The Forestry Forum

General Forestry => Tree, Plant and Wood I.D. => Topic started by: caveman on May 08, 2019, 09:21:36 PM

Title: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 08, 2019, 09:21:36 PM
A lot of times folks find the Forestry Forum while searching the web trying to i.d. a tree they have in their yard or one they stumbled across and was of interest to them.  I thought it would be fun and possibly educational to have a tree of the day.  We have members from all over so we should be able to provide quite a variety.

I'll start with a relatively easy one (for southerners).


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~181.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1478459629)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~187.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1478717147)
 It is simple and alternate.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 08, 2019, 09:27:15 PM
Oops, I probably should have posted this under the tree i.d. section.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: hacknchop on May 09, 2019, 07:01:22 AM
What kind of birds in tree @caveman (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=12883) ? We don't have any birds like that except perhaps doves.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 09, 2019, 07:09:34 AM
And a fine majestic tree it is ;D.  A lot of history behind this one.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Roxie on May 09, 2019, 09:33:58 AM
This will be fun to follow. 

As I am old and immune from the rejection of being wrong, I'll throw out the first guess.  Is it a magnolia?

  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: timberking on May 09, 2019, 09:43:36 AM
parakeet
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 09, 2019, 02:39:14 PM
I believe the birds are some kind of parrots.  The birds are not indigenous but they seem to thrive in this climate.  The little caterpillar on the cup beside the leaf should give a hint as to the genus of the tree.  The wood from this tree is probably the hardest and most dense
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~469.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1517752578)
 of the North American hardwoods.  Notice the Spanish moss.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on May 09, 2019, 02:42:46 PM
Mulberry
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on May 09, 2019, 02:47:30 PM
That ought to liven up things at your mill :)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 09, 2019, 02:51:10 PM
Not a magnolia or mulberry.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on May 09, 2019, 03:07:29 PM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/IMG_4087.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1522981132)
 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/IMG_4085.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1522981180)
 
Here are a couple of examples of what the lumber would look like.  ;D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on May 09, 2019, 03:10:00 PM
Persimmon
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on May 09, 2019, 03:22:15 PM
The bark doesnít look like the persimmon around here.

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on May 09, 2019, 03:26:16 PM
Live oak
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on May 09, 2019, 03:33:03 PM
The leaf reminds me of live oak but the branches donít look like it.

Hopefully this doesnít become the tree of the month, cause curiosity is gettin to me.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Roxie on May 09, 2019, 06:52:32 PM
Me too.  :D

But, if it's the hardest, it must be locust. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on May 09, 2019, 07:25:30 PM
Willow oak?

With a tobacco worm.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 09, 2019, 08:18:25 PM
Southside and Beenthere got it...Live Oak (Quercus virginiana). Let's see what we can find for today.  WDH and Magicman did not spoil it and let it go on for a little while.
Today's tree of the day.
This small tree is found in most of the eastern half of the U.S.  It is already blooming here.  Sorry, I have no wood pictures from this one.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/button_bush.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1441069113)


Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on May 09, 2019, 08:41:49 PM
Live Oak

It is already blooming here

Interesting.  Nothing at all like the "Live Oak" we have out west.  While the wood, provided by MM, looks like typical oak, the leaves look nothing like any oaks I see out here.  As far as flowers, all our trees have the caterpillar like flowers, not that ball pictured.

Edit:  Oops, I missed that the funny flower tree was a second tree!  Thought it was the same thing in flower ::)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on May 09, 2019, 09:03:58 PM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/IMG_4088.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1522981620)

Bookmatched Live Oak slabs.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/IMG_4086.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1522981160)
 
All Live Oak that I have sawn has exhibited that same "ripple" texture in the lumber.

I have never sawn the next mystery "Tree of the day".
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 09, 2019, 10:00:52 PM
I usually see the next mystery specimen around water.  

Here is a hint that is a dead give-away....stipules persistent, scars leaving stipular line connecting petioles........ :D.

Some info:  Poisonous to cattle and becomes a troublesome weed in low lying pastureland.  Restricted to moist sites or poorly drained areas.  Numerous species of waterfowl and birds feed on the seeds.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 09, 2019, 10:16:20 PM
The picture of this one was taken about a quarter of a mile from my house in what is considered the southwestern edge of the Green Swamp, especially if one is trying to obtain a building permit (now limited to one house per 10 acres).
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: curdog on May 09, 2019, 10:58:54 PM


Here is a hint that is a dead give-away....stipules persistent, scars leaving stipular line connecting petioles........ :D.


Well that clue buttons it up for sure...
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 10, 2019, 11:49:05 AM
Buttonbush or Cephanlanthus occidentalis.  Curdog and others recognized it right off.  Since we are in the swamp we might as well go with another one that does not mind getting its feet wet.


This will be Friday's tree of the day.


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/lob_2.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1441069130)
 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/lob.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1441069151)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 10, 2019, 08:55:58 PM
Iffin yore name was Gordon, you might stumble onto this one........
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on May 10, 2019, 09:09:42 PM
It's a Quixote bush? :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on May 10, 2019, 11:12:35 PM
Ahh :D Stewartia, loblolly bay
Whoops googling, got the cousins confused, gordonia lasianthus, loblolly bay
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 11, 2019, 06:28:16 AM
Winner, winner, chicken dinner.  Loblolly bay.  We may get out of the swamp for today's tree.  Check back later.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 11, 2019, 08:48:56 AM
 
Today's tree of the day pictured here may be several years old already.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~49.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1459133018)
 
New growth on a lateral bud.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~51.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1459133064)
 
This tree was under attack by pine sawflies.  This one lived, while the 125 year old one on my side of the fence died after the hurricane and pine sawfly infestation. I thought it might have a chance until I noticed the ambrosia beetle dust accumulating around the base.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~144.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1475633432)
 
These were some JMoore and I cut on a house lot.  Notice the size of the twigs and that the needles grow at the end of the them.  The needles are three to the fascicle.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~379.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1500162876)
 
It may be tough to see but the bark is very flaky and that is one of the features that enables this species to be very fire tolerant.  Coincidently, it also provides a great habitat for scorpions.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~376.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1500162119)


(https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/images/cleardot.gif)

This tree may have endured a lightning strike.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~404.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1503787161)
Break out the diesel fuel to keep the blade clean and sawing relatively flat.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~405.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557578311)


I do not expect it will take long for this tree of the day to be identified.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: curdog on May 11, 2019, 09:16:28 AM
Definitely moved out of the swamp for that one.... one of my favorites..
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on May 11, 2019, 09:35:25 AM
Those logs look too long for the trailer.  ;)


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/IMG_6057.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1557269912)

Sawed some of that last week.  ;D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on May 11, 2019, 09:37:55 AM
I long for the day I can leaf pine like that laying around my mill yard. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on May 11, 2019, 09:54:49 AM
That tree has heart :). In my oldest books of pine strength values this is the granddaddy, oldfield pine isn't even listed.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on May 11, 2019, 12:55:43 PM
Nothing else can hold a candle to it.  :)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on May 11, 2019, 01:22:21 PM
Took a core sample on some 7 inch dbh longleaf that was on a ridge  around Tuscaloosa Ala.  That tree was over 150 years old and solid resin.  Also saw a block of the heart used as a foundation stone on direct soil contact under a 160 year old home, Termite proof, also will make a dandy torch just plain exposed resin heart.  Makes nice wood for building but treat it like gasoline soaked wood as a fire hazard.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 12, 2019, 06:43:19 AM
Yesterday's tree was longleaf pine or Pinus palustris.  

Today's is another pine.
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Slash_Pine.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586944)
 


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Slash_Pine_3.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586943)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Slash_Pine_2.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586943)


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~142.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1475186605)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~182.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1478459644)
 The picture above is of a young tree and the pine webworm's house constructed out of frass.  
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~180.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1478459629)
 This is the pine webworm.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 12, 2019, 07:32:17 AM
I very strongly suspect that the needles are in fasciles of two and three and the cone is a bit shiny. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on May 12, 2019, 07:57:03 AM
The lead guitarist for GN'R wrote a song "Sweet Pine of Mine" about this tree, but the other hit the band had overshadowed it and it never really took off.    :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on May 12, 2019, 08:39:26 AM
 What kind of song would Slash name Elliot ???
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 12, 2019, 09:36:04 AM
Be careful, one could end up in a Snake Pit.
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~249.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1484949502)
 Banded water snake eating blue tilapia beside the pond where our logs are stored awaiting sawing.  

Back to the tree of the day.  The south Florida variety also has a grass stage like the longleaf and was also important to the naval stores industry back when there were no "Welcome to the Sunshine State" signs, more like "Welcome to the Jungle".
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 12, 2019, 10:52:11 PM
Slash Pine (Pinus elliottii).  Tomorrow morning I will try to post another while my coffee is brewing when I get to work.  I think it will be something from south of the equator.
Clue: enigma
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 13, 2019, 06:05:05 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/mp1.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1448307703)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/mp2.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1448307381)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/mp5.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1448307432)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/mp6.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1448307463)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/mp9.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1448307519)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/mkyp1.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1448591823)
 
If the needles, cone, and trunk look sharp, it is because they are.  These are not native to the U.S. but they do have a broad range here.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on May 13, 2019, 06:13:44 AM
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Araucaria_araucana (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Araucaria_araucana)

Yup, its a Sth American  species. We have it here in NZ.

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on May 13, 2019, 09:58:53 AM
Yeah, Monkey Puzzle tree.  Had one attack me when I was walking along a sidewalk.  I was looking down at the weird "leaves" on the ground when a low branch bit the top of my head! :o
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 14, 2019, 06:33:34 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Sugarberry_2.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586946)
 Today's tree of the day.  On a lot of the ones I come across, they often have sooty mold and mealy bugs on their leaves.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 14, 2019, 04:10:33 PM
Has summer teeth along the margin, at least on some leaves. 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Sugarberry.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586946)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 14, 2019, 09:58:18 PM
Sugarberry or Celtis laevigata.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 15, 2019, 06:28:55 AM
Well, the one I tried to post today did not so I will try a different one.  
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/gumbo_limbo~0.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1490489699)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~153.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1474722356)
 The leaves are alternately arranged.  From the name one might expect it to be from La. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 15, 2019, 07:36:16 AM
Is it native?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 15, 2019, 02:08:20 PM
It is native but not to Ga.  It would probably not make it in my neck of the woods due to occasional cold weather.  It will grow along coastal areas and south.  I have never sawn one but have seen a lot of them.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on May 15, 2019, 07:08:23 PM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/DSCN0228.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1366640159)
 
It looks confused.  smiley_dizzy

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/DSCN0110.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1366754277)

No way to get a log outta that!  :o
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 15, 2019, 08:28:31 PM
Magicman, I have seen some of these with straight trunks that would make decent logs.  

The bark is smooth and has a red tint to it.  This particular tree is at Desoto Memorial in Bradenton, Florida within 100 yards of the Manatee River which flows into the south end of Tampa Bay. In the far background of the picture one might see red mangroves growing.

That Cajun dish that often includes okra is a hint to this tree's first name.  The second name reminds me of a word that loosely means being in a "state of undecidedness". 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 15, 2019, 08:32:36 PM
I am in limbo.  Never seen this one. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 15, 2019, 08:57:31 PM
Gumbo Limbo or Bursera simarubra.  It grows in south Florida, Cuba and the other islands over to Mexico and the Yucatan.  The wood has some construction uses but is evidently brittle, glue can be made from its sap, the leaves have some medicinal uses and the bark can be used to relieve rashes from plants that are in the poison oak and poison sumac family.

It is used some places as living fence posts as it roots easily from cuttings.  I may have to try growing some in pots the next time I get an opportunity to go to the coast.  

Danny, most of those trees we dug up at your place last July are alive and well in pots.  The jury is still out on the hophornbeam - not sure if it is going to make it or not.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on May 15, 2019, 09:26:56 PM
One can only hope that it does not make it if you're talking about Ostrya Virginiana, I pretty much keep the chainsaw idling on account of it. The deer don't much care for it and it squeezes out better trees. The wood although small is very reminiscent of hickory but probably a little less well behaved. I think it smells similar to hickory on the grill and isn't bad for planked fish. It decays at least as fast as hickory once down. It is a handsome little tree if it would stay down in numbers to a few per acre but that is not its habit. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 15, 2019, 10:45:55 PM
DonP, the hophornbeam are not numerous here.  I try to have at least one of everything on the dendro list for the FFA forestry contest close by.  North of here a little bit they are used as landscape trees some.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 16, 2019, 06:51:08 AM
Thursday's tree of the day.
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Yellow_Poplar.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586433)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Yellow_Poplar_2.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586494)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Yellow_Poplar_3.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586495)
This one should be familiar to many of you.  I have one of these growing in a pot as well.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on May 16, 2019, 07:08:31 AM
Ours are in bloom now, the largest tree in the eastern forest.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 16, 2019, 07:18:39 AM
There were some huge ones growing at the Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on May 16, 2019, 07:23:38 AM
That is a very popular species that I saw quite often, but I haven's sawn any since....well a couple of weeks ago.  :)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on May 16, 2019, 07:28:01 AM
They can come in a rainbow of colors too, which can cause a sawyer much stress. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on May 16, 2019, 10:00:21 AM
got one in my front yard
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 16, 2019, 11:31:22 AM
They are not too popular in my neck of the woods.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Weekend_Sawyer on May 16, 2019, 01:36:50 PM
I'm getting ready to mill a couple of them.
They make great paneling, I just wish they would stay the color they start out as when you mill them.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Weekend_Sawyer on May 16, 2019, 01:41:58 PM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10233/poplar.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1558028479)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: sprucebunny on May 16, 2019, 03:53:36 PM
Why aren't they popular, Caveman ?

We don't have many up here but the first part of thier name is in flower :)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on May 16, 2019, 04:06:45 PM
It takes two lips to say the name.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 16, 2019, 04:41:26 PM
They do not seem to thrive here.  I do not know if it is the climate or the sandy soil.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 17, 2019, 03:04:48 PM
The tree for today is coming to you a little late - I've been grilling pork, chicken, rib trimmings, potatoes and beans all day. 


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3249.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1558119387)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3248.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1558119388)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3250.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1558119393)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3250.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1558119393)
 Even though it has the corky growth, it is not juvenile sweetgum. It does have a lotta them. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on May 17, 2019, 03:15:21 PM
Thereís an elementary school next door.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on May 17, 2019, 05:40:39 PM
The tree for today is coming to you a little late


And a little blury...:D Were you Winged n' it with the chicken or Elm I out of focus too?  :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 17, 2019, 09:00:31 PM
Winged Elm (Ulmus alata).  They get a little more challenging to i.d. when they do not have wings but the buds are not as big as American Elm's and the leaf petioles are shorter.  The leaves are also usually a little narrower from margin to margin compared to an American Elm of the same length.

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 17, 2019, 09:08:28 PM
They are usually more scabrous than american elm which is normally smooth.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 18, 2019, 06:10:34 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Water_Hickory_2.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586598)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Water_Hickory_4.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586599)
 
br> This tree of the day may be a little more challenging for some than yesterday's winged elm. It is compound, alternate and usually has 9-13 leaflets.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 18, 2019, 07:20:10 AM
One of the pecan hickories. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 18, 2019, 10:23:11 AM
Water Hickory or Carya aquatica.  I did not think that one would bedevil you, WDH.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 18, 2019, 04:47:55 PM
I found the Georgia State Champion one back about 7 years ago.  Has scaly bark like pecan with many leaflets with a flattened nut. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 18, 2019, 06:56:54 PM
How big was your champion?  I have seen a few around here but none that I have found are very big.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on May 18, 2019, 07:32:34 PM
I found the Texas State champ back in the '70's on the local reservation, not a big tree here.

edit, just looked no longer champ
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 19, 2019, 06:24:22 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Southern_Magnolia__3.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586944)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Southern_Magnolia_2.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586945)
 Sunday's tree of the day.  Many will find it familiar.  There is a variety used in landscape called Little Gem.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 19, 2019, 06:51:44 AM
Look at those stipular scars completely encircling the twig ;D.

The GA Champion water hickory is 35.33" at DBH and 122' tall. 

Georgia Forestry Commission (/forest-management/champion-tree-program/list/View.cfm) (http://www.gfc.state.ga.us/forest-management/champion-tree-program/list/View.cfm?ID=1969)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on May 19, 2019, 07:17:16 AM
Look at those stipular scars completely encircling the twig ;D.
Grand!
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on May 19, 2019, 09:11:14 AM
Some are evergreen and some are deciduous too. They are related to that popular tree you showed the other day. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 19, 2019, 09:28:45 AM
If the genus and species pictured here is not green, it is dead.  

WDH, that is a big water hickory that you found.  I am surprised at the height too.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on May 19, 2019, 08:10:08 PM
Magnolia Grandifolia spp "little gem"
Quote
Genus name honors Pierre Magnol, French botanist (1638-1715).

Here's the only grandifolia we can grow up here, sort of. That bottom of the leaf is the giveaway on which one. It becomes sort of deciduous when it gets really cold, there are some leaves that will drop here directly, ice is the real problem though, this one has been broken up pretty badly a couple of times.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10017/brackensbeauty.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1558310906)
 



Not a Magnolia but too pretty to pass by with the camera right now;
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10017/flame.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1558310948)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 19, 2019, 10:37:11 PM
DonP, that looks like the same Southern Magnolia.  I did not know that they would shed their leaves when it gets cold.  Your flowers look like they belong to an azalea in a color I have not seen on azaleas before.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on May 19, 2019, 10:56:27 PM
That cultivar is "Bracken's Brown Beauty", the brown underside of the leaf is its giveaway, it is cold tolerant here, grandifolias don't come up the mountains naturally. I think Grumpy says one other one can make it here but with those big leaves in winter heavy snow and ice is a problem.

The flame azalea, Rhododendron calendulaceum, is a native, I've seen them down as far as the Chatooga in GA. There are a few mountainsides covered in Catawbas and flames that are beautiful this time of year. That particular flame azalea Michelle grew from seed, which is quite a feat. The pinksters just finished up late last month.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Weekend_Sawyer on May 20, 2019, 06:32:32 AM
Lets take this thread to food.

Way back on Friday @caveman (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=12883)  mentioned he was grilling rib trimmings.
Please tell me more, a picture would be nice.

By the way, I am enjoying this thread!
Jon
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 20, 2019, 06:46:08 AM
Lets take this thread to food.

Way back on Friday @caveman (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=12883)  mentioned he was grilling rib trimmings.
Please tell me more, a picture would be nice.

By the way, I am enjoying this thread!
Jon
Jon, Not sure how to move this to the food thread without getting messing things up but I did not get any pictures Friday.  I was slammed trying to get food ready to serve by 10:30 a.m and then pack some of it up to take to some workers at a steel fabrication plant whose owners support our students in their livestock sale each year.  
Anyway, last fall the students pre-sold 330 slabs of ribs for a fundraiser to pay for the veterinary assisting team to attend the national contest.  We trimmed the brisket bones and the flank meat off of the slabs and froze it.  As a reward for our students who earned industry certifications this semester, we had a big lunch and invited school and county administrators too.  I cook the trimmings similar to the way I grill ribs but I usually wrap them in foil or put them in a pan after about an hour.  Friday, I poured a small amount of Italian dressing over them when I put them in the pan and covered them to ensure that they would be tender - they were.  I generally refer to them as riblets (the flank meat is cut into rib shaped pieces after it is taken off of the grill).
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Sassafrass_2.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586942)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Sassafrass.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586942)
 
Tree of the day.  I wish I had a picture of the underside of the leaves as the veins are a dead give away.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on May 20, 2019, 07:04:03 AM
Wow, never seen that bottom mitten. The twigs of that tree were often chewed to make a colonial toothbrush.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 20, 2019, 07:38:26 AM
Wow, never seen that bottom mitten. The twigs of that tree were often chewed to make a colonial toothbrush.
Back when prominent folks had wooden teeth?  


Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on May 20, 2019, 07:41:21 AM
You are getting too sassy for your britches.  8)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on May 20, 2019, 07:46:49 AM
Stirring up quite a frass with all this talk of good eating. Looks like you had the makings for some refreshing beverages too. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Weekend_Sawyer on May 20, 2019, 08:44:32 AM
Makes me want to have a glass of tea!

I seem to remember there is some controversy over drinking tea made from this tree's roots, some say it's good for you, some say it's bad.

This was one if the first trees my uncle Elwood taught me about. I remember it well because of the different shapes of the leaves on the same tree.

Also, caveman, maybe you could start a thread on those rib ends next time you make them. I'd be interested to learn more about them.

Jon
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on May 20, 2019, 09:34:09 AM
We only have small ones here.  I'm amazed when I see people making lumber from them.  All I can make is root beer.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 20, 2019, 08:33:53 PM
I always imagined that this venation pattern is what dinosaur skin would look like.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 20, 2019, 08:37:25 PM
I tell the kids that it looks like old man's skin and then show them the back of my hand.  In many ways I am a bit like a dinosaur.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: CJennings on May 20, 2019, 09:05:41 PM
Sassafras. I was pleasantly surprised to find that growing in southern Vermont two years ago. Along with some chestnut too. That was an interesting piece of ground I was on that day. I love the smell of sassafras. I don't think I'd drink the tea myself though.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 21, 2019, 06:52:18 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Southern_Red_Cedar.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586945)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~48.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1459097411)

The top picture is of new growth.  The bottom picture has a fungal body that is fruiting which has the alternate host as an apple tree.  The heartwood is red.


