_bucked_to_length.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Dave Shepard on March 07, 2008, 08:55:23 PM
How does the forwarder move amongst the saplings? Do you just pick the path of least damage?


Dave
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: rockenbman on March 07, 2008, 10:42:56 PM
 Most of the time I run my 87 Toyota 4x4 4cyl 4 speed truck for most cuting jobs,like hauln out fire wood, hedge post,brush.And my tools  8)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 08, 2008, 12:19:40 AM
The forwarder runs on existing trails and the paths of least resistence as you stated making effort to knock down the least amount of saplings and regeneration. Some future photos will show a Fabtek 344B forwarder at work.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: twobears on March 08, 2008, 08:20:32 AM

RON:thanks for the mule center section pic.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: thecfarm on March 08, 2008, 08:26:01 AM
I kinda think what Dave means.I had my lot cut.It's alot differant than what was posted.I had a lot of old white pine,not much small stuff growing around the trees,like in the picture.He also had a graple,cable skidder too.There was some spots where they would use the skidder to bring the logs to the forwarder.I saw quite a few places where they would pull up along side of a tree that was not bucked to lenght and pull it to him on the forwarder.This required a guy with a chainsaw to be there to buck the tree to log lenght.I should of taken a picture of that.Looked real odd to see a 3 by 80 foot path in the woods.A forwarder CAN do a nice job.Depends ALOT on the operator.You still need trails to get the wood out no matter what.But with a forwarder the logs are being carried out,not dragged out.Alot less damage is done to the ground with a forwarder.I have a steep hill that is the only way across the bog.This hill would of been at the bottom if they would of been skidding the logs.There is less barking up of trees too.My land is kinda of a challange,big rocks,small mounds of dirt,trees I wanted left.I saw one spot where they had to stop and back up the forwarder to save a few trees and go around a big rock.I would not let just a skidder crew on my land.I watched this guy cut for more than 20 years.I do have pictures in my gallery.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 08, 2008, 12:11:23 PM
Well there is no blanket prescription as to what machine to use. The ground, local climate/season and the vegetation (trees and such)/available seed (good seed years) should dictate the proper system every time. Most of the time it's just $$ driven when you look out the door and see one lot after the other clear cut.  ::)

For instance, a woodlot that was picked through for firewood often grows back with beech in the understory. You could carry the dang firewood wood out by hand or use a machine, still beech regen on some sites. Up here, beech is about as bad as having pin cherry because it all gets infected with disease. I've had instructions from some woodlot owners who want PCT done to cut every one of those %$%$ beech and save all the maple and birch that you can, even aspen is better than growing junk.

Another scenario is cutting hardwood using a type of selection. But, the understory is overtaken by fir that is 40-60 years old, hollow butted and 8-15 feet tall. The S maple and yellow birch may have been very poorly regenerating. Not too hard to age fir if it's intact on the stump and not rotten, whack some off the stump and count rings throughout your work area. Now, you gonna save old suppressed trees about the end of their life? What machine do you use and what type of harvest do you used to help get S maple and Y birch coming?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 08, 2008, 05:35:23 PM
Fabtek 344B Forwarder. Works its way through a northern hardwood winter selection harvest. Nixon timber harvest;2/08.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/fabtech_344B_forwarder.JPG) (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/fabtech_344B_forwarder_1.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: JLeBouton on March 08, 2008, 09:22:13 PM
Fabtek 344B Forwarder. Works its way through a northern hardwood winter selection harvest. Nixon timber harvest;2/08.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/fabtech_344B_forwarder.JPG) (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/fabtech_344B_forwarder_1.JPG)

Looking good! 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Dave Shepard on March 08, 2008, 10:27:12 PM
Yeah, that looks like a nice comfy way to get the logs out! ;D


Dave
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on March 08, 2008, 10:55:26 PM
Does that Fabtek have a squirt boom  ???  That's a feature I'd like.  It seems like the boom on Iron Mule is always just a little too short  :) :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 09, 2008, 09:54:40 AM
No its not a squirt boom, but it has more reach than the iron mule. Its a bigger machine than the iron mule and can also handle the heavy snow and hills much better. Of course it carries a bigger payload also.

A good operator is key to operating it in selection hardwood thinnings so as to damage the least amount of regen and skinning of the better quality leave trees.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: moonhill on March 09, 2008, 10:26:14 AM
A person could spend hours going through this thread!  Tim B.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: semologger on March 09, 2008, 04:00:30 PM
actually around 18 and a half hours. Slow reader. ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 09, 2008, 05:25:52 PM
 :D :D :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 09, 2008, 06:44:06 PM
Fabtek 344B Forwarder. The forwarder operator provides assistance to the  sawyer in getting the hard maple hanger safely down for bucking. He will then pick up the sawlog lengths for transport to the landing/decking area. Nixon timber harvest; 2/08.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/fabtec_344B_forwarder_assists_with_hanger.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: TeaW on March 09, 2008, 07:28:30 PM
Ron  does the sawyer have a machine (skidder ) with him or does he rely on the forwarder for that. How small do they take the wood down to.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 09, 2008, 11:51:09 PM
The forwarder picks up the cut-to-length sawlogs that the sawyers have bucked at the stump. We usually take the wood down to a 4 inch top, but on this sale sawlogs to an 8 inch top were removed. The landowner wanted the pulpwood and topwood left for his own firewood use.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 10, 2008, 02:49:19 PM
Fabtek 344B Forwarder. Unloads sawlogs at the landing/decking area. Nixon timber harvest; 2/08.
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/fabtech_344B_forwarder_unloads_at_the_landing.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 11, 2008, 04:54:32 PM
Western Star Woodhauler. The Western Star woodhauler arrives at the landing/decking area for a load os sawlogs. Nixon timber harvest; 2/08.

The woodhauler turns around at the end of the landing while the Fabtech forwarder continues unloading its bunk of sawlogs.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/western_star_woodhauler.JPG)

The woodhauler moves into position to the log deck for loading while the Fabtech forwarder is moving around behind it.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/western_star_woodhauler1.JPG)

The woodhauler prepares to start loading while the Fabtech moves to unload its sawlogs on the opposite deck.
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/western_star_woodhauler2.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: rockenbman on March 11, 2008, 09:05:58 PM
 I sure wood like to have a forwarder ;D it make for a easy day in the timber. how long of saw logs does it handel ?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ed_K on March 11, 2008, 09:24:22 PM
 I noticed orange & blue paint on one tree, is that the cut boundry?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 12, 2008, 12:11:51 AM
Forwarders of this size bunk will carry 8-17 foot sawlogs. The shorter logs are placed on the bottom with the longer logs being placed on the topload.

The trees with the blue painted ring at breast height and stump mark are the trees to be cut. The orange spots are marks made by a timber purchaser while looking at the sale prior to bidding. Some timber buyers will place their own marks of another paint color on the trees while making their own volume cruise, designate veneer trees, etc.

Our cutting boundarys are marked with red painted line trees. A blue painted "W" on a tree is a wildlife tree not to be cut. A blue painted "X" on a tree is an unmerchantable tree that is not in the tally, but may be cut at the purchaser's option.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 12, 2008, 05:52:56 PM
Western Star Woodhauler. It is loaded and the load chains are tightened. Plans are to move off 3 loads of sawlogs today. Nixon timber harvest; 2/08.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/western_star_woodhauler3.JPG)

The Western Star is "ready to roll" with its sawlog load.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/western_star_woodhauler4.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 14, 2008, 08:38:30 PM
Daylight On The Landing. Nixon timber harvest; 2/08.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/daylight_on_the_landing.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on March 24, 2008, 07:51:24 PM
Logger's Pickup. One can easily recognize a logger's pick-up as it shows the tools and wear of the trade including the empty pop cans inside on the floor. ;) Sheffer timber harvest; 12/08.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/logger_s_pickup_doug.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Dave Shepard on March 24, 2008, 08:01:26 PM
I've never seen a loggers truck that didn't have a pail of hydraulic fluid in it. :-\


Dave
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gary_C on March 24, 2008, 09:13:28 PM
And a bent tailgate.   :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Coon on March 24, 2008, 10:41:54 PM
That tailgate has got many hours of use left in it yet?  You should have seen ours at work last summer.  Had it been clean one could have used if for a large salad bowl. :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 24, 2008, 10:43:40 PM
One can easily recognize a logger's pick-up as it shows ...................the empty pop cans inside on the floor. ;)

 :D :D :D Yup,very true and the back of the pickup with cans and coffee cups at times. :D Oh, man the times I've gone for rides in a logger's pickup and the rubbish under my feet.  ::)

Famous last words: "I told my son to keep this truck clean, but I can't do anything with'im." :D :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Craig on March 25, 2008, 10:52:28 AM
My tailgate isn't bent but there is always hydraulic oil in there.

Craig

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10792/pickup1_copy.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: isawlogs on March 25, 2008, 12:28:59 PM
My tailgate isn't bent but there is always hydraulic oil in there.
[

 There is a very important little word you fogot to put in there between " bent but " . That little word would be   My tailgate isn't bent yet, but there is always hydraulic oil in there.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on March 25, 2008, 02:09:36 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/Logger_truck.jpg)

It's not as straight as it looks  ;) ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on March 25, 2008, 02:14:02 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/Mule_in_the_woods.jpg)

Iron Mule and beech saw bolts
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on March 25, 2008, 02:20:10 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/Holding_Wood.jpg)

What happens when your back cut isn't level and you cut through the holding wood  ;) ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Dave Shepard on March 25, 2008, 02:29:12 PM
Gas cans: check
Chainsaws: check
Fuel tank: check
Pail of hydraulic oil: check
Banana tailgate: hmmm, are you sure it's a logger's truck? Looks pretty straight to me. ;D


Dave
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on March 25, 2008, 02:56:44 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/Basswood_Logs_and_Leaner_Mess.jpg)

Basswood logs to be forwarded and a couple hangups.  One was a natural blowdown.  The other was fallen into it to dislodge it and after trying to pull it out with the Mule's loader it ended up 12' in the air.  Had to cut the top out to get it back down and then it was like cutting ends off a teeter totter one at time  ;) ;D  You should never fall trees into others to get them to fall down  ;) ;D  This was actually the second one I'd fallen on it.  I finally had to hook a chain to the orginal and pull it down with the Mule.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/Iron_Mule_basswood.jpg)

Collecting basswood logs

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/Iron_Mule_basswood_III%7E0.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/Iron_Mule_basswood_II.jpg)

Mule and basswood saw logs

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/Iron_Mule___Truck_II.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/Iron_Mule___Truck_I.jpg)

One of Everingham Enterprise's Western Stars.  Mike's putting his cross chains on the pup.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10027/Me_beech_II.jpg)

Me, Jonsered 2186 and a hollow beech.  Beats wearing a tie to work any day  8) 8) 8)

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on March 25, 2008, 03:04:17 PM
That truck's tailgate's been a real survivor  8)  It's got a crease on the outside from the old straps breaking when I flipped a round bale out of the bed and has had enough bar, hydraulic and other oils spilled on it that it'll never rust  ;D ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Dave Shepard on March 25, 2008, 03:06:12 PM
The inside of my pickup bed won't rust either. Did you know those rubber floor mats will grow about two feet when they are saturated with diesel?


Dave
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on March 25, 2008, 05:06:29 PM
That's an awesome beech Corley, even if it was hollow.  ;)

Wish our beech was smooth. I don't know how you guys escape scale, because they like warmer, not colder climates. Maybe one saving grace is the females can't fly (I think that's true  ::) ). Nature is interesting at times.

Nice basswood logs, your cutting those as if they were as thick as sugar maples in our woods. ;D

Who needs a tie me down, eh?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on March 25, 2008, 05:23:15 PM
  Beech scale is on it's way to us  :( :'( :(  It's been in the eastern half of the UP for a while and is in the NW tip of the LP now.  The DNR attempted a control cut when it was first found in N Emmet County but it's since been found in other areas there also.  So it's only a matter of time now.  The theory is it came in from the UP on birds.  The scales are assexual and are only mobile for a short while in the spring I believe.  Birds and wind are their primary modes of transport.  That's how I remember it but I haven't read the literature in a while  ;) ;D  I'd prefer to leave beech standing for wildlife mast and shelter but they're goners anyway and this harvest site is going to be sold and the owner wants everything merchantable taken out.  Lots of firewood in one of these brutes.  Solid ones go for hardwood saw bolts.  This area was pretty thick with basswood and a few sugar maple.  It's pretty thin of anything now  :) :)
  Dave,  that mat musta been trying to climb out of the bed on its own  eh eh
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tillaway on March 27, 2008, 10:35:31 PM
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10098/DownHillYarding_Pic_01.jpg)

A little down hill cable yarding Westwood Timber Sale 3/26/08.

http://www.youtube.com:80/watch?v=7QKqbVPY3QM (http://www.youtube.com:80/watch?v=7QKqbVPY3QM)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bicboro on April 13, 2008, 10:20:23 PM
I am harvesting mountain sides.  It's quite a challenge, but I think I'm up for it.  I run 1270D wheeled harvester, but we put tracks on it.  I have a 1710D forwarder picking up behind me.  These pics are from January 08.  I traded these in, in April, and my new ones were delivered today.  I'll put up some pics of the new one soon.

PHOTOS MUST BE IN YOUR FORESTRY FORUM GALLERY
See instructions here:
Link (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=help)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on April 14, 2008, 04:40:57 AM
Nice machines Bicboro. But hard on the dial-up. Should squeeze some bytes out of them and resize down to 450 per long side. Then upload them to your forum gallery. ;)

Do they do pre-commercial thinning on clearcut sites at a later date down there? Or just let it go wild?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 07, 2008, 05:38:01 PM
Sale Closure.The timber harvest contract has been completed. The landing has been cleaned of all woody debris and graded. The iron mule forwarder is now driven onto the lowboy for transport to the next job. Sheffer timber harvest; 4/30/08.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/sale_closure_loading_iron_mule.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 09, 2008, 07:29:04 PM
Sale Closure. The landowner (wearing suspenders) and the logger (in black sweatshirt) discuss a "job well done" on the 80 acres as the iron mule forwarder is loaded on the lowboy and ready the be hauled off the job. Sheffer timber harvest; 4/30/08.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/sale_closure2.JPG)

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/sale_closure1.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 12, 2008, 01:32:01 PM
 On its Way. The iron mule forwarder leaves the harvest area. It will be trucked home for a rest and maintenance and then on to the next job. Sheffer timber harvest; 4/30/08.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/on_its_way_iron_mule.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gary_C on May 12, 2008, 02:12:54 PM
Ron, thats a nice wrap up for a good job. How long did this job take from the initial contact to you thru the bid, contract, job start and then finish? 

