The Forestry Forum

General Forestry => Chainsaws => Topic started by: knuckledragger on March 28, 2018, 12:33:57 PM

Title: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: knuckledragger on March 28, 2018, 12:33:57 PM
A young man I know started a new job about a year ago with one of the local logging companys. He is a recipient of a Fraunk-n-Steen saw(266/630). To be gifted one of those saws a young man has me interested in his well being. With that said, he came to me to tell me of his new job. I told I was happy for him and his family. Then asked him if he had safety equipment. I was concerned because I had no knowledge of his employment as a professional. He had no safety equipment. I gave him some chaps and told him to get a helmet asap. Recently this young man was off work for two weeks. You guessed it, chainsaw got him. Although the accident wasn't serious because he was lucky. It could've been very serious. I have witnessed only one serious saw accident and that was enough for me. Fella came close to bleeding out before he got to the hospital. He wasn't wearing chaps at the time of the accident. A 3/8 rip on the inside of his thigh. I'm submitting this as a reminder to all you pros and a stern directive to the weekenders/hobbiest. Wear your safety equipment. If you don't own any, get some.
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: sawguy21 on March 28, 2018, 12:42:50 PM
Sound advice, couple it with proper training. A chain saw is a dangerous tool in inexperienced hands. I haven't been hurt yet but have scared myself a couple of times.
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: Crusarius on March 28, 2018, 12:49:48 PM
I just found out Stihl offers a beginner safety package. It includes a set of half wrap chaps, and a hardhat that has screen face shield and ear muffs all for $100.

I have never had any safety stuff and I got bit once. Super lucky it was just a flesh would but it sure gets your attention.

If I remember I will try to get pics of the kit. Definitely worth the $100
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: Tin Horse on March 28, 2018, 01:39:37 PM
About 15 years ago I was getting tired at the end of the day. Should have stopped working but just wanted to finish. Long story short the Homelite 922 chain tip entered my left foot just back of my new steel toed boots. It went in about an inch.
I pulled my boot off ( shouldn't have) wondering how much foot was still in my boot. Lots of blood but no missing parts.
Doctors cleaned and stitch and morphine plus demurral. Couldn't reconstruct, to chew up behind my big toe. No pain now but that part of my foot is fused now.
I'm reminded of that stupidity with every step from now on. :(
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: knuckledragger on March 28, 2018, 02:14:47 PM
Pros know better than to be with out equipment, so when they get cut they are harder on their selves than anyone. Novist, generally speaking, aren't as aware the chainsaw is an unforgiving machine. A 42cc saw and smaller will even have a unassuming look about it. I don't know how much attention this post will get. So far the replies are A+. The young man I spoke of in the original post has went back to work. He loves being a logger and because of that he will be a good one. Maybe,just maybe, his accident coming so early to him will keep him and others who will learn from him safer.
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: thecfarm on March 28, 2018, 02:18:43 PM
They will all be A+  ;)  I still have 2 little marks just below my knee.  ::) No loss of blood. Lucky,mighty lucky.
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: Skeans1 on March 28, 2018, 04:53:56 PM
10 years of hand falling the only accident has been a widow Maker to the left shoulder and a full brim hard hat a lucky day. Another thing make dang sure the plastic hard hats or helmet are up to the task of taking a hit from a limb most aren't.
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: gspren on March 28, 2018, 07:49:28 PM
I fit the frequent novice category and ran chain saws for over 30 years without PPE then I joined this forum, the stories woke me up and now I wear chaps and helmet, I know I'm not bullet proof.
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: HolmenTree on March 28, 2018, 10:52:27 PM
All the PPE in the world will not keep you safe if you make constant bad decisions while cutting wood and not learning from your mistakes.

You must pay respect towards your saw in how you handle it, how dangerous it can be, how well you maintain the powerhead and bar/chain.

Never leave a cut tree standing then turning your back on it and walking away from it.
When felling trees work with the wind not against it. Good wind, bad wind.
Always keep checking by looking up, never forget about what's above you when felling or removing trees.

If your not sure don't do it.
Pace yourself, fatigue increases chance of accidents.
What you do while cutting wood you are responsible for the safety of people and property around you.
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: Rebarb on March 28, 2018, 11:51:49 PM
Good posts from knowledgable people. 

I'll never forget the day, August 3rd 1980 when my father in law who was a very intelligent electrical engineer was helping me clear a lot. 

He was somewhat controlling and was questioning my PPE and my felling method so as usual i let him have his way.
He grabbed the old steel cased Homelite from my hands and said grab me some wedges. 
As i was returning with the wedges a small widow maker fell onto the reving saw and forced the chain DEEP into his leg , worst cut I've ever seen. 