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/porch.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1439686344)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on May 21, 2019, 07:04:05 AM
Teliospore, Gymnosporangium juniper-virginianae ;D They look like they're from outer space.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on May 21, 2019, 07:26:11 AM
Blue birds love the berries the tree produces too. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 21, 2019, 07:26:41 AM
It is in the Blanket Chest family.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on May 21, 2019, 08:10:55 AM
I Cee dem logs quite often when I am sawing.  Ceems dat everyone has a couple.  8)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 21, 2019, 08:42:39 PM
I hope that y'all enjoyed today's tree of the day.  I do not know if the one's pictured are Southern Redcedar or Eastern Redcedar, Juniperus silicicola or Juniperus virginiana respectively.  I have never been able to tell a difference between them.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 22, 2019, 07:25:21 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Turkey_Oak_2.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586640)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Turkey_Oak.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586640)
 Today's tree of the day.  Often these will be found growing on sand hills along with longleaf pine and sand pine.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 22, 2019, 07:26:51 AM
Great for decorating the Thanksgiving table. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on May 22, 2019, 08:16:09 AM
But it probably doesn't taste as good as it's namesake. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Weekend_Sawyer on May 22, 2019, 12:35:36 PM
With those hints I guessed it right away!
I never knew of such a tree!

We used to call people that in the 70's when they acted stoopid!

Jon
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on May 22, 2019, 06:56:15 PM

Oh he's all right but he's a quercuss
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 22, 2019, 09:43:30 PM
A queer cuss :D. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 22, 2019, 10:56:02 PM
Turkey Oak (Quercus laevis).  They laevis eggs.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 23, 2019, 06:19:38 AM
Today's tree of the day.  These are two spindly boys are growing along the fence. 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3255.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1558606531)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3256.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1558606563)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3257.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1558606254)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 23, 2019, 07:05:54 AM
Getting a little rusty on my tree ID as well as working too hard, so I need to take my golf clubs and head to the golf course for a little R&R and practice my tree ID on some of the woods there :). 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on May 23, 2019, 07:10:40 AM
Some might say you have a black heart Danny, but I think it's just throw back to one of your distant cousins.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on May 23, 2019, 07:20:29 AM
American ebony :)

Turkey Oak (Quercus laevis).  They laevis eggs.

If you sing the rooster song "since that quercus came in our yard" you'll get my opinion of oaks, not even the turkey is safe :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: stanmillnc on May 23, 2019, 07:50:42 AM
Persimmon. Good hints WDH using the golf club reference - old golf club heads were made from persimmon wood because it is so dense.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: thedoublejranch on May 23, 2019, 10:47:37 PM

Today's tree of the day pictured here may be several years old already.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~49.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1459133018)
 
New growth on a lateral bud.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~51.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1459133064)
 
This tree was under attack by pine sawflies.  This one lived, while the 125 year old one on my side of the fence died after the hurricane and pine sawfly infestation. I thought it might have a chance until I noticed the ambrosia beetle dust accumulating around the base.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~144.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1475633432)
 
These were some JMoore and I cut on a house lot.  Notice the size of the twigs and that the needles grow at the end of the them.  The needles are three to the fascicle.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~379.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1500162876)
 
It may be tough to see but the bark is very flaky and that is one of the features that enables this species to be very fire tolerant.  Coincidently, it also provides a great habitat for scorpions.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~376.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1500162119)


(https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/images/cleardot.gif)

This tree may have endured a lightning strike.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~404.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1503787161)
Break out the diesel fuel to keep the blade clean and sawing relatively flat.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~405.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557578311)


I do not expect it will take long for this tree of the day to be identified.  
Ponderosa Pine
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 23, 2019, 11:02:21 PM

Today's tree of the day pictured here may be several years old already.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~49.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1459133018)
 
New growth on a lateral bud.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~51.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1459133064)
 
This tree was under attack by pine sawflies.  This one lived, while the 125 year old one on my side of the fence died after the hurricane and pine sawfly infestation. I thought it might have a chance until I noticed the ambrosia beetle dust accumulating around the base.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~144.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1475633432)
 
These were some JMoore and I cut on a house lot.  Notice the size of the twigs and that the needles grow at the end of the them.  The needles are three to the fascicle.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~379.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1500162876)
 
It may be tough to see but the bark is very flaky and that is one of the features that enables this species to be very fire tolerant.  Coincidently, it also provides a great habitat for scorpions.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~376.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1500162119)


(https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/images/cleardot.gif)

This tree may have endured a lightning strike.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~404.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1503787161)
Break out the diesel fuel to keep the blade clean and sawing relatively flat.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~405.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557578311)


I do not expect it will take long for this tree of the day to be identified.  
Ponderosa Pine
That was a longleaf pine.  If there is a Ponderosa pine growing around here, it took a wrong turn and is hopelessly lost.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 24, 2019, 06:40:39 AM
I have not quite mastered capturing another's quote.  Anyway, I was trying to say that the tree in question by thedoublejranch was a longleaf pine.

The sap from today's tree may cause a similar reaction to the skin as poison ivy exposure.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3258.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1558694125)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3259.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1558693930)
 These leaves are 8-11" long.  This tree is growing in the backyard of a coworker.  It would not have survived to this size at my house which is only 15 miles north and quite a bit lower.  This tree does not have much tolerance for cold weather.  I have never sawed or turned this wood but the pictures I have seen of it would make it a worthwhile venture.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on May 24, 2019, 06:52:28 AM
Asian native?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 24, 2019, 01:01:17 PM
It is a native of Asia.  
Today's tree also produces a tasty fruit that enhances the flavor of vanilla ice cream(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~531.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1532309303)
T
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on May 24, 2019, 01:18:31 PM
I've never seen the tree that I know of, but from your description this morning of the PI reaction I was wondering if it was a mango, apparently so.
Our snowbird friends should be back soon, we trade them for zucchini and squash all summer, works for me ;D

From yesterday, persimmon is in the ebony family.
Inside the seeds is a set of flatware.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: tule peak timber on May 24, 2019, 01:57:43 PM
Loquat
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 24, 2019, 03:27:01 PM
Today's tree is a mango (Mangifera indica).  My folks have a couple at their beach house.  I hope to be able to get down there at the end of next month.  They should be getting ripe by then.  The Dang squirrels and rats will ruin a good amount of the fruit.

Rob, today's tree was almost going to be a loquat.  The loquat leaves are similar in size and shape but it is serrated and the texture is not slick and waxy like the mango leaves and the color of the loquat leaves is darker and duller green.  Our loquat trees produced a prolific crop of loquats this year.  They were sweeter and a little larger than normal too.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: tule peak timber on May 24, 2019, 03:42:18 PM
Super, remembering back-the serrated and "dusty" leaves.White and yellow different fruits. I've been up here on the mountain too long :D
   Can I  still have the ice cream.........with sprinkles ?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on May 24, 2019, 05:53:00 PM
I don't know that I've ever had a loquat, do put up a pic.  Is the taste similar?, same skin reaction? Apparently with mangos if you are sensitive even handling the rind can cause a rash, the meat is fine just the skin has whatever the chemical is.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 24, 2019, 06:59:17 PM
I do not have any loquat fruit pics.  They have been gone here for a month or so.  They are more cold tolerant than the mango so someone north of here may be able to post pics of the fruit as it may still be in season.  The loquat fruits are quite a bit smaller than a golf ball and usually have two or three brown seeds.  The fruit is fuzzy like a peach and is textured and tastes a little like a peach.  The mango has one, large seed about three to four inches long.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on May 25, 2019, 03:38:03 AM
Much off topic, but mangoes make an excellent wine.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 25, 2019, 04:20:35 AM
Today's tree of the day.


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~203.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1479080530)

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Black_Walnut_2.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586931)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Black_Walnut.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586932)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Black_Walnut_3.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586932)

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ellmoe on May 25, 2019, 06:57:50 AM
 They are more cold tolerant than the mango so someone north of here may be able to post pics of the fruit as it may still be in season.  
Fruit has been gone for a couple of weeks "up" here. Bumper crop this year , very tasty!
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 25, 2019, 07:02:29 AM
Note that the terminal leaflet is aborted.  This is a distinctive characteristic of this species, separating it from its kin. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: tule peak timber on May 25, 2019, 07:26:34 AM
origin is Persia ?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on May 25, 2019, 12:59:00 PM
Is that nut the lumber on your wall?  And how did you ever clamp down that "log" to get that mantle out of it?  :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on May 25, 2019, 01:17:56 PM
I wish that you had a sample of the sapwood.  It would be easier to identify.....well for some folks anyway.  :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on May 25, 2019, 04:42:24 PM
Does it have an oriental name?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on May 25, 2019, 07:49:35 PM
More of a Stuckey's name :)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 25, 2019, 08:34:12 PM
The inner bark is bright yellow.  The pore structure is semi-ring porous.  A dye used to made from the fruit involucre :). 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on May 25, 2019, 09:21:07 PM
LOL, I better back up, black walnut
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on May 25, 2019, 09:31:12 PM
ďThe fruit has been gone for a couple weeks . . .Ē  ??? That throws me.



Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on May 25, 2019, 09:32:24 PM
The inner bark is bright yellow.  The pore structure is semi-ring porous.  A dye used to made from the fruit involucre :).
And the first time you saw it the sap wood and sawdust will go from white to blue, to green, and make you wonder just how badly you have ruined said "highly valuable" lumber.   ;D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 26, 2019, 12:31:45 AM
The tree of the day for 5/25 was black walnut (Juglans nigra).  Many recognized it right away.  WDH pointed out on this thread and another that the terminal leaflet of the black walnut leaf is aborted (absent).  If it is present, it will generally be smaller than the others and misshapen.  

Today's tree of the day (up late tonight) ...

 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3263.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1558844775)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3261.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1558844705)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3262.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1558844708)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on May 26, 2019, 02:31:23 AM
Something in the Juniper family?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 26, 2019, 05:35:37 AM
Not in the Juniper family but it is a conifer that lacks fire tolerance.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 26, 2019, 08:07:32 AM
That is why you find it growing in alluvial swamps or in the water.  Also very long lived.  Even a small one only 10 - 12" in diameter can be hundreds of years old.  It has a much larger cousin that has two ranked leaves and can grow to over 10' in diameter.  The heartwood is very decay resistant.  One of the few deciduous conifers.  I was looking at some of the lumber and a red headed woodpecker pecked me.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on May 26, 2019, 08:10:25 AM
Cypress Somekindofous? 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on May 26, 2019, 08:54:17 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/DSCN0715_28Small29.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1328235510)
 
But did I say butt?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: tule peak timber on May 26, 2019, 10:35:40 AM
Butt.... Wait a minute: question on the walnut, do farmers outside of California graft on the black root  stock for better nut bearing ?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on May 26, 2019, 12:33:57 PM
Taxodium distichum.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: nativewolf on May 26, 2019, 12:38:22 PM
Butt.... Wait a minute: question on the walnut, do farmers outside of California graft on the black root  stock for better nut bearing ?
Not really farmed on east coast for some reason so we don't get the graft stock.  The clario you show pics of that cause so much drooling.. is not grown.  Perhaps in TX they could pull that off.  
For us it is black walnut and the fruit is sold but rarely in organized orchards like in CA, just a niche product.  Hard to shell the eastern black walnut but it is very tasty.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: tule peak timber on May 26, 2019, 01:19:34 PM
The big nut top stock out here is from Persia, so I've read. The nuts from claro( J.Hindsii) are thick walled , small, and super tasty. I just missed out on a nongrafted orchard taken down due to age. The owner was selling exclusively to See's candy. I don't remember exactly the numbers but the logs went for something like 5 or 10 K-bucks each.  OUCH
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 26, 2019, 06:38:12 PM
Firefighter, you are right on the genus but wrong on the species.  The leaf and where they typically grow is the main distinction.  This species typically grows in domes (cypress heads) rather than beside flowing water.  Notice that the leaf is not feather like.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 26, 2019, 08:48:02 PM
I learned it as a variety of the bigger cousin. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on May 26, 2019, 09:39:39 PM
Pure google here :D
?
Quote
The taxonomy (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/taxonomy) of the genus Taxodium (https://www.britannica.com/plant/Taxodium) is contentious; the genus consists of one to three species. The smaller pond, or upland, cypress of the southeastern U.S. is usually listed as a variety of the bald cypress (T. distichum, variety imbricatum); however, it is sometimes considered to be a separate species (T. ascendens).
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ellmoe on May 26, 2019, 09:45:49 PM
Variety nutans , if even a variety. I have found "bald " cypress growing in domes , both types of needles. To the east along the St Johns river was typical bald cypress growing in strands and to the west, pond cypress growing in domes. In the middle , these "hybrid " trees.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: nativewolf on May 26, 2019, 09:50:30 PM
The big nut top stock out here is from Persia, so I've read. The nuts from claro( J.Hindsii) are thick walled , small, and super tasty. I just missed out on a nongrafted orchard taken down due to age. The owner was selling exclusively to See's candy. I don't remember exactly the numbers but the logs went for something like 5 or 10 K-bucks each.  OUCH
Wow...that would have been some check to hand over, 50 trees/acre?  OUCH indeed.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 27, 2019, 07:00:33 AM
The pond cypress (Taxodium ascendens) generally does not get as tall as the bald cypress and as Ellmoe stated, they sometimes grow in the same places.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on May 27, 2019, 09:19:05 AM
Interesting, hadnít heard of pond cypress.  My book, Knowing Your Trees, doesnít even mention it.  It was originally written in 1937, but my edition was revised and printed in 1984.  I guess back then it was still considered as bald cypress.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 27, 2019, 02:17:57 PM
Jmoore showed up, cracking the whip, as I was getting ready to post today's tree earlier this morning.  Time to take a break from the oppressive 98į heat and look for today's tree.
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Seagrape.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586943)
 The fruit on this one is edible but my tongue is not tough enough to eat very many of them.  They are salt tolerant but they do not like the cold much.  The leaf is probably 5-8" across.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 27, 2019, 04:55:06 PM
You are just South enough to get all that weird stuff that I have never encountered. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on May 27, 2019, 08:13:35 PM
Looks like something I remember seeing by the beach, but donít know what it is.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 27, 2019, 10:16:12 PM
It does grow near the beach.  The leaves are thick and waxy.  My parents have one in the back yard on Anna Maria Island.  It grows like a weed and along with the mango trees and mangroves I usually spend part of a day or two pruning them. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on May 27, 2019, 10:38:22 PM
You say tree but it looks like sea grapes...
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 27, 2019, 11:05:27 PM
It is the sea grape (Coccoloba uvifera).  It does get to tree size but evidently does not tolerate temperatures below 35į F.  WDH, it won't grow at my house either.  It occasionally gets too cold here but 10 miles south of me in town I know where some are growing. The wood has been used to make furniture and it is a useful plant for sand dune stabilization.

I did not get a chance to get any new tree pictures today so when I get to work tomorrow I'll look through my gallery to find something I have not posted.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 28, 2019, 06:55:32 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Gum_Bumelia.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586937)
 This is a small tree that goes by several different names.  If you look carefully, you may be able to see the reddish pubescence on the back of the leaf.  I do not have any pictures of it with flowers or seeds.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 28, 2019, 08:12:35 AM
I have one in my backyard that was the Georgia State Champion until about 2011 when I found a larger one near the Ocmulgee River on a sandy ridge that was laid down eons ago by a flood.  Part of the common name is derived from the gum that will exude from the inner bark when cuts are made into it.  The leaf has a pronounced velvety texture on the underside, and it sports short shoots and thorns.  Fruit is a blackish colored drupe (a drupe is a fruit with a fleshy outer covering over a hard pit like a cherry or an olive). 

Kyle is the only person that I have shown this species to that knew what it was. This is a difficult one because, although not rare, it is not very common.  It grows naturally in the Southern Coastal Plain and west to Texas, Oklahoma, and up the Mississippi River valley into central Missouri.  I have found it in East Texas. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on May 28, 2019, 09:06:32 AM
Sideroxylon lanuginosum (gum bully) (https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=sila20)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on May 28, 2019, 09:13:20 AM
I was thinking Red Bay, but that spine has me stuck.  ::)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on May 28, 2019, 12:44:04 PM
@wdh You sure it's not ash?  :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 28, 2019, 05:16:35 PM
This one evidently goes by a couple of different Latin names and several common names.  Texas Ranger identified it but I learned it as Gum Bumelia (Bumelia lanuginose).  Virginia Tech Tree I.D. agrees with Texas Ranger Sideroxylon lanuginosum (gum bully) (https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=sila20) .

As with a lot of these trees, some spilt hairs when classifying them (think back a day or so to the Pond Cypress). 

Usually I see Gum Bumelias while at FFA forestry camp at O'leno State Park each summer.  I do not think I will be able to go this year.  Danny has a very good one in his yard (arboretum).



Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 28, 2019, 08:28:08 PM
I learned it as Bumelia lanuginosum.  Stuff gets renamed. 

Way to go, TR!  Y'all have the smooth bumelia, Bumelia lycoides in your neighborhood, too.  I have seen it in San Jacinto County.

Southside, you don't know your ash from your bumelia ;D. 

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on May 28, 2019, 09:20:18 PM
 :D :D :D :D :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 29, 2019, 06:45:17 AM
I failed at posting the tree of the day about 20 minutes ago.  This one is for Ellmoe.  This one and another are so close in appearance that I usually use the site location to i.d. them.  A few clues:  there is an invasive ambrosia beetle that is threatening this species in addition to killing avocado trees by plugging up the xylem in the stem preventing the transport of nutrients.  The leaves enhance foods such as chicken and rice.


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3267.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559125135)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3268.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559124025)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3269.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559126613)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ellmoe on May 29, 2019, 06:58:10 AM
This one was one of my favorite trees to saw . It is easy to cut , dry , machine , reminded me of mahogany , haven't seen a live one in a while.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ellmoe on May 29, 2019, 07:00:29 AM
Also, normal habitat is not Caveman's backyard. Used to find it on edge of swamps . Makes a fair sized tree .
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 29, 2019, 07:52:38 AM
I have some that are 18" in diameter.  It has a sassy cousin. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on May 29, 2019, 09:23:42 AM
How sweet it is!
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 29, 2019, 09:27:58 AM
It is not this one.
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Sweetbay.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586948)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on May 29, 2019, 09:41:18 AM
You all keep throwing out clues but the "over 18" and "sassy cousin" stumps me.  I want to say "sweet" basil but that is just a little herb...  So how about sweet bay, not that I've ever heard of it before!
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on May 29, 2019, 10:06:45 AM
Sweet bay magnolia?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ESFted on May 29, 2019, 10:44:45 AM
Persea burbonia.. Florida Mahogany, Redbay??
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 29, 2019, 10:54:46 AM
ESFted nailed it. smiley_clapping  The tree of today is the Red bay or Persea burbonia.  There is a swamp bay that looks about the same as the red bay to me.  I goes by Persea palustris.  It is supposed to have long, shaggy hairs on the underside of the leaf except for in Florida (suppose that is why it looks the same to me).  I think both species are affected by the red bay ambrosia beetle that causes laurel wilt.


The sweetbay, pictured four posts previous to this one, is silver on the back the veins are not as prominent and lacks the drupe fruit.  The sweetbay has a seedpod that looks a lot like its cousin's, the Southern Magnolia.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 29, 2019, 10:59:10 AM
There is a Florida Mahogany, (Swietenia mahagoni.) but it has alternate, compound leaves with unequal bases and grows south of my location and along the coast.  If I get a chance to go to Anna Maria this summer I will take pictures of one.                        
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on May 29, 2019, 11:16:58 AM
I was thinking Red Bay
No fair, I was trying to make yesterday's tree a Red Bay and then you chunked one in for today.  :-\  That borders on cheating.  ;D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on May 29, 2019, 11:20:23 AM
Kinda like slapping someone with sapwood eh?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on May 29, 2019, 11:23:07 AM
Yeah, sumping liken dat.  Gonna take my leaves and leave.  ::)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 29, 2019, 04:41:03 PM
Magicman, don't leaf MAD (maple, ash, dogwood).  Ellmoe requested a redbay tree of the day. Be on the lookout for the species I think I remember you have a bowl or serving vessel made out of in the coming days.  I need to go get a good picture of one at my neighbor's place.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: tule peak timber on May 29, 2019, 07:05:13 PM
The roots make a tea.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 29, 2019, 08:32:02 PM
The "sassy" reference was to sassafras.  Both sassafras and red bay are in the Lauraceace family. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 29, 2019, 09:18:52 PM
I was telling my middle daughter, Shelby, that I have learned a lot from many of you on this thread as she was pushing my Dad's wheelchair down our road this evening.  I had the dog and was taking pictures of a few more trees in the swamp.  

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on May 29, 2019, 10:35:27 PM
The "sassy" reference was to sassafras.  Both sassafras and red bay are in the Lauraceace family.
I did google sassafras and saw that and then Bay...
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 30, 2019, 04:25:14 AM
Today's tree is often just a bush. It has uses. One of its uses is that the leaves, especially when crushed deter some insects.  The leaves are usually 3"-4" long.
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3284.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559203994)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3281.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559203987)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 30, 2019, 07:38:49 AM
The fruit is a waxy berry.  The American Colonist used the berries to make candles.  Native Americans used the stems and leaves to treat fever and crushed the leaves and rubbed them on their skin as a natural insect repellent.  Has a unique, but to me, pleasant odor. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on May 30, 2019, 07:48:18 AM
bayberry?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on May 30, 2019, 07:53:58 AM
Yes, it is sometimes called Southern bayberry.  I know it as wax myrtle.  Genus Myrica.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on May 30, 2019, 07:59:14 AM
I just got lucky based on your mention of candles. I thought ok, search for waxberry. Somehow that got me to bayberry. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 30, 2019, 10:36:49 AM
It is a good little tree.  It is also used to treat itching skin, stomach problems as well as a host of other maladies.  There is a west coast Myrica too that is similar.  The Southern Waxmyrtle is Myrica cerifera.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on May 30, 2019, 10:54:55 AM
How do prepare the wax myrtle for medicinal use?  Leaves?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 30, 2019, 11:24:32 AM
The leaves, fruit, roots, and bark all have uses.  The bark is dried and made into a powder.  The seeds/drupes are either eaten raw or boiled (may be carcinogenic according to some sources) and then used, the leaves can be dried and used to make a tea or just crumpled up and rubbed on the skin as a cover scent or to discourage the onslaught of mosquitoes (not as good as DEET in my experience but much more pleasant to apply on my skin).  