Most of the state jobs I do here are 5 year contracts, and there are good tax reasons to hold a logging contract for at least a year before harvesting and on a sold as appraised job there are additional growth incentives to hold contracts as long as possible.

However, I know that most private landowners do not have the patience that the government has on logging jobs.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on May 12, 2008, 07:29:02 PM
Gary, that's for sure. It's usually cut and run on woodlots here and you can see the results as most woodlots get liquidated in a harvest or so badly high graded that what gets left should be burnt.  ::)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 12, 2008, 08:04:38 PM
Gary,
Time frames on this job were as follows:

(1) September 22, 2005, landowner contacted me to look at their 80 acres of hardwoods and aspen. I met with the landowner and prepared a management prescription for their timber management. The landowner didn't want any activity on the property until after the October - December, 2005 deer seasons.

(2) January 6, 2006,  the landowner contacted me and signed an Agreement To Prepare & Manage Private Land Timber Harvest.Work on the property was now authorized.

(3) February 4 - March 4, boundary lines were checked and marked, timber was selectively marked and cruised. Round trip travel was 110 miles.

(4) March 21, 2006, Timber Sale Proposal, Bib Sheet, Timber Sale Area Map, and sample Private Land Timber Contract were prepared for approval by the landowner.

(5) April 15, 2006, Timber sale was put out on bids for a May 2, 2006 bid opening.

(6) A number of producers looked at the sale but markets were now going "soft" and most were "backed up" with wood to be cut. There was one bid that was acceptable.

(7) The Harvest Contract was signed on May 16, 2006 with an expiration date of April 30, 2008.

8.  September 12, 2007, the purchaser started the harvest with the intent to complete it in a short time frame. However with slow markets and backed up with wood on other sales they had to complete the job dragged out for 6 1/2 month until the very last day of the contract, April 30, 2008. This job was carried on longer than usual, mostly because of the poor markets.
 
I've found that logger's are never as timely as they say they will be. When they say tomorrow, it's usually two weeks from tomorrow.  ;)

The producer was one of my better ones, but poor markets and the reasons you mentioned caused their late start-up and slow production. Once they started they were slow and consistent, but did a good job overall.

Over all from first meeting with the landowner until harvest completion it was just over 2 1/2 years. I usually allow enough time on my contracts so as to get the better producers and bidders and I inform the landowners of this though they may sometimes get inpatient.  
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on May 13, 2008, 05:01:01 AM
Yeah, quite a while to complete. You can get a few producers to do a good job, but you have to watch most of them close. Some tend to high grade if not watched over, and some take a long while and you wonder how they pay the bills. Had one guy that took 3 years and the owner was a town. They had budgeted $45,000 a year from harvests from a 300 acre woodlot. $45,000 was close to the figure from the volume removed in those 3 years. It took 3 years and the owners were at a point where they were calling everyone involved thieves.  That same lot had been badly high graded 10 years before. ::)

At the same time I looked after another lot that we harvested in the months of January-March over two years and collected the same amount of money on 80 acres. The job looked real good and you couldn't even see the skid paths after 3 years. Chalk full of regen. We had about 6 acres of clearings (I measured them), plus roads and the clearings where no bigger than 2 acres and down to less than 1 acre. It was areas of mature fir and aspen. Some of the aspen was veneer, most of the hardwood removed was small and low grade.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: AlexHart on May 22, 2008, 09:34:34 PM
Well I've just recently joined this forum and I have really enjoyed reading this thread, especially seeing how you midwestern guys seem to put these 4 wheel forwarders to such effective use.   Almost nobody runs machines like that out here.    I just purchased a 1987 Franklin 132 forwarder from out in NW Illinois and had to pay to get it trucked all the way out here to Connecticut and can't wait to try it out once all the repairs are made on it.   Maybe I can get some pics and add something to this thread.   
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Dave Shepard on May 22, 2008, 10:23:12 PM
Welcome to the Forum! You can't be too far from me, I'm just over the line in MA


Dave
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: AlexHart on May 23, 2008, 09:09:00 PM
Thanks Dave,   I had never heard of Alford Mass and I just looked it up and you aren't very far from me at all.   I truck quite a bit into Bob Beham's yard in Ashley Falls and hauled a lot of logs off of Mt. Washington this winter which looks very close to you.  Its pretty funny I'd never heard of your town and I drove right by it dozens of times the last few months. If you ever need trucking or anything let me know.   
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Dave Shepard on May 23, 2008, 09:30:36 PM
I'm about ~20 minutes from Bob. He said he stops by the Forum once in a while.


Dave
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: timberfaller390 on May 30, 2008, 10:42:24 PM
WOW took a full week to get through that one, and that was just skimming through to look at all the purdy pictures. :D I especially liked the 3 pictures of the old log trucks,except for my saw and tractor all I run is old junk.. I mean antique equipment   ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Harvester on June 03, 2008, 03:37:45 PM
Hi all,
I'm new to this forum, I just dreamed that I was -25 years and could start with the gear that below link shows:
http://www.e-series.fi/revolution/index.htm
The younger has a pretty good start nowadays with excellent machines, I had a TJ404 with "open cab" and the blue heaven above my hard hat, free exhaust smoke in my face.
 :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: stonebroke on June 03, 2008, 04:33:16 PM
wonder how much they cost?

Stonebroke
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: semologger on June 04, 2008, 06:53:26 PM
I want a couple of the simulators. They look like fun.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: stonebroke on June 05, 2008, 08:06:22 AM
semologger

 The real things would be much more fun.

Stonebroke
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: zackman1801 on June 05, 2008, 05:58:33 PM
I want a couple of the simulators. They look like fun.

we have four computers in our forestry class with both Harvester and Forwarder simulators on them. they are pretty cool because with the joysticks you buy for the software the controls are actually very similar if not the exact same as alot of Valmet equipment.  the only things these lack is graphics. the graphics are utterly horrible, the limbs on the trees are just green triangles on the stem, and the white birch trees look like someone painted a spruce tree white.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Harvester on June 11, 2008, 03:05:10 PM
wonder how much they cost?

Stonebroke
Stonebroke, according to a Scandinavien Forestry News magazine price for the harvester 1470E is US$ 616,000 and the forwarder 1270E is US$ 450,000, Cheap  ::)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: stonebroke on June 11, 2008, 05:34:09 PM
I wonder how much wood you would have to cut ina average day to pay for that?

Almost like you are working for John Deere.

Stonebroke

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on June 11, 2008, 06:05:38 PM
Up here it means a lot more woodlots will suffer with the clear cut mentality pushed onto the operator to pay for them. It's more about finance sometimes than management.  ::)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: beenthere on June 11, 2008, 06:54:57 PM
.............Almost like you are working for John Deere.
.....

What does that comment mean?  and directed at who?   :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Woodhog on June 12, 2008, 09:57:55 AM
Maybe they mean John Deere FINANCE Division..

It would only then cost around a million dollars to get some wood out and sell for nothing.

Here now you have to run 3 processors to make what at one time you made with one.

Lets also buy a tractor trailer and loader to have the complete package and haul our own wood. The cost per mile for fuel on the highway for that is only about $1.15 per mile around here.

It looks like fun tho sitting in there with no blackflies chewing you up... :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: stonebroke on June 12, 2008, 01:05:59 PM
.............Almost like you are working for John Deere.
.....

What does that comment mean?  and directed at who?   :)

It means that you are working real hard just to pay the equipment off and you really don't make any money except for the equipment maker. It is common among us farmers.

Stonebroke
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: beenthere on June 12, 2008, 01:56:44 PM
Thanks, now I "see"... 8) 8) :) :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 17, 2008, 12:38:10 PM
Our Next Job. Last week's severe storms have caused a lot of blowdown and tree damage to local woodland areas. This is a salvage job we have started the field work on today. Not our favorite kind of work areas.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/maturen_blowdown.JPG)

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/maturen_blowdown1.JPG)

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/maturen_blowdown2.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: zackman1801 on June 17, 2008, 06:21:34 PM
looks like a big mess, lots of springpoles to deal with.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on June 17, 2008, 06:33:36 PM
What a nightmare to work in. Is a lot of that aspen? Seems like small root balls.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 18, 2008, 10:47:38 AM
Yes, it is mostly aspen with areas of standing sawlog size aspen that should have been harvested several years ago. The landowner realizes that, but just didn't. We are going to harvest all of the aspen and downed red maple and oak in and around the blowdown and leave the intermixed standing red and white oak for wildlife. It should end up looking like a shelterwood cut.

There is also a small blowdown area of red pine plantation of pole size timber that we will try to have cleaned up also.

Yes, a mess and not the safest areas to work.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: twobears on June 18, 2008, 04:53:15 PM

 last week we also got a very bad wind storm. saddly,i lost a friend in it as he was running a log loader the storm hit.he saw a tree coming for the loader and tryed running for safety.he didn,t make it.he was going down the steps of the loader and got hit acrossed the back.he died right there..  :'(

 delbert
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 18, 2008, 08:05:52 PM
What a sad incident.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: twobears on June 18, 2008, 09:02:02 PM

 YEP RON:that really bothered me.who would ever think that a tree would get ya as you ran a log loader.i can see a log getting away from ya,the loader busting,or falling off the loader..but,hit by a blow down?? i figured i,de post it so everybody else would know it can and has happened.. :'( i worked with kenny for several years on a logging job.

 delbert
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: beenthere on June 18, 2008, 09:40:53 PM
No ROPS on that log loader?  Sorry to hear about it, but might have been safer lived by not jumping off, i.e. leaving the protection of the ROPS.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: semologger on June 18, 2008, 10:12:00 PM
Sorry to hear about your friend Two Bears. We had a bad twister a few years back. We took on a 20 acre job. Mostly white oak and red oak. It didnt take long for us to get back to the pine thicket. I hated it i ran the skidder and had a guy running the saw. He knew what he was doing thank goodness. I was happy for that job to be done.

Most guys around here that did good on the jobs used a Bell cutter with a dangle head.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: thecfarm on June 19, 2008, 07:08:08 AM
Hindsight is always 20/20.
Sorry to hear about Kenny.That was a freak accident.That is too bad something like that had to happen.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: twobears on June 19, 2008, 08:43:23 AM

 BEENTHERE:log loader cabs are mostly for comfort not stopping falling trees that inch square tubing and 1/8inch steel plate won,t stop much.it,s tough to stand your ground when a trees coming at you.it,s to bad he ran tho.if he had stayed in the loader he would still be here.but,like i said it,s tough to stand your ground if a trees coming at you.
 CFARM:your right..talk about being in the wrong place at the wrong time.i,ve been thur tornato's(sp) 100 mph straightline winds,ect,ect,ect and i can say that storm was the most violent storm i,ve ever been thur.the wind went from about 10 mph to over 70 mph in a split second and it rained so hard i think a fish could have swam thur the air.the whole house shuttered when the wind first hit...it sounded like a big truck hit the house.

 delbert
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 19, 2008, 11:06:22 AM
Mother Nature continues to show us "who is boss".
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on June 19, 2008, 03:53:04 PM
Yeah, just rotten luck. When your in panic mode you don't think too clear some times. Sad you lost your friend.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on June 22, 2008, 05:25:53 PM
The center mount loaders we use up here don't have any kind of operator protection, just a seat. Slasher loaders that have cabs usually don't contain a ROPS, it's just to keep you out of the cold.  Sorry to hear about your friend, twobears.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: redneck logger on August 09, 2008, 02:07:56 PM
heres whats going to be on my crew

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17515/h822-2pi.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17515/610-demo.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gary_C on August 09, 2008, 02:55:05 PM
That's a nice looking tracked harvester. Is that one of those big Valmet heads on that machine?

Do you always use graple skidders rather than forwarders behind your harvesters?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on August 09, 2008, 04:03:50 PM
Grapple skidder is quite commonly used with processors here Gary. I find that a skidder makes for a better catch of new regeneration. Often a processor will tear up advanced regen from a lot of operations I see. And some advanced regen is best torn up if it's 50 year old fir 4 feet tall. If the timing of the harvest is right the fir, spruce, sugar maple and yellow birch will come back thicker than dog hair. ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: redneck logger on August 09, 2008, 07:04:07 PM
sorry thats what i want when im older im only 13
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gary_C on August 10, 2008, 03:54:02 AM
The only jobs here that use a grapple skidder behind a harvester are in steep terain where the danger of rollovers with a forwarder is just too high.

There is just no way to keep up with a harvester without a good forwarder and even then it's difficult. Even a forwarder is seldom used for long distances like over a half mile. When you have to haul farther than that, they usually fix the road up for the semi's and use intermediate landings.

Also on many of the jobs we get now there are multiple species and cut lengths to deal with and hauling small bundles is waay too time consuming and sorting is even worse.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: thecfarm on August 10, 2008, 04:27:19 AM
Forwarders are common here now.Seems like if you have 2-3 guys a forwarder is used.When my lot was cut they used a forwarder and a grapple.I had a couple steep area that he wanted to use the skidder.Trees were to big for the havester or he would of used that.There are still some guys that cut alone that only have a skidder.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Dom on August 10, 2008, 04:29:37 PM
That's a nice looking tracked harvester. Is that one of those big Valmet heads on that machine?

Do you always use graple skidders rather than forwarders behind your harvesters?

