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Author Topic: looking for my first mill...  (Read 2145 times)

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Offline Skipper11A

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Re: looking for my first mill...
« Reply #20 on: April 11, 2018, 12:41:43 AM »
Now I understand the HP thing better TY TKEHL, HP is Speed and Speed is $$ if you are in business or in a race. It is not dictated by the type of wood you are cutting.

Jerry, The HP thing is a balance between HP, blade width and thickness, and  hardness of wood.  A 100HP motor driving a 1- blade will not perform any better than a 25HP motor because that blade will begin to deflect (dive or rise) due to the hardness of the wood, regardless of how much HP is turning it.  You will notice, that the higher HP mills use wider (1- and 2") and also thicker blades so they remain straight in the cut.  The wider logs also cause blades to dive or rise and it doesn't matter one iota how many HP you have, because you will have wavy boards!  It's a balance.

Offline starmac

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Re: looking for my first mill...
« Reply #21 on: April 11, 2018, 12:57:00 AM »
I guess there is more than one way to look at that. It looks to me like the higher horspower mills have the torque to mill straight through a hard knot, where a lower mill may not, and make a smooth cut at a higher speed than a lower one.

I may be wrong in my thinking, but we are always seeing folks upgrading to higher horsepower, I have never seen anyone post that they would like to g lower.
Old LT40HD, old log truck, old MM forklift, and several huskies.

Offline Ianab

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Re: looking for my first mill...
« Reply #22 on: April 11, 2018, 01:48:22 AM »
This is true, but it still relates back to cost vs speed. The lower power mills cut slower, and when they hit a knot etc you have to slow down even more, or you loose band speed and the blade wanders. So yes when people have a motor wear out, they think "hmmm.. an engine with 10 more hp is only $xxx more" 

When they are in a small / easy cut the bigger engine is actually throttled back by governor, and might only be making 10hp anyway. But when the going suddenly gets tough, it can call on another 10+ as needed. Makes milling a lot easier as you can power steadily through those without having to "nurse" it. 

Like driving a 4 cyl car vs a V6 or 8. Sitting on a steady 60 mph you don't notice the difference. Pull out to pass on a hill, and you do  :D

There is a limit of course, where more power becomes impractical as the rest of the machine can't handle it. 
Weekend warrior, Peterson JP test pilot, Dolmar 7900 and Stihl MS310 saws and  the usual collection of power tools :)

Offline Darrel

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Re: looking for my first mill...
« Reply #23 on: April 11, 2018, 03:22:42 PM »
A band blade not running at its optimum speed will wander when the going gets tough. I've seen this even in 8" wide bands. When the going gets tough with a low horsepower mill the blade slows first then wanders. If you have enough power to keep the band speed in the sweet zone it is much less likely to wander. Another thing that shows this to be true is the fact that if suddenly your blade starts to wander is that the first thing you should check is drive belt tension as a loose drive belt fails to transmit all available horsepower to the blade. 
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Offline CJBeav

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Re: looking for my first mill...
« Reply #24 on: April 11, 2018, 07:15:45 PM »
Hello Everyone,  The Horsepower issue is an interesting one, and everyone has their experience.  I enjoy reading your comments because they all come form the experience of running your mills.

I beat the internet to death looking for used Mills the majority of the ones I found were very $$$. (there were not a lot)  Many of the bandmills were priced almost the same as new. As I did my research a few things came up...

Push feed compared to crank feed  is one better?  I think I would rather push the blade through, but one of the Mills I like is crank feed.

Log Table I would assume a welded frame is better over a bolt together frame.  is this an issue?

Thank you for all your comments, I am Learning....   Jerry

Offline Darrel

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Re: looking for my first mill...
« Reply #25 on: April 11, 2018, 08:20:57 PM »
The crank mills I have seen use a rope to pull the mill head through the log. So if you should choose one with the crank just untie the rope and push it on through a few logs. If you don't like it retie the rope, easy peasy. As for one being better than the other, as far as I know, the one you like is the better. Personally I don't like turning a crank all day, it makes my elbow hurt. Some folks really like the crank. 

I'm not knowledgeable enough to address bolts vs welds. 
1992 LT40HD

If I don't pick myself up by my own bootstraps, nobody else will.


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