Some folks even use the leaves to enhance the flavor of food as one would use bay leaves.          

 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 31, 2019, 08:06:42 AM
Getting a late start today.  
This one is non-native and at first glance may be briefly confused with the redbay.  The skinny tree in the foreground is another example (live oaks behind).  The bark seems to dull a saw chain quickly.  We milled some of this a couple of years ago and the vapors were almost overwhelming.  (http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3278.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559124039)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3279.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559303927)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: tule peak timber on May 31, 2019, 08:39:50 AM
We posted sawing some last week !
   From earlier...Didn't anyone as a kid make tea from sassafras roots ?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: bwstout on May 31, 2019, 08:57:21 AM
We posted sawing some last week !
   From earlier...Didn't anyone as a kid make tea from sassafras roots ?
We use to dig the roots after Church on Sundays and Mom would boil it for tea at dinner time, evertime I smell it brings back the "Good-ol- Days" then I remember how poor we were not sure why we call them "Good" ;D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on May 31, 2019, 09:31:17 AM
We posted sawing some last week !
   From earlier...Didn't anyone as a kid make tea from sassafras roots ?


What do you mean as a kid? I still do.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: tule peak timber on May 31, 2019, 09:59:38 AM
 :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on May 31, 2019, 10:40:09 AM
Looks like Eucalyptus.  Quite stinky!
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 31, 2019, 04:46:11 PM
Hints: Has a menthol medicinal smell like Vick's vapor rub.  Native to China and Japan.  Garlon will kill it.  They produce drupes which birds eat and often deposit in disturbed areas where the seeds sprout.  This tree is found from at least Texas to Georgia.

Extracts from this tree have been used to treat toe nail fungus, heart disease, itchy skin, improve circulation, open airways, and even treat hemorrhoids (works even better than eating a bowlful of habaneros).

It is considered an invasive in Florida even though it is often used as a fast growing yard tree.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: tule peak timber on May 31, 2019, 06:13:20 PM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/35190/DSCN2082~0.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559340787)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: samandothers on May 31, 2019, 09:09:50 PM
Yes on the sassafras tea!  I would dig roots on farm and bring to mom or my grandmother to make tea.  Have not had the tea in a while.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on May 31, 2019, 11:01:42 PM
Today's tree was Camphor or  (Cinnamomum camphora).  It is used for Vick's Vapo Rub.  When I was a child with bronchitis, twice a year, my grandmother would slather the Vick's all over my chest and back and then wrap me in saran wrap.  It must have worked.  I am still alive.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: tule peak timber on May 31, 2019, 11:12:07 PM
We are putting some in the kiln next week for a headboard and some furniture.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 01, 2019, 12:28:06 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3283.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559203987)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3283.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559203987)
 I should have gotten better pictures of this one but this is all I have. Southside should be all over this one.  Hint:  one of my mentors told me that if I saw this tree growing, do not try to build a house there.  Magicman has sawn some of these.  I have never had the opportunity to get one big enough to saw.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ellmoe on June 01, 2019, 05:47:13 AM
Wet area?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 01, 2019, 07:55:25 AM
Wood is light and soft.  Was used for wicker furniture. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on June 01, 2019, 08:04:38 AM
From the hints and from what I can see of the leaves it should be this:

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/DSCN0859.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1425516545)
 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/DSCN0860.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1425516561)
 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/DSCN0861.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1425516672)
 
I have sawn many Mbf for several different customers.  This job was ~10Mbf.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on June 01, 2019, 08:17:21 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/DSCN1143_28Small29.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1347822994)
 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/DSCN1140_28Small29.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1347822991)
 
A different customer.  All of this species that I have sawn has been dried, T&G, and used as wall paneling.  ;D

These boards are 1" X16".  :o
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on June 01, 2019, 08:21:19 AM
The wood was used at one time to make artificial limbs.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on June 01, 2019, 12:01:57 PM
I had to Ash myself why I was not seeing the forest through the trees.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on June 01, 2019, 02:10:08 PM
Was this one claimed to make the best charcoal for black powder?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on June 01, 2019, 03:10:07 PM
bark cures a headache also.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on June 01, 2019, 03:27:36 PM
??  Are we all looking at the leaves in Reply #209?  smiley_headscratch
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 01, 2019, 04:37:18 PM
Yes, the charcoal made from this wood is supposed to be good for making black powder.

Yes, this tree grows in the wetter areas.  I think I read that this tree grows in 36 states and a lot of Canada.  It evidently gets to saw log size in Mississippi based on the pictures MM posted with the nearly BLACK heartwood.

The leaves also have small serrations.

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: tule peak timber on June 01, 2019, 04:51:38 PM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/35190/DSCN2102.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559422286)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on June 01, 2019, 04:55:27 PM
Does it have a cousin that weeps?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on June 01, 2019, 05:21:27 PM
It evidently gets to saw log size in Mississippi based on the pictures MM posted with the nearly BLACK heartwood


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/DSCN0857.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1425516642)
 
Yes it does on both counts.  Some of those logs in the background were easily in the 18" - 20"+ class.  The color variation can be dramatic from black to a very pleasing amber.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on June 01, 2019, 05:27:09 PM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/DSCN0307~0.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1442712187)
 
Another example.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/DSCN0303~0.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1442771563)
 
Same species but very different colored heartwood.

I love to saw it.  :)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 01, 2019, 05:59:20 PM
That one did not challenge any of you.  I doubt tomorrow's will either but the leaves will be far from simple.  Rob, that rocker is phenomenal.  The black willow (Salix nigra) around here gets big enough to make some artificial limbs but I hope that I do not need them any time soon. MM, good looking wood inside those logs.

Time to go back out and attempt to start the mill's engine and start sawing some mostly really small cedar logs that were brought to me earlier today.  At least it has cooled off to the lower 90's now that it is almost 6 p.m.  I even saw a cloud today but no rain for the crunchy, brown grass.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: tule peak timber on June 01, 2019, 06:11:14 PM
We had snow near us last weekend!
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 01, 2019, 08:08:52 PM
I partially grew up on a farm where black powder was produced for the south in the war of northern aggrssion.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on June 01, 2019, 08:30:07 PM
Not far from here is Saltville, the salt source for preserving meat after the coastline fell, ancient underground salt domes. They would inject water and pump out the brine then boil it down. One of the nearby iron furnaces cast the salt pots for those evaporating furnaces. Further along that old rail line that "Stoneman's calvary came and tore up again" several times is Lead Mines. If the yanks only knew they would have raided harder, towards the end the lead that was in those mines was coming out of the end of a gun in Richmond the next week.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: doctorb on June 01, 2019, 08:36:51 PM
Got to tell all you smart tree guys that this thread is one of the finest in quite a while.  thx.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 02, 2019, 06:59:53 AM
This invasive bipinnately compound leaved tree has Chinese roots, is fast growing and produces an attractive flower.  The one pictured is showing less than one year's growth since mowing it off at ground level.  Florida's state tree is in the background (technically, not a tree) and an old longleaf may be visible behind that.





(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3292.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559425630)


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3290.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559425628)

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3291.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559425629)


Hopefully the pictures will come through.  I had a heck of a time getting them from the gallery to the post.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on June 02, 2019, 07:19:08 AM
Has another name that is very similar to the real name. I milled one once and the wood was quite pretty. had a red color to it. Champagne for breakfast anyone? 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on June 02, 2019, 07:45:49 AM
Silk Tree.  I don't mind the flower's smell, but some folks hate it. 

I have never sawed it.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: nativewolf on June 02, 2019, 07:49:10 AM
We had snow near us last weekend!
I wondered if that had gotten close, seemed awfully late in the season for southern cal to be getting snow and rain.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 02, 2019, 07:49:51 AM
Has one of my favorite scientific names. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 02, 2019, 07:53:14 AM
And a fruity drink of the same name.
My goats love to eat the seed pods.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on June 02, 2019, 07:55:00 AM
The biggest one I've seen here is 4 or 5 inches.  Not quite saw timber.  They are listed as invasive in VA, but I don't find them to act that way.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 02, 2019, 08:10:02 AM
Weíve got a few here that have been here for at least 15 years. They donít seem to be reproducing.  Here is a bowl made by a friend of mine from Lumberjocks.  She got the wood from FF member gfadvm.  Heís not active anymore due to illness.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/36921/5AD3D977-FA46-470D-830B-A9D48D086F87.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1559477720)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: lxskllr on June 02, 2019, 11:30:57 AM
The biggest one I've seen here is 4 or 5 inches.  Not quite saw timber.  They are listed as invasive in VA, but I don't find them to act that way.  
I saw a huge one on a job I was on. I was gonna post it here for confirmation cause I'd never seen one so big, but my picture didn't turn out well. By memory, it had a 20" trunk, and a 25' canopy.

edit:
Here's the picture...

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/49990/20190514_090756.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1559489707)

Doesn't look like much. It's the really leggy tree behind the wood play set.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 02, 2019, 08:58:54 PM
I never paid attention to them until last July I cut a relatively large one down at my parents' vacation house in Franklin, NC.  I got home and noticed there were several here.

Mimosa tree or silk tree (Albizia julibrissin).  Tomorrow we will be back in the acorn tree family.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on June 02, 2019, 09:27:43 PM
Has one of my favorite scientific names.  
Unrelated to mimosa, I think my favorite scientific genus name is liquidambar. The native American name for that tree translates to "tree that makes pine resin".
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 03, 2019, 06:31:05 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3305.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559557687)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3307.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559522870)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3306.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559557716)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3304.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559522865)
 
Today's tree of the day.  I took these pictures yesterday afternoon when I went to town to buy a new battery for the mill.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 03, 2019, 06:45:47 AM
"Frankly my Dear, I don't give a Dang". 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on June 03, 2019, 07:11:03 AM
They really hold onto their old branches, sawed a couple up over the weekend.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 03, 2019, 09:01:10 PM
I don't think this is a scarlet oak but its very close relative.  Quercus........ii.  A really smart forester showed me how to tell them apart by looking at the concentric rings on the pointy end of the acorn of the scarlet oak.  

This afternoon I took a few more pictures of some that will show up over the next couple of days.  One will be in Ian's wheelhouse.  One is buttressed but it is not a cypress and the other share a name of a town that my uncle is the mayor of.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 03, 2019, 09:16:25 PM
Aside from an acorn, site can help distinguish the "Miss Scarlett I don't give a DanG" tree and one that ends in ii.  The former, in addition to the concentric rings on the acorn tip has a very deep bowl shaped acorn cup while the latter fellow has a thin, saucer shaped cup just like Northern Red Oak. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 03, 2019, 09:42:03 PM
Thanks, WDH.  Shumard Oak or Quercus shumardii for today.  I could not think of any movie/book hints to go with Shumard Oak.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on June 03, 2019, 10:57:59 PM
Well DanG.  After WDH said Scarlet I didn't research further 'cause I don't have any.....but I do have Shumard.  :-\

One is buttressed but it is not a cypress
I hates them kind, well kinda.  :-X
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 04, 2019, 12:23:33 AM
Well yesterday's tomorrow turned into today while I was reading on the FF.  I was going to use the tree that Magicman hates but he knows it, evidently, from one description so it will have to wait a day or so.

We sawed one of these right after getting the lt-28 several years ago.  It was dense and hard.  Tom used to say it made decent flooring.  Today's tree is ....

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3324.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559621610)



(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3325.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559621790)
 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3328.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559611102)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3327.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559611103)


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3326.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559611098)

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on June 04, 2019, 07:02:39 AM
Easy for us Sth hemisphere folk, that's Casuarina  of some sort. 

I've milled it and it's HARD. As it dries it gets harder.  :D

BTW, this is where we got married a few years back. What are the trees on each side of the picture?

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/sails.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1385522952)

Muri Beach, Rarotonga, Cook Islands. 

Wood is awesome if you can get it to dry straight, and have carbide tools to work it. 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20171010_112312.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1507968591)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 04, 2019, 04:56:42 PM
In north America it grows in zones 10 and 11 (probably why there were not too many responses). It has a cone like fruit that feel almost the same as a sweetgum ball under a bare foot.  A lot of these trees were planted along Florida's gulf coast and provide much appreciated shade to those of us who prefer shade. The past several years local governments have decided to declare war on them and remove them in favor of native sea oats and sea grapes, which evidently do a better job of dune establishment and erosion reduction.

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on June 04, 2019, 10:25:54 PM
The top one is a non native cousin of one posted a week or two ago, the bottom one I posted a pic of the leaves, they were both opening today.
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10017/stewartiaop.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1559701510)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 04, 2019, 11:12:29 PM
DonP, I'm guessing the top one you posted is some kind of Asian Magnolia.  

The one I posted early this morning and those pictured at Ian's wedding are what are known here as Australian Pine (Casuarina species).  I think some folks in NZ call them Sheoaks.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 05, 2019, 06:37:50 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3320.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559730734)
 
Today's tree is growing on the edge of a swamp in central Florida.  It will grow in most of the south.  The leaves will be one of the first to turn colors in the fall.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3319.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559611086)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3318.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559611086)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3317.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559611083)
 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3315.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559611080)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3314.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559611080)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 05, 2019, 06:53:15 AM
The wood ducks love to eat the drupes.  The wood from the butt swell is sought after by carvers. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on June 05, 2019, 07:32:02 AM
The top branch in the vase is a Stewartia psuedocamillia, Japanese Stewartia, cousin of loblolly bay, the bottom is southern magnolia, var bracken's brown beauty, a cold tolerant one.

I'd guess todays tree was also used as a home for bees?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on June 05, 2019, 08:02:19 AM
I had one of today's in my back yard for many years.  I loved the brilliant red in the Fall.  :)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 05, 2019, 08:07:33 AM
Don P, I did not know that about the bees in this tree.  I have learned a lot from folks' responses since we started this thread nearly a month ago.  I need to go through and write down all of the trees of the days so that I do not inadvertently repeat any of them.  CRS is kicking in pretty good.

MagicMan, If I recall, you had a bowl made out of the wood from today's tree.

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on June 05, 2019, 08:22:28 AM
Oh yes, I had forgotten about that one.  When you mentioned bowls last week I thought about another bowl and was ready to go with it.  ::)

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN1029.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1282567389)
 
This one was a favored species for the "old timers" that made "dough bowls".

I have sawn it a few times but it always took me a bit to identify it without any leaves.  :P
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 05, 2019, 09:20:35 AM
By gum, I recognize that one!
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on June 05, 2019, 09:45:51 AM
Brings to mind a Van Morrison song.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Cartwright on June 05, 2019, 09:01:29 PM
Magicman, isn't there a town in Mississippi by today's tree's name. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 05, 2019, 09:08:36 PM
Elvis left his first building there. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 05, 2019, 11:00:26 PM
The tree from today, as most of you hinted to, is Swamp Tupelo, Blackgum, Black Swamp Tupelo and probably has a couple of other names.  The Latin name is Nyssa biflora or Nyssa sylvatica (depending on the source).  Someone can probably clarify which we have pictured.
https://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/misc/ag_654/volume_2/nyssa/silvatica.htm (https://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/misc/ag_654/volume_2/nyssa/silvatica.htm)

Nyssa sylvatica Marsh.
[size=+4]Black Tupelo[/b][/font][/size]
Cornaceae -- Dogwood family
N. sylvatica Marsh. var. sylvatica Black [size=+2]Tupelo (typical)[/size][/color]
Charles E. McGee
N. sylvatica var. biflora (Walt.) Sara. [size=+2]Swamp Tupelo[/size][/color]
Kenneth W. Outcalt
Black tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica) is divided into two commonly recognized varieties, typical black tupelo (var. sylvatica) and swamp tupelo (var. biflora). They are usually identifiable by their differences in habitats: black tupelo on light-textured soils of uplands and stream bottoms, swamp tupelo on heavy organic or clay soils of wet bottom lands. They do intermingle in some Coastal Plain areas and in those cases are hard to differentiate. These trees have moderate growth rate and longevity and are an excellent food source for wildlife, fine honey trees, and handsome ornamentals.
BLACK TUPELO
Black tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica var. sylvatica) is also widely known as blackgum; other common names include sourgum, pepperidge, tupelo, and tupelogum.
Habitat
Native Range
Black tupelo grows in the uplands and in alluvial stream bottoms from southwestern Maine to New York, to extreme southern Ontario, central Michigan, Illinois, and central Missouri, and south to eastern Oklahoma, eastern Texas, and southern Florida. It is local in central and southern Mexico. Optimum development is made on lower slopes and terraces in the Southeastern United States. 



Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Cartwright on June 05, 2019, 11:12:06 PM
I can't tell by the tree but there is Tupelo and then there is Black Gum. I have graded many mbf of each and have had to seperate it!  :( Not fun when sawn together at about 70mbf in 8 hrs!!!  :-[
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on June 05, 2019, 11:43:00 PM
 I don't know of anyone still using a bee gum, they were from hollow pieces of our sylvatica, black gum, but that was common in my granddaddy's time, they didn't call it a hive, it was a "gum" even if it was a modern hive. I don't hear that anymore so I guess it is one of the old ways and old ways of talking that is fading away.

The tree grows a few years left handed and then a few years right, switching back and forth as the tree grows causing that interlocked grain. It makes good mallet heads because of that. My shop bench is made from it, it takes abuse pretty well. I've also used it for hidden splines in timber framing where they cannot be checked. I know they will not split unexpectedly, the visible wood will fail under load long before they do.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 06, 2019, 06:41:15 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3321.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559611089)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3323.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559611093)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3322.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559611093)
 Today's tree of the day.  There are males and females of this tree (dioecious).  I think this one is a male.  My maternal grandfather, who lived in a town that has the same name as this tree, had one growing in his yard which was across the tracks from a phosphate pit. I spent several hot summer hours in the branches of that tree.

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 06, 2019, 07:49:54 AM
Heartwood is a pretty yellow color.  Wood looks lke osage orange, but differs in that the pores of osage are filled with tyloses while the pores of this species is not.  Kinda like white oak versus red oak.  If the new growth stem is bruised or cut, it exudes a milky, latex like sap.  I read somewhere that the wood was used for airplane propellers in World War I because it was very strong for its weight.  Fruit is a delicious berry that I enjoy in late May very year.  To me, the bark looks like the little ridges that run up stem vertically looks like they were taped on.  Like thick masking tape.  Very distinctive look.  It has a cousin that was imported from China in the the 1700 - 1800's for the silk worm trade.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on June 06, 2019, 08:20:30 AM
Are you saying it's male because you looked under the leaf or did you just mull it over before coming to that berry important conclusion?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on June 06, 2019, 08:32:19 AM
Oh my, I spent many hours sitting in our tree and eating the fruit before the Bluejays got it. 

Never sawed it.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on June 06, 2019, 09:02:05 AM
Got one by the front gate. Almost cut it down last month before I looked up and noticed the fruit hanging from it.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: tule peak timber on June 06, 2019, 09:09:34 AM
Ahh, pah, give me a hint.....
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 06, 2019, 09:19:44 AM
Ahh, pah, give me a hint.....


You will just have to mull it over.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 06, 2019, 09:51:59 AM
Tule Peak:  hints, central Florida, phosphate mines/pits, berries, town name, imported and very pubescent cousin that is now invasive here- still mulling it over?

Southside, I have never seen berries on this one which indicated it is probably not a female.  I do not think the males of this species are all steers but I have never seen any with nuts :D, even after looking under the leaves.

MM, the berries are scrumptious.

WDH, I had forgotten about the white sap.  As boys we used to throw knives and other sharp things at trees and this one would leak profusely when stuck.

A little history:

https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3601&context=flstud_pub (https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3601&context=flstud_pub)

When member Jmoore (John) and I were in high school we installed spas and hot tubs as one of our jobs.  One day we installed a tub for an old man that gave us a first hand account of some of the nefarious events that occurred in and around the tree mentioned in the article.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on June 06, 2019, 10:19:21 AM
If 5th or 6th grade we were all given a silk worm or two to take home.  We had one of these trees in our front yard and mine ate well!
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: bwstout on June 06, 2019, 10:23:20 AM
i mull this around think that I planted three of them in my yard last year ;D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: tule peak timber on June 06, 2019, 10:30:28 AM
Let me mull over the "pubescent cousin " part berry well. :o
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on June 06, 2019, 10:35:30 AM
Don't they have leaf shapes sometimes like sassafras?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 06, 2019, 12:42:29 PM
Woodpecker, they sometimes have mitt shaped leaves.  I could not find any on this particular tree.  Today's tree, Red Mulberry (Morus rubra) is serrated while the sassafras is entire.  The texture is quite a bit different also.
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Red_Mulberry_2.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586941)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Red_Mulberry_3.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586941)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Red_Mulberry_4.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586942)
 Red Mulberry
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 06, 2019, 04:28:59 PM
This was a perfect tree of the day.  I was in a training yesterday for a mock earthquake of the New Madrid fault and I sat in the shade of one of these trees and wondered what it was.  The leaves had the mitt shape.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: tule peak timber on June 06, 2019, 04:33:50 PM
Earthquakes, I have had 1037 in the last 365 days as of this morning. Most centered 1/4 mile from the corner of my property.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 06, 2019, 04:39:11 PM
We donít have them often, but they are getting very concerned here about the ďbig oneĒ.  About 200 years ago they figure there was a quake between 7 and 8 on the scale.  Iím on a FEMA urban search and rescue task force in MO.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: tule peak timber on June 06, 2019, 04:43:24 PM
Roger that. Better 4 small ones each day. Rock and roll ! 8)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: doc henderson on June 06, 2019, 05:10:40 PM
jumping in a little late, but due to the variation I thought i would throw in a few more pics of mulberry leaves.  and a few berries here in Ks.