The head is a Logmax. I'm assuming a 7000. The harvester looks like a Tigercat 822.
Logmax heads are very productive units.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: zackman1801 on August 10, 2008, 11:37:13 PM
Forwarders are common here now.Seems like if you have 2-3 guys a forwarder is used.When my lot was cut they used a forwarder and a grapple.I had a couple steep area that he wanted to use the skidder.Trees were to big for the havester or he would of used that.There are still some guys that cut alone that only have a skidder.
the only really mech logging around my area is for big companies that work directly for paper mills and the sort. mostly they just cut softwood for pulp and chip the tops and small trees. But the most common operations are usually just  guy or 2 and a skidder.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: thecfarm on August 11, 2008, 04:33:12 AM
How much do you drive around in ME,Zackman?I'm not talking up north.Just in our area.I see forwarders quite often cutting on small lots.I went with my Grandson's field trip,forwarder,grapple,even a three wheel havester,and chipper.I drove by a lot last year on the way to work and there was a forwarder cutting for a house lot.Was another on the way to my FIL house.I've been seeing them.Maybe they all work for the paper company.The guy that cut for me does a lot for IP or whatever it is now.
I do wonder how some was and can make decent money with all the high cost of equipment.At first I was not all that impressesd with a forwarder.But from what I've seen on other sites and on my lot,I'm very impressesd now.I have quite a hill to get up into my lot.With a skidder the top of the hill would of been at the bottom.The trails are so much better looking.I would like to have one just to haul rocks with.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on August 11, 2008, 05:38:16 AM
Gary, delimber and slasher on the yard on a few operations. On sites with small hardwood it's all pulp and might be someone bucking logs, but the volumes here are low so the bucker would never really be flooded with wood.  ;) On softwood ground, it would go tree length and probably a delimber on the yard. Talking private woodlots and career loggers, not small operators or weekend loggers. Yarding is usually less than 400 meters. Most private woodlots are between 250-400 meters wide, road up the middle or on the property line. ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: timberfaller390 on August 11, 2008, 06:30:42 PM
Everybody down my way uses a buncher followed by a grapple skidder, except us small timers then its chainsaws cable skidders and some kind of loader. I have never seen a forwarder on a job site here.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on August 11, 2008, 09:26:21 PM
Timberfaller3, I have a friend down there that lives in Juliette. He has a Ponsse Ergo harvester, another fellow has a Ponsse forwarder that works behind him. They are the only Ponsse machines in Georgia, I believe there are some John Deere cut to length operations though. The wood down there is ideal for the cut to length machines, but they aren't very well accepted.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: timberfaller390 on August 12, 2008, 10:28:15 AM
Timberfaller3, I have a friend down there that lives in Juliette. He has a Ponsse Ergo harvester, another fellow has a Ponsse forwarder that works behind him. They are the only Ponsse machines in Georgia, I believe there are some John Deere cut to length operations though. The wood down there is ideal for the cut to length machines, but they aren't very well accepted.

Your right about it not being accepted. But then again neither is most standard safety gear. If you find a one or two man operation up here in the hills besides me that uses so much as a hard hat, then you done something worth talking about. In my area there is still a good many 1940-1970 log trucks on the road and alot of home brewed equipment, now that ain't to say that the big companies don't use all the proper safety gear cause most of them do, but it's awful hard for OSHA to come down on one guy with a chainsaw for not wearing chaps especially when Georgia ain't an OSHA state.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: twobears on August 15, 2008, 09:12:16 PM

 anybody that runs a chainsaw without the proper safety equiptment is a fool! when,that chain cuts into you..you,ll wish you had chaps on..or if a tree hits you on the head you,ll wish you had a hard hat on.
 i always ware safety equipment but,i know just whats it,s like to watch a chainsaw kickback and rip you apart.three years ago this coming tuesday,i got cut by a husky 272.i got cut pretty much from my left wrist to the inside of my elbow.it hit down by my wrist and twisted around my arm.when,it stopped the bar and chain was stuck in my arm and i had blood pouring out of me.i was a good 400 yards back from the landing and by myself.the other skidder op was 700/800 yards behind me and as lucky would have it the truck driver just showed up on the landing.
 i pulled the saw out of my arm,tossed it on the ground and held my arm back together as best as i could.i had blood pouring thur my fingers in streams.i had to jump off the tree i was standing on.once,i got on the ground i leaned over and pushed my arm into my hip to put more pressure on it..i had blood running thur my fingers and down my chaps,it was running off the toe of my boot.i hit the landing and yelled to the truck driver.he looked but didn,t see me so i yelled again.. i,ve worked with him on and off for 20 years..i never seen him move so fast.. :o i also never saw him turn so white.
 it has taken me two and a half years to recover and i,ll have a messedup left hand for the rest of my life.
 now is not wearing the proper safety equipment worth it?? oooo,and don,t depend on that chain brake saving you..mine didn,t.it didn,t go off when the saw first kicked back and it didn,t even fire when the brake handle hit the side of my hand.

 delbert
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: timberfaller390 on August 15, 2008, 09:18:40 PM
Exactly the reason I have chaps helmets boots gloves and eye/ear protection at all times, and being with the local fire/rescue department I have seen my share of chainsaw mishaps that range from very minor to dead when we got there.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: twobears on August 16, 2008, 08:47:20 PM

 a logger has to remember where he is.the hospital might be hours away.i,ve taken two trips.the first time i got hit in the face and busted my nose really baddly.we where on paper company land.it took 45 minutes to just get to the gate on town road.then,it took another hour plus to get to the hospital.
 the time i sawed my arm i was just around the corner from my house and working on private land.the land owner keepplaying game on fixing the road into the landing and we could hardly get in and out..even,in a 4x4 pickup truck.things moved pretty fast that day but it still took awhile to reach the hospital.the log truck driver called 911 on his cell phone.i was really surprized he got a good enough signal...he did tho.once,he got the emt's on the way he took his sons pickup truck and drove me out to the town road.the emt's gpt there just a very minutes later.they checked me out and then drove me acrossed my little town to a feild so,a chopper could take me the rest of the way.i ended up in a hospital about 45 minutes away by road.but,it was about two hours from getting cut until i got in the hospital.
 you only have so much blood and once part of it's drained out of you..your done.EVERY!! logger should not only wear chaps,hardhat,ect they also should learn first-aid.i think a person should also learn to deal with seeing blood,ect..alot of people can,t.when,my friend got killed i heard that the skidder op saw him first and he wouldn,t even go check on him.he waited for another guy to get out of the woods and had him check on my friend. thats NOT!! the way to handle a accident.if i had been that way i,de most likely be dead. it surely wasn,t pretty or fun to see that saw cut me apart but,i had to deal with it or die.
 ok,enough of that..go get your chaps,hardhat,check your chain brake and get some first-aid training then be careful so you never have to use it,,

 delbert
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Craig on August 19, 2008, 09:24:52 AM
Don't forget a personal first aid kit on you as well. If you are pinned or injured really badly the kit in the skidder or in a truck on the landing won't do you much good.


Craig
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: twobears on August 19, 2008, 11:18:23 AM

 CRAIG:you right.i know very few loggers around here that carry a first aid kit right on them.you should carry one plus,you should learn ways to use whats always around you..(your shirt,belt,hands,,ect,ect,ect.i had a licence from the state and i had to have a up to date first aid and cpr card to keep it.when,the time came to use it i was very glad i had it.
 after,i got cut i had alot of time to think about my accident.i learned the military and hopitals use several products to stop bleeding.one is called clotstopper.i learned about that on the web.i printed the info and showed it to my doctor.he told me they had stuff like that also.the clotstopper cames in a MRE type package and is weather proof.a guy could tape it right inside his hardhat.you just open that package and sprinkle it on the wound to stop the flow of blood.

 delbert
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on August 19, 2008, 02:07:14 PM
I carry a first aid kit in my brush saw harness as well as fire retardant ansil pack.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 19, 2008, 05:40:12 PM
 Hitachi 150 Tracked Harvester. This tracked processor is being used on a cut to length timber harvest. A Valmet 544X Forwarder works with the processor. Ewald timber harvest; 5/08.



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/hitachi_150_tracked_harvester.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 20, 2008, 07:35:36 PM
Hitachi 150 Tracked Harvester. Cut to length harvesting; Ewald timber harvest; 5/08.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/hitachi_150_tracked_harvester1.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 21, 2008, 04:46:46 PM
Valmet 544X Forwarder. The Valmet fowarder is used to support the Hitachi 150 tracked harvester in the "cut to length" timber harvest; Ewald timber harvest; 5/08.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/valmet_544_forwarder.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 23, 2008, 11:46:54 AM
Valmet 544X Forwarder. Wood processed by the tracked harvester is forwarded to the landing'decking area.



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/valmet_544X_forwarder2.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: stonebroke on August 23, 2008, 12:01:03 PM
What kind of trees are those ?

Stonebroke
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 23, 2008, 03:25:17 PM
Those are aspen in the above photo . The timber sale was mostly aspen and red maple, and some black cherry.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: stonebroke on August 23, 2008, 04:46:29 PM
So does it go mostly for pulp or do they saw those nice aspen?

Stonebroke
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 23, 2008, 05:36:35 PM
10 inches and up will go for sawlogs if straight and sound and the rest goes for pulpwood.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 24, 2008, 09:09:06 PM
Kenworth Woodhauler. The Kenworth woodhauler picks up the sorted wood products decked along the access road. The wood deck in front are aspen sawlogs.



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/kenworth_at_the_landing.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 26, 2008, 11:16:29 AM
Kenworth Woodhauler at the landing. The Kenworth has been turned around at the end of the access road and is now being loaded with aspen pulpwood for transport to the Tenaco mill 40 miles away.



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/kenworth_at_the_landing1.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 28, 2008, 07:29:25 PM
Timber Harvest Completed. This shows some of the thinning area a couple days after completion by the tracked harvester.  The harvester does a good job on getting the slash down. Ewald timber harvest. 5/08



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/ewald_sale_thinning.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 29, 2008, 05:39:59 PM
FT-153 Fabtech Tracked Harvester. The harvester arrives at the timber harvest area for unloading. This harvester replaces the Hitachi 150 tracked harvester seen on previous harvests as the timber producer upgrades to a newer and faster machine. Maturen storm damage timber harvest; 8/08.



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/fabtech_tracked_harvester_FT-153.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 31, 2008, 10:14:12 AM
Fabtech Tracked Harvester FT-153. The Fabtech unloads on the county gravel road to prepare the access into the harvest area. Maturen timber harvest; 8/08.



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/fabtech_tracked_harvester1_FT-153.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 01, 2008, 06:49:09 PM
Fabtech FT-153 Tracked Harvester. The Fabtech harvester clears and widens the narrow winding two-track road into the storm damaged timber area as the first order of business to allow for truck access and hauling. Maturen timber ahrvest; 8/08.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/fabtech_tracked_harvester2_FT-153.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: JLeBouton on September 08, 2008, 06:28:09 PM
Looking good...
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: semologger on September 16, 2008, 12:22:39 AM
ron i was curious you said
Fabtech FT-153 Tracked Harvester. The Fabtech harvester clears and widens the narrow winding two-track road into the storm damaged timber area as the first order of business to allow for truck access and hauling.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/fabtech_tracked_harvester2_FT-153.JPG)

But do you bring in a dozer to build the roads afterwards to build the roads? if so dont the stump holes give ya problems?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 17, 2008, 09:44:26 AM
We very seldon use a dozer since we have many existing two track roads that usually need minor improvement for timber hauling. In this case, there was already an existing winding two-track road with a firm base, but not wide enough and with curves theat were too sharp for the 100 foot wood hauler to negotate. (Our loggers are very particular with their semi's and don't want to dent them or get them dirty.  ;) )

The Fabtech cut additional marked trees along the two track to widen and straighten it out for wood hauling. The valmet forwarder was then used to pull the stumps and fill the stump holes and pack the road in. The woodhauler then packed it in very well for a firm base.

When we left the harvest area the road was graded with the forwarder blade as neded and by dragging a tree top over it to smooth it out for two wheel drive vehicle use. We left the landowner with a good passable road that a pickup could hardly negotiate to begin with.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on September 17, 2008, 04:04:25 PM
As what Ron said about the Trucks not getting messed up, some truckers here don't even like a road with green limbs over hanging and swatting the mirrors.  And they will tell you right quick. ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on September 19, 2008, 07:15:57 PM
If you ever had to pay to replace any of those chrome trim parts you would understand why...
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 26, 2008, 07:59:34 PM
FT-153 Fabtech Tracked Harvester.  Cutting aspen products to length in a blowdown timber harvest. Maturen timber harvest; 7/08.



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/fabtech_harvester1.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: nas on September 27, 2008, 08:44:48 AM
Ron
  What is the aspen used for?
Is it all for pulp? OSB?
Thanks
Nick
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on September 27, 2008, 09:30:43 AM
It's (veneer quality aspen) often veneer product core wood. Take a sheet of birch plywood, you have that razor thin birch veneer outside and the core layers will sometimes be aspen. I can smell the stuff when ripping on the table saw. Has that asprin smell in the dust.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 27, 2008, 11:24:32 AM
Aspen is used for all of the above, lumber, pulpwood, OSB, core stock, pellets, chipwood, etc. depending upon the quality and local markets.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bill Johnson on September 29, 2008, 12:44:13 PM
Photos taken on Nighthawk Timber job in Brunswick township (east of Gogama, south of Timmins, west of Gowganda...sort of).

First is a truck being loaded with 8 foot jackpine pulp most likely going to Nairn Centre for chipping.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10003/Picture_005_1.jpg)

Second is piles of pulp wood and sawlogs at roadside waiting to be hauled
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10003/Picture_006_1.jpg)

Third is the processor and a closer shot of the processing head

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10003/Picture_008_1.jpg)


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10003/Picture_009_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: stonebroke on September 29, 2008, 02:15:44 PM
Are those seed trees in the background or what?

Stonebroke
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bill Johnson on September 30, 2008, 07:39:10 AM
Stonebroke
In the case of Nighthawk Timber (as well as any other Crown forest operators on the Timiskaming Forest) there is a legal requirement to leave living, dying or dead standing trees for wildlife purposes. Our rule set calls for a minimum of 25 trees/hectare (12/acre) well distributed across the cutover of which 6 must be large living with 2 being at least 12" dbh).

Additonally, there is also be a requirement to leave uncut patches to provide additional cover for wildlife but this depends on the total disturbance area (combination of new and old cuts).
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 05, 2008, 12:45:13 PM
Valmet 544x Forwarder. The Valmet forwarder works along with the Fabetech track processor. Here it picks up recently cut-to-lenght aspen wood products for carry to the landing/decking area. Maturen timber harverst; 7/08.



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/valmet_544X_forwarder.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on October 05, 2008, 07:32:07 PM
Well, I hope you have lots of big wood and good price.  ;) :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Dom on October 05, 2008, 08:10:46 PM
I should specify that I do contract work for Rottne Canada.

Rottne Canada is going to try and do a demo of the H20 soon. When they do, I'll take some pics.

Here is a picture of the machine in the shop:

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11394/H20-2.JPG)

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 12, 2008, 08:11:26 PM
Loading Directly From The Valmet Forwarder. The woodhauler is top-loaded directly from the valmet forwarder. Maturen timber harvest; 7/08.



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/loading_truck_from_valmet1.JPG)



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/loading_truck_from_valmet1%7E0.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: John_valmet on October 22, 2008, 03:37:11 PM
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18154/forwarder.jpg)
A valmet 840 forwarder.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: John_valmet on October 22, 2008, 04:01:54 PM
ill post more when i can resize my photos  ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gary_C on October 22, 2008, 04:06:55 PM
Hello John. Is that a coincidence with your last name?