Many stitches and he was ok but kinda glad i witnessed this freak accident as it's kept me focused from that day forward. 
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: HolmenTree on March 28, 2018, 11:55:51 PM
Welcome to the forum Rebarb.
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: teakwood on March 29, 2018, 03:46:35 AM
Definitely worth the $100


I wear at least 500$ of PPE on me when falling and even if it would be 1000$ it's always worth it and definitively alot cheaper than a chainsaw accident!   
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: PA_Walnut on March 29, 2018, 08:01:28 AM
I am continually amazed (appalled) at what I see people do with chainsaws. I recently witnessed a dude place the saw into the wood, one-handed, then get'er going full-throttle (still single-handed) while looking over his shoulder and other stuff. A kickback would have launched the saw--most likely onto his head.  :-X :o
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: Crusarius on March 29, 2018, 08:24:22 AM
where I come from we call that natural selection :)

as long as innocent bystanders are not involved
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: sawguy21 on March 29, 2018, 12:05:01 PM
That is why I tried to talk consumers out of top handle saws. They frequently said they wanted a hand free to hold the log or brace themselves in the tree while limbing. :o
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: PA_Walnut on March 29, 2018, 12:41:11 PM
I have a Husq 395XP that I have a great deal of respect for. The manual states something like, "Do you REALLY need a saw this size. You should really consider using a smaller saw...." True story!
 :D :o
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: knuckledragger on March 29, 2018, 08:19:27 PM
My 372xp has a similar statement"This saw is capable of severe kickback. Do not operate it unless you have extraordinary cutting needs and experience and special training for dealing with kickback". It goes on to say lower kickback saws are available.
Construction co., demolition co., factories and more will have safety meetings with employees as frequent as once a week. Insurance requires documentation of these meetings. A safety meeting is a reminder. Keeps a person thinking about getting their job done without injuries to anyone. I decided to touch on this subject because of the young man I spoke of in the original post. Just a reminder to use ppe, common sense, and to get someone to help you when needed.
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: Skeans1 on March 30, 2018, 07:28:35 AM
To go with this it may not hurt to put up some of the other types of PPE that's available that you normally don't see unless you're in industry.
Internal chaps great in the summer
Safety Insert Pads For Labonville Lightweight Pants - Pair | Chainsaw Pants | Chainsaw Protective Clothing | www.baileysonline.com (https://www.baileysonline.com/Safety-First-Aid/Chainsaw-Protective-Clothing/Chainsaw-Pants/Safety-Insert-Pads-for-Labonville-Lightweight-Pants---Pair.axd)
Aluminum full brim hard hat
Woodlandpro Full Brim Aluminum Hard Hat - Hi-Viz Orange | Hard Hats | Hard Hats & Helmets | www.baileysonline.com (https://www.baileysonline.com/Safety-First-Aid/Hard-Hats-Helmets/Hard-Hats/WoodlandPRO-Full-Brim-Aluminum-Hard-Hat---Hi-Viz-Orange.axd)
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: Woodcutter_Mo on March 30, 2018, 09:06:33 AM
 I've only had a couple fairly close calls over the years, one put a good scratch in my good pair of jeans. Nothing will make your hair stand up quite like coming in contact with even a barely moving sharp saw chain. I bought a pair of chaps earlier this year, hopefully they never get put to the test but that's potentially one of the best investments I've made as far as chainsaw related stuff goes.
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: John Mc on March 30, 2018, 12:12:12 PM
That is why I tried to talk consumers out of top handle saws. They frequently said they wanted a hand free to hold the log or brace themselves in the tree while limbing. :o
It's a serious concern. The other problem with them is with the handles so close together, you have much less leverage with which to control the saw in a kickback or other unexpected situation.
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: knuckledragger on March 30, 2018, 05:39:49 PM
That's the thing that gets most folk. "Some other unexpected cause"
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: John Mc on March 30, 2018, 07:11:14 PM
10 years of hand falling the only accident has been a widow Maker to the left shoulder and a full brim hard hat a lucky day. Another thing make dang sure the plastic hard hats or helmet are up to the task of taking a hit from a limb most aren't.
In all my time in in the Vermont/NY/New Hampshire woods, I've only seen one person wearing an aluminum hard hat. No one seems to use them out here. In that time, I've seen plastic helmets that have taken solid hits and protected the wearer appropriately.

They do need to be replaced after a good hit, and periodically whether they've been hit or not: the plastic can get brittle with age and UV exposure. I believe OSHA requires replacing every 5 years. The average landowner probably does not do this - and probably has no idea of the need for it (on the other hand, the average landowner probably doesn't have their helmet out in the sun and elements 40+ hours per week either).
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: Tin Horse on March 30, 2018, 07:34:18 PM
I've bought or tried different helmets over the years. Last year I bought a Phanner Protos helmet. They're expensive but unlike anything I've used before. The design and function is ahead of anything else I could find. My wife even thought it was worth the money.  ;D
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: HolmenTree on March 30, 2018, 11:31:57 PM
The Aluminum Macdonald T helmets popular in the PNW have had a history of punctures  from falling debris. But over the last decade or so have been reinforced with a double layer of aluminum riveted into the crown.
They have upgraded to a ratchet adjuster on the suspension recently but still only have 4 point suspension.

Best helmet I own is  New Zealand made called a Pacific Kevlar with 6 point suspension and a full 4 webbing chin strap.
The shell is claimed to be 5 times stronger then steel of equal weight.
The helmet I'm wearing in my avatar pic is a Petzl climbing helmet not near as rugged as my Pacific but being brimless the Petzl offers me better visual of my surroundings while up in the canopy.