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51041/0E0EFEC6-62AD-42D3-9C48-4DA506D03B11.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1559855310)
 

still green a few red. it'll be dark blue purple when ripe.


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51041/8AA028B9-1A7C-441C-AA7B-CBF17A1B8859.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1559855364)
 

had a sprinkle of rain.  just enough that my son suggested stopping chores!


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51041/DEAAECAD-0942-45C3-9F38-E92BB4E44204.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1559855418)


can see a few "mitt" shapes at the top of this pic.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: lxskllr on June 06, 2019, 07:37:04 PM
Mine are all mitt shaped. I don't care much for the berries. They have a kind of thin sweetness, and are a little "grainy". I much prefer the wineberries which are due in a few weeks.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 06, 2019, 07:57:51 PM
Doc,

You posted another species.  Not red mulberry, which is native, but a cousin, white mulberry which was brought over for the silk trade.  One way to tell them apart is by rubbing the top of the leaf surface.  The non-native white mulberry will have a texture on top that is smooth as a baby's bottom.  I believe that is the one in your pic.  Our native red mulberry is scabrous on top, i.e. fells like sandpaper.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on June 07, 2019, 12:25:18 AM
Thanks Danny. Which one has the tyloses, red or white?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ellmoe on June 07, 2019, 06:53:48 AM
Are you saying it's male because you looked under the leaf or did you just mull it over before coming to that berry important conclusion?
In dendrology class we were told you just had to look at the crotch!
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 07, 2019, 07:03:36 AM
Today's tree is another that grows in zones 10 and 11.  I drive past 100's used as ornamental trees each day on the way to work, which is 17 miles and 38 traffic lights away.  It is too cold for them where I live (not today but some winter days) but they thrive in town.  I did not realize that the wood Ipe comes from trees in this genus.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3334.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559904496)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3333.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559904494)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3332.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559904493)
 The leaf arrangement is compound opposite.  It is pubescent.  Hint:  It is not an ash.  It is in the family Bignoniaceae, which is the same as Southern Catalpa.  

As a side note, several years ago I chaperoned one of my students on a FFA trip to Costa Rica.  We spent some time in the north, near Nicaragua.  While there, one of the places we stayed had some enormous, wide, long. live edged, one slab tables.  When I asked the folks who owned the place what kind of wood was used for the tables, their response was something like legumes (bean trees).  I have noticed since then that most trees that produce beans also produce good wood.

I have not sawed up any of the wood from today's tree of the day but they are on my list.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 07, 2019, 07:13:20 AM

In dendrology class we were told you just had to look at the crotch!
DanG, Ellmoe.  I just about spewed my coffee. 

I am going to go out on a limb and predict there will not be as much "tree of the day" FF member participation today due to the limited areas in North America where today's tree grows.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 07, 2019, 08:06:16 AM
Red mulberry does not have tyloses.  Osage orange does.  Not sure about white mulberry. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: gersus on June 07, 2019, 11:42:45 AM
Just ate a few mulberry's off my father in laws tree a couple days ago. Love them! Friend of mine was lucky enough to snag a huge (probably 28" or so) mulberry log that was getting removed from a local college. He got some real nice slabs out of it.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on June 07, 2019, 11:43:38 AM
Allrighty then. Don't know how I crossed that up.  :D

I think I remember reading somewhere that there are hundreds of different plants in the same family from all over the world.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 07, 2019, 04:01:29 PM
DanG, none of my Texas books have that one.  But real familiar.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 07, 2019, 04:12:34 PM
Then again, I may want to blow my horn.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 08, 2019, 06:20:04 AM
Texas Ranger got it.  Some call it a trumpet tree.  I have known it as Tabebuia spp.  Some have yellow flowers and some have pink.  They bloom here in the late winter or early spring.

Today's tree of the day is...

 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Sassafrass.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586942)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Sassafrass_2.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586942)
 I am certain a lot of you will recognize the leaves from this one.  I do not have any tree or bark pictures, sorry.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: curdog on June 08, 2019, 08:15:59 AM
I'll raise a glass of root beer while I think this one over..
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 08, 2019, 08:22:37 AM
sassy little devil
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on June 08, 2019, 08:28:02 AM
Repeat?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on June 08, 2019, 08:29:44 AM
I thought I was the only one having deja vu all over again :)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on June 08, 2019, 08:39:21 AM
I thought so too, Reply #88:  Tree of the day in Tree, Plant and Wood I.D. (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=106300.msg1658433#msg1658433)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on June 08, 2019, 08:42:45 AM
At least it's not another zone 11 tree I've never seen before!   :D :D :D  I'm not complaining, caveman, just noticing.  :)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: lxskllr on June 08, 2019, 08:51:23 AM
I thought the same thing. I was thinking "Huh, I thought I knew that, but it's already made the rounds. What could this one be?"  :^D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 08, 2019, 12:12:14 PM
JYou know when you get into the roots of this tree while doing any kind of excavating.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 08, 2019, 01:19:29 PM
DanG it.  Sorry for the repeat.  I really do need to go through this post and make a list so that I can check them off.  I usually double check if I am not sure if I have previously used one but this morning there was no time.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 08, 2019, 01:23:40 PM
Okay, let's do another tree for this afternoon.  I think several of you will recognize it.  Maybe someone will post a close up picture of the bark.
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_0426.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1416870133)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_0427.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1416870166)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on June 08, 2019, 01:27:20 PM
We forgive you. Itís quite a lot of responsibility you have every morning.

That looks kinda white, but I can get lost in the pines if Iím not careful.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: lxskllr on June 08, 2019, 01:35:08 PM
Cones don't seem right to me for white, but I'm not good at tree ID, and I'm especially bad at the conifers. ERC is about the only thing I can accurately identify, and that's in the wild. Add domesticated wildcards, and even that might stump me.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 08, 2019, 01:57:07 PM
This one has three needles per fascicle that are 2 1/2"-5" long.  White pine has five needles per fascicle.  Today's pine is found from Georgia up to New England.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on June 08, 2019, 02:12:30 PM
Ahhhh.

It wouldnít hurt me to spend a whole month on pines. I know the ones around me, but thatís a very limited variety.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 08, 2019, 07:02:20 PM
My guess is that it grows in Virginia.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on June 08, 2019, 07:10:48 PM
Seems that it must. Not my part though. Or at least I donít recognize it from the picture.  Iím still waiting for the experts.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on June 08, 2019, 07:24:15 PM
Virginia has 2 shorter needles per fascicle.
Hmm, looking at the VT Dendro page that looks mighty rigida  though, and the range is right.
http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID=33 (http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID=33)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: nativewolf on June 08, 2019, 07:29:48 PM
My guess is that it grows in Virginia.
It does but heck it grows in Atlanta too, heck even in NYC
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on June 08, 2019, 07:40:50 PM
That is by far the SYP subspecies that I saw most often.

Oddly enough I do not have a bark picture but surely WDH has one.

Edit:  I whacked myself on this one.  :-\
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on June 08, 2019, 07:51:11 PM
I guess the range is throwing me a curve. New England?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on June 08, 2019, 08:01:55 PM
Echinata
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on June 08, 2019, 08:03:37 PM
Didnít know they grew that far north. Apparently they do.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 08, 2019, 09:20:24 PM
DonP got it.  Pitch Pine, (Pinus rigida).  

MM:  These cones look a lot squattier than the ones of the trees that I assumed you spend most of your time sawing.  The needles should be a bit shorter too. 

The only three needle pines in my area are longleaf and loblolly.  

Did someone want a month of pines?  That would be as bad as a month of palms.  There are so many of them.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 08, 2019, 09:29:10 PM
No pitch pines here in MO.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: curdog on June 09, 2019, 12:21:41 AM
I always think that pitch pine cones look like someone smashed the base against their hand and flattened them out. And a lot of times I see tufts of needles coming out of the trunk,  not covering them but a few clumps up to down the trunk...
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 09, 2019, 06:23:47 AM
Good Sunday morning.  After my sassafras oops yesterday Pitch Pine saved the day.  CurDog mentioned the tufts of needles that grow out of the main trunk, a unique feature of Pitch Pine.

I have never seen today's tree actually growing.  The closest I have come to seeing it is the limb and cone cuttings pictured which were taken after the conclusion of the 2014 National FFA Forestry Contest which was held at Bernheim Forest in Kentucky that year.  I have helped unload truckloads of them starting on Thanks Giving Day throughout a lot of the next month.  We have even sawed some into boards but they came from transmission poles.


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_0429~0.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1416870244)



(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_0428.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1416870202)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on June 09, 2019, 06:40:04 AM
Fir what it's worth we have a FF member with the same first name, good American fellow. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: tule peak timber on June 09, 2019, 08:55:43 AM
DonP got it.  Pitch Pine, (Pinus rigida).  

MM:  These cones look a lot squattier than the ones of the trees that I assumed you spend most of your time sawing.  The needles should be a bit shorter too.

The only three needle pines in my area are longleaf and loblolly.  

Did someone want a month of pines?  That would be as bad as a month of palms.  There are so many of them.
Palms ? These have edible coconuts, and grow in the snow here....
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/35190/snow_2014_8~0.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1560084900)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/35190/Jubea_3_Aug0617~2.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1560085499)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 09, 2019, 10:14:47 AM
I have been unsuccessful at having them live in my yard, but my parents have several.  They buy rootball trees for outside Christmas trees each year and then plant them.  Not a true fir.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 09, 2019, 09:05:31 PM
Southside was on the Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) like the early bird.  Rob, your palm looks familiar but I do not recall what it is.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: tule peak timber on June 09, 2019, 09:37:30 PM
Slow growing , largest palm in the world,sought after for their sap.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 09, 2019, 10:37:00 PM
A Chilly and wine palm (Jubaea chilensis).  Should have known by the snow pictured.  I'll be in Orlando most of this coming week for work.  Although it is one of my least favorite places to drive or otherwise spend time, there are some phenomenal landscapes with a variety of plants.  I will look for one.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: tule peak timber on June 09, 2019, 10:52:56 PM
It takes almost 2 years to germinate the seed, rabbits think they are candy,and they are very , very slow to grow. If you find some specimens I'd love photos.  Rob
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 10, 2019, 06:28:53 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3273.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559124032)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3274.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559124034)
 Today's tree of the day.  This is a small, potted sample that we dug up at WDH's place last July.  The back of the leaves are pubescent.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 10, 2019, 07:44:23 AM
The old bell and clapper. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 10, 2019, 09:29:44 AM
applause for this old fella, 'course that much exercise leaves me red in the face.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on June 10, 2019, 09:41:40 AM
tyloses?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 10, 2019, 11:53:20 AM
The end grain of boards from this tree are not plugged up with tyloses.  The base of the leaf reminds me of a southern belle's dress.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on June 10, 2019, 12:45:32 PM
Water you doing? Playing possum with this one?   ;D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on June 10, 2019, 12:48:06 PM
I learned my lesson on this one recently.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 10, 2019, 01:24:26 PM
It seems that thereís two that it could be, just based on my limited research.  Hmmm.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 10, 2019, 04:01:34 PM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~527.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1530972909)
 The tree in the left side of the picture should be of the same genus and species of the leaves pictured from today's tree of the day.  They are usually relatively easy to spot in the forest "because of the way they are" (Lenny Pepperbottom youtube).  This pic was taken last summer in Franklin, NC.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 10, 2019, 10:14:15 PM
Today's tree is Southern Red Oak (Quercus falcata).  I have seen quite a few of them, all north of my location, but I have never sawn one.

Tomorrow's tree will most likely be an Asian invasive.  We dropped off a couple of the school's cows today at a pasture that is located on "reclaimed" phosphate mine land in Mulberry(weaning calves and breeding cows).  In just the few minutes we were there we saw Brazilian pepper, cogon grass, tropical soda apple and the tree that I expect several of you will be able to identify tomorrow.
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 10, 2019, 10:21:40 PM
Really?  Southern red oak?  I was thinking black jack or water.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 10, 2019, 10:29:08 PM
Southern red oak.  The shade leaf with the rounded leaf base looks like a bell with the tip of the leaf looking like the clapper hanging down. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 10, 2019, 10:31:59 PM
Shade leaf pic of southern red oak.  


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14370/IMG_1635.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1192071588)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: doc henderson on June 10, 2019, 10:38:18 PM
@WDH (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=4370) is that what they really look like?... or did you  just run that through you jointer ??? learn something new everyday.  curious what you think of the elm pics and if you have an explanation.  in whatcha sawing 2019
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 10, 2019, 10:45:23 PM
Yes.  That is what the shade leaf looks like. The sun leaves look different, more finely cut and lobed.  Sun leaf:


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14370/IMG_1633.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1192071587)
 

The mature leaves are also two toned in color.  Deep dark shiny green on top, dull tawny green/brown on the underside. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: doc henderson on June 10, 2019, 10:48:48 PM
i assume the tree is conserving energy and carbon in the shade, and more chlorophyll on the sunny side?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 10, 2019, 10:55:27 PM
I donít know.  That is just the way it is. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on June 10, 2019, 11:12:37 PM
So were those immature leaves?  I was going with water oak or possom oak as well.    :P
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 10, 2019, 11:28:31 PM
Sorry fellas.  I did not intend to put a tricky sample out there for Southern Red Oak.  That is the only one I have in captivity thanks. 

I checked on the only white pine that I know about in Florida yesterday afternoon and it is dead as a beaver hat.  The last month of dry, hot weather must have done it in.

It is difficult to tell texture by looking at a picture but the water oak is smooth (glabrous) and the Southern Red Oak is pubescent.

Thank you for posting some more representative samples of the Southern Red Oak.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on June 10, 2019, 11:33:38 PM
The reason I asked about tyloses was also guessing it was a blackjack.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 11, 2019, 05:43:58 AM
After sleeping fast last night, today's tree of the day.
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3346.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1560245365)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3347.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1560245390)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3348.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1560245417)
 The leaves are 2"-3" long.  Some of you may find interesting that the founding father who introduced this species to the U.S. in 1776, is the same person that many mistakenly think served as a U.S. president.  He was prominent enough to get his picture on money though.

Anyway, what is the tree of the day?  In the lightning round you could identify the one who brought it here. popcorn_smiley 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: thecfarm on June 11, 2019, 06:24:35 AM
Ben Franklin would be my guess.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 11, 2019, 06:52:50 AM
Ray, you are a winner, winner...turkey dinner.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on June 11, 2019, 07:50:51 AM
I have sawed some of today's tree.  I never saw Ben.....

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/DSCN1206.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1369361689)
 

but I am quite fond of his children.  ;D  Clue = popcorn_smiley

 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 11, 2019, 09:07:32 AM
and a sweet, clear honey
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on June 11, 2019, 09:29:21 AM
I am good on skin ailments but please do not eat the fruit as I will kill you says the T-l--W tree.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on June 11, 2019, 09:35:43 AM
Can't hold a candle to that one.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 11, 2019, 10:18:05 PM
That oneís corn is popped. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 11, 2019, 11:24:03 PM
A lot of you got this one.  Chinese Tallow or popcorn tree (Triadica sebifera).  I did not know until recently that Ben Franklin brought it here.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 12, 2019, 06:50:04 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/photo~1.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1415732726)

I do not have any really good pictures of today's tree but I will try to give a good description to accompany this picture. 
-Two needles per fascicle, usually 2-4" long
-The cones remain closed until opened by heat (fire)
-This tree has very low fire tolerance
-Grows on poor, well or excessively drained sites
-Cones stay on the tree for many years
-Wood from this tree is used for pulp or to make knotty pine paneling

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Old Greenhorn on June 12, 2019, 07:16:36 AM
I'd love to throw in on this, but this one doesn't grow around here and I din't know jack about pines.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 12, 2019, 08:53:19 AM
Reminds me of Mr. Daniels
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 12, 2019, 12:38:31 PM
This tree covers a lot of Ocala National Forest in central Florida.  I recall seeing quite a bit growing in Florida's panhandle as well.  Today's tree is not Jack Pine.  The needles of this one are short but not as short as those of Jack Pine.  It does, like Jack Pine, have serotinous  cones. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 12, 2019, 12:50:25 PM
Well, slashed my answer
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Old Greenhorn on June 12, 2019, 01:07:07 PM
The only thing I know about that geography is that there is a lot of SAND and I only know that clausa somebody telling me.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on June 12, 2019, 01:21:43 PM
When I am around them I feel sleepy, It must be the Sandman from them, I do not think it was from his Slashey sister.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 12, 2019, 05:18:13 PM
Those that thought they knew this didnít know jack either.  I would have said Jack, except for the southern/Floridian nature of most trees of the day so far.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 12, 2019, 07:51:27 PM
 I'll try to expand the range on the trees of the day some in the future.  That cone picture with the dark area near the edge has some significance in identifying this one.  WDH showed me that several years ago.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ellmoe on June 12, 2019, 09:45:07 PM
I don't believe I have ever seen one grow straight up . It is normal to grow at an angle , all the better to toast the cones! My favorite pine to saw.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 13, 2019, 12:05:26 AM
Sand Pine (Pinus clausa) was 6-12 tree of the day.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 13, 2019, 12:11:51 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Post_Oak_2.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586941)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Post_Oak.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586941)
 I apologize for not showing the other side of this leaf but it has pubescence.  Tree of the day for 6-13.  It can be found in most of the south east of the U.S.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on June 13, 2019, 07:40:44 AM
I didn't know Sand Pine but at least you posted something that I know and have sawn today.  ;D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on June 13, 2019, 07:51:01 AM
Magicman, but you know Sand Gum! 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 13, 2019, 09:35:38 AM
I have an idea what the tree from this post is.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on June 13, 2019, 12:27:32 PM
Classic cross shape, post oak
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 13, 2019, 12:34:53 PM
Y'all got it.  Post Oak or Quercus stelatta.  It is one of the white oaks.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 13, 2019, 06:10:46 PM
I didnít know it was post oak right away, but I did know it was white oak.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on June 13, 2019, 09:56:52 PM
When we were looking at the last oak I happened across a good oak field guide;
https://www.fs.fed.us/foresthealth/technology/pdfs/fieldguide.pdf (https://www.fs.fed.us/foresthealth/technology/pdfs/fieldguide.pdf)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 14, 2019, 12:08:31 AM
 

Tree of the day for 6/14.  Most will recognize this one but an invasive insect is killing this species.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Eastern_Hemlock.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1560444263)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on June 14, 2019, 12:23:58 AM
The cones look like the hemlock we had back in NY state.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on June 14, 2019, 04:18:01 AM
When you run out of TOTD locally, let me know. 

I can go for a wander around town and find some head scratchers for you all. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 14, 2019, 07:37:42 AM
Ian, I am sure there are some trees down there that would stump us all.

Ijohnsaw, you got it.   Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis).  The hemlock wooly adelgid has wiped out a considerable amount of these trees in the east.  Biological controls include an introduced, black lady beetle from Japan that feeds on the adelgid. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on June 14, 2019, 09:22:50 AM
The hemlock wooly adelgid has wiped out a considerable amount of these trees in the east.
 
That is really sad to hear.  We had them as sort of a fence row between houses where I grew up in upper Westchester county.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 14, 2019, 06:26:20 PM
I tried to grow hemlock here, but they wouldnít grow.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 15, 2019, 06:11:29 AM
Today's tree of the day is brought to you by Don P.  
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/ewp3.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1560443954)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/ewp4.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1560444140)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/ewp2.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1560444106)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 15, 2019, 07:19:38 AM
Those branches look whorly and the fasicles five-ish.  Cones probably have a glandular tip, too.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on June 15, 2019, 07:51:24 AM
Back in the day the King claimed a bunch of them for ship masts and would have a representative carve a symbol into the tree. I have actually seen the remains of one of those symbols on a living tree. 

One can also say it is a very "naughty" wood.  :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 15, 2019, 08:37:39 AM
One of my favorite pines.  My absolute favorite one was a big one in my grandmas yard.  It was a great climbing tree because of the way the limbs grow like wagon wheel spokes.  Unfortunately a tornado took it down in 2003.  Some of its descendants grow on our land now, but theyíre small.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 15, 2019, 08:57:16 AM
need to put a strobe light on this so I can see it
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: hacknchop on June 15, 2019, 10:15:38 AM
referred to as the Giants of forest on account of their being head and shoulders above all other trees in our neck of the woods and here in Canada still owned by the Queen of England.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Andries on June 15, 2019, 12:36:47 PM
In NW Ontario, this tree is the preferred nesting spot for Bald Eagles.
So, as @hacknchop (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=26031) has said; it's like the Queen's tree is receiving Donald Trump as a guest.
:D   ;D   :D  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: hacknchop on June 15, 2019, 12:39:40 PM
:D:D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on June 15, 2019, 01:10:27 PM
One of my favorite pines.  My absolute favorite one was a big one in my grandmas yard.  It was a great climbing tree because of the way the limbs grow like wagon wheel spokes.  Unfortunately a tornado took it down in 2003.  Some of its descendants grow on our land now, but theyíre small.

You canít fall out of one. The pitch wonít let you.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 15, 2019, 08:54:13 PM
Where is everyone?  I need closure.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on June 15, 2019, 08:58:34 PM
The pitch wonít let you.
 