Here is my Valmet 840:

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11467/Valmet-840-Forwarder.jpg)

Seems strange they are both the same models, but I know they are. Where was that one made?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: John_valmet on October 22, 2008, 04:11:06 PM
yeah the name is probably cos i like valmet machines lol, it was made in sweden. used in the uk its a 1997 model a bit older than yours i suspect lol
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: John_valmet on October 23, 2008, 06:04:22 AM
 


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18154/DSC00389.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18154/DSC00388.JPG)
this is my valmet 860 when i was working on a clear fell site in mid Wales.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 23, 2008, 11:26:08 AM
Well Done! What type of harvester were you supporting?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: John_valmet on October 23, 2008, 02:30:00 PM
lol there was three!! We had a Daewoo 225 with a Viking havesting head, Timberjack 1270C with a 758c head and also a (Silvatec Sliepner with a silvatec 560 head on demo). i have a photo of the silvatec.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18154/DSC00387.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gary_C on October 23, 2008, 03:42:20 PM
John, nice forwarders and harvester. What lengths do you cut? I see you have two different lengths.

Do you have both an 840 and a 860?

I think all the black painted 840's here in the US were made in Gladstone, MI. and had Cummins engines but that could be wrong. My 840 was at least assembled in the US and had a Sisu 4 cylinder diesel and is a bit underpowered. The 840.2 had a 6 cylinder Sisu engine.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: John_valmet on October 23, 2008, 03:51:15 PM
we cut too many different legnths gary lol in one of those pictures of the 860 i was loading fencing stakes at 5'6" then the second picture i was loading 10' saw logs. but we cut stakes 5'6", rails 12', bars 8', pulp/chip usually 8', different saw logs from 6' to 16'.yeah the sisu 6 cylinder is what was in our 860. we have a brand new 840.3 i dont have pictures of that one though and the 860. the 840 is capable to match to the 860. we had the bunk on the 840 extended so it can take two bays of 10' logs easily.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: John_valmet on October 23, 2008, 04:18:12 PM
to be honest gary i have always been interested in what it would be like to work in the US on a harvesting site. Ive always been told by people ive worked with who have worked in canada and austraila that its the same as here only everything is much bigger lol.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 24, 2008, 10:08:31 AM
How large of a cutting area are you working with the 3 harvesters? Are there additional forwarders being used also? It sounds like you have a good product mix to sort and market.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: John_valmet on October 24, 2008, 10:32:35 AM
we only use two forwarders a new valmet 840.3 and the 860. thats enough to keep up with 3 harvestors i cant remember the actual size of the patch i just remember that there was approximatly 15 000 tonnes of standing timber to harvest  ::)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: John_valmet on October 24, 2008, 10:49:15 AM
i hope this helps give you some clue to the size of the patch ron. its a shot from before the we started the site. the patch both sides of the road was harvested.
 http://www.flashearth.com/?lat=52.377658&lon=-3.435533&z=16.1&r=0&src=msl
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: JLeBouton on October 26, 2008, 03:28:55 PM
http://www.youtube.com/v/3OisG3meFks&hl=en&

FABTEK 663 checking saw speed
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on October 26, 2008, 03:45:59 PM
All you need FabTek, is the Youtube URL as typed below. Html code doesn't work in the forum threads.


Code: [Select]
http://www.youtube.com/v/3OisG3meFks

FABTEK 663 checking saw speed
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gary_C on October 27, 2008, 08:46:00 PM
to be honest gary i have always been interested in what it would be like to work in the US on a harvesting site. Ive always been told by people ive worked with who have worked in canada and austraila that its the same as here only everything is much bigger lol.

I am not so sure the jobs here are bigger. While we do have some 6-8000 cord jobs, it looks like you have the same size jobs there. We still have some 100+ cord jobs as the private woodlots are being more and more fragmented. And on many of those larger jobs, the loggers are still using big tracked feller bunchers along with big grapple skidders. Those jobs are not of much interest to a smaller cut to length operator, at least not to me.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: John_valmet on October 28, 2008, 05:38:28 AM
yeah im not that interested in feller buncher - grapple skidding operations. infact i dont think in the uk we do anything like that to be honest. its more cut to length jobs. also skyline jobs too they were quite populor but less now because contractors tend to use harvesters and forwarders to do the skyline jobs. For cheaper rates than the skyline gangs. which i think is not very fair.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 28, 2008, 11:19:02 AM
The soil types, landscape and management objectives will usually guide the method and equipment we allow to perform the harvest.

Our selection harvests will be "cut-to-length" with chainsaws, harveters and forwarders and our pine row thinnings and selections between rows and clear cuts or land clearings, and chipping operations may use feller bunchers and grapple skidders.



Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: John_valmet on October 28, 2008, 11:55:32 AM
thats probably why there aint many if any feller bunchers work in the uk because the ground is too soft. i havent been on a site yet were our forwarders could go without band tracks or wheel chains.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: semologger on February 13, 2009, 09:39:47 AM
This thread just needed bumped up. Lots of new guys around.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Big Stick on February 13, 2009, 09:46:03 AM
Am suprised to read more about cords,than millions of board feet in a sale.

Photo test.


[img width=500 --Photos MUST be in the Forestry Forum gallery!!!!!--.com/albums/v136/BigStick/NoUndercut.jpg[/img]
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on February 13, 2009, 09:51:17 AM
I'm surprised not to see m3. Not. 

Sometimes even more surprised that the photo posting tutorial isn't noticed. But I can understand when there is a photo posting icon in the posting header. ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Big Stick on February 13, 2009, 09:58:29 AM
I guess when a guy is putting a minimum of 5 million boards a year on the ground,"cords" lose their luster.

My bad,for being desensitized..............
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on February 13, 2009, 10:02:34 AM
That's a lot of boards, 'bout 10000 cords.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: chevytaHOE5674 on February 13, 2009, 10:21:16 AM
I'm going in the field this afternoon. We have a Ponsee processor cutting hardwoods, and spruce/fir, so i will grab some pictures and videos if i get a chance.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barniescamp on March 02, 2009, 04:16:36 PM

For those of you who ever wundered how they got the chips out of the trucks when they got to the mills ..   

                       
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10487/t%E9mis025.jpg)
 
 
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10487/T%E9mis032.jpg)

This was taken at the Tembec mill in Témiscamingue Québec . Both wear being unloaded at the same time . I work here been here for five years I used to haul chips for them before from Bancroft and Huntsville Ont.

 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 10, 2009, 05:02:35 PM
Loaded Chip Van of Scotch Pine Chips is pulled up the steep hill on the access road after spring break-up. The John Deere 450E pulls while the 380 Timberjack grapple skidder pushes. Schirmer wood chip harvest; 4/08.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/chip_van1.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/chip_van2.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on May 14, 2009, 06:19:54 PM
Equipment Used On A Fuelwood Chip Harvest. Clearcutting wildland scotch pine plantation for fuel chips. The areas will be replanted next spring with 2-0 red pine. Schirmer Fuel Chip Harvest; 4/09.

411 EX Hydro AX


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/hydro_ax_411ex%7E0.JPG)

380 Timberjack Grapple Skidder


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/380_timberjack_grapple_skidder%7E0.JPG)

Small Trelan Chipper


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/treelan_chipper%7E0.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 26, 2009, 08:02:54 PM
Scotch Pine Chip Harvest. The timberjack grabble skidder pulls the poorly formed Scotch pine trees to the chipper for processing and blowing into the chip van. Schirmer chip harvest; 6/09.



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/schirmer_chip_sale.JPG)



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/schirmer_chip_sale1.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: tractorg25 on July 02, 2009, 12:58:33 PM
grew up pulp wood / short stick logging. Felled with Poulan straigt bars and bucked with bow bars. skidded with a 1952 D2 Cat with a sled that would hold two cord. Hauled to mill on an old two ton IH truck similar to the one in Tom's picture. Now I have moved up to a D6 Cat and John Deere  wheel tractor for skidding, still fell and buck with chain saws and haul with a 1973 C-65 chevy truck and tandem trailer. 10 to 16 ft saw logs and ceder fence post is all I cut now.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 05, 2009, 07:15:17 PM
Trelan 5600-L Chipper. Chipping Scotch pine; Schirmer chip harvest; 6/09



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/trelan_chipper.JPG)



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/trelan_chipper1.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: semologger on July 06, 2009, 09:59:51 PM
Welcome aboard tractorg25.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 22, 2009, 12:20:47 PM
West Virginia Logging. My return to Richwood West Virginia after 31 years found logging to be quite active now in the Richwood area. While I was their during the early 1970's the Monongahela N.F. was under court injunction prohibiting clearcutting.

Here a log tuck travels down the main street of Richwood, West Virginia, the Gateway to the Monongahela National Forest, 6/09. I never saw this happen during my 4 years there. Only coal trucks .

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/richwood_log_truck.JPG)

Another log truck makes a turn from Oakford Avenue on to Main Stree in Richwood, W. Va., 6/09.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/richwood_log_truck1.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 30, 2009, 07:47:26 PM
Columbia Mill Road Sign; Craigsville, W VA; 6/09

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/columbia_mill_road_sign.JPG)

A wood hauler prepares to make a turn into the large Columbia hardwood plywood mill in Craigsville, W Va; 6/09.



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/wv_log_truck.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on July 31, 2009, 02:42:37 AM
Ron,

Is that a sawmill or veneer plant? As you probably know, they are the largest veneer manufacturer in the country I believe. They have a plant up in Presque Isle, Maine and send a buyer around the Maritimes and Quebec for veneer to scale. I know one fellow that works there and a former scaler as well. The fellow that works there now has worked under me at the Marketing Board.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on July 31, 2009, 10:55:19 AM
It's quite a mill complex producing a number of wood products including hardwood plywood and fiber board. The Jeld-Wen Wood Fiber division is also located there in the Nicholas County Wood Products Park. It's the most wood producing activity that I've seen in awhile.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: GregW on July 31, 2009, 04:37:47 PM
Here's some old iron...



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/19979/skidder2.jpg)

1974 International S8 "Paylogger". Weight is about 20k. 3-53 Detroit, 23.1x26 tires, Gearmatic 119 winch. I bought this about 15 yrs ago. Used it full-time logging until 3 yrs ago. I now only log part-time, mostly in the winter months. This has been a good skidder and has used me well.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/19979/skidder.jpg)

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/19979/skidder1.jpg)

I use it sometimes to load big logs on my sawmill ...

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/19979/BigPine.jpg)

IH quit making skidders in the early 80's I think. I have used JD's, Timberjacks, Tree Farmers and Franklins. I like this IH the most of all.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on July 31, 2009, 06:15:10 PM
Dad had a late 60's Tree Farmer, gas engine. The only thing I seen him replace was the battery. He used to remove it when the machine was sitting idle for a few months. I was going to say he replaced the manifold, but all he did was repair it because I think parts were hard to find at the time. Never sold it until he was ready to sell the farm. Dad used to cut all his own wood on the farm for fuel and for mill sales. There was places far off the fields he never even got to. "Why go way over there? Lots of wood right here."  I tried to convince him to cut some huge aspen at the end, close to the field to, but he was all done farm'n. :D :D :D

There was a small grove of large toothed aspen that grew back since a cut in 1994, and in 2007 those trees were already 8" dbh. Fastest growing native tree I've seen around here, it will out pace trembling by far.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Weekend_Sawyer on August 03, 2009, 09:06:34 PM

 Saw this harvester sitting out by the road in Southern Maryland along 301. No one was around so I didn't get any information. It says BELL on it. looks like a fun ride.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10233/270/Bell_Harvester2.JPG)

Here's a front view. Looks like George Lucas would like one for his movies  :)

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10233/270/Bell_Harvester.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: beenthere on August 03, 2009, 09:10:34 PM
Weekend_Sawyer
Here is a tube video of one.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lrKoxnUx2vQ
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: beenthere on August 03, 2009, 09:31:37 PM
And another. This one shows a grapple on a boom.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pzI46UA-J_8&feature=related
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Tripp on August 03, 2009, 09:56:06 PM
That is one wild vehicle. I like it!

Tripp
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: wi woodcutter on August 03, 2009, 10:39:19 PM
That thing looks like it would turn on a dime and give you eight cents in change. :)

It also looks like a accident waiting to happen.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Don K on August 04, 2009, 12:05:19 AM
Excellent piece of equipment for clearing really dense stands of young pines. The first thinning on my dads place was done with a bell three wheeler with a shear head. he could get in some tight spots and didn't tear up a lot of stuff. Frasseling skidder was bigger than he was. They are not real common. Don't seem to work good in the hills (like a Z-turn mower on a sideslope) and a back weight disadvantage for larger trees.

Don
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 04, 2009, 05:17:14 PM
A 3 wheeled Bell feller buncher was used to salvage the many acres of burned over jack pine after the Mack Lake Fire of May 1980 on the Mio District of the Huron National Forest. It did a good job on the flat burned over areas, but I haven't seen one at work since.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Meadows Miller on August 04, 2009, 10:20:23 PM

 Saw this harvester sitting out by the road in Southern Maryland along 301. No one was around so I didn't get any information. It says BELL on it. looks like a fun ride.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10233/270/Bell_Harvester2.JPG)

Here's a front view. Looks like George Lucas would like one for his movies  :)

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10233/270/Bell_Harvester.JPG)

Gday This is a great thred its taken me nearly 12 months to read it  Its a BELL Super T fellerbuncher  ;)Have have been built in africa since the mid 60s and where built in NZ also and under licence buy Morbark in the US untill the mid 90s you can still get new ones from Bell in Africa they where pretty popular here  they come in the Super T ,120 and 220 teli loggers like in the second clip  ;) they are  Easy to drive and a 1000lb counterweight helps on the rear  ;)

Il add some pics of my own and dads from the 80s when i cget them scaned  ;)

Chris
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 14, 2009, 08:18:21 PM
Manufacture of Forest Products is active in Craigsville, W VA, 6/09

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/nicholas_county_wva_woodpark_sign.JPG)

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/jeld_wen_wood_fiber_div_sign.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 20, 2009, 12:42:35 PM
Colunbia Veneer Mill Log Yard. A result of all the logging truck traffic makes for a full log yard. Craigsville, W VA, 6/09.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/columbia_log_yard.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on August 20, 2009, 04:50:05 PM
Ron, I'll have to drive up to the Columbia yard in Presque Isle, Maine and see what's up. I was just up by there last weekend to, but not over in the Industrial Park. We could see it from the Route 1A coming down from Caribou, actually I could pick out the airport. The folks and I came over from Perth, NB to shop and went back over the line at Bridgewater by my place (below the wind mills).
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: semologger on August 27, 2009, 09:59:18 AM
That pine wood that bell is cutting is what i like. You guys can have all the oak trees. I would like to have that saw head on my hydroax seen inthe first video. Mine just having the shear makes it a bit slower putting the wood down. But then again the Skidder still cant keep up with me now. Also i hated shelling out the money to replace those Teeth on the saws.  Ive only had to buy 2 blades for my cutter in 10 years.

