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Author Topic: Blade Question, Circle mill  (Read 2083 times)

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Offline ely

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Re: Blade Question, Circle mill
« Reply #20 on: April 04, 2013, 04:31:13 PM »
that is true, i like the logs peeled if i can do it. not dragged preferrably.

Offline steamsawyer

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Re: Blade Question, Circle mill
« Reply #21 on: April 04, 2013, 04:34:53 PM »
I'll start by saying that high production is not in my vocabulary but...

If everything goes along without any issues, when we shut down for lunch I will sit down and file the bits. I like to keep ahead of them and not let them get too dull, it saves time and wear.

A sharp saw is a happy saw.

Alan
J. A. Vance circular sawmill, 52" blade, powered by a 70 HP 9 1/2 x 10 James Leffel portable steam engine.

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Great minds think alike.....  Does your butt itch too?

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Offline moosehunter

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Re: Blade Question, Circle mill
« Reply #22 on: April 04, 2013, 04:36:41 PM »
Ok. back to the blade and hammering.
Just want to see if I understand.
A blade is hammered to put a concave into it.
The blade then stretches as it is turning to make it straight.
So a blade that is Hammered for a higher speed would have a deeper concave because it would stretch more with the higher cintrifigal force?
Are there known specs for the amount of concaveness for a given blade diameter? Metal type? Or is it more of an art form getting the concave right?
If it is true that we learn from our mistakes, I must be Brilliant!

Offline POSTON WIDEHEAD

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Re: Blade Question, Circle mill
« Reply #23 on: April 04, 2013, 04:55:03 PM »
Just like with a bandmill blade. That bark hides a lot of grit, even if it is power washed.

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Offline STUMPKICKER

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Re: Blade Question, Circle mill
« Reply #24 on: April 04, 2013, 06:21:36 PM »
I'll start by saying that high production is not in my vocabulary but...

If everything goes along without any issues, when we shut down for lunch I will sit down and file the bits. I like to keep ahead of them and not let them get too dull, it saves time and wear.

A sharp saw is a happy saw.

Alan
Steamsawyer... more true words have never been spoken.  ;D ;D  8)  8)

Offline sawsmith

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Re: Blade Question, Circle mill
« Reply #25 on: April 04, 2013, 09:09:03 PM »
moosehunter
A new saw from the factory will generally have little or no "concave" on the log side. It will however have some convex on the board side. Thats if it is a split gauge saw. Example 6-8 Ga. or 7-8 Ga. However most scragg saws are a straight gauge and are therefor flat on both sides of the saw. As far as more or less "concave" for a higher speed those are two different things when checked by your hammerman with the saw in two different positions. So there is no difference in the "concave" for diferent speeds
 

Offline Tripp

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Re: Blade Question, Circle mill
« Reply #26 on: April 04, 2013, 09:39:31 PM »
Smaller saw blades, like my 40 inch Belsaw blade, have no dish. They stand straight when not running. Larger blades are hammered to stand up straight when running.

Offline lyle niemi

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Re: Blade Question, Circle mill
« Reply #27 on: April 04, 2013, 11:10:51 PM »
Ok. back to the blade and hammering.
Just want to see if I understand.
A blade is hammered to put a concave into it.
The blade then stretches as it is turning to make it straight.
So a blade that is Hammered for a higher speed would have a deeper concave because it would stretch more with the higher cintrifigal force?
Are there known specs for the amount of concaveness for a given blade diameter? Metal type? Or is it more of an art form getting the concave right?
I had posted some pics of a blade being hammered a while back.

Offline lyle niemi

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Re: Blade Question, Circle mill
« Reply #28 on: April 04, 2013, 11:15:15 PM »
Sawing with bark on will really kill the life of the bits. Just like with a bandmill blade. That bark hides a lot of grit, even if it is power washed.
Jeff, I have some stelite bits and new shanks coming tomorrow??? Im itchin to try them out. I have only run soft bits so far

Offline Jeff

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Re: Blade Question, Circle mill
« Reply #29 on: April 04, 2013, 11:32:17 PM »
I hate to tell you this, but anytime you are putting new shanks in a saw, it should be retentioned.
Just call me the midget doctor.
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Commercial circle sawmill sawyer in a past life.

Offline lyle niemi

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Re: Blade Question, Circle mill
« Reply #30 on: April 04, 2013, 11:38:22 PM »
I hate to tell you this, but anytime you are putting new shanks in a saw, it should be retentioned.
Dang! LOL

Offline bandmiller2

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Re: Blade Question, Circle mill
« Reply #31 on: April 05, 2013, 07:54:03 AM »
Jeff,what would the odds be if Lyle replaced the bits and shanks and ran the saw.?Would changing every outher shank and running for a wile help.?? Frank C.
A man armed with common sense is packing a big piece

Offline Jeff

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Re: Blade Question, Circle mill
« Reply #32 on: April 05, 2013, 08:09:16 AM »
I would change them all and try it. You can always send it in if you can't make it saw.  The reason for new shanks is to make the saw run efficiently if the old ones are causing problems. it makes no sense to me to change only half of them.
Just call me the midget doctor.
Forestry Forum Founder and Chief Bottle Washer.

Commercial circle sawmill sawyer in a past life.

Offline bandmiller2

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Re: Blade Question, Circle mill
« Reply #33 on: April 05, 2013, 08:39:32 AM »
Jeff,perhaps its an old wives tail,many of which haunt our industry,that replacing every outher bit and shank then running the saw and later replacing the rest will somehow negate the need to rehammer.Personally I have doubts and never hesitate to have a saw retentioned,but some sawyers tend to be frugal to the point of cheap. Frank C.
A man armed with common sense is packing a big piece

Offline Jeff

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Re: Blade Question, Circle mill
« Reply #34 on: April 05, 2013, 08:43:51 AM »
 Maybe it works, I don't know, but maybe you just end up with a saw that never ever reaches it's potential.
Just call me the midget doctor.
Forestry Forum Founder and Chief Bottle Washer.

Commercial circle sawmill sawyer in a past life.


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