So it must be a "pitch pine"?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 15, 2019, 09:12:14 PM
The 5 needles to the fascicle make it a white pine.  Pitch pine has 3 needles to the fascicle and it is a yellow pine. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on June 15, 2019, 09:14:07 PM
I think itís a white pine. Climbing one would get you pretty sticky. I didnít mean to throw a curve ball in there. Better wait for confirmation. My track record is not that good.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 15, 2019, 09:18:53 PM
Pinus strobus.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 15, 2019, 09:19:33 PM
I was sure that it was white pine.  I just wanted to hear it from caveman.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on June 15, 2019, 09:20:02 PM
In English please!
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: thecfarm on June 15, 2019, 09:27:08 PM
I had a bunch of big ones of those pines. Some very nice ones,some not so nice ones. Some made some very nice logs. I had some that was 36 inches across. That was a normal size. No big deal. Had some that even went up to 4 feet across and than about 8 feet crotched out 3 times. :o I had a few trees that went well over 50 inches. Those was the ones the truck diver loader had a hard time with.Someone had to keep the mill supplied with pallet grade.  :D  Those big ones took a while to limb out. My Father and me would cut a "road" for the big ones to fall into. No sense in smashing down trees 6-8 inches across.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Old Greenhorn on June 15, 2019, 09:33:53 PM
Love these pines, the needles are so soft compared to the others.  And they grow SO fast! Some day I might get to mill one, but I love the ones on the property and they are strong and straight and too few. The ones that could come down are not 'milling material'. stunted, curved, and lots of side branches. Lovely tree though.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: doc henderson on June 15, 2019, 09:59:38 PM
If your experience ends up like mine, after gifts and custom projects, your friends, family and neighbors will start calling you with every tree that has to come down in the county that comes down.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 15, 2019, 10:19:35 PM
WDH identified it in Latin.  It is a White Pine.  Sorry, I have been outside until now burning some nonconforming Longleaf pine along with some other stuff (confederate jasmine and live oak branches).  Tomorrow's tree should be familiar to a lot of you also.  It will be dioecious.  Another white one.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on June 15, 2019, 10:45:15 PM
I was just checking in and saw my front yard was tree of the day. When caveman said the only one around him turned up dead I sent some pics, this is one tree I have a lot of. In the trunk pic you can see I limbed the first log of these around 8 years ago but probably a little too late to do any good, it really takes 20-40 years of growth after limbing to create enough clear wood to make it worthwhile.

The Kings Broad Arrow was the mark on any tree over 24" dbh claimed by the crown for ships masts. A patriots house contained planks over 2' wide just to thumb their nose at the king.

That whorl of knots every 18"-3' is an easy way to approximately age a tree, it shoots up and produces a new set of branches each year about this time. That wagon wheel of branches also can make EWP a less than ideal boxed heart timber, every couple of feet there is a cluster of knots potentially across the entire section, it warrants good grading. It is also a very stable easily worked wood, one of my favorites.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 16, 2019, 07:32:30 AM
Thank you, DonP.
Today's tree is a little smaller.  It is dioecious and is a hardwood.  If you listen carefully you may hear it say "I likes to poke ya".

I do not have any pictures of the tree.  I have a couple growing in pots here and one I planted last summer but it is only about 2' tall.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/MVC-006S.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1560444696)

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on June 16, 2019, 07:46:30 AM
A lot of those around here.  What's the range?  That should be easy for most of us in the SE at least.  I have several different cultivars of that around the house also.  They haven't had they're their spring pruning yet, and it's getting hard to see out the windows.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on June 16, 2019, 08:47:42 AM
They REALLY like the lumber from this tree in southern California, made a big sign to "celebrity" it.  :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: lxskllr on June 16, 2019, 09:50:52 AM
The flowers smell good. I have them all over my yard in various sizes. There's a local woodland park. One of the trail heads goes into a grove of tall straight specimens. Looks fantastic in the snow. There's another park that's on the site of an old farm. Some of it's been cleared, with an easy walking path to a lighthouse. There's more rugged trails that let you explore further. Go off those trails, and through the briars, vines, and ravines, there's areas few people go(Best!). Back there, there's a solitary tree in the middle of nicely spaced oaks, poplars, and beech that's the only green thing around in winter. Some old farm equipment, a stove, and some fallen trees that seem to add seating for viewing the tree. It's almost magical when you walk up on it. I've taken a couple pictures, but it just doesn't capture the feeling of seeing it in person. Love that spot  :^)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 16, 2019, 10:02:59 AM
Didnít you say it would be ďwhiteĒ.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on June 16, 2019, 10:42:12 AM
Whitest wood on earth.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 16, 2019, 11:44:11 AM
As Btulloh wrote, the wood is white, which is what I was hinting at.  Maybe someone will post some wood pictures or something made from the wood.
http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID=51 (http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID=51)
American Holly (Ilex opaca)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 16, 2019, 12:12:29 PM
I gotcha.  Iíve never seen the wood.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 17, 2019, 06:24:17 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~170.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1476839125)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~171.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1476839127)
 Okay, several easy trees of the day in a row.  This one may be a little more challenging.  The leaf is usually 3-5" long, the leaf forms a vee shape at the midrib and the midrib is very pronounced and relatively sharp.  The tree does not tolerate cold well.

The leaf petiole is also an identifying feature.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 17, 2019, 09:13:54 AM
Y'all need another clue?

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~172.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1476906617)
 This tree is native to North America and Asia but is seen as an invasive in Australia.  The leaves and seeds have been used for medicinal purposes although the seeds are poisonous. The fruit is edible but evidently is not very good.  When grafting more palatable fruit bearing trees of this genus, this tree is often used as the root stock.  It gets to be about 60' tall when mature and lives a long time.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 17, 2019, 09:24:10 AM
picking them and putting them in a basket.  Er, pocket.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on June 17, 2019, 09:26:49 AM
road apple.   :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 17, 2019, 10:24:32 AM
As Btulloh wrote, the wood is white, which is what I was hinting at.  Maybe someone will post some wood pictures or something made from the wood.
http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID=51 (http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID=51)
American Holly (Ilex opaca)

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10007/IMG_1019.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1560781436)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on June 17, 2019, 10:36:39 AM
That tree reminds me my dog needs to go to the vet to check his PAWs and what I use to call my granddaddy PAW PAW.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on June 17, 2019, 11:18:14 AM
There are a few people around here that make pies out those, but I've never tried any.  I think there's a lot of sugar involved.  With enough sugar, I guess you could make pies out of sawdust.  Sawdust pie is high in fiber, so it would be good for you.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: doc henderson on June 17, 2019, 11:28:04 AM
at least your toots will have that fresh clean pine smell! :)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 17, 2019, 09:16:36 PM
Thank you, Texas Ranger, for the holly wood picture.

Today's tree was Pond Apple (Annona glabra).  I did take a few minutes today on the way home from work to go take a few pictures of a few more trees and leaves. Most are native.  I left my list of what has already been posted on my desk at work.  The leaf petioles on Pond Apple look similar to an apple stem and the fruit somewhat resembles an apple.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 18, 2019, 06:40:10 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3383.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1560854298)
 That ought to be enough for a lot of you to get today's tree of the day.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on June 18, 2019, 07:50:23 AM
Yup, any more would have been too much.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on June 18, 2019, 07:56:15 AM
Agreed, it would have been sick to give a more clues.  :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 18, 2019, 08:06:20 AM
Some will need a few More clues.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: thecfarm on June 18, 2019, 08:38:44 AM
I think I was in DC when I saw that tree. I asked a women dressed up like a park ranger what kind of tree that was. She did not know!! :o   Made me sick to think she did not know more about trees.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: doc henderson on June 18, 2019, 08:51:16 AM
had a pt. that was ill yesterday, but they are not "sick any more"   ;)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on June 18, 2019, 08:53:31 AM
Some will need a few More clues.
You going with Ash Danny?  :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 18, 2019, 08:54:46 AM
For those who have not recognized the bark.  
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3384.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1560823766)

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 18, 2019, 09:25:26 AM
Very pretty when quartersawn!
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 18, 2019, 09:26:41 AM
Hadnít heard of pond apple.  Iíll go look it up.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Old Greenhorn on June 18, 2019, 10:21:37 AM
Terrible firewood. Is this the European flavor? does not look to be.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 18, 2019, 11:31:55 AM
American Sycamore (Platanus occidentalis)

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ESFted on June 18, 2019, 11:57:03 AM
Depends on location.  London Plane (P. acerifolia) is more widely planted in cities.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: tule peak timber on June 18, 2019, 04:53:33 PM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/35190/sycamore5.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1560891194)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on June 18, 2019, 05:27:21 PM
I didn't know we got to measure out to the far edge of the sawdust pile, I guess it is all wood ;D.

A friend had a floor that was quartersawn sycamore, beautiful.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: tule peak timber on June 18, 2019, 05:44:12 PM
I didn't want him breathing on the log.......... :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 18, 2019, 09:03:28 PM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14370/IMG_2740.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1554727414)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: tule peak timber on June 18, 2019, 09:52:10 PM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/35190/sawing_project_2019.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1560909120)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 18, 2019, 10:11:59 PM
If anyone cares to explain how one can differentiate London plane from American Sweetgum I would appreciate the lesson.  I read the VT fact sheets on both and looked at the pictures of both and I did not see anything that would allow me to key either one out confidently every time.  I have had foresters tell me that Southern Redcedar and Eastern Redcedar are different too but I cannot tell them apart.

Thanks for posting a couple of pics from Jake's place, I look forward to that gathering all year.  The problem is that I come home and slide down the slippery slope a little more each time.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on June 18, 2019, 10:15:37 PM
I have had foresters tell me that Southern Redcedar and Eastern Redcedar are different too but I cannot tell them apart.


It's in how well they behave... :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 18, 2019, 11:48:32 PM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/36921/909A51F8-EA01-4B09-A8E0-EEBC2269D171.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1560916080)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 19, 2019, 12:28:36 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3399.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1560823804)
 Thanks, Firefighter.

Today's tree of the day gets off to an early start.  I am going to go out on a limb and predict that this one may not be as easy for everyone as yesterday's tree but I am certain it will not challenge everyone.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3397.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1560917897)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3398.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1560823800)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 19, 2019, 07:28:46 AM
The green photosynthetic stems are one good clue.  Also, a compound leaf.  Southside is going to ask me if I think that it is ash, pulling my leg as usual, but he needs to show more respect to his elders. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on June 19, 2019, 07:44:25 AM
I have a beautifully colored bowl turned from that species.  :)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 19, 2019, 07:49:05 AM
You probably have a few red stars in your pith, too :D. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: curdog on June 19, 2019, 07:50:27 AM
Some of the woods has really pretty red streaks... that's something that can't be negated. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 19, 2019, 07:51:46 AM
You can make really nice boxes for your elders with that wood. 
When I was a kid fishing with my dad, I got my lure stuck in a tree.  We were fishing from a canoe and didnít want to stand up to long to get the lure out so I just reached up and broke off the red stem.  Well, it turned out I had broken off the end of my red fishing rod.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 19, 2019, 07:54:15 AM
I hope Southside is listening to this.  He thinks that anything with compound leaves and opposite branching is an ash.  OK, Southside, ash ain't in the maple family. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on June 19, 2019, 08:07:34 AM
Well, Dogwood Ash and Maple, if you want to Box me in like that.  Village Elders, geesh.... :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 19, 2019, 09:14:03 AM
Don't forget the compound, opposite Tabebuia from several days ago.  Not all  opposite trees are Dogwood, Ash, or Maples and not all compound, opposite trees are Ash.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 19, 2019, 04:50:28 PM
I hope Southside is listening to this.  He thinks that anything with compound leaves and opposite branching is an ash.  OK, Southside, ash ain't in the maple family.
ash maple, one hand or the other
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 19, 2019, 09:47:23 PM
The tree of the day today was Boxelder (Acer negundo).  To me, it resembles a red maple with compound leaves.  I do not know if I photographed any that will be at all challenging this week.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: hacknchop on June 19, 2019, 10:45:14 PM
Maybe not challenging to you guys but for me very interesting and educational I sure appreciate this thread so to those responsible Thank you.
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 20, 2019, 12:23:02 AM
 <brToday's tree of the day (Thursday)>(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3405.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561003737)
 Disregard the bark on the slash pine on the right.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3408.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1560823819)
<br I apologize for the blurry leaf pictures, the wind was blowing a bit.  In case you cannot tell by the pictures, the leaves are doubly serrate.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3407.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1560823817)
 These leaves do not belong to the live oak tree in the background.

This tree can be found in the eastern half of the U.S., Mexico and Central America.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on June 20, 2019, 12:38:31 AM
Did you hear we have a FF member taking the weekend off and heading to the sandy shore of the lake with his fishing boat?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 20, 2019, 06:04:32 AM
The Rabid Angler? 

Southside, I see these growing along the rivers a little north of me.  A couple of more clues:  The leaf buds are brown and white, the twigs are very small between the branches and the leaf petioles and the leaves are smooth.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 20, 2019, 09:15:18 AM
deck the halls.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 20, 2019, 09:16:03 AM
Have one for you southern boys and girls. 



(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10007/group.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1561036477)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on June 20, 2019, 10:23:40 AM
Winged elm
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 20, 2019, 10:36:04 AM
yup
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 20, 2019, 11:33:06 AM
Those striated, muscle-like, fluted patterns in the trunk picture of today's tree should be a pretty good clue as to what today's tree is.  Wood from this tree has traditionally been used for tool handles and even golf club heads.  Some sources report that the underside of the leaves are slightly pubescent (I earlier stated that they are smooth).  There are at least five common names for today's tree.
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/American_Hornbeam_2.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1557586927)
 Also, unlike a very similar appearing, much more pubescent leaved tree, the veins on this species (almost all of them) go to the margin of the leaf without splitting.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on June 20, 2019, 12:36:26 PM
Well Wahoo TR :D
I'm guessing our angler might be going for carp, it could take some muscle and nerves of iron to bring one in.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on June 20, 2019, 12:48:50 PM
This tree makes the best walking sticks, tough as IRON that WOOD is, I have its harry trunk cousin on my place he has a lot of muscles also Mr. Hoppy Hornbeam.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 20, 2019, 05:07:12 PM
Don't jump in the car and pine away just because you did not know this one. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on June 20, 2019, 05:34:21 PM
With those additional photos I think the Rabid Angler landed on a rocky shore and not the fine sand I was thinking it was earlier.

Have to say this thread has become my favorite one here on the Forum, well right behind the "Thanks Southside" one that is.  :D  :D  :D

Keep hoppin and makin us all better for it!   ;D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 20, 2019, 09:23:46 PM
OK, here is one.


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14370/Cowoak1.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1192071559)
 


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14370/Cowoak4.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1192071560)
 


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14370/Cowoak5.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1192071560)
 

Leaf margins are scalloped.  Underside of the leaf is downy.  Bark is scaly.  Grows on wetter sites.  Has a bovine connection.  This one was photographed in Polk County, East Texas. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 20, 2019, 10:11:50 PM
The tree I posted for today is known by the names American hornbeam, blue beech, Ironwood, water beech, musclewood or muscle tree (Carpinus caroliniana).  This was one of the most challenging trees for me to learn to identify every time.  A friend and former fellow ag teacher, Teddy Lynn (now deceased), explained to me that the hornbeam's leaf veins go to the margin of the leaf without breaking while the more pubescent hophornbeam's leaf veins diverge (hop) before they reach the margin.  It was so simple when I finally got it.

Thank you, WDH, for posting another.  I do not have any of those here.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 20, 2019, 10:24:56 PM
At first I was thinking Chinquapin, but the cow thing had me guessing.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on June 21, 2019, 12:06:14 AM
CHESTNUT shaped leaves, Lives in wetter sites like the SWAMP  sometimes common named for what Miss. State Univ. used to be called  That C-- College whose fans ring C--Bells at football games, not to be confused with Ole Miss whose Hotty toddy fans like to sip suds in a grove of OAK trees.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on June 21, 2019, 12:07:06 AM
Hummm - I think I know what it is, but can chest nut figure out the oakey dokey connection.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 21, 2019, 07:44:14 AM
They can get big.  This is the Georgia State Champion.


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14370/GAChampSwampChestnut.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1192071565)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on June 21, 2019, 08:49:28 AM
Where's the beef?  :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 21, 2019, 09:08:24 AM
might get swamped on this one
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 21, 2019, 06:50:25 PM
WDH posted some good pictures of his Georgia state champion Swamp Chestnut Oak (Quercus michauxii) today.  I'll plan on posting tomorrow's tree of the day some time prior to 6:30 tomorrow morning unless someone else adds one.  

I have a tree in mind that might be similar to one that made an appearance recently.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on June 21, 2019, 08:29:12 PM
So what's the bovine connection?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 21, 2019, 08:45:19 PM
Cows really like the ping pong ball sized acorns so one of the common names is Cow Oak.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on June 21, 2019, 10:09:00 PM
Going backards, well I stepped out the door to grab a pick of a different chestnut oak but squirreled and saw the blooms on eastern hophornbeam so here it is. I pushed the sharpness on the image shrinker so hopefully you can see the hopping veins near the edges on the vertical leaf. That's cool, I didn't know that.


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10017/easternhophornbeam.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1561169281)
 


Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 21, 2019, 11:13:42 PM
Good picture, DonP.  The pubescence is also easy to see in your picture.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 22, 2019, 06:18:08 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3392.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1560823786)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3391.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1560823783)
 Today's tree of the day is an alien cousin of one we saw not too long ago.  The wood from this tree is used to make tea chests and the tree has several medicinal uses.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: DelawhereJoe on June 22, 2019, 08:47:26 AM
I'll go with Chinese sweet gum on this one
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 22, 2019, 09:22:15 AM
Montpellie?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 22, 2019, 12:22:19 PM
DelawareJoe got it right off the bat. Chinese Sweetgum (Liquidambar formosana). 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: lxskllr on June 22, 2019, 09:00:54 PM
I was on the right track. Thought it looked gum-like, but I'm not familiar with Chinese Sweetgum.

I've been enjoying this thread. My tree ID skills are pretty poor beyond the basics. I sometimes have to locate trees at work, and if the name doesn't come to me, it gets labeled as a "Tiswood", as in 24" Tiswood  :^P
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 22, 2019, 10:58:50 PM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3385.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1560862442)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3386.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1560823773)
 Tomorrow's tree of the day an hour early.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 22, 2019, 11:12:00 PM
off the top of my head, I think green
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 23, 2019, 07:30:48 AM
Down this way, green is more common.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: DPatton on June 23, 2019, 09:37:08 AM
 :D This one might cause discussion between Southside and WDH about opposite branching  ;).
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on June 23, 2019, 10:19:58 AM
ain't touching that with a 10 foot burnt up stick.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on June 23, 2019, 10:41:38 AM
Green or Carolina ASH .
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on June 23, 2019, 05:13:32 PM
I have a few of these trees on my property which I protect as they are  usually not found in this area.  I know what they are do you have an idea also.
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51812/IMG_0757.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561324071)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51812/IMG_0760.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561324181)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51812/IMG_0756.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561324314)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 23, 2019, 05:54:57 PM
WoodPecker, Looks like Acer floridanum or Florida Maple.  There are not many that I know of this far south.  I need to plant one at my place.

Today's tree of the day was a Green Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on June 23, 2019, 06:11:20 PM
Bingo,  they seem to be understory only and do not get much bigger than this one, usually under oaks, sapsuckers and yellowhammers love to drill the trunks,  I am on the loess bluffs just off the delta so I have some unusual ones like American beech, ironwood, elms, ash, sassafras.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 23, 2019, 08:30:10 PM
Florida maple is a hard maple like sugar maple.  Note that the leaf margins are not toothed between the lobes.  The soft maples are. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 24, 2019, 12:11:41 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3404.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1560823814)
 Monday's tree of the day.  The leaf is smooth, both top and bottom.  The tree blooms with small, white flowers in the springtime.  The trees' trunks are usually spiral grained and do not make nearly as good of lumber as its close relative does.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 24, 2019, 07:31:45 AM
Twigs have strong odor when broken or bruised.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on June 24, 2019, 07:36:03 AM
Twigs have strong odor when broken or bruised
So do I.  :o
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 24, 2019, 10:07:42 PM
Smells just like cherry cola.  No one wants to go out on a limb on this one?  It has "fill in the state" teeth.  Some are there and some are missing.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on June 24, 2019, 11:26:44 PM
Seems nobody's knowledge base is rooted deep enough to branch out this far.  Ok I will lumber out the door and leaf now.   :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 25, 2019, 12:14:42 AM
hmm, wished I was in Carolina
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 25, 2019, 06:51:27 AM
I prunused one one (Tom) time. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 25, 2019, 07:02:00 AM
Yesterday's tree was Cherry Laurel or Carolina Laurel Cherry (Prunus caroliniana).
Today's tree should be familiar to many.
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3394.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561197960)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3395.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561197975)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3396.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1560823797)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~111.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1468713475)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~112.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1468713546)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Old Greenhorn on June 25, 2019, 07:26:51 AM
These I have everywhere, they'd like to take the place over. They get so thick and tight I have to HEM and poke my way around.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 25, 2019, 08:32:03 AM
These trees look completely different in the winter due to their nature.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on June 25, 2019, 08:36:39 AM
I must be lucky. Never picked up any stains even on wo and holly. I donít leave anything but a piece of junk sitting overnight especially white oak.

(oops - wrong topic)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 25, 2019, 12:21:18 PM
There are a lot of interesting tidbits about today's tree and its wood.  One may make a pirogue using this wood.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 25, 2019, 01:21:37 PM
One may also make a floor in a log cabin.  Itís kind of soft for that purpose, but thereís no going back now.  Itís been in service for 18 years. Itís pretty distressed in high traffic areas.  I love it anyway.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/36921/BAA4510D-8A8C-45DE-B9F6-AD34F1C8C93C.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1561483288)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: DelawhereJoe on June 25, 2019, 02:21:14 PM
Looks like bald cypress to me
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 25, 2019, 03:18:43 PM
It is Bald Cypress (Taxodium distichum).  The tree can live to be over 2500 years.  The one with the biggest diameter, 39' @ Dbh is in Real County, Texas.  There is a submerged forest of them miles off the coast of Mobile, Alabama from 50,000 years ago.  The wood is evidently still good. 