The bell in weekends post has a chainsaw bar that comes out and cuts the tree once you have gotton ahold of it. You cant carry the trees around with that one like in the video. You still directional fall the trees then pull them around.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Chico on August 27, 2009, 05:14:33 PM
The only thing I dislike about a shear is fiber damage esp  when they get misaligned I've seen it so bad that 2-4 ft deductions were made on logs
Chico
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: SwampDonkey on August 27, 2009, 05:29:51 PM
They probably stopped using shears here 20 years ago. There was a lot of prototyping here in the 80's and many things came and went. Most everything now has a chain on the felling head, sometimes a slasher on the yard. Not a whole lot of delimbers, leaves huge piles of brush on roadside that takes away forest acreage until it is rotted away. They don't burn slash here anymore. I see them some on woodlots and sure is an eye sore to see all that roadside slash or worst strung in rows or piles in the landowner's field.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: semologger on August 27, 2009, 09:28:08 PM
Ya the fiber damage is the only thing i hate about my shear. The places we sell to have cut off lines so they but the ends off Around 5 inches or so. I am in the process of setting in a post yard for the type of pine trees seen in the video. Will be useing a buck saw to cut to length. I Will be butting off the ends of the the trees at the mill before i make post out of them. I hate having The extra mess but its wood and money for me. 

As far as the  delimbers go we use ours and spread the slash out in the rows left behind after cutting and skidding. I dont like to see a pile of slash no taller than 2 foot or the landowner cant get over in a 4 wheeler. My skidder driver dont like it when i come back through and see a pile left in a row thats to high for my standards and make him go find it and flatten it out.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on January 02, 2010, 03:59:44 PM
I have some pics from the last few years in the woods, thought I'd post them and bring this subject back up top 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on January 02, 2010, 04:05:28 PM
Here's some of a loblolly thinning in central Georgia. My friend Jake moved down there from MN and bought a Ponsse Ergo processor. (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/667/georgia_loblolly_2.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on January 02, 2010, 04:10:37 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/667/georgia_loblooly.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on January 02, 2010, 04:13:48 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/667/Jake_and_his_Ergo.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on January 02, 2010, 04:14:37 PM
I think Loblolly kind off smells like lemon.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on January 02, 2010, 04:17:24 PM
Now, here's some from Northern MN where I've been hauling the last couple of winters(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/667/jarden.JPG) This is the Jarden woodyard in Cloquet, my truck being unloaded.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on January 02, 2010, 04:20:58 PM
This is my oldest daughter, Kiara, and Ron, one of the loggers I hauled for. About 8 months after this Ron was ran over by this skidder and severely injured, was within an inch of his life. But he pulled through and is back out in the woods again. (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/667/Kiara_and_Ron.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on January 02, 2010, 04:23:39 PM
This is a TJ 1270 working a black spruce clear cut(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/667/timberjack_1270_in_MN_black_spruce.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on January 02, 2010, 04:24:55 PM
I'll get a few more up later
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 02, 2010, 05:45:59 PM
Nice photos! Can you tell us more about Ron's accident with his skidder?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on January 02, 2010, 07:03:55 PM
A rock or something had scraped off an inspection cover underneath the machine. Later, a stick made its way through the hole and jammed up a linkage. Ron got out, WITHOUT shutting down the machine, and tried to remove the stick. When he pulled on it, it pulled the machine into gear and it went right over the top of him. Now Ron and his partner, also named Ron, have a time limit of I believe 10 minutes. If you haven't returned to the landing within 10 minutes the other guy comes looking for you. So, Ron went to find Ron and found him laying in a hole and the skidder up against a tree. He was able to call 911, let me tell you they were in the middle of nowhere too. They ended up airlifting him to Duluth, when they were putting him in the chopper he was still responsive but couldn't see because his blood pressure was so low. Partner Ron figured that was the last time he would see him alive. But they got him to the hospital and he made it through that first night, I think they put around 16 pints of blood in him before they finally got the bleeding stopped. His liver had been ruptured, broken pelvis, tore up his colon, in short he was in real bad shape. But by the grace of God Ron made a quick recovery, from being in a cast for his pelvis where he couldn't even get up, to a wheelchair, to a walker, and finally a cane. If I remember right, the accident happened the end of September 08, he was back in the woods (with cane) running his feller/buncher and slasher mid Feb 09, so like 4 1/2 months later. Pretty amazing recovery, considering he had to relearn how to walk and the extent of his injuries. Good lesson to everybody about being in a rush, Ron knew better, he was finishing up a job and looking at getting ready to move equipment etc. I really didn't think he would make it through that first night, I know my family and a lot of others spent a lot of time praying for Ron, just that he would live- we weren't even thinking about walking or working again at that point. The Docs said that if he would of had one thing against his health, smoking for instance, he wouldn't have made it. It was that close. Everytime one of us that know Ron go to do something risky, this incident pops into our heads and we step back and THINK. Sorry this has gotten so long, the moral of my story is be safe, there is nothing so pressing that it means chancing not going home to your family at night.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on January 02, 2010, 09:18:30 PM
This ASV has a grapple that was taken off an old pulp loader attached. This set-up was used on the landing to sort and stack.(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/667/ASV_with_grapple.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on January 02, 2010, 09:25:09 PM
This is a common view for a wood hauler in Minnesota that Gary C will recognize- sitting in line at Sappi Fine Paper in Cloquet, MN. These trucks are being unloaded into the woodroom, which basically eats the wood as fast as the Liebherr crane can throw it in. It takes a good crane operator about 3 minutes to unload a rail trailer, probably 4 with a bunk trailer.   (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/667/sappi_woodroom_3.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on January 02, 2010, 09:36:02 PM
This is Sappi's Scanlon woodyard, I don't remember how much wood they pile up there in the winter, seems like it was around 10,000 cords, in addition to the Cloquet woodyard, which is probably around the same capacity. The sequence for getting unloaded with the centermount loader is 1. Run the loader straight up in the air, as you see in the pic. 2.When the loader finishes the front half of the trailer, you get out of the truck, reach up for the pedal on the loader that controls your swing and spin the loader around to the back so the crane operator can reach all of the wood. This is because all of your hydraulics etc stick out the back of the operator platform. So you have to spin it around so the crane doesn't risk hitting all of that with their grapple. 3. Say "thank you" on the radio, pull up to the sweepdown area, set the loader down, sweep the trailer off, get in and scale out.   (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/667/scanlon_woodyard.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on January 02, 2010, 09:40:32 PM
 A bucket of wood soaring into the Sappi woodroom. That is about 1 cord of wood in the bucket. Thats all of my pics for tonight, I'll see if I can find more or try to take more of the CTL operation I'm hauling for now.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bobus2003 on January 03, 2010, 03:15:43 AM
440 John Deere Cable Skidder Working in Ponderosa Pine & Tending Slash Piles
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20739/2610/006.JPG)

Link Belt 1600 Excavator, Fitted With PATU 410 Processor (Stroke) Working in Ponderosa Pine
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20739/2610/005.JPG)

Peterbilt Log Truck Loaded with Ponderosa Pine, Black Hills So. Dak.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20739/2610/Shafers_Truck.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on January 03, 2010, 09:08:04 AM
I was going to ask if that was in the hills, nice pics. I work with a fella that logged out there for quite a few years- his name is Wally Houtari.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gary_C on January 03, 2010, 09:47:49 AM
This is a common view for a wood hauler in Minnesota that Gary C will recognize- sitting in line at Sappi Fine Paper in Cloquet, MN. These trucks are being unloaded into the woodroom, which basically eats the wood as fast as the Liebherr crane can throw it in. It takes a good crane operator about 3 minutes to unload a rail trailer, probably 4 with a bunk trailer. 

Nice pictures. That scene is not so familiar any more as Sappi has been so stingy with their quota.

But don't you have it backwards? You should be down in Georgia in the winter, not here in the Frozen North. Especially since it's 30 some below zero this morning.  :o
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: stonebroke on January 03, 2010, 10:14:47 AM
440 John Deere Cable Skidder Working in Ponderosa Pine & Tending Slash Piles
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20739/2610/006.JPG)

Link Belt 1600 Excavator, Fitted With PATU 410 Processor (Stroke) Working in Ponderosa Pine
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20739/2610/005.JPG)

Peterbilt Log Truck Loaded with Ponderosa Pine, Black Hills So. Dak.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20739/2610/Shafers_Truck.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: stonebroke on January 03, 2010, 10:17:24 AM
I didn't know the Black Hills grew such nice timber.

Stonebroke
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on January 03, 2010, 10:57:42 AM
There is some real nice timber in the black hills, from what I have seen out there. Beautiful country, it has a character all its own. Gary, I'm thinking you have it right , what am I doing up here when it's -30 :o. I just talked to Jake, he said it is cold there too. Only 30°, I reminded him that is 60° warmer than here. :) They have their own struggles down there though, it's been so wet they can't get any wood out.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bobus2003 on January 03, 2010, 05:34:41 PM
The Hills have there areas of Really nice wood.. I'm working a 160 Acre tract that hasn't been touched in over 70 years.. and I'm pulling some really dandy wood.. Plus right now the USFS is Pushing alot of sales too try and get ahead of the Pine Beetle outbreak so tracts that wern't too be done for another 5-10 years are getting done now
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on January 03, 2010, 07:48:52 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/667/burt_s_08_trucking_pictures_with_a_few_of_baby_005.jpg) NewPage in Duluth, MN. You can see the bridge that crosses from MN into WI in the background.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: 240b on January 05, 2010, 04:41:27 PM
This the best thread on here. Thanks all
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 05, 2010, 08:25:09 PM
Thank you. We appreciate your interest and contributions to the thread. ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: 240b on January 05, 2010, 09:03:26 PM
how do you guys get that frozen pulp to stay on those rail trailers?  DOT would just freak out if they saw that here.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on January 05, 2010, 09:34:55 PM
They have a piece of square stock about 1/2" by 1/2" welded on top of the main frame rail that kind of bites into the wood, it's actually more secure on top of a rail trailer than a flatbed, because the wood is only touching those two points whereas it can kind of slide across a flatbed. Of course, the crib trailers probably hold the load the most securely, but it ends up being a taller load. You can defineately feel the difference. The other nice thing about a rail trailer is if you start to flip over, the load will just fall off instead of flipping the truck. Or so I've heard  :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gary_C on January 05, 2010, 09:41:45 PM
how do you guys get that frozen pulp to stay on those rail trailers?  DOT would just freak out if they saw that here.

Well, the MNDOT doesn't think they do, and they have ONE picture to prove it. And they trot that same one picture out every chance they get to harass all pulp haulers.

They did make two changes in the new tiedown regulations for crossways haulers (rail trailers) a couple of years ago. One is you have a center hold down for your straps to go over and the other is that you have to uniformly crown the top of each section so the strap touches every log on the top of the load. No more going down the road with a long rail trailer with the straps flapping in the breeze in the center of the load.

That crown on the top is also for multi bunk trailers unless you have front and back barriers to prevent escape of any log. If you do have end gates and the bunks are close together, you do not need tie downs. If you don't have front and back endgates and your loads are being stick scaled, you are destined to be in conflict between your stick scaler who can't measure any higher than the outside log and the DOT that says you have to crown the load and give away the crown to the mill.  ;D

Actually I think there has been a change to more bunk trailers and less rail trailers. With a crib trailer you can throw the logs in and go. No more throwing straps.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: 240b on January 05, 2010, 09:52:15 PM
back when we had 4' wood there was always a few sticks by every big frost heave.  everything is long now. 12' to 48' don't miss 4' wood
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: timberjack240 on January 06, 2010, 12:04:09 AM
i remember my pap tellinme that they cut 5' peices and loaded it by hand . started w a bow saw till he go the money for a chainsaw lcs 26 homelite . there one still inteh basement actually .
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: rick f on January 06, 2010, 08:04:08 PM
Here's what I use 1250 jd with an elkem winch.    40 hp tractor  one picture of the woods road

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18632/2622/DSC_0137.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18632/2622/DSC_0132.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18632/2622/DSC_0133.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18632/2622/DSC_0141.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: bill m on January 06, 2010, 08:26:30 PM
This is my equipment. I also have a home made farmi style winch but don't have pictures at this time

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20547/007.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20547/DSC00364.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on January 06, 2010, 09:27:03 PM
Gary- the trucks I'm running now are both pulling crib trailers with the end barriers, it is nice not having to chain down.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on January 06, 2010, 09:41:45 PM
This is at Savanna Pallets in McGregor, Mn. One of their yard trucks is unloading me. (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/667/savanna.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on January 06, 2010, 09:46:52 PM
 This is out at the landing on a northern hardwoods harvest- red oak, soft maple, white birch, aspen, and a little basswood. The John Deere forwarder is loading the truck with birch pallet bolts. (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/667/landing_2.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on January 06, 2010, 09:48:24 PM
Gary, do you ever bring any wood up to savanna?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: timberfaller390 on January 06, 2010, 10:33:22 PM
Here a couple of links to some skidder safety videos. They are kinda old but thought ya'll might enjoy them.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEleTqx1gSc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YFc4qYgbhhw&feature=channel
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: dail_h on January 08, 2010, 09:49:36 PM
   Hey Tom,
   Boy,wouldn't some of those old shortwood guys with Homelite 55s n bow blades,and a coupla bigsticks like ta get in those rows of loblollys in Barbender's first coupla pics??? Ooooopps,I'll show my age if I ain't kerful
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 17, 2010, 04:23:25 PM
The Amish Cutters are on the job. Schirmer hardwood sale; 1/10

Their transportation to the sale area is parked for the day.
 
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/amish_buggy.jpg)

The horse is taken care of and fed during the work day for the trip home.
 
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/amish_horse.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: stonebroke on January 17, 2010, 05:47:08 PM
Do the Amish skid with horses?

Stonebroke
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: hollywoodmfg on January 17, 2010, 05:53:51 PM
Two amish guys skidd with horses in this area but most have skidders
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 17, 2010, 05:59:51 PM
No, not on this job. They just come to the job in their horse drawn buggy. They have contracted the forwarding with a couple loggers that I referred them to. They are also now carching rides to the job with one of the loggers who picks them up at their mill each morning. Some of the hills on the access road and more snow has been making it a little difficult for their horse and buggy travel.

