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Author Topic: White Cedar stand  (Read 1135 times)

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Offline dgdrls

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White Cedar stand
« on: June 25, 2016, 08:37:50 AM »
Hello to the Forester's

I'm in central NY and looking for advice on cutting some white cedar.
When is the best time to cut?
Is there a time not to cut it. (had a fellow tell me not to cut in the warm weather, only when cold because it holds the growth rings tighter)

I would like to thin an existing stand by taking only the larger trees,
Does cedar react well to thinning cuts?

Thanks

D

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: White Cedar stand
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2016, 05:15:22 PM »
Winter is the preferred time for cutting northern white cedar when the hydric soils that it usually grows on are frozen over to allow good access for equipment. Cutting during this time also provides a good source of winter deer food. We usually strip cut or patch cut it though small amounts may be thinned depending upon the products you are harvesting. Thick stands are difficult to operate however. Strip cuts work on a cut one leave two basis. Cut one strip 66 feet wide, leave 132 feet and cut the next strip.

If you have a heavy deer population, regeneration of the cedar is most difficult.
~Ron

Offline Thuja man

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Re: White Cedar stand
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2018, 10:15:52 AM »
I seek info on thinning of very dense intermediate-aged stands of whitecedar.  On my land, which burned during the 1930's, some of the whitecedar groves are extremely thick.  I suspect that growth of remaining stems could be hastened were I to go into those thick stands and take out all the runts.  Does this make sense?  What stocking level do I want to end up with?  Goal is more biological than commercial, although some forest products can be taken.  We want the cedar to flourish and expand on this plot.  We actually are able to transplant young whitecedars into the field area and the deer don't mess with them.  Pretty good situation, but i would like to know if I can boost growth of best stems in extra-thick regeneration via thinning.  Thanks

Offline BaldBob

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Re: White Cedar stand
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2018, 02:54:55 AM »


I would like to thin an existing stand by taking only the larger trees,


I have no experience with White Cedar, but what you are describing as what you want to do is called high grading not thinning.

Offline Clark

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Re: White Cedar stand
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2018, 07:31:28 AM »
It's not often that I have seen cedar thinned but much like jack pine, it doesn't seem to affect the stand for good or bad.

Clark
SAF Certified Forester

Offline dgdrls

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Re: White Cedar stand
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2018, 06:27:59 PM »


I would like to thin an existing stand by taking only the larger trees,


I have no experience with White Cedar, but what you are describing as what you want to do is called high grading not thinning.

I saw this post resurfaced,  no cutting has occurred.  Baldbob,  thank you for your input here.
Never occurred to me in a monoculture stand that removing the larger "merchantable"  stems only
is in-fact, a type of high grading.   

Best

D

Offline Thuja man

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Re: White Cedar stand
« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2018, 08:10:36 AM »
My intentions would be the reverse-to only remove suppressed, overtopped, small, and otherwise weak stems, leaving behind all the best.  Hardwoods in the immediate vicinity consist of paper birch, balsam poplar, trembling aspen, alder, dogwoods, a couple black ash and sugar maples.  Softwood competition/cohorts consist primarily of white pine, with tamarack and balsam fir present. 

Another situation which occurs is the regeneration of whitecedar under heavy sandbar willow/dogwood brush.  I have pondered;  Do I go in and release that cedar from the brushy stuff or is it better to let well enough alone, considering shade tolerance of the species,its need for apical dominance reinforcement compared to other softwoods (offered by close spacing), its possible protection from deer/hare herbivory when "hidden" in the brush, versus a possible growth boost if given full sun.  Any thoughts on that item?  And as in my other whitecedar post, photos forthcoming when I'm able to get in there.

Thanks

Offline tmbrcruiser

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Re: White Cedar stand
« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2018, 04:55:00 PM »
I live in Delaware and Atlantic White Cedar is found in only a few areas, very little of which has been managed. A close friend has offered some logs to me from his farm and I would like to make sure there is some regeneration before harvesting any of the cedars. In the past cedar was cut from his farm with no thought to regeneration and the stand is converting to sweet gum and red maple. My plan is to cut the hardwoods (approximately 10 acres +/-) and stump spray with a herbicide. Leave the cedars standing as seed trees until a stand has regenerated, then harvest the seed trees.

I would be interested in opinions and thoughts on likely hood of this successful.
Once you get sap in your veins, you will always have sawdust in your pockets.


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