A fungus, Lauriliella taxodii, causes some trees to produce pecky cypress which is often desired for wall paneling and other decorative uses.  The heartwood contains a  chemical called cypressene, a sesquiterpene (I know how much WDH likes BIG Werdz), that makes it naturally decay resistant.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/frame.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1451046890)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_2481.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561489032)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_2478.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561489025)
 
  They can be used for cookies.  The fluted buttresses were commonly sold along side the road when I was a child.  A lot of them became tables and clocks.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_1816.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561489023)
 
This is one of several buildings built at O'Leno State Park in Florida by the CCC men during the 1930's.  This is the site of Florida's FFA Forestry Camp.  I will miss attending for the first time since 2001 in a couple of weeks.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_0216.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561489022)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_0086.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561489021)
 
The wood is very lightweight when dry and many picnic tables and porch swings have been made from it.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: gersus on June 25, 2019, 04:34:32 PM
Cool thread! So much cool info. We don't have cypress around this area. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: curdog on June 25, 2019, 04:54:42 PM
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/north-carolina-bald-cypresses-among-worlds-oldest-trees-180972134/ (https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/north-carolina-bald-cypresses-among-worlds-oldest-trees-180972134/)

Here is today's tree in NC... They are listed as the 5th oldest species on earth. Bald Cypress are pretty adaptable as well. I was driving up a logging road located on a finger ridge around 2000 feet on a southern aspect and I stopped to take a second look... the landowner had planted it just to see how it would do. It was probably 50 feet tall and 12"dbh give or take. Definitely a neat tree.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on June 25, 2019, 05:51:27 PM
Bald Cypress are pretty adaptable as well.
 

Sure can grow outside it's normal range.  This one's near Stratford in New Zealand, about 1,000 ft ASL, and in a temperate rainforest area. It's maybe about 50 years old, and just caught my eye because it's got such a nice straight form. Picture taken about a month ago (end of autumn), it's completely "bald" now. 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190525_162411.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1561499364) 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on June 25, 2019, 06:45:47 PM
It is probably my all time favorite to saw, and I also love the unique smell of fresh sawn Cypress.  Some of my "bestest" pictures:

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0503.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1317518464)
 
A monster Sinker Cypress crotch log.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0504.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1317518467)
 
And what was inside.  :o

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/DSCN0716.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1328750682)
 
A nice butt.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/DSCN0732_28Small29.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1328665224)
 
Several Mbf.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/Photo648.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1402616987)
 
My favorite Tailgunner shoveling Cypress sawdust.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/Photo650.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1402617005)

And loading another Sinker Cypress log.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/DSCN2039.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1403049227)
 
1" X 26" X 10' Sinker Cypress boards.  :o

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/IMG_2052.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1488421123)
 
Mineral stained Pecky Cypress at it's best.

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 25, 2019, 08:30:55 PM
Here is a nice one.  Posted this pic several times before. 


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14370/Cypressknees.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1192071561)
 

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 25, 2019, 08:40:27 PM
OK, here is one.  This one is only a small tree.  Leaves are serrated and the bark is a touch scaly.  Also, twigs have short shoots.  Here is a hint:  Flowers are about quarter sized, very pretty, with five clawed petals.

Leaves.
 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14370/IMG_2868.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561509108)
 

Bark.


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14370/IMG_2870.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561509142)
 

A short shoot.


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14370/IMG_2871.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561509176)


I believe that Caveman has seen set eyes on this very same specimen. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on June 25, 2019, 09:40:36 PM
Well, we can rule out Ash, the flower isn't right.   :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on June 26, 2019, 08:25:17 AM
Looks mighty "fruity". 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 26, 2019, 10:49:49 AM
All species have fruits.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 26, 2019, 11:19:07 AM
Cool thread! So much cool info. We don't have cypress around this area.
Donít have to go too far to find it in southern MO in the swamps.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 26, 2019, 11:31:01 AM
wine on this one
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: gersus on June 26, 2019, 01:08:51 PM
Cool thread! So much cool info. We don't have cypress around this area.
Donít have to go too far to find it in southern MO in the swamps.
True! I've never been down there to see them though. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 26, 2019, 03:08:26 PM
OK.  One little hint.  It has a cousin that has been much planted and is well liked but this cousin was originally found in Central Asia and imported into the US very early in the colonial days.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 26, 2019, 03:32:48 PM
Cool thread! So much cool info. We don't have cypress around this area.
Donít have to go too far to find it in southern MO in the swamps.
True! I've never been down there to see them though.
Neither have I.  I live about 30 miles south of St. Louis.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 26, 2019, 03:51:44 PM
I'm going to go out on a limb, I may be plumb crazy after my first erroneous attempt at an answer via PM, but possibly a Chickasaw Plum.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 26, 2019, 05:44:57 PM
You got the family right!  I will post a pic of the fruit when I get home.  The fruit is round and a little larger than a marble.  If you bite into it, it is very sour.  

Sometimes those reproductive shoot shoots (also called spur shoots) can be sharp resembling and functioning like a large thorn. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 26, 2019, 07:51:15 PM
is it a flatlander?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 26, 2019, 09:55:50 PM
It ranges from Missouri in the West down to Texas and across to the Eastern Seaboard up to about Pennsylvania and New Jersey.  Not a flatlander per se.  One last clue, the fruit is a pome, albeit a small one.


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14370/IMG_2872.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561600495)
 

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: DelawhereJoe on June 26, 2019, 10:36:46 PM
.....crabapple
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 27, 2019, 07:41:55 AM
Yes Sir!!

Malus angustifolia.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 27, 2019, 07:59:50 AM
I'll throw out another that should be relatively easy for many.  I need to replenish my tree of the day folder with new tree pics.  The VT app did not help me much with the crab apple.  
 
This particular tree usually has a lot denser foliage this time of the year.


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3388.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1560823778)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3390.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1560823781)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3389.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1560823786)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 27, 2019, 03:44:21 PM
This one evidently provided nightmares for a lotta you based on the lack of participation.  I almost did not post this tree.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: lxskllr on June 27, 2019, 04:54:03 PM
Does it have a lot of streets named after it?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: DelawhereJoe on June 27, 2019, 06:46:39 PM
Nightmare on _ _ _ street...... oh no...what could it possibly be
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 27, 2019, 08:51:07 PM
I was feeling a little crabby yesterday but today I elm felling much better :).  

Southside will surely call it ash ;D. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 27, 2019, 09:00:30 PM
Vase form, could it be?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 28, 2019, 08:09:59 AM
Yesterday's tree was American Elm (Ulmus americana).  Today's tree is not technically a tree but some may recognize it.  Tom and Nomad have sawn them into boards.  I have eaten the heart from it several times (swamp cabbage), usually at Thanksgiving lunch.  The leaves have been used for roofs and the stems have been used for dock pilings.
It can grow to 80' tall.
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3401.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561636451)
 I'll add and better picture later but this one shows the leaf which will help you differentiate it from others that are similar.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 28, 2019, 09:09:44 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3418.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561727307)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 28, 2019, 03:16:04 PM
Donít get it confused with the armory.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 28, 2019, 03:49:41 PM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3429.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561750381)
 Here is one that has lost most of the old leaf remnants (bootjacks).  This is also the state tree for two U.S. states.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WV Sawmiller on June 28, 2019, 08:56:54 PM
   I'd like a good mess of swamp cabbage. You cut too far up on the bud and it gets tougher and more bitter from the quinine which was supposed to be one of the reasons the Seminole Indians did not have problems with malaria as it was part of their staple diet. My grandma added a little sugar to compensate but we liked a little of the bitter after we got used to it. We always considered the ideal size to cut as about waist high and cut them off at ground level. The heart in one that size would be as big as one 100' tall.

 My favorite way to cook it was dice up a couple strips of bacon and fry them to season and grease the pan then add the swamp cabbage and cook till tender. It was typically served with grits at any central Fla fish fry. Often the fish served was fresh mullet from the Gulf. (I guess this should be in the food category not tree ID)

 Warning to the uninitiated - it can also be one of the world's greatest natural laxatives.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 28, 2019, 10:43:47 PM
Today's tree is a Cabbage Palm (Sabal palmetto).  Tomorrow's will be something that is not native to the U.S. but there are a lot of them here.  I do not know yet if it will be a conifer or a hardwood with bipinnately compound leaves.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 29, 2019, 12:13:31 AM
Saturday's tree of the day...
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3423.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561750029)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3422.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561752090)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3424.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561750033)
 This last picture is of one leaf.  I have seen pictures of some WDH has sawn.  It is invasive here.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on June 29, 2019, 12:30:01 AM
Chinaberry ???
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 29, 2019, 06:22:18 AM
Ian was right on with Chinaberry (Melia (http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/DENDROLOGY/data_results.cfm?genus=Melia) azedarach).  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 29, 2019, 07:27:50 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14370/013~1.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1362917249)


What the wood looks like.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: doc henderson on June 29, 2019, 07:34:39 AM
Danny, it looks like gatorwood.  I can see the nose pointing down, mouth open, the tiny eye ball then hips and a long tail. in the center of the board.?   :o :o :o   :)  sorry too early in the am.  how is your thumb?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: DelawhereJoe on June 29, 2019, 07:44:16 AM
Thats not a gator....is MagicMans foot.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 29, 2019, 08:24:19 AM
Not the thumb but the little finger on the left hand.  Healing up nicely. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: DanG on June 29, 2019, 09:32:46 AM
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10074/chinaberry01.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1192057493)

I used chinaberry flowers to try and stump Swamp Donkey in a thread called "Stump the Donkey" way back in 2005. :)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 29, 2019, 10:37:25 PM
Dang, thanks for the flower pictures.  Were you able to stump the SwampDonkey with that one?  Tomorrow's tree will likely be another import.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 30, 2019, 06:53:38 AM
Today's tree is not an import.  Many will be able to handle it.
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3419.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561751879)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3420.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561750023)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3421.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561750025)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 30, 2019, 07:14:55 AM
Once in a while even a blind PIG will find a acorn tree with alternate compound leaves with leaflets in fives (sometimes seven) and a smooth rachis and interlacing bark ;D. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 30, 2019, 07:30:44 AM
John and I will probably end up sawing this one.  It is still alive but I suspect it will not be very long as it has ambrosia beetle dust collecting at the base of the tree and in the lower bark. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on June 30, 2019, 07:32:38 AM
Get you some 4į bands :).  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on June 30, 2019, 07:36:32 AM
That stuff is the smiley_devil to saw but beautiful wood.  I was first initiated with it many years ago when a friend gave me a tree for firewood.  Yup, I was young and I did split it but I didn't want any more.  :-X
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on June 30, 2019, 08:04:50 AM
so smooth
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on June 30, 2019, 08:46:49 AM
The easiest way for me to id these is the huge leaves.  8-12Ē long.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on June 30, 2019, 09:31:54 AM
Can't believe you posted that photo knowing poor WDH would have to see it!  :D 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on June 30, 2019, 09:38:48 AM
Iíve got more of those than I want. As far as Iím concerned, itís an invasive species!
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 30, 2019, 12:08:09 PM
The prettiest cabinets I've ever seen were made from wood from this genus of tree.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 30, 2019, 09:49:14 PM
The tree today was Pignut Hickory (Carya glabra). 

 Have any of you had any success sawing hickory with turbo 7's?  I looked through all of our blades today and all I saw was 7's and 4's.  We had really good results with the 4's sawing everything from cedar to live oak on the lt-28, but they went with it.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on June 30, 2019, 10:35:35 PM
Yes I have sawn Hickory with my 35 using Turbos. Have some to get to in the next week or so and will use either Turbos or 7/40's on the 70 for those logs. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on June 30, 2019, 11:58:23 PM
Thanks, Southside.  

When taking pictures of the hickory the other day I noticed the Laurel Cherry trees were fruiting.  That was the tree of the day from June 24 if I recollect.
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3425.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561750034)
 You may recognize another tree of the day in the background.  The cabbage palms were making their way in to pictures all over that day.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 01, 2019, 12:14:14 AM
July 1, tree of the day is ...
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3427.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561752188)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3428.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561752233)
 Sorry about the low quality pics on this one.  There were no needles low enough for me to reach.  This was in someone's yard.  It is not native to the U.S.  Magicman posted a close up of the needles in March of 2016, maybe he'll add it here.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on July 01, 2019, 07:49:22 AM
Oh my, hopefully this it:

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/DSCN0355.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1366640614)
 
Da trees.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/DSCN0356.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1366640636)
 
Da needles.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/DSCN0303.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1366640331)
 
Bonus points for da Rooster.  You see dem spurs?  I'd hate to cook dat rascal.  :o
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on July 01, 2019, 09:23:51 AM
Makes me think of the Islands.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ESFted on July 01, 2019, 10:44:43 AM
Makes me wanna take a NIP.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: doc henderson on July 01, 2019, 01:51:49 PM
a little spanish moss in the pic???
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 01, 2019, 05:49:54 PM
Definitely doesnít grow around us NORthern FOLK.  Itís a popular thing to buy at Christmas with red bows on it.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on July 01, 2019, 05:58:18 PM
Actually I'd COOK up a different ID to that one.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 01, 2019, 09:55:55 PM
Norfolk Pine or Norfolk Island Pine (Araucaria (http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/DENDROLOGY/data_results.cfm?genus=Araucaria) heterophylla) was the tree of the day today.  Beenthere and others recognized it.  I have never sawn it but I have heard that wood turners like it .  This species has whorls of branches similar to white pines and monkey puzzle trees.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on July 01, 2019, 10:23:34 PM
I was thinking Cook Pine from MM's picture. Closely related, but a much more slender form. Norfolk Pines have a more pyramid shape with much larger lower branches.  Araucaria columnaris.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on July 01, 2019, 10:37:19 PM
Iíve never seen a large one, only potted versions. Hereís a bowl turned from a nip whirl.


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/39962/40CFFA7D-84D8-440F-A88C-260C61D504F6.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1562034767)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on July 01, 2019, 10:39:05 PM
This was given to me. Not my work. Whoever turned it knew what they were doing.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on July 01, 2019, 10:53:28 PM
Magicman posted a close up of the needles in March of 2016, maybe he'll add it here.
I only posted those pictures because.......
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 01, 2019, 11:16:40 PM
Ian, after looking up a Cook Pine, I think that may have been what Magicman's pictures were of.  I am fairly certain that the poor pictures that I posted were of a Norfolk Island Pine.  I ride by them every day but rarely have or take the opportunity to get up close to them as they are just used as an ornamental, but not in my backyard.  

Doc, I did not even notice the Spanish moss until you pointed it out.  

If you look in the background and foreground of some of today's pictures you will see several other trees that have already had their days.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 02, 2019, 05:41:05 AM
Today's tree is another from the world's largest continent.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3431.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561825642)

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3430.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562059857)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3432.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561825645)
I did not take a picture of the whole tree because it would have needed to go under a new topic titled, improper pruning, akin to the crape murder that goes on where crape myrtles grow.

By the end of the week, the growing zones of the tree varieties will likely change.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 02, 2019, 07:45:24 AM
I elm not sure if I have seen one outside of the University of Georgia campus :).
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 02, 2019, 10:47:29 AM
These pictures are of another exa
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3442.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562077584)
mple of yesterday's tree.  



(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3443.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562077585)


(http://<br>[img width=650 height=487]http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3444.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562077588)



(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3444.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562077588)
[/img]
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on July 02, 2019, 02:19:41 PM
ah, so.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on July 02, 2019, 03:07:22 PM
Iím out of clever puns for these last couple trees. I better stop by the pun store and re-stock.

Nice work, caveman, finding a new tree every day. Quite a responsibility!
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 02, 2019, 04:46:18 PM
This is fun and I am learning a lot (Cook Pine).  Today's tree and my wife's maiden name are the same.  When I start running low I anticipate others will offer samples.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 02, 2019, 08:44:50 PM
I would love to throw in a few from around here, though not everything I have is native to MO.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 02, 2019, 09:15:11 PM
Folks would probably appreciate seeing trees from other places. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 02, 2019, 09:24:07 PM
I took some pictures and am ready to go with a tree right out my back door.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 02, 2019, 09:40:53 PM
The tree of the day today was a Drake Elm or Chinese Elm, (Ulmus parvifolia).

Firefighter has the tree of the day for 7/3. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 02, 2019, 10:03:30 PM
Without further adieu, here is the tree for tomorrow.  It will probably be an easy one for some.  It does not grow naturally in MO, but ours were planted originally about 60 years ago by my dad and grandparents.  They seed very well here though and we have had many volunteers over 60 years.  The small trees suffer greatly with snow and ice.  Iíve got some that need to be cut down as they are bent all the way to the ground from snow this winter.  The specimen outside my back door is about 36Ē dbh and is about 90í tall Iím guessing.  Itís needles are in groups of three and are between 5Ē and 9Ē long.  Itís cones are from 3Ē to 6Ē long.  

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/36921/BBA315C5-FFAA-4EF6-9AB0-5BF79D4C81B2.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1562119142)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/36921/DC236A2B-8185-4D10-95EB-FE1900042A74.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1562119172)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/36921/5E86759F-19C2-4E8B-9F30-A35E0C5FECCD.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1562119297)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/36921/F6B33BC5-B33E-4822-8F14-30596644D7D8.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1562119319)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/36921/EA564848-D01D-4AB0-8C8A-06573365B4F3.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1562119379)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on July 02, 2019, 10:13:49 PM
I lob a lot of this lumber around my mill.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: DelawhereJoe on July 02, 2019, 10:26:34 PM
Loblolly pine by the look of that pinecone, lots grow here in Delaware, not many in my neck of the woods though....and it may be time to sharpen your mower blades its starting to tear your grass.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 02, 2019, 10:47:15 PM
If I had time to take care of my grass or my lawnmower, I wouldnít have time to use my sawmill.  Lol.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on July 03, 2019, 11:15:49 AM
I believe I may partake of a drink from the land of this tree.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 03, 2019, 08:19:17 PM
As a few pointed out, the tree of the day was in fact loblolly pine.  One of the southern yellow pines.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 03, 2019, 09:48:54 PM
Loblolly Pine (Pinus taeda). Thanks, Firefighterontheside.

Tomorrow morning around 5:30 I'll have another compound leaved tree for you.  I will be driving a lot tomorrow so I doubt I'll have time to log on to the FF until early Friday morning.  Tomorrow's tree is an Asian native that has been used worldwide as a landscape tree.  It entered north America prior to the forming of the U.S.A.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: DelawhereJoe on July 03, 2019, 10:55:00 PM
Tree of heaven......
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 04, 2019, 05:28:14 AM
Today's tree also has edible seeds.
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3448.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562077593)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3447.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562077591)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3445.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562077589)
 This tree is in the front yard of a friend.  I apologize for not having good leaf pictures but I guess he had one of his boys lop off the lower branches.  The leaves seen in the bottom picture belong to a staghorn fern which is hanging in the tree.  There is more Spanish Moss too.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 04, 2019, 08:28:13 AM
(http://dendroapp.frec.vt.edu/VT_Assets/Fact_Sheets/images/Koelreuteria%20paniculata/map.jpg)The leaves of this tree are supposed to be compound alternate although some from my picture seem to be compound opposite.  Based on the map, many of you probably have seen this one, especially when it is flowering.  It even has invasive tendencies in Florida.  There are cultivars of this tree sold in nurseries for ornamental use.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 04, 2019, 09:56:05 AM
If it's what I think it is, it is such a prolific seeder that the seeds were used as packing material for Chinese porcelain. A royal pain.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 04, 2019, 11:53:43 PM
Today's tree was a Golden Raintree. It has a really cool scientific name but I can't spell it. I'll try to post it in the morning after I go outside and take some tree pictures. Just made it to Franklin, NC. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 05, 2019, 01:41:39 AM
Iíve never heard of that.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on July 05, 2019, 05:07:20 AM
Picture from today, tree OTD from a couple of days back. 
Norfolk Island Pines at Ngamotu beach today. Looks like summer at the beach, it wasn't. Temp about 10C and a brisk breeze. 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190705_150411.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1562317598)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 05, 2019, 07:43:50 AM
Today's tree...

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3452.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562326933)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3453.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562326936)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 05, 2019, 07:53:42 AM
The Golden Raintree, yesterday's tree of the day, is Koelreuteria paniculata. It is easily confused with the Chinaberry tree. I would like to saw one. A lot of trees with pretty flowers also have desireable wood.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on July 05, 2019, 08:10:22 AM
Didn't know yesterday's but today's species brings back many memories which always included hard work.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: lxskllr on July 05, 2019, 08:16:02 AM
They come up everywhere. Like a plague...
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on July 05, 2019, 09:46:54 AM
As strong as iron, would one say?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Jack S on July 05, 2019, 10:31:40 AM
the old dairy farmer used to say.    Kid if you are going to hang around here lets not be an ornament get to work
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 05, 2019, 01:56:16 PM
Quote
The tree that won a war
 And yet we could make the case that the black locust helped the United States win the War of 1812. The decisive battle of that war was fought on Lake Champlain. On Sept. 11, 1814, the American fleet, commanded by Commodore Thomas Macdonough, engaged the British fleet, commanded by Capt. George Downie (killed in action), in Plattsburg Bay. 
The Americans won a decisive victory, essentially stopping the invasion forces, led by Sir George Prevost. Prevost was recalled to England to face a court martial for his actions but died before the trial was convened. 
One of the reasons circulated for the British Navy's defeat was that English ships were built with oak nails (the large pins or trunnels that hold the wooden members of a ship together), while American ships were built with locust nails. As a result, when the cannonballs from the American fleet hit the British ships, those ships came apart. But when the shot from the British ships hit the American fleet, their ships held together ó and that is the reason they lost the Battle of Plattsburg Bay. 
The very next year, the British began importing thousands of locust nails to refit the British Navy. By 1820, the Philadelphia market alone was exporting between 50,000 and 100,000 locust nails to England per year. As locust continues in export, even to this day, some would say we have been selling weapons to the enemy ever since.
That article states that it has the highest beam strength of any north American wood, I'd need to check that but it is a great timberframing wood, low shrinkage, machines well albeit tough on tools and men. It goes on to say that a cord has the same number of btu's as a ton of anthracite.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: JohnW on July 05, 2019, 04:12:39 PM
I wonder how much a cord of black locust weighs.