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Samuel on January 17, 2010, 06:02:17 PM
Is that allowed?  Or they just can't own a motorized vehicle?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 17, 2010, 06:41:59 PM
I don't know for sure, but they are good at catching rides with others. ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: timberjack240 on January 18, 2010, 11:32:40 PM
amish can ride in a vehicle jsut not on sundays. they can run equipment to. the very strtict ones wont jsut jump on the boss has to say u "have to ;) " run that but the ones i work around jsut do what has to be done. acutally an amish bought my dads 440 C but the guy that worked for them " bought " it . he told us that he was jsut helpin this kid buy the skidder and my dad looked at him and said i dont care whos buyin it as long as the moneys in my hand  . theres acutally ppl around here that make a living haulin the amish around . the mill i used to cut for has a big computerized sawmill and an ol amish guy ran the headsaw. theyre not as stupid as you might think
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: forest.c on January 19, 2010, 01:57:12 AM
the amish here use some power equipment and they never refuse a ride.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 19, 2010, 07:32:31 PM
Tree Farmer Forwarder C5D. Forwarding oak sawlogs, pulpwood, and firewood for the Amish cutters. Schirmer hardwood sale, 1/10.



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/tree_farmer_forwarder_C5D.jpg)

 

(http://www.forest
ryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/tree_farmer_forwarder_C5D_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: huskyxp on January 19, 2010, 08:39:14 PM
nice porter,i owned one like it sweet!! single bunk,barko 40 loader,deutz,23.1/26 tires,very tough reliable machine 8)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: footer on January 20, 2010, 01:37:54 PM
Does any one still use mechanical shears? I found a Barko 775a for sale pretty cheap with a shear on it. I talked to the service rep at Barko and he said they are pretty much obsolete, because of the damage they do to the log. How far up the trunk is ruined by one of these sheers?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: chevytaHOE5674 on January 20, 2010, 06:44:38 PM
The amount of damage from a sheer head depends on species, season, temperature, site, yada yada. But I've seen splitting up to 9-10 feet. Remember generally your best log is the butt log, and an inch at the bottom is worth a foot at the top.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 21, 2010, 11:19:16 AM
Haven't seen any used here for the past 10+ years.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: stonebroke on January 21, 2010, 03:46:56 PM
Wouldn't that be a plus for firewood trees?

Stonebroke
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 29, 2010, 05:07:41 PM
It could be if firewood was all that you were producing, but you would not want to devalue your higher valued wood products of grade logs, pulpwood, etc. by damaging or splitting the wood.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on January 29, 2010, 05:14:31 PM
Bucking Oak Sawlogs. This young sawyer bucks oak sawlogs which will be forwarded by his father with the Iron Mule. Schirmer hardwood sale, 1/10.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/bucking_oak_sawlogs.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: treefarmer87 on February 05, 2010, 11:12:30 PM
i cut with a jonsered 2171 mostly poplar sawlogs, skid with the tractor(soon to be replaced with a c5 treefarmer) and load with my 110 prentice
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: graves logging on February 08, 2010, 11:29:36 AM
i worked for a company for 18 years we used new 860 tigercats tracked machines.and rotine 8 wheel drive porters.good set up.we cut alot of wood.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on February 16, 2010, 11:23:48 AM
More Wood Hauler Names noted on the road:

Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bobus2003 on May 27, 2010, 12:53:19 AM
Hahn Harvester:

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20739/2610/002%7E0.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: arbo71 on May 27, 2010, 05:52:57 AM
How does that work ? Never seen anything like that before.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bobus2003 on May 28, 2010, 02:05:27 PM
Its a whole tree wood processing unit, Has a 5th wheel Pin so it can be towed to the job with a Semi, once there its can move its self around the job... There are a few differnt versions of the above machine:

http://www.hahnmachinery.com/htl300.html

And a Short Wood Version:
http://www.hahnmachinery.com/hsw110C.html
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 20, 2010, 09:02:26 PM
4510 Iron Mule Forwarder, unloading oak sawlogs, pulpwood, and firewood on the landing. Schirmer hardwood sale 1/10.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/4510_iron_mule1.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 24, 2010, 12:45:45 PM
Woodhauler. Trucking hardwood sawlogs at the end of a winter's day
 over 1 1/2 miles of snow covered wood's access road. Schirmer hardwood sale, 1/10.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/woodhauler_schirmer_sale.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on June 27, 2010, 07:59:21 AM
I think a lot of folks would mess themselves if they got to ride in a woodhauler on some of our woods roads around here. Even a lot of OTR drivers. "You're driving a truck in THERE?!?" They tend to get a little hairy with the icy hills, corners, and tight spots. It's what makes hauling wood interesting though, it gets a little boring cruising down the highway.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 27, 2010, 06:00:17 PM
The day before, this woodhauler went off the road on the icy curve just beyond where  the picture was taken. The driver just missed a large black cherry tree and it was lucky that he only ended up on flat ground in a a red pine plantation of small trees. He was stuck pretty good though and had to call out the skidders for some help. More lost time on the last load at the end of the day.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bobus2003 on June 27, 2010, 08:51:52 PM
How about an oops like this?
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20739/2610/Ooops.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on June 28, 2010, 06:10:32 PM
That's not good. ;) Tell us the story.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bobus2003 on June 28, 2010, 11:43:54 PM
I wish I knew what happened, Cause ya don't see that everyday. I'm just glad it wasn't my equipment or sale
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Samuel on July 03, 2010, 04:40:46 PM
Apparently the block layout/planning crew needs to be spoken to...
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Jamie_C on July 03, 2010, 05:13:00 PM
How about an oops like this?
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20739/2610/Ooops.jpg)

It was an accident somewhat similar to this that outlawed leaving open holes from digging for gravel along woods roads here. A Feller Buncher ended up submerged on it's roof after going across an unmarked open pit hole in the winter. If memory serves me right the operator actually drowned.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: twobears on July 03, 2010, 08:17:30 PM

  it looks like he found a creek.

 delbert
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: graves logging on July 09, 2010, 08:20:23 PM
How about an oops like this?
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20739/2610/Ooops.jpg)

It was an accident somewhat similar to this that outlawed leaving open holes from digging for gravel along woods roads here. A Feller Buncher ended up submerged on it's roof after going across an unmarked open pit hole in the winter. If memory serves me right the operator actually drowned.
i have a pic of that somewhere.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on July 09, 2010, 09:45:25 PM
Maybe Gary C was driving it  :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: deutz4 on July 10, 2010, 01:09:24 AM
HahnHarvesters have been around here for at least 30 years. They usually had 2 operators, 1 for delimbing & 1 for either cutting or shearing. "Piece of advice" I've never seen anyone upgrade after owning one of these. It's kind of like the Ponsse curse. It will either make you rich or destroy you within 2 yrs.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gary_C on July 10, 2010, 01:22:03 AM
Maybe Gary C was driving it  :)

Naw, if it was me, I'd have got all the wheels under water. No sense in going in part way.

Something like this:

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11467/DSCN2025_edited.jpg)

It's kind of like the Ponsse curse. It will either make you rich or destroy you within 2 yrs.

What's this all about?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: OneWithWood on July 15, 2010, 11:34:53 AM
Nice parking job, Gary!

Makes it easy to get in and out of  :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bobus2003 on July 15, 2010, 10:42:04 PM
Holy crap.. I think ya may have found some thin ice
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 04, 2010, 01:17:48 PM
John Deere 440B Cable Skidder. This small skidder is used to pull tree lengths from steep hill sides and wet areas not accessable by the iron mule forwarder in the short wood harvest operation. Schirmer hardwood sale, 3/10.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/j_deere_440b.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gary_C on August 04, 2010, 02:42:37 PM
Ow Ron, that was a shock. I wasn't ready for that picture with the white stuff in August and I'll probably see to much of that this winter as I have a lot of jobs to finish by spring.

Don't even want to think about it now.  :) :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 04, 2010, 02:56:07 PM
With the heat and high humidity here lately, the "white stuff" looks good. At least for the wood's work.  ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on August 04, 2010, 07:55:29 PM
Bring on the frosty mornings :) :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawguy21 on August 05, 2010, 11:26:33 PM
You can have my share.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on August 22, 2010, 02:06:27 PM
New Product. A local Amish sawmill is now cutting red pine into these cants which are sold to a buyer to be cut into fencing slats.



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/scan0001.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 09, 2010, 03:55:50 PM
Cedar Stumps. The Amish are very good in wood utilization. These cedar stumps will be used for table basis in there table making shop at their sawmill.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/scan0001.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Norm on September 10, 2010, 07:50:59 AM
Those are cool Ron, do you know how they get them so clean? Pressure washer maybe?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on September 10, 2010, 10:53:28 AM
Yes, they pressure wash them.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on September 19, 2010, 10:09:25 PM
The Pettibone 501 Master Mountain Goat Speed Skidder, what a name, eh? Picked it up last winter.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/667/speed_skidder.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 20, 2010, 08:32:36 PM
Western Star Wood Hauler. Loading out pulpwood on the single lead only. The "pup trailer" is not being used due the long, sandy, and hilly seasonal access road. Schirmer hardwood sale, 10/10.



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/scan0002.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/scan0001%7E0.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 21, 2010, 07:53:29 PM
1270D Timberjack Harvester. Harvesting Red Pine in the Manistee National Forest, 9/10



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/scan0001%7E2.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/scan0002%7E1.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gary_C on October 21, 2010, 08:25:16 PM
That looks like a nice job compared to the ones I get here in MN. This is what I get.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11467/Job-from-H1.jpg)

How was your job set up? Row thin, logger select to some DBH, or marked sale? Got any more?  :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 21, 2010, 08:41:59 PM
Row thinned every 3rd row and selectively marked in between rows to 90-120 sq. ft basal area. This stand was in a real need of thinning. Yes, the Huron-Manistee NF's have a lot of red pine stands like this in need of their first and second thinnings. The Superior and Chippewa NF's in your area should have similar stands. Many are from the successful reforestation efforts of the CCC's. 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 22, 2010, 01:30:03 PM
1010D John Deere Forwarder. The 1010D forwarder supports the 1270D Timberjack processor. Manistee NF red pine harvest, 9/10.



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/scan0003.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/scan0004.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Norm on October 23, 2010, 06:52:55 AM
Thank you for the pictures Ron.  :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: LOGDOG on October 23, 2010, 09:33:52 AM
Talk about some beautiful pine forests.  :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: northwoods1 on October 24, 2010, 07:12:12 AM
That pile of wood in the last pic has got to be the smallest diameter pile of pine I have ever seen, is that pulp? Looks like its all 3" dia/ or less :o can't kick about utilization of that job, looks like it really did need thinning normal 1st thinning is every other row but that stand couldn't have taken it.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 24, 2010, 10:43:43 AM
Yes, we try for maximum utilization depending upon markets. The small topwood will go for pulpwood or sold to the Amish for fence posts and specialty products. I suspect that is where their market is for these wood decks.

The stand was in dier need of thinning and the USFS finally got to it. We usually don't do every every other row here, usually every 3rd row with selection removal between rows. Sometimes we will do two rows and leave too rows. We are concerned about preventing wind throw, retaining moisture content within the stand, moving the stand towards quality poles in the second thinning, etc.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: northwoods1 on October 24, 2010, 12:46:54 PM
That is great if they are able to utilize that small stuff for posts i've never heard of that. All the first thinnings I have ever done in my area have been every other row, 2nd thinnings approx. every other tree all geared toward producing poles. The plantations around here are a lot more mature on the average most were planted by the ccc's and there is a lot of it. The picture  I show of the standing wood is just down the road from my house a couple miles I thinned it about 10 years ago and it was 3rd thinning there was some very nice poles. Back in the early 90s' a big mill opened up in northern wi for tree length wood and we thinned a lot of these stands for the 2nd time shipping it tree length. We lost a big chunk of it in a windstorm june of 2007 that is the other picture I show, just down the road from my home. The f-5 tornado went right through the middle of two very expansive areas of this mature pole timber with a path 1 mile wide+. After all the years of watching this be carefully nurtured and managed now I get to see the whole process start over, they haven't begun planting yet but most sites have been cleaned up and prepped for planting everything that was planted anyway.





 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17553/1886/DSCN6150.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17553/1886/hwy_64_aerial.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 25, 2010, 06:59:29 PM
Back to the Hardwoods.

The 4510 Iron Mule Forwarder operator sorts and decks oak pulpwood/firewood and aspen pulpwood at the landing. Schirmer Hardwood Sale, 10/10


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/scan0007.jpg)



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/scan0008.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: mad murdock on October 25, 2010, 07:07:42 PM
Nice looking 'Mule Ron,  my brother and I bought a model 4501 (smaller version) from Ison Equip, in Monico Wisc, back in the day, ( I think it was 1982?) we paid about $45K for it back then.  The nice thing about the 'mule, is that they were so easy on fuel, ours had the 3 cyl. Perkins, and they could snake around real well for a forwarder.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: LOGDOG on October 25, 2010, 10:48:23 PM
Mad Murdock ...how'd you end up out West. I grew up about 25 miles from Monico, WI and knew the Ison family. I ran a Iron Mule 5510 I guess it was back in the day ...and a Tree Farmer, and a Franklin... Great place to log. Loved logging in the winter up there.

Northwoods1 .... that picture you posted of the tornado damage, is that by chance up on Hwy 64 between Hwy 55 and Hwy 32? Just curious.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: mad murdock on October 26, 2010, 02:52:30 AM
Logdog, I ended up here via the Great Land (Alaska), after kicking around in the Alaskan Bush a few years(Kotzebue, Nome, Aniak, Bethel), my wife and I moved back to the big village (Fairbanks), where she greew up, and when she heard that I had been offered a job in the stataes, she said" why aren't we on our way yet?"!? So in 1997 we moved to Oregon, for the glory of aviation, and one thing after another, we find ourselves on a 40 acre tree farm in the Oregon Coast range, watching these awesome douglas fir grow to the sky, not to mention, it is a pretty good place to raise some young uns' in the ways of the wood.  My dad's family moved to Forest Co. from Eastern KY back around 1919, and my Grandad owned and operated as a General merchant, and they had a sawmill Near Nashville, on Co Rd. B.  A lot of the folks buried in the old Forest Home cemetary there are my relation.  I did most of my logging in Vilas Co. as we grew up near Eagle River.  My uncle had the sawmill in Eagle River for decades, until it burned down in the 50's, and the old woodland business there on Hwy 45 where the mill yard was, stayed in operation until it my cousin shut the doors on the place maybe 15 years ago.  My Dad had contracts with all of the big timber co's like LP, Thilmany, Champion Intl. Badger Paper, P&G, Mosinee Paper, Menasha Corp, Consolidated etc. etc.  As  kid I knew alot of the people in the timber industry in that region, and my brothers and I cut our teeth logging at an early age.  I guess my dad thought it was a good way to keep 6 boys busy in the summer, peeling popple, and cutting firewood in the late summer, to save on heating bills for the winter.(We used to go throught about a truckload of firewood a season), and we got the express priviledge of cutting, splitting, and stacking it all.  It was great character building time for us, we all stayed out of trouble, and at the urging of my dad, none of us stayed in the woods professionally, at least not for too long.  But once in the woods, it's hard to boil it out of yer blood, I have always kept a foot in the woods, one way or another, even though my day job involves fixing helicopters.  The Northwoods are a great place to be from, my problem is, I have to admit, after chasing the snow from Northern Wisc, and the UP, to Alaska, when we came down to Oregon, and figured out that we didn't have to spend 4 months shoveling it, rather we can watch it run off the front porch most of the time, we kind of got soft, and decided that it is nice to visit the snow, (only an hour away to get to it in the cascades), then when we are done, we can leave it behind, and go home.  How the heck did you get to Lousianna?  I did some work there for a few weeks out of Abbyville, and Pine Island, when we worked doing seismic support for oil exploration in that area several years back. It was neat visiting, but the swamp never grew on me too much.  There is some nice timber in that country though.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: northwoods1 on October 26, 2010, 07:03:35 AM
Mad Murdock ...how'd you end up out West. I grew up about 25 miles from Monico, WI and knew the Ison family. I ran a Iron Mule 5510 I guess it was back in the day ...and a Tree Farmer, and a Franklin... Great place to log. Loved logging in the winter up there.