But the key for safety is the chin strap harness. It keeps the helmet on your head after getting hit by a struck- by, mostly a broken tree limb or top.
Fatality and serious injury reports have shown many forestry workers have had their non- chinstrap helmets knocked off by the first part of the outer twigs of the tree struck by .
Then the solid part hits the unprotected head.
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: MAF143 on March 31, 2018, 01:52:35 AM
From the head down to the toes.

Our woods is full of Honey Locust trees and I will be cutting a lot of them.  Along with the standard PPE, I got some steel lined insoles for all my workboots that I wear out in the woods.  Much less expensive than the dedicated steel lined boots.  They give me peice of mind when I'm tromping around a big locust I just dropped.  My wife still has a scar on her one foot where a locust thorn went through her foot 45 years ago.  I do watch where I walk, but out in the woods, especially when alone, safety, safety, SAFETY.

The steel lined insoles tend to be a little thicker than the standard insole so if your boots are nice and tight, they may be a little more snug.  I have replaced the insoles in some of my older boots that seem to have streched and were loose and it has given them new life again.
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: Skeans1 on March 31, 2018, 11:27:15 AM
The Aluminum Macdonald T helmets popular in the PNW have had a history of punctures  from falling debris. But over the last decade or so have been reinforced with a double layer of aluminum riveted into the crown.
They have upgraded to a ratchet adjuster on the suspension recently but still only have 4 point suspension.
Have you ever seen a limb go through 1" AR2 lexan? A limb flying out at 200' is a rocket no matter what you're in or wear is going to feel the abuse plastic, aluminum, or steel. To New Zealand have you been around their tethering stuff any? I have and have seen a few of the failures because their standards are up to the same as the USA they've had cables snap and shackles fail both the helmet and the tethering you're putting your life on the line.
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: HolmenTree on March 31, 2018, 12:28:12 PM
Limb falling 200 feet your neck will probably be busted anyways.
From what Sam Madsen out of Centralia told me years ago the aluminum T's were taking a lot of punctures, plastics weren't.
Tethering stuff? Explain better
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: chet on March 31, 2018, 02:18:23 PM
For obvious reasons aluminum hardhats were never an option for me, working in close proximity to high voltage lines.  electricuted-smiley
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: Skeans1 on March 31, 2018, 04:27:15 PM
Limb falling 200 feet your neck will probably be busted anyways.
From what Sam Madsen out of Centralia told me years ago the aluminum T's were taking a lot of punctures, plastics weren't.
Tethering stuff? Explain better
Sam is a very nice guy we've done business with them for a lot of years. Tethering is what has killed the hand falling industry it's a cable assist system for cutting as well as yarding it's interesting to see a big leveler on a steep slope that it can't be level on.
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: dgdrls on March 31, 2018, 06:11:20 PM
Former B.I.L responded as an EMT to a logging C.S incident.  Ugly, and it took years
for him to reconcile what he saw and the result of it.

C.S wins........always.

D
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: HolmenTree on March 31, 2018, 06:31:11 PM
Limb falling 200 feet your neck will probably be busted anyways.
From what Sam Madsen out of Centralia told me years ago the aluminum T's were taking a lot of punctures, plastics weren't.
Tethering stuff? Explain better
Sam is a very nice guy we've done business with them for a lot of years. Tethering is what has killed the hand falling industry it's a cable assist system for cutting as well as yarding it's interesting to see a big leveler on a steep slope that it can't be level on.
Feller bunches, processors killed the hand falling industry here. And we got flat ground, no looking back. 
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: knuckledragger on April 01, 2018, 01:46:49 AM
Chainsaws always win against flesh, for that matter any moving steel or metal does. This topics purpose is to remind anyone that safety equipment is crucial. The helmet post are good enough that I've read them several times. One point that I believe should be touched on is this. Frequently I work alone. At times I need another set of eyes or help in some form I go get some. 
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: John Mc on April 01, 2018, 08:36:15 AM
Frequently I work alone. At times I need another set of eyes or help in some form I go get some.
 

That's a good point. It relates to why a cell phone is part of my safety equipment- and why I carry it on my body when working alone with a chainsaw. Even when working with a friend, the difference between having one with you and not can make a big difference in getting First Responders there in an emergency.
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: Stoneyacrefarm on April 02, 2018, 02:44:45 PM
Good point John. 
Cell phones donít do us any good if they are out of reach. 
Even without cell reception in our area 911 still works. 
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: thecfarm on April 02, 2018, 02:48:14 PM
My wife insists I have my cell phone on me in the woods, I said on me,not on the tractor, Yes,it's only a cheap tracphone,but it could save my life.
Title: Re: serious chainsaw accidents
Post by: Skeans1 on April 03, 2018, 05:07:48 AM
On some of the companies lands one of us is always required to have service of some sort in case of injury. There's a tracker you can get kind of like that life alert but for timber fallers out here to get help if you push the button. Best cheapest advise that was given to me about falling is never do it alone always fall in pairs and walk out what both of you are doing that day.