Black locust is great.  I think Euell Gibbons even used to eat the inside bark (without ketchup or anything).
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 05, 2019, 04:53:11 PM
The flowers make good honey.  Leaf is pinnate compound.  Thorns are stipuar, i.e. two at each leaf axil like a rose bush. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on July 05, 2019, 06:56:20 PM
Telephone company pressure treated "open wire" cross arms were equipped with threaded Black Locust pins that the insulators screwed onto. 

I wish that I had kept a few as souvenirs.  Those are days long gone by.  ::)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 05, 2019, 08:39:49 PM
A quick google looks like it weighs between 4000-4600 lbs/cord so about half the btu's of hard coal by weight.

One other reference I saw said that it may have been the locust that John the Baptist survived on rather than the bug, I'd need lots of chocolate coating for either :D

Our leaves already have lots of leaf miner damage but our soils are sour, over the mountain where you leave the granite based Blue Ridge and get into the Valley and Ridge, think Shenandoah Valley and the mountains along I-81, it is more limestone and they seem to do better, oaks do better over here.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on July 05, 2019, 08:51:58 PM
That article states that it has the highest beam strength of any north American wood
The "Engineering Toolbox" shows Black Locust exceeding all of the Oaks and being challenged only by the Hickorys in Fiber stress at Elastic Limit, Compressive Strength, and Sear Strength.  The way I read the charts, Black Locust does indeed have the highest beam strength.  I was surprised.

I often wonder what my Granddad used as bridge timbers?  I am thinking probably White Oak because we had no Post Oak and not large enough Black Locust.  Nothing else except maybe Sassafras would have been rot resistant enough to use.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: tule peak timber on July 05, 2019, 09:00:42 PM
When it comes to strength, I build quite a bit of furniture from canyon live oak. The settlers out west used this oak for wagon axles, tools, and splitting wedges to fell giant redwoods. Crazy hard stuff.
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/35190/Live_oak_island_1.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1562374827)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 05, 2019, 09:04:26 PM
Seems like a good bit of interest in Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia).  This is one I seldom see.  I appreciate the info sharing- I learned a good bit today.  Enjoying a gentle rain in NC mountains right now. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on July 05, 2019, 09:16:47 PM
Caveman - that must just about be the arctic circle for you!!   :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 05, 2019, 11:18:09 PM
 The Nantahala will frost your pumpkin any time of year :D

Black locust is the timber of log bridges around here. One of the reasons it was used for the glass insulator pins besides its rot resistance was that it didn't move much when wetted or dried. I think I have only one or two insulators and never thought to save a pin, they are all but disappeared now.

After Hugo we had tons of it on the ground, I jokingly call it the American teak. I called the wood products lab at NCSU and asked about using it for outdoor furniture, they thought it was a great idea. Another one of those projects that never got the round tuits.

This was one of the brackets for a roof made out of locust

 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10017/locust.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1220612671)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 06, 2019, 07:41:57 AM
I enjoy coming up here. My youngest daughter asked me if we could come back in November or December-she reminded me that she has never seen snow.  That cold Nantahala water is just what the doctor ordered for these hot summer days. I mentioned to the girls just yesterday that they should go rafting while we are here. 
Thanks to all who shared about the locust. 

Today's tree is...
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3456.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562342027)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3455.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562342017)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on July 06, 2019, 08:13:28 AM
If you had shown today's tree trunk it would have been a dead giveaway.  I have sawn some big'uns and the QS can be striking.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: lxskllr on July 06, 2019, 08:17:14 AM
Looks like one of my least favorite trees to limb with a machete. Every branch is hard won. OTOH, something like tulip polar makes you feel like a superhero  :^D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 06, 2019, 08:38:38 AM
The bodgers wood :)
In the regular NDS beam tables this one is in the highest strength species group. When we first moved here I didn't fully appreciate the mat root system these things have. There was a small cluster in the way and I chained them to the bumper of the truck. I gave a tug and nothing happened. So I backed up to give it some slack, braced and hammered down. I heard it let go and looked in the rear view mirror. Yup there was my bumper chained to the still happy trees :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on July 06, 2019, 09:45:50 AM
I happen to have one in my side yard.  Here is the "mat root system" of which you speak.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/IMG_6178.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562420463)
 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/IMG_6180.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562420515)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/IMG_6181.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562420567)
 
Much runoff water comes through this area but the roots hold what they can.  It's time for a load of dirt. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 06, 2019, 09:53:54 AM
I'll try to get some bark and bud pictures today. I may try to dig up a small one and put in a pot to take back home. I had a white pine growing until about two months ago. Some of these trees do not like the Central Florida climate. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: DelawhereJoe on July 06, 2019, 06:23:19 PM
Its one of the most popular trees for lovers to scratch there names, I have 1 on my driveway that shows the claw marks from a raccoon as it climbed it.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on July 06, 2019, 07:30:21 PM
A few pictures:

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/IMG_6182.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562455526)
 
Da tree.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/IMG_6183.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562455577)
 
The nuts are already starting to crack open.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0598.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1267041276)
 
On da sawmill.  :)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 06, 2019, 08:13:40 PM
No sunny beaches near the Nantahala :). 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: JohnW on July 06, 2019, 09:42:01 PM
So are beach nuts good for anything?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 06, 2019, 10:13:52 PM
I did get a bark picture but Magicman posted a good example. I took the youngest cave girl on a dendro walk late this afternoon and we found a few more trees that we have not featured as tree of the day.  I am interested in hearing more about the bodgers use of  Today's tree, American Beech (Fagus grandifolia).
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 06, 2019, 10:34:33 PM
So are beach nuts good for anything?
I donít know about the nuts, but the wood is good for aging Budweiser.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 06, 2019, 11:43:51 PM
In pre industrial times mainly in England in the fagus sylvatica woods a bodger was one of those men you rarely saw in town. Beeches root sucker like crazy from that root mat, forming dense dog hair thickets if maintained that way. A bodger would take advantage of that and travelled through the polewood stands making camp and setting up his spring pole lathe. He would clear the stand, rough turning parts for the chairmakers in town. By the time he had his cart full and headed for town the rough turnings would be partially air dried. He would resupply with staples and return to his solitary life in the woods. Like the collier making charcoal he wasn't interested in big trees, he maintained a young small wood forest.

In the fall keep an eye out for beech drops, a parasitic fungus that grows up from the roots and blooms then.

My wife's family is from Holland, I imagine many of you have had the thin spiced windmill cookies, speculaas. The old molds were often carved from beech. I think you can see the ID I was taught in the pic, in flatsawn the rays look like "chicken scratches"

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10017/cookies~0.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1562469292)

Her cousin was coming over here for a visit and Michelle asked him to bring some speculaas spice. Niels went to a bakery and asked for some and at first they were reluctant, each baker has his own secret blend and they suspected cookie espionage. When he explained that it was for his cousin in the US, well, when we opened the package, they had sent the poor wayward dutch girl a kilo :D

When beech bark disease rolled through here one phase is massive aphid attack, then the young branches are covered in black smut. I was thinning trying to get more light and air and burning the really bad ones. Then I started playing with a twig that was absolutely covered in aphids. I could tap it and they all did the wave, then settled down, I'd tap it again and they would do it again. I hate to admit how long we played with each other, before they went to the sauna ;D.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 07, 2019, 06:49:29 AM
Thanks, Don P. I saw an old bodger do a demonstration Turing Windsor chair legs nearly 20 years ago. Later I saw him on PBS. 

Today's tree of the day...
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3472.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562466277)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3474.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562466286)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3473.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562466288)
This particular tree was small so I did not take a whole tree picture as I would not have helped with identifying it by its form. It is not very showy this time of the year. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on July 07, 2019, 07:30:21 AM
I hate to admit how long we played with each other, before they went to the sauna .


Sounds like you had a Men In Black moment there.  :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 07, 2019, 07:36:32 AM
Flowers makes very good honey.  This is the first tree that I keyed out that had a pseudoterminal bud when I first started Dendrology class.  A tree of the Mid to Upper Piedmont and Mountains.  Bark has very deep v-shaped ridges.  Leaves turn a deep red in the Fall.  You can deal with oxymorons until you are frustrated, but then you can go the arboretum to look at trees to calm down, but if you find this tree there, don't beat your own drum.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 07, 2019, 07:52:08 AM
That leaf looks sour, chewing on it if you're out of water in the woods quenches your thirst.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 07, 2019, 06:56:41 PM
Did Tim McGraw sing about it?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 07, 2019, 09:39:42 PM
I don't know much about McGraw's music (my wife listens to him). Today's tree is sourwood (Oxydendrum  arboreum)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 08, 2019, 12:11:52 AM
Nope, he didnít sing about sourwood.  He sang about Tupelo.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 08, 2019, 07:07:45 AM
The leaves of the sourwood are serrated - tupelo leaves are not, they are entire. 
I found today's tree yesterday on the grounds of the Macon County Coon Hunters Club. All of these trees that were there had injuries to the bark similar to the one in the first picture. At first glance it resembles lightening strike injury. 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3493~0.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562526280)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3494~0.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562526278)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3492~0.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562526179)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3491~0.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562526137)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3491~0.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562526137)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 08, 2019, 07:29:57 AM
Warms my heart and chest to see that one. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 08, 2019, 07:44:10 AM
Looks like a burr in the pic. Do you see orange in the injured bark?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 08, 2019, 08:04:11 AM
The injuries were not bright orange but they were tinted a bit of a different color. Most were 18-22" dbh I would guess. There were probably 10 of these trees, all with a similar injury. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on July 08, 2019, 08:27:14 AM
" . . .  . . .
  Jack frost nipping at your nose."

Chinese or American?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on July 08, 2019, 09:13:13 AM
Well, nuts!
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 08, 2019, 02:58:56 PM
They looked to be American. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 08, 2019, 05:37:36 PM
Thereís one in mom and dads yard and I still didnít recognize it.  Never looked close enough at it.  Always looking down to make sure I donít step on one.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on July 08, 2019, 05:54:41 PM
The bark looks a little smoother than the chinese version.  (Maybe "less course" would be a better way to say that.) 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 08, 2019, 08:48:18 PM
Chinese is wooly tomentose on the underside.  American is smooth as a baby's bottom.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 08, 2019, 09:26:42 PM
I am not an expert on these but they were smooth and I think they were American. These were at one time the most important hardwood tree in the eastern half of the U.S.  
American chestnut (Castanea dentada). 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on July 08, 2019, 09:53:44 PM
Not sure of what the status is these days of the American variety surviving much but I do know of a population of them on an island off the coast of Maine.  A family member has some of the seed pods in his freezer, I need to ask for a couple.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on July 08, 2019, 10:28:24 PM
Are yíall familiar with the American Chestnut Foundation?  Theyíre doing some good work.

Saving the American Chestnut Tree | The American Chestnut Foundation (https://www.acf.org/)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 08, 2019, 10:59:13 PM
Matthews State Forest nearby is also working on reestablishing American chestnuts. They have some good looking trees. I hope we see its return.

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 09, 2019, 07:51:54 AM
Today's tree of the day.  
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3477.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562466324)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3476.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562466317)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3475.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562466303)
I see quite a few of these growing in the mountains of NC and north Georgia. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on July 09, 2019, 09:07:52 AM
giving me the blues
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 09, 2019, 09:36:12 AM
This one is from Europe and is planted in zones 2-7 as a timber tree and as an ornamental. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ESFted on July 09, 2019, 10:59:13 AM
Yup.  Norway is in Europe.  It's a beautiful country, but maybe they could spruce it up a bit. :)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 09, 2019, 12:27:03 PM
Norway is in Europe, but itís also in my front yard.  I was blue when my other spruce died, so I planted this one years ago.  Grows much faster.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/36921/E23B78F4-7FB3-4C4B-927B-805AAAC50EE2.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1562689613)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 09, 2019, 10:11:13 PM
Today's was Norway Spruce (Puces abides). Tomorrow's will be a domestics species. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 09, 2019, 10:23:03 PM
Norway spruce is one of my pet peeves right now in construction. We are importing it from Europe, Canada and have recently allowed native grown into the lumber supply. With most species if I'm given a species and grade I simply need to look that up to get the design strength values and from that the maximum spans. A #2 NS grade stamp can presently carry any of 7 different sets of strength values depending on where it comes from. I was working on a house a few weeks ago that had NS from 3 different countries. I can guarantee nobody knew what the maximum allowable spans were.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 10, 2019, 06:48:49 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3512.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562709977)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3513.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562709977)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3514.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562709985)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3515.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562709985)
 Today's tree is probably familiar to most, especially if you ever eat at Cracker Barrel restaurants. I do not ever think I have been to a Cracker Barrel that did not have these planted in the yard. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 10, 2019, 07:31:42 AM
This tree is a poster child for doubly serrate leaves and scaly bark.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on July 10, 2019, 07:57:46 AM
It's also a poster child for continually dropping small limbs.  :-\
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ESFted on July 10, 2019, 08:34:26 AM
It also has a heavy spring sap run.  The squirrels used to "tap" the one near my front door and the walk was covered with sweet sticky sap.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on July 10, 2019, 08:43:48 AM
I have sawed a couple, very nice lumber. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on July 10, 2019, 09:33:01 AM
saw a paper on this some where
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 10, 2019, 06:13:20 PM
You could build a canoe and not need the lumber.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: lxskllr on July 10, 2019, 08:43:51 PM
Not sure about the canoe, but I can almost see the river.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 10, 2019, 08:54:07 PM
Yep, today's tree is a River Birch ( Betula nigra). 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: nativewolf on July 10, 2019, 09:29:12 PM
Are yíall familiar with the American Chestnut Foundation?  Theyíre doing some good work.

Saving the American Chestnut Tree | The American Chestnut Foundation (https://www.acf.org/)
Yes they do.  Largest nursery for testing purposes is just south of @Don P (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=17) off 81 before Abingdon.  However, I wish they would release seedlings in commercial quantities.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 11, 2019, 07:30:43 AM
I do not
Think I have used this one previously as tree of the day.  
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3520.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562710032)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3521.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562710035)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3522.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562710037)
  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 11, 2019, 08:33:01 AM
Delawherejoe sent some pictures of a tree that will probably be a tree of the day soon.  
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3534.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562848267)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3533.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562848265)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3532.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562848264)
  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on July 11, 2019, 08:57:36 AM
Today's tree looks like the trees I enjoy so much in the early spring.  Very colorful understory and landscape trees.  Full bloom just before the dogwoods bloom.  A little messy in the yard, but worth it.  Hard wood.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on July 11, 2019, 09:00:14 AM
Yup, today's tree makes me smile in the Springtime.  :)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on July 11, 2019, 09:11:24 AM
A close relative of the exotic rosewood.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: doc henderson on July 11, 2019, 09:41:50 AM
I think this one reminds me of when one of my buddies gets embarrassed.  we give out the seed packets in the fall to boy scouts to plant in their yards.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 11, 2019, 09:50:43 AM
I planted four of these bare root seedlings in my yard last winter. I was pleased to see them all produce leaves and then some kind of caterpillar I suspect came along and ate most of the leaves. They are no longer cordate  and look like they have been hole punched with 3/8" diameter holes. I hope that they make it as they would add some early color to the landscape since most of my azaleas bought the farm. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on July 11, 2019, 09:50:55 AM
Planting seeds is rewarding.  I'm amazed by how fast they grow in the first few years.  I can't say for sure, but it seems like planting the seeds yields better results than transplanting a small seedling.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on July 11, 2019, 09:55:18 AM
Too bad about the caterpillars, caveman.  I'll send you some pods if you want.

The deer won't let me have azaleas even though they are prolific here in most yards.  I can't seem grown them big enough to survive the deer.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 11, 2019, 10:01:30 AM
I take a picture of the one closest to my house every year when itís blooming.  It seems I deleted the most recent one or I would post it.  My grandpa had these in his yard and they always make me think of him.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on July 11, 2019, 11:01:55 AM
This may give too much away too fast, but . . .


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/39962/Redbuds-1.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1554820725)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on July 11, 2019, 12:53:13 PM
@btulloh (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=29962) I'll take some seed pods if you still have them, believe it or not we hardly have any around here.  Now and then I will see one by the side of the road but that is all, have wanted to plant some for a while.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on July 11, 2019, 01:53:01 PM
I'll have plenty in a month or two when they start bearing.  I'll be glad to share them with you.  I may even deliver them since I like to take the short ride down to your neck of the woods to check on the crops.  There are a couple tobacco plots down your way I like to see.  It's getting difficult to find anyone growing tobacco these days.  

Google will turn up loads of websites that explain how to propagate from seeds.  Not a big deal.  I just take handfuls of pods and scatter them around and let nature take over.  Lower yield, but effective.  I do the same with black walnuts.  Throw them in the loader bucket and dump them in the woods.  The squirrels get excellent germination with the walnuts they plant.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on July 11, 2019, 04:08:16 PM
Sounds like a plan. There are only two guys around who got a tobacco contract this year, one is just a few miles from my place on 40, the other is on 1. Both were big growers. Word is 5 years and it's over. I have a bunch of walnuts around the house, to the point you get sick of stepping on them, so we gather them in 5 gallon  pails and dump them in the woods. They should make good lumber trees some day.  The ones we don't get make for great squirrel viewing all winter. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on July 11, 2019, 04:41:01 PM
We all look forward to those rare opportunities to see a squirrel.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 11, 2019, 07:01:30 PM
We all look forward to those rare opportunities to see a squirrel.
Iíd like to see the squirrels that took all the peaches off my trees.  One day they were there and two days later they were all gone.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 11, 2019, 09:21:21 PM
Today's tree was Eastern Redbud (Cercis Canadensis).  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 11, 2019, 09:29:48 PM
 
I doubt I will have time to check in in the morning so this will be tomorrow's tree of the day. (http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3518.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562710027)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3519.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562710029)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 11, 2019, 10:26:42 PM
No moosin?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 11, 2019, 10:58:24 PM
A new one on me, though I recognize the genus.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: curdog on July 12, 2019, 08:02:18 AM
You'll earn your stripes if you get this one right. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Magicman on July 12, 2019, 09:16:07 AM
That pennipalmate leaf is a head scratcher.  smiley_headscratch 

It is known to exist in only two counties in Mississippi, so I have never seen it.  :P   Of course that is true only if I have correctly identified it.  ::)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on July 12, 2019, 11:07:15 AM
Pardon me, boy, is that the Pennsylvania station?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 12, 2019, 10:04:29 PM
The foresters who chimed in know what it is.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 12, 2019, 11:26:32 PM
Today's tree is Striped Maple (Acer pennsylvanicum).  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 13, 2019, 06:14:57 AM
Today's tree is another that was found in western North Carolina.
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3458.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562413526)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3457.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562413527)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3459.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562413533)
 The needles are shorter than 4", probably closer to 2-3".
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: curdog on July 13, 2019, 07:25:00 AM
I hope you take as many of today's tree home with you as you can. I'd like to get rid of every one of them....
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: nativewolf on July 13, 2019, 07:41:43 AM
Here in Virginia we feel the same way..but it's hopeless.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on July 13, 2019, 08:35:26 AM
I came up short on this one.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 13, 2019, 08:50:10 AM
I have these trees in Missouri, but they are not native here.  They were planted on our property about 60 years ago.  One of the less important southern yellow pines.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on July 13, 2019, 10:44:01 AM
I don't know Jack about these short needle pines.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 13, 2019, 01:20:13 PM
Its not worth sprucing up a jack pine lodgepole with sand - something else.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 13, 2019, 05:02:24 PM
Apparently it is known in some places locally as spruce pine or just spruce, even though itís not a spruce.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 13, 2019, 05:07:23 PM
Hereís the one in my back yard.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/36921/E1AAF883-8E68-4E79-A665-081B214826F7.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1563052028)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 13, 2019, 05:43:52 PM
Yesterday's tree, striped maple is also known as moose maple or goosefoot maple.
Todays looks like it has 2 needles per fascicle, I believe it is probably native to my state.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 13, 2019, 05:49:02 PM
Yesterday's tree, striped maple is also known as moose maple or goosefoot maple.
Todays looks like it has 2 needles per fascicle, I believe it is probably native to my state.

I would say your state in particular.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on July 13, 2019, 07:24:00 PM
did it cross the Pond?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 13, 2019, 08:30:15 PM
Bark is rather scaly.  Inner lip of the umbo is purple. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 13, 2019, 09:01:31 PM
Don P is on the right track.  These two needle pines can be quite confounding.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Old Greenhorn on July 13, 2019, 09:37:45 PM
I thought pitch pine, but now I am not so rue. I have to work on my skills, I used to know this stuff.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 14, 2019, 06:53:24 AM
Oh :P, if we're on the track but not there, I think TR might have scotched his train at the station already ???

I'm back over to a friends to do shingles. We're playing the edges of the day. We had a big moon last night and worked till midnight, that used to be pretty common.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 14, 2019, 07:04:36 AM
I did not intend to mislead anyone with yesterday's tree. It was a Virginia Pine (Pinus virginiana).  