Northwoods1 .... that picture you posted of the tornado damage, is that by chance up on Hwy 64 between Hwy 55 and Hwy 32? Just curious.

I haven't sat in an iron mule for a long time, but sure have skidded a lot of wood with them over the years, out of all the different makes I've run I liked the franklins best, hard to get by without the roof mount loader after you get used to having it :). Which direction were you from Monico? Yes that is where that picture of the storm damage was taken. This was about mile 20 of the 40 mile long continuous path.  Might be hard for some to make out what there looking at but just in that shot there are tens of thousands of chords of wood down you can see how one big pine area of r.pine plantation is laid down showing the rotation of the tornado. Just a couple miles off the photo to the right there was a large federal sale with a crew working way back off the road cutting the day the tornado went through. It was a 2man/machine mechanized processor crew and they were directly in the middle of the path as the storm went through. The processor operator  told me he was cutting and the wind picked up a little bit. Then it got a little windier, then he said all the windows in the machine fogged up almost instantly and the debris started flying he just put his head down between his knees and waited. It was over in less than a minute but imagine how weird it would be to be in a situation like that, way out in the middle of the woods 1 minute and then literally couple minutes later not be able to see a single tree standing for as far as you could see just all downed trees! Talk about timber harvest methods and equipment :D it was like a logging convention around here after that for a good long while. Just in that pic alone there had to be at least 12 different crew working for close to 2 years just cleaning up tipper over wood no standing trees. I worked for over 1 year on just an 80 acre area of Exc+ red oak and large white pine to the upper left in the photo.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: northwoods1 on October 26, 2010, 07:12:31 AM
, my problem is, I have to admit, after chasing the snow from Northern Wisc, and the UP, to Alaska, when we came down to Oregon, and figured out that we didn't have to spend 4 months shoveling it, rather we can watch it run off the front porch most of the time, we kind of got soft, and decided that it is nice to visit the snow, (only an hour away to get to it in the cascades), then when we are done, we can leave it behind, and go home. 

You didn't get softer you got smarter :D  I just can't hardly take the cold anymore myself. I mean, if it's below zero I ain't going out and cutting wood! Unless its in from a heated cab! Oregon sure sound nice!
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: LOGDOG on October 26, 2010, 08:24:19 AM
MM & Northwoods1 ... A lot of what you described fits my life growing up right down to cutting and splitting the firewood for the winter. I know right where Cty B is in the town of Nashville. I grew up in Pearson which is about 8 miles Southeast. Do you remember a restaurant called "Hill's Still" ... about a mile up the road from there. My folks still live up that way. I don't get back much. I know what you mean about getting soft once you're out of the snow and the cold. It's a rare thing to see snow in our parts down in LA. What brought me here? ...My wife. She's from here. It looks like we have our property sold though so we're looking at our options. Actually looking hard at the NW. I'll be looking for some land to do a 1031 Exchange into so I don't get killed on taxes.

Yep, my Great Grandpa worked in the logging camps down on the Wolf River. He used to have a cabin on the river down by Cty A near what was Michelor's Bar if that rings a bell. I heard the property that the cabin was on recently sold and was disappointed that none of my family had told me about it or done anything to try and buy it. I think I probably would have bought it just for nostalgia if nothing else. It's a great spot on the Wolf River too. Did a lot of trout fishing there over the years.

NW ... I'm with you, those Franklins are Cadillacs with the roof mount loaders. The one I ran was brand spanking new. You know, in the event of a bad storm, sitting in a processor probably isn't a bad place to be... as solid as they're built with thick plexiglass and steel around you. What a show that would be to watch huh? I heard it was ugly though. Lot of big deer up those woods on Hwy 64.  ;D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: northwoods1 on October 26, 2010, 09:40:06 AM
MM & Northwoods1 ... A lot of what you described fits my life growing up right down to cutting and splitting the firewood for the winter. I know right where Cty B is in the town of Nashville. I grew up in Pearson which is about 8 miles Southeast. Do you remember a restaurant called "Hill's Still" ... about a mile up the road from there.

Yep, my Great Grandpa worked in the logging camps down on the Wolf River. He used to have a cabin on the river down by Cty A near what was Michelor's Bar if that rings a bell. I heard the property that the cabin was on recently sold and was disappointed that none of my family had told me about it or done anything to try and buy it. I think I probably would have bought it just for nostalgia if nothing else. It's a great spot on the Wolf River too. Did a lot of trout fishing there over the years.


My family/grandfather worked the camps around here also. They floated a lot of timber down that river I have a collection of vintage photos of that era very neat stuff, the wolf was a very fast river I've got one pic of a big jam down by the Dalles. Pics of the drivers taking bateaus through the dales pretty hairy water! Was up canoeing up near where you mentioned just a couple weeks ago. Put in by Lily. We had a lot of rain last few weeks so river was high(real high for this time of year!). Took my girlfriend who I hadn't canoed with before and was hesitant, but I thought she could handle the water it can get pretty fast in places, what a beautiful trip it was :) ... I live just East of Langlade and I also have a small farm a little further east on the South Branch of the Oconto, very good trout fishing there only 1 fish over 20" and the browns can run a fair amount larger than that!
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on October 26, 2010, 10:13:07 AM
Hey, this thread is supposed to be timber harvest methods and equipment, not a cheesehead reunion :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: mad murdock on October 26, 2010, 10:53:18 AM
Well Barbender, bringing it back on topic, I know what you all mean about them Franklins, After we ran the tires off that Iron Mule, My brother got tired of fixing the planetaries (It was from constant overloading the machine) on the 4501, he traded up to a 132 pack a back, with the roof mounted hawk loader.  That was a sweet skidding machine!  Nice cab, tons of power, and a truck loader on top of the cab, a little over 3 skidder loads and you had a truckload out.  Production went from an honest 18-20 cord a day to every day a 30 cord day, and more if you were in good wood.  We had a JD 450C w/ a Morbark shearhead on it, you could lay down usually 4 truckloads of wood a day with that machine as well.  That was about as mechanized as we got.  We could've gotten bigger, but eventually we all went the way of the 4 winds, and the rest as they say is "history".  There sure are some nice machines out there now for woods work, I just wonder how a guy can afford them with wood prices the way they are.  Makes the old iron worth alot more today in my book, you don't have to spend your whole day working for the bank.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on October 26, 2010, 11:33:07 AM
I'm just ribbing you guys, I enjoy hearing about your experiences in the north woods.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: mad murdock on October 26, 2010, 12:19:37 PM
i figured as much B B :D  Did have some good times "growing up under a tree", as my wife tells my kids, "your dad was born under a tree"! "and raised by his'self".  As far as timber harvest methods go though, I do like the way they do things in this country, cutting longer lengths, and hauling them that way to the mill.  Makes for better production at the end of the day for sure.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: LOGDOG on October 26, 2010, 10:13:42 PM
Northwoods ... I'd love to see those river pics with them floating the logs down the river if you ever get the chance to scan them. Sometimes I think I was born in the wrong era. Then again, those guys were tough scrappers and I probably couldn't have cut it.
I've caught many a trout out of the Wolf River. Never fished the Oconto, although I've heard it's good.

You guys feel free to stay in touch via PM that way we're not hijacking the thread.  ;D

MM ...did that 450C you ran the shear head on have a front end loader that allowed you to get some lift on it and tilt the sheer head? I remember we used to run a shear head on a Case 1150 with the front end loader. Used the grapple skidder to forward it up to the slasher if we were in pine.

I don't know how they get the numbers to work on the new machines either. Volume is the ticket I guess. So long as you have the contracts and the wood to fill them and can stay working the payments get made. Working in the woods taught me real quick that I needed to get book smart sooner than later and pursue something else for my primary income. That said, my heart's still in the woods. Always will be. 

 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on October 27, 2010, 02:26:05 AM
Go ahead and hijack, I'm enjoying all this except that I've never got to fish trout over in Wisconsin so I'm getting a little jealous ::) Pics of large trout hooked on beautiful rivers are always welcome, too!
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: mad murdock on October 27, 2010, 02:32:45 AM


MM ...did that 450C you ran the shear head on have a front end loader that allowed you to get some lift on it and tilt the sheer head? I remember we used to run a shear head on a Case 1150 with the front end loader. Used the grapple skidder to forward it up to the slasher if we were in pine.

LogDog, that is what it was, had a 4 in 1 bucket that would interchange with the shear head.  It made a pretty stable snipper, though not near as fast as a rubber tire machine (Hydro-Ax), but it was pretty versitile, being able to have the use of the bucket now and again.   There was an old guy in Ashland way back in the day, who had an old WWII sherman tank modified with a shear head that he used in the woods for years.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 27, 2010, 09:02:14 PM
The 440B John Deere Cable Skidder is used to pull tree lengths off the steep slope areas to be cut into product lenghts for pick up by the Iron Mule forwarder. Schirmer Hardwood sale 10/10.



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/scan0009.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/scan0011.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on October 27, 2010, 09:09:52 PM
That looks like a really well maintained 440. Nice machine.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on October 27, 2010, 09:34:03 PM
Yes, this operator takes excellent care of his equipment. He owns the Iron Mule also. He had two Iron mules, both in great shape, but sold one of them.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: treefarmer87 on October 27, 2010, 09:49:03 PM
i would like to have a 5510 iron mule
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: D Hagens on October 27, 2010, 09:51:14 PM
 85 pages and still going strong! I’ve been reading and following this thread and I find it very interesting and informative. I’m learning a lot about the machines that are used on a daily bases in the forestry industry.
 I would like to say a big thanks to Ron and others for keeping this thread going and posting all the pics.   :) :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Okrafarmer on October 28, 2010, 12:24:19 AM
I'm slowly working my way through this thread-- about 10 pages a night. Wow.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bobus2003 on October 31, 2010, 01:46:56 PM
Timberline 3800 Boom Delimber w/leveling Cab Working Ponderosa Pine, Black Hills SD
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20739/2610/T-Line_3800.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: northwoods1 on November 01, 2010, 07:51:49 AM
:o We wouldn't be allowed in the bush in those conditions.
That looks normal for Maine. The land heals itself. These are the conditions skidders are built for. If they didn't have to contend with these conditions, they would look a lot tamer.

How forestry equipment is designed and built and what conditions it can operate under, and managing/harvesting timber land in a sustainable manner are two different things. Just because a skidder can drive through wet ground up to the axles making ruts 2' deep with #20,000 of wood on its back is no excuse or justification for doing it. Acceptable damage standards on logging jobs varies everywhere.  Up here loggers have to operate under guidlines... BMPs, or best management practices in order to have contracts with many mills. Loggers are required to have training on the hows and whys of BMPs'. True enough the land heals itself but that is still not justification for damaging it unnecessarily. That is why we have people who are foresters who determine the best way to prevent damage to land/timber and promote things like management of timber, protecting watersheds, improving land for recreation or wildlife habitat. How they go about harvesting the swamps of the southern U.S. really can't be compared to how forests are managed in other parts of the country.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: northwoods1 on November 01, 2010, 07:54:26 AM
heres the cutter

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21384/Early%252060%2527s%2520Processor%2520%2528a%2529.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21384/Page%252047%2520-%2520B.jpg)


What the ?????? , do you have any info on these pics like who, what where, when? I've never seen or heard anything about a machine like you showing and the pics look like there taken somewhere right up by me, I wonder what year?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: northwoods1 on November 01, 2010, 09:06:46 AM
You're absolutely right. It's all about what's acceptable for the given circumstances. The free market means that if there is a demand for lighter impact  logging, it will be supplied by the loggers.

No not really that is not what I was saying. What constitutes sustainable forestry managment practices has nothing to do with the free market or what loggers or landowners want. If a landowner wants to ruin there land through unwise timber harvesting method, maybe to make a buck,  that does not make it acceptable or sustainable forestry. The entire challenge of sustainable forestry practices, the way I see it, is to figure out how to be able to incorporate them and still be able to make $$ in the free market not the other way around :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: northwoods1 on November 01, 2010, 09:14:21 AM
its in michigan in the 60s try this http://www.heavyequipmentforums.com/showthread.php?t=12720



I find that to be some very interesting equipment :) , this was such an innovative time up here in the forest products industry people were just beginning to figure out the potential of mechanization. My neighbor has sitting in his shed the very 1st Timbco ever made and that was right around the time Case was experimenting with a shear head on a tracked excavator. I really can't believe how far it has come since then, that 1st timbco spawned todays timber pro machines. I can remember when they first got that machine up and running and cutting on some of there large sales here, they really thought they were on to something  :o and they were!
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: northwoods1 on November 01, 2010, 10:19:24 AM
I know of one guy that guy fined for cutting in a brook like that back in the 80's.I remember reading about it in the paper.Still see some butcher jobs around,or at least in my eyes.I've been told before that I'm to fussy with my woodlot.  ::) Most jobs are very well done.Even back in the 80's and 90's too.There are still are few around that will holler,"Well you got to get the wood out" A nice,neat job can be done without destroying the land the tress grow on.Just takes more time to do it.And of course time is money.