Today's tree should be familiar to many of you.  
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3469.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562466256)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3471.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562466267)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3470.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562466270)
 I do not think this one has had its day until today.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 14, 2019, 07:19:01 AM
Pitch pine is a 3 needle pine., not a 2 needle pine.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 14, 2019, 08:21:10 AM
I have lots of Virginia pine here on our 13 acres of pines in the middle of the oak cedar forest.  When my grandparents bought this place right after he returned from WW2 it had no trees on it.  They bought loblolly, Virginia, shortleaf and white pines from the conservation dept.  I like the Virginia when theyíre young because they are pyramidal and do resemble a spruce.  When they get older though, they get kind of gnarly.  The yellow pines have been great at reseeding themselves.  The white pines have not.  We do have some young whites, but not what youíd think after almost 70 years.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 14, 2019, 08:22:07 AM
The round shape of todayís leaf tells me something, but Iím not sure yet which one.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 14, 2019, 07:36:53 PM
The acorns mature in a single year and sprout in the fall.  Preferred by deer.  Native Americans pounded the acorns and dried to a powder, leached with water to remove tannin and bitter compounds, and made acorn flour.  The wood has led to many a wee dram.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on July 14, 2019, 08:02:34 PM
Jack and Jim proud.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 14, 2019, 10:13:58 PM
Today's tree was a white oak (Quercus alba).  Maybe someone could show a picture of quartersawn white oak-one of my favorites.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 14, 2019, 10:22:49 PM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/36921/59C7352D-D318-472C-BC89-ED3AFBF451C6.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1563157357)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 15, 2019, 12:18:03 AM
Probably not pc anymore but one memory trick I was told was "Red man shoots arrows, arrowheads are pointed like red oak leaves. White man shoots bullets that are rounded like white oak leaves."
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 15, 2019, 07:12:40 AM
Some white oak leaf lobes have pointed glandular tips that look like a red oak, but there is no little spike on the tip.  Chinkapin oak is one. 

Virginia Tech Dendrology Fact Sheet (http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID=244)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 15, 2019, 07:38:08 AM
I think Firefighter is doing the tree for today.  Thanks for sharing the Chinkapin Oak, Danny.  That is another that I was not familiar with.  While looking at dendro fact sheets you may notice that the range of a lot of the species common to most of the south eastern United States does not extend down to peninsular Florida. 

Don P, I learned a lot of the scientific names from my students the year I became an ag teacher and the students elected me to be their forestry CDE coach.  Many of the associations were not politically correct. When teaching them how to key out leaves, based on leaf arrangement, I remind them not to forget their DAM (dogwood, ash and maple) trees.  That is sometimes amended to CDAM (Catalpa).
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 15, 2019, 08:09:57 AM
I cut a Chinkapin oak yesterday.  When I cut it, I thought it was a hickory. I saw the leaves and thought they were hickory leaves because they were shriveled up.  Later I looked closer at the leaf and saw the little tips and knew it was Chinkapin.  Itís spelled chinquapin in my tree book.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 15, 2019, 08:18:44 AM
Todayís tree of the day is going to be identified only by some photos of the cones I collected in California while on a forest fire.  You can see the size by the yard stick and also by comparing to the loblolly cones hanging next to them.  My biggest one is about 15Ē, but they can get to 20Ē.  Iíd give some other details about the tree, but I donít want to make it too easy.  We can talk about details later.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/36921/00DFB532-EF96-4E5A-AA39-CD0426A55619.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1563192876)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/36921/6F9800AD-2785-409D-8A30-CB9584B1133D.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1563193022)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/36921/241934C4-A1B1-42A6-B32E-9076522B8852.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1563193023)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on July 15, 2019, 11:51:07 AM
That is one sweet cone, must come from a pine that would have a diabetic getting nervous if they stood too close :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 15, 2019, 12:31:35 PM
John are there any of these in your house build?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on July 15, 2019, 04:53:32 PM
I did find a couple cones way down on my property but I haven't bothered to figure out which tree it is, yet.  They could have bounced down the hill quite a ways.  I do have a number of bigger trees that have died (most seem to be white pine) in that area, maybe one is this tree.  It would be exceedingly difficult to get the whole tree up to the cabin.  I may have to relocate my mill down there to make use of all that timber.  My neighbor has a view of a lone tree about 1/4 mile from their back porch - interesting how the cones grow way out at the tips.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: DelawhereJoe on July 15, 2019, 06:21:23 PM
Don't those pines get to be over 250' tall....if a squirrel drops one of those cones on your head from 250' I'll send my condolences to your family.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 15, 2019, 06:32:17 PM
Yes, tallest of all pines.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on July 15, 2019, 06:35:13 PM
if a squirrel drops one of those cones

I was camping once in my pop up trailer (tent bunk ends).  My truck was out front (maybe 15' away) with my aluminum canoe still on the lumber rack.  About 6 am or so, I hear what I thought was a propane tank exploding. :o DanG squirrel dropped a green cone about the size of a small cantaloupe from about 100'+ up onto the canoe.  And then repeated it again the next morning, after I moved my truck further away from the tree! >:(
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 15, 2019, 08:49:55 PM
Sugar pine, Pinus lambertiana I suspect.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 15, 2019, 08:57:55 PM
In Id'ing the lumber sugar tends to have some kind of unique very small pin knot clusters we would call cat's paw. Back in the day it was the preferred wood used by patternmakers for foundry work. It is stable and easily worked.

We were touristing through the giant Sequoia's and a person in the group scavanged a giant cone from one of those monsters, well it was a big cone, it must have come from one of those, nah it was one of these cones :D.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 15, 2019, 08:58:53 PM
Yes, these sweet cones are from the Sugar Pine.  Native to California and Oregon and possibly Nevada and even Mexico.  It can attain a height of 250 feet and upto 7í diameter.  It is a white Pine and so has needles in groups of five.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 15, 2019, 10:31:12 PM
I hope caveman doesn't mind if I hop in with another pine. I took the scenic route to town and went up on a ridge in the national forest today. These are a few pics of another minor yellow pine. It has been slowly leaving the landscape since the late '20's, it needs more fire. Not endangered but not that common.
It typically does not have great form and usually grows on the dry higher shaley ridges of the Appalachians.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10017/tbl1.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1563240068)


Here's the needles closer

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10017/tbl2.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1563240175)




(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10017/tbl3.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1563240477)
  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 15, 2019, 11:08:05 PM
Good one.  How many times Iíve leafed past this pine in my book on the table and never really read about it.  Looks a lot like Virginia pine, except for those cones.  I have a feeling Caveman will approve.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 16, 2019, 07:03:52 AM
The umbo's are considered armed.  The needles, while two to the fascicle like virginia pine, are much more thicker, stouter, and stiffer.  Almost prickly.  These characteristics set it apart from the other two needle pines at the table. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: nativewolf on July 16, 2019, 07:20:16 AM
Glad to see we're not going to Table the IDs while caveman is on a break.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 16, 2019, 09:07:32 AM
There seems to be a mountain full of those pine.

Cell phones allow me to participate while sitting in a room with 600 others while listening to someone saying "blah, blah, wah, wah, wa wha". They have a captured audience for another half hour. Thank you Forestry Forum.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 16, 2019, 02:18:24 PM
It sounds like you were stuck in a room with Charlie Brown's teacher :D.
No fooling you guys with this one, Table Mountain Pine, pinus pungens.
It is the only one I know with cones on the trunk as well as the branches. It is very limby and holds the dead branches forever so lots of black knots. It thrives best with frequent fires that clear out the competition and expose the soil. The cones are somewhat serotinous but you can see from the picture some do open in the absence of fire. In fire they all open and dump their seeds. On the ground in this stand I found a number of unopened cones on the ground and many the squirrels had gnawed on. The trees can hold those cones in waiting for a long time. The table mountain pines in the upper part of this stand are in tough shape, it is converting to chestnut and other oaks and white pine. I've been told that historically these ridges had fire every 5-10 years, its been close to a century right there although they did some extensive prescribed burns close to there a few years ago. I've never sawn one but I suspect it is like a tight ringed low grade Virginia pine ???
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 16, 2019, 05:24:03 PM
I am sure that not many have sawn one. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on July 16, 2019, 05:55:50 PM
not to mention some off us have never seen one
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on July 16, 2019, 06:00:30 PM
Heck, I never even heard of one.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 16, 2019, 06:21:47 PM
Iíve never seen one or sawn one.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: nativewolf on July 16, 2019, 06:28:30 PM
@Don P (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=17) I might be mistaken but I believe Pond Pine (P. serotina)will also form cones directly on trunk where buds get active and flower.  Trunks turning into green stalks is something to see after a pocossin burns.  Hope I didn't ruin a tree of the day.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 16, 2019, 07:55:47 PM
Y'all are putting out some good ones.  Does someone want to do tomorrow's?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 16, 2019, 08:33:26 PM
They grow on the higher droughty ridges of the Appalachian mountains. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 16, 2019, 09:54:53 PM
@nativewolf (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=24089), that's neat, I'd like to confirm that if you have an opportunity, pond pine is out of my range. I was just reading and there was much mention and pics of needles and small branches growing out of the trunks after fire but I couldn't confirm cones directly on the trunk.

For us that is a high droughty ridge, I was within a mile of the foundations of the old firetower that was on that ridge. I look at it from the back porch. We are at about 2500 ft, the mountain we are on is about 3700', Blue Ridge, so the first Appalachian orogeny, with a granite/gneiss basement, even up top it is well watered and decent soil.  Although I see a few over here, some on a stony bluff above the New, not many. The Valley and Ridge starts with that mountain, it is 600 million years younger and Africa's second try at drivers ed. If you look at a map of the mountains you can see the random bumps of the blue ridge then look inward towards the center of the Appalachian strip and you'll see more linear mountains. The coalfields were the third bump, a raised plateau, deeply gorged, full of buried forests. With the valley and ridge life had begun in this world, dolomite and calcerous shales from very small sea creatures. The top of that ridge is drier than a popcorn fart, I've had to wander back down that road quite a ways with a jug for the radiator before, that's where they are. Going down the backside is a huge rhododendron slick with Catawba and rosebay rhodos, flame azalea and mountain laurel, stunning when in bloom and a good place to get really turned around. The place names say something, Mule Hell, Horse Heaven, Mike's Gap. Mike was a peddler back in the early days. He left the cove on the far side of what is now the forest on Christmas eve heading over towards our side. The family there asked him to stay and wait out the weather. They found him frozen by a tree up in the gap that bears his name.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: nativewolf on July 17, 2019, 05:32:12 AM
I will have to ask my old dendrology professor, just retired, at NC State.  Don't have them here in northern va either.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 17, 2019, 07:03:20 AM
Table Mountain pine was on the Georgia FFA Tree ID list so I had to go collect a sample specimen for many years for the contest.  Found them in the upper NE corner of Georgia Northeast of Clayton in the Warwomen Wildlife Management Area. A lot of pitch pine up there, too. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 17, 2019, 07:48:00 AM
Sorry caveman, Iím at work and the only tree we have here is a Japanese maple.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 17, 2019, 08:27:36 AM
Jmoore sent a few pics for me to post on tree of the day. This is in Winter Haven, Fl.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3559.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1563366254)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3558.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1563366272)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3557.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1563366298)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3556.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1563366314)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3554.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1563366333)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3555.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1563366357)
 Maybe the addition of the fruit picture will useful.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 17, 2019, 04:29:48 PM
Before the picture of the fruit I figured it was a fruit tree, like plum.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 17, 2019, 09:27:36 PM
It is a plum.  I think I know what it is but I would feel a little more confident in my identification with some of the experts chiming in. I did not physically see the tree, just the pictures posted earlier.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on July 17, 2019, 09:51:34 PM
Looks like a Santa Rosa plum.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 17, 2019, 10:13:55 PM
I was going to guess a Winter Haven plum ???
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 17, 2019, 10:53:21 PM
I was thinking it is a Chickasaw Plum as it appears very similar to the ones I have seen north of here and resembles the fact sheet that VT had.  The bark is deeper fissured than the one on VT.

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 18, 2019, 02:13:39 PM
Today's tree of
The day. I do not think we have used it yet. 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3561.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1563473282)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3562.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1563473225)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3563.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1563473298)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3564.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1563473301)
   
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: reelman65 on July 18, 2019, 05:02:04 PM
I am learning a lot from this thread. very interesting.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 18, 2019, 08:45:30 PM
I think that I have got this one.  Leaves are a bit larger than I am used to. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 18, 2019, 09:32:47 PM
There are only two of these that I allow to grow in my yard, both were planted in a pot by my Papa (maternal grandfather) the year before he died (25 years ago next month).  The leaves pictured were shade leaves.  
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~464.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1516062716)
 This is the wood from one we let stand dead for a while prior to sawing.
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~463.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1516067653)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on July 18, 2019, 09:48:09 PM
not a clue, but tend toward an oak
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 18, 2019, 10:09:21 PM
I was thinking swamp laurel oak.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 18, 2019, 10:52:30 PM
Yep, its an oak.  Laurel Oak (Quercus laurifolia).  They share a lot of the undesirable characteristics of Water Oaks but some seem to grow taller and live a little longer.  The bark is very similar to that of the water oak as is the wood.  It is in the red oak group.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on July 18, 2019, 11:15:22 PM
Those are some serious growth rings.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 19, 2019, 12:22:47 AM
 
This particular example is a multi-stemmed bush but they can be single trunked an reach 40'.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3549.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1563451444)
 Most of the ones around here bloom around Father's Day.  Last week while driving through Georgia they were in full bloom.  They are relatively easy to propagate by air layering or stem cuttings.  Notice that the leaves are alternate but the occur in pairs. 

One of my students missed this one several years ago on the state nursery and landscape contest (it did not have leaves) and the team lost by one specimen.  Another missed fire ants and the other two missed super easy stuff too.  If you ever need to find aphids these would be a good place to start looking for them.

Brandon sawed some and made some cheese boards that he showed several of us at Jake's last project.  The pruned off branches make good walking sticks and pointers.  Before whips became the driving tool of choice most of my show hog exhibitors used them to present their hogs at the fairs.

I hope this is adequate for tree of the day for 12/19.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on July 19, 2019, 12:57:03 AM
It makes a beautiful tree if left alone by the branch pruners!!!!!
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on July 19, 2019, 02:11:30 AM
We have mostly red, pink and purple ones out here.  Not a lot of white. I have one right off the edge of my deck trying to make it a real tree but it keeps throwing a LOT of branches out.  Right now it is about 25' tall.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 19, 2019, 07:25:34 AM
I love the texture of the bark.  Very distinctive.

On the laurel oak, note that the base of the petiole has a yellowish color, as well as the midrib.  This is diagnostic for laurel oak.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 19, 2019, 08:10:06 AM
Always reminds me of the very thin pancakes my wife makes.  Mine is just starting to bloom now.  They bloom for a long time.  I think a few years ago mine bloomed late and was in bloom all the way til the first frost.  Forum member gfadvm(Andy) is very proud of his.  He showed me his in OK that heís trained to grow into a nice tree.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/36921/5ADB7027-B9A6-4AD3-B780-5A464489C9B1.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1563538151)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on July 19, 2019, 09:03:19 AM
They're in full bloom here.  I don't have any white ones, but there are lot's around the area.  On of my favorite ornamentals in the yard.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on July 19, 2019, 09:17:11 AM
It's murder what they do to some of those, just plain murder. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on July 19, 2019, 09:20:00 AM
It's murder what they do to some of those, just plain murder.
So true.  I don't understand that method of pruning.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on July 19, 2019, 09:22:33 AM
Some - maybe all - of the white ones are named after a famous town on the Mississippi River (in Mississippi no less) that was a major paddle wheeler stop.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: nativewolf on July 19, 2019, 09:49:54 AM
It's murder what they do to some of those, just plain murder.
So true.  I don't understand that method of pruning.
It should be pruned to form  vase, no interior branching, if it grows back toward the center of the shrub-cut it off as low as you can.  After it reaches the desired height it has to be maintained there by pruning the top every year.  Cut off seed heads every year right after flowering.  It wants to be pruned, you can't hurt it.  What you don't want to do is cut it flat like a hedge and let suckers come into the interior.  As a landscape foreman we would sometimes spend hours fixing other companies neglect from them just being pruned on the top.  Like  vase, sides lower than top, spreading, beautiful, elegant.

I personally don't grow them as they are not native (from Japan/Korea/china I guess )and I've moved to only native species (even if I grow cultivars or slightly out of range things, they are all native to the US).  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 19, 2019, 06:03:07 PM
40' tall?, you're creping me out.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ESFted on July 19, 2019, 07:43:05 PM
Natchez used to be the standard in this color, but there are at least ten others now.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 19, 2019, 10:53:47 PM
Today's tree was Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia indica - crapemyrtle (http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/DENDROLOGY/syllabus/factsheet.cfm?ID=213)).  In addition to different colored flowers, I have seen some that have very small leaves compared to the ones normally see.  This difference is not due to sun or shade differences.

Tomorrow  morning we should have another tree of the day.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 20, 2019, 06:19:37 AM
Today's tree of the day.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3464.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562466225)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3465~0.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562466228)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3466.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1562466237)
 It was advised to me by my dad many years ago to not ask questions that you do not already know the answers.  I am not 100 percent sure what the species is of today's sample.  Hopefully someone will be able to definitively key this one out.  This tree is in NC but I think it may have been planted south of its natural range.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on July 20, 2019, 06:32:17 AM
I think not only south, but also an ocean away.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 20, 2019, 06:49:17 AM
Whoever owns it needs to clean out around it to "spruce" it up. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 20, 2019, 08:44:49 AM
I think I have seen these blue looking trees in Colorado.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on July 20, 2019, 09:18:34 AM
You can see one at the pig roast if you make it up there.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 20, 2019, 12:48:45 PM
It did not feel as sharp or rigid as the blue variety that I recollect unloading off of semis when I moonlighted in the Christmas tree industry, delivering trees to lots all over Florida.  I had kind of narrowed it down, right or wrong, between red or white.  It did not smell like cat urine to me (I would have cut it down if it did). We do not see spruce very often so I will defer to the experts.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 20, 2019, 02:12:09 PM
I'm no expert especially on these. There are or were some remnant colonies of red spruce and balsam fir as far south as Mt Mitchell, leftovers from the ice age. It is retreating from Mt Rogers and Whitetop here and I think it is probably gone from Mitchell by now.

The mountains in the western hemisphere run N-S where in the Eastern they tend to run E-W. During the ice ages trees could move south with the slowly changing temperatures. Here, a seed would fall and it would be warmer to the south and it would survive, things were good, the process reversed as the ice retreated and we kept quite a bit of diversity. On the highest peaks some of those Canadian trees remained stranded, only now beginning to fail as those peaks are warming up and in some cases getting more acid fogs. In Europe the seed falling to the south ran into a mountain climbing upward and so it was colder, the seed failed and the trees could not cross the icy peaks. They ended up with bupkus for diversity.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 20, 2019, 11:12:16 PM
Based on the VT pictures and Firefigther's first hand account in addition to descriptions, it sure looks like a Blue Spruce (Picea pungens).  Unless someone has a better option, that is what we will go with.

For those not familiar with spruce, the needles are four-sided and will roll between your fingers, unlike hemlock.  The needles are also on woody pegs, called sterigma.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on July 20, 2019, 11:27:47 PM
At least the blue ones don't smell like some tom cat peed on your shoes!!! 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: lxskllr on July 21, 2019, 06:04:20 AM
My first thought was blue spruce when I saw it. Doing an image search, I'd say red's ruled out. White's closer. but still looks like blue to me.

Spruce hasn't been doing well around here. I've had two die on my property, there's a few in decline on the farm, and driving around, it looks like they're stressed all over. I'm more surprised when I see one that looks perfect than I am seeing one turning brown.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 21, 2019, 07:17:35 AM
I appreciate all who weighed in on yesterday's Blue Spruce.  That one had me perplexed for quite some time.  

Not too long ago someone asked about today's tree and some of its interesting attributes but I do not think we have used it in this particular thread.  This is the only one I know of within 150 miles of my place.  There was another at a City Park but it was cut down due to rot and I suppose it was considered a hazard since it was near a walking trail.

 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3568.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1563624118)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3569.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1563624119)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3570.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1563624123)
 I did not take a picture of the tree's form as it was only 15' tall and not impressive at all.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on July 21, 2019, 07:31:19 AM
If you used the fibers to make fabric would it be rayon or cotton?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 21, 2019, 08:04:00 AM
Remember that star shaped pith that I showed you?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 21, 2019, 08:09:02 AM
I do now, thanks for the reminder.  Flat petiole too.  Each time I see them I get a hankering for collard greens even though they really do not closely resemble each other.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: doc henderson on July 21, 2019, 09:04:27 AM
a very poplar tree in Ks.  grow fast and only live a hundred years or so.  after a storm we often have branches 24 inches across laying on the road and or yards.  a softer and under appreciated wood.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 21, 2019, 10:20:41 AM
From my experience after over 30 years of skiing in CO, the native blue spruce arenít always as blue as the the ones we see planted in landscapes.  They pick the bluest ones to use for that purpose.  We see them here in the east as short, wide, pyramidal trees, but from the ski lift I see tall, narrow trees that are blue, but not as blue.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 21, 2019, 10:25:30 AM
When it ďsnowsĒ here in the summer, itís because of todayís tree.  The fire truck engine bays get so much blown in that we have to use leaf blowers to blow it all out.  Iíve yet to mill any, but I want to.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on July 21, 2019, 12:19:33 PM
No picture?  You gotta show the deep furrowed bark on the big trees and the leaves that look a lot like aspen...
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: doc henderson on July 21, 2019, 12:27:11 PM
made this one into a cooler based on the design and discussion of the French Bassin.


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51041/49B06DAD-2C7A-4588-B3AF-9B06F40E1574.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1563726353)
 


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51041/D53E061F-6855-4629-B26A-53BABACAC590.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1563726349)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 21, 2019, 12:46:47 PM
The only time I have ever seen one of