I saw a very sad situation this past summer. Long time friend of mine called me and said he was having 40 acres of timber land logged which was located up near Florence WI. He is an absentee landowner and lives 300 or so miles away. He got a forester from up in the U.P. to set up and administrate the job. He called me because he was concerned about the cords coming up short it had been estimated at 1300 cords total aspen. When I got out to the job I couldn't beleive what I saw. =To access the  timber the logger had tried to cross a black ash swamp by laying down timber mats for 150 yards, (totally unnecessary he could have went around this swamp if he would have walked the job and looked for the path of least resistance)  The mats were all floating there and they had things royally screwed up. The job should have been a winter only job and they came in and started april of the wettest year on record here. They had things so rutted up I have never seen anything like it before in all my years of logging. To top it off they had all the timber cut, the wettest area skidded and totally rutted, trails up hills with springs running out of the ground right down 2' deep ruts, and a small creek only 150 yards away the whole 40 acres wide running in to a large creek just off the propery line. All the soil was washing off the hills down in to the creek. And they ended up pulling out because it was too wet and leaving 70% of the wood to be skidded all of it cut.  I got on the phone with the forester and I found that he hadn't even been out to the job since marking the property lines even though he had told my friend he had been and was monitoring things. My friend had not received any money down, which the contract stated he would have, and that they would not haul anything from the job without it being payed for, which they had done. I simply told him things better be corrected and in a hurry. The contract had only a $1000 performance bond which wouldn't nearly cover repair of the damage they had done or how much they devalued the land. My friend is still working things out on that job. I take a lot of pride in doing a nice neat job. Staying out of the mud and not doing that kind of damage is a matter of sheduling jobs correctly for conditions.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 06, 2010, 02:35:45 PM
Ponsee Fox Harvester. Harvesting lowland timber species in a Michigan lowland area.The Ponsee Fox Harvester has a good lighting system for working in low light or night time operations. These machines are often worked 20 hours per day with only 4 hours down time for maintenance. Grayling. MI 11/10

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/100_2213.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/100_2214.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/100_2215.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on November 07, 2010, 03:09:08 AM
That's one of the few Ponsse Fox's in the states there Ron, isn't it? Ponsse just had one up here demoing it.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on November 07, 2010, 09:18:43 AM
Ya gotta have lots of lights and run those Ponsee's 20 hours a day just to make the payments on them :-\
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 07, 2010, 09:59:56 AM
This actually was a Ponsee demonstration. Ponsee bought the lowland timber sale so as to have their own demonstration area and operator/service training for their machines. They were giving this demonstration at a Michigan SAF meeting.

The machine with tracks works very well in lowland areas. Yes, at a "1/2 million $ purchase price", they have to run constantly. There was a logger coming to look at it for possible purchase however. Ponsee's are starting to get popular here over some of the other historical brands.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Okrafarmer on November 07, 2010, 02:39:26 PM
Ya gotta have lots of lights and run those Ponsee's 20 hours a day just to make the payments on them :-\

I think I'll pass for now, my mama warned me not to get caught up in any ponsee schemes.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 08, 2010, 07:25:47 PM
Ponsee Fox Harvester. Harvesting spruce pulpwood in a lowland area, Grayling, MI 11/10. It is powered by a quiet Mercedes Benz 4 cylinder engine.



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/100_2219.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/100_2216.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: treefarmer87 on November 08, 2010, 07:29:17 PM
thats $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ high dollar
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on November 08, 2010, 07:37:40 PM
Wonder how it'd perform/hold up in gnarly, knotty northern hardwood  ??? :-\ :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: snowstorm on November 08, 2010, 07:45:31 PM
i have a 150 keto on a valmet. you be surprised at the hardwood it will limb. a 3"  limb dosent even slow it down...4" back up an hit it a couple times
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: treefarmer87 on November 08, 2010, 07:55:02 PM
do the processors break down much?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: snowstorm on November 08, 2010, 08:10:16 PM
its been pretty good. did buy a reman computer for it. 2500 bucks and it comes with a dent in the screen screws missing and the battery is flat. but it dose work fine for 2 months then throws code short cirkit-cable bk. call the dis. in quebec says he will look into it . that was in june....2 weeks ago i hear from him "the display is fine must be somethind else"..........anybody on here ever deal with quadco???
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: chevytaHOE5674 on November 08, 2010, 09:05:29 PM
do the processors break down much?

I know many guys UP here break the feed wheels often trying to ram large hardwoods through to delimb them. Often times in the process they chew the logs up (which can knock them down in scale and grade) and where the limbs are sheared off it can cause fiber pull and such .
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bobus2003 on November 08, 2010, 09:16:35 PM
do the processors break down much?

My Patu 410 Has tendancy to Shake the Processor Board loose after 30-40hrs or limbing (Stroke) so it has a bit of abuse thrown at it..
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: snowstorm on November 09, 2010, 06:09:43 AM
keto dose not use feed wheels. it has tracks there are times they will slip. most of the time they dont. there are lots of vids of them on youtube
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 09, 2010, 08:29:42 AM
A well trained operator is certainly needed in these high priced technical machines.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on November 09, 2010, 08:04:16 PM
Do processors break down a lot? Yes, but it depends on the abuse they recieve. You can't take someone that is used to hammering through the woods in a skidder and just throw them in a CTL machine, they will destroy it in short order. But even with a good operator that doesn't abuse the machine, they are high maintainence machines.
.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: TW on November 11, 2010, 02:56:13 AM
I found some short film clips of some classic forwarders on Youtube.

Stornalle was considered a great forwarder back in the days. They still have a great reputation for being able to work in rocky terrain where everything else gets stuck.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MqNd-SUhhZM&feature=related

Skogsboxer was a common logging tractor back then. They are still sought after in Sweden.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xp97W0QPvpI

Both were based on the strongly built Volvo BM 350 farm tractors. The motor was a three cylinder slow running thing giving about 60hp. They were manufactured in the 1960-ies.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: LOGDOG on November 11, 2010, 08:30:28 AM
I like the throaty sound those tractors have. Reminds me of my little John Deere 450C when he's under load. Pretty backdrop with all the snow too.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 13, 2010, 10:04:20 AM
The Ponsee Fox Harvester makes it turn on the lowland cutting strip. 11/10


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/100_2220.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/100_2221.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 21, 2010, 08:35:34 PM
Ponsee Fox Harvester, H6 Harvester Head

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/100_2223.JPG)
 A Ponsse Sales Rep points out the features of the Ponsse H6 harvester head.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/100_2224.JPG)
The Ponsse H6 Harvester Head has a cutting diameter of 25 inches.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: arbo71 on November 25, 2010, 10:21:58 AM
just a moment - I ll try again soon
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: treefarmer87 on November 25, 2010, 11:50:29 AM
that is a cool harvester
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Corley5 on November 25, 2010, 11:57:19 AM
Tree Farmers were manufactured by CanCar.  My C4D forwarder which is newer than an 1986 has CanCar on the ID plate.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: paul case on November 26, 2010, 09:15:03 PM
 i just finished reading all 87 pages of this great thread. heres a pic of my dads tractor we use to load logs.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20540/2953/SANY0386.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 29, 2010, 08:05:30 PM
It is often asked if the chains should be put on the front or the back tires. Here the chains are being put on the front tires of the 440B JD Cable skidder. Schirmer hardwood sale, 3/10.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/scan0002%7E2.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/scan0003%7E0.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: treefarmer87 on November 29, 2010, 08:11:42 PM
nice skidder
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bobus2003 on November 29, 2010, 08:31:37 PM
I do love those little 440's
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: isawlogs on November 29, 2010, 08:35:58 PM
 I like having the front chained up if only one set is available, why does he not have the sid ecovers on the engin , where they off to check a few things , I would never take to the bush with out them in place , there is just too much to go wrong with a limb going in there   :o :o  It sure don't take long for a limb to find the chain and climb into the pump  ::) :o :-X
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 29, 2010, 08:53:08 PM
He must have taken the side covers off while putting the chains on for some reason. This guy is very particular and careful with his equipment so he wouldn't run without them. ;)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bobus2003 on November 29, 2010, 09:59:59 PM
My 440 Doesn't have factory Engine Covers.. I have a Home-made set, but they tend to make it over-heat.. Did the 440 have Engine covers from the factory? I have never seen one with them
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: isawlogs on November 29, 2010, 10:06:22 PM
 Bobus2003
    As far as I know they did.
  I saw that the machine was really clean and not abused from the pics, one reason for asking, for a machine that old it sure stands proud.  :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: snowstorm on November 30, 2010, 06:22:31 AM
My 440 Doesn't have factory Engine Covers.. I have a Home-made set, but they tend to make it over-heat.. Did the 440 have Engine covers from the factory? I have never seen one with them
    if for some reason you have a pusher fan you must have the side covers with the holes in them.  some of the b's had pusher fans.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: grassfed on November 30, 2010, 06:46:49 AM
The owners manual lists side covers as an option.

My skidder did not have side covers when I got it but it had the hinges. I once had a limb break off the oil pressure sending unit. I saw what I thought was a black thread coming out of the engine and going up toward the sky.  A couple of seconds later I realized what it was and I shut down the skidder. I did not damage the engine but I had to spend the rest of the day  bagging black snow to clean up all of the oil. I lost about 3/4 of a gallon of oil in a few seconds. I now have side covers. 
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Bobus2003 on November 30, 2010, 07:43:41 AM
My 440 Doesn't have factory Engine Covers.. I have a Home-made set, but they tend to make it over-heat.. Did the 440 have Engine covers from the factory? I have never seen one with them
    if for some reason you have a pusher fan you must have the side covers with the holes in them.  some of the b's had pusher fans.

I Actually have both, Pusher and Puller fans for my 440.. My dad used to change the fans for winter/summer use.. The side Covers i have have holes, but maybe just not enough holes or maybe they need to be bigger.. :-\
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on November 30, 2010, 11:03:39 AM
Other photos of this machine in the thread shows a black engine cover.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: mad murdock on November 30, 2010, 12:51:34 PM
I sure liked those fans that had the blades that you could adjust to suck or blow, depending on the season.  Just reach in, push down and twist the blades to whichever position you wanted.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on December 13, 2010, 02:31:28 PM
I like this thread to stay near the top, so I'll throw up a pic of my equipment on a little clearing job I did.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11286/667/DSC00105.JPG)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Gary_C on December 13, 2010, 04:04:39 PM
That's a nice Minnesota winter picture. Too bad we all have to switch to our black and white cameras in the winter. It's the law you know.  :D :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: paul case on December 13, 2010, 07:19:41 PM
i like this thread also. it is neat to see all the logging equipment.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20540/2953/SANY0387.JPG)

this is my unloader at the mill. pc
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: paul case on December 13, 2010, 09:52:18 PM
here's how i get to where i m logging at.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20540/2953/SANY0036.JPG)

this picture was at the end of a day of logging black walnut at the silvey farm, seneca, mo.    pc
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on December 14, 2010, 03:31:36 PM
That's a nice Minnesota winter picture. Too bad we all have to switch to our black and white cameras in the winter. It's the law you know.  :D :D
Gary, that's a color picture, it's just a black and white day :: :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: treefarmer87 on December 14, 2010, 09:00:02 PM
i like your truck paul case :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: paul case on December 14, 2010, 10:03:03 PM
it kinda reminds me of banjo pickers and his kinda reminds me of yours! ;D ;D   pc
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 23, 2010, 09:38:23 AM
Some more woodhauler truck names noted.

`Chip
`Steady Teddy
`Husky's Headache
`I Love My Money
`Hoodlum
`Road Runner
`The Ripper
`Money Pit
`Late For Dinner
`Big Ben
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: northwoods1 on December 23, 2010, 10:16:17 AM
Some more woodhauler truck names noted.

`Chip
`Steady Teddy
`Husky's Headache
`I Love My Money
`Hoodlum
`Road Runner
`The Ripper
`Money Pit
`Late For Dinner
`Big Ben

 - dog & pup - a neighbors Mack
 - the old warhorse -  another neighbors International
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Clark on December 23, 2010, 10:44:50 AM
Some more woodhauler truck names noted.

`Chip
`Steady Teddy
`Husky's Headache
`I Love My Money
`Hoodlum
`Road Runner
`The Ripper
`Money Pit
`Late For Dinner
`Big Ben

 - dog & pup - a neighbors Mack
 - the old warhorse -  another neighbors International


I recall seeing quite a few different names when I was a scaler at the mill.  The only one that I recall, and northwoods1 is probably familiar with, is "The Hairlip Duck", which naturally calls out "Mac, Mac" instead of "Quack, quack".

Clark
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: sawguy21 on December 23, 2010, 10:54:50 PM
I remember 'Old Snort' an International with a 6-53. Never any question who was coming down the hill above the house. Jim is retired now and kinda hard of hearing. :D
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: Ron Scott on December 28, 2010, 04:32:28 PM
Amish Horse Logging. With the recent heavy snows and the delay of their contracted producer getting back to work after the firearm deer season and the recent heavy snows, the Amish brought their team of Belgem work horses in to the job to do the skidding in the interim and to keep things moving in the woods.

They are also waiting for the access road to get all plowed out for trucking. They are working 1 1/2 miles back in from a seasonal access road and one of their truckers refuses to haul until conditions get better. Hopefully all will get back to normal soon. Schirmer hardwood sale, 12/10.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/scan0001%7E6.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/148/scan0002%7E3.jpg)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: barbender on December 29, 2010, 09:38:07 AM
Neat pics, Ron
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: GRANITEstateMP on December 29, 2010, 03:42:31 PM
Wow Ron,

I always enjoy your pictures but seeing those two animals working is great don't see much of that around here.

Matt
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: northwoods1 on December 30, 2010, 07:40:12 AM


Those are great pictures, hope you get a chance to take some more  :)

We have lots of Amish up around these parts and it never ceases to amaze me how expert they are with horses. I was married to a large animal veterinarian for many years and got a chance to visit many farms it was something I always looked forward too :)
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: timberfaller390 on December 31, 2010, 10:41:08 PM
paul, how are your standards attached to your flatbed?
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: weisyboy on January 01, 2011, 07:34:47 AM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/displayimage.php?album=lastup&cat=21903&pos=9)
fiat AD 10 dozer, 110hp, 12 ton

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21903/2924/gear_%2810%29.JPG)
fiat 415c crawler, 45hp

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21903/2924/gear_%284%29.JPG)
fiat 480 4wd tractor, 55hp.
Title: Re: Timber Harvest Methods & Equipment
Post by: paul case on January 01, 2011, 11:45:19 AM
paul, how are your standards attached to your flatbed?
just bolted down thru the 1/8'' steel floor with 2- 1/2'' bolts each bunk.those bunks are 4'' tube uprights sandwiched at the bottom by 2 pieces of 3/8''x4x4 angle iron. they would almost stand alone. i always bind loads of logs all the way to the truck frame. i made the bunks this way so i could drop them off and use the truck to pull a gooseneck trailer. i thought i might have trouble with the bolt holes ripping out but i have hauled logs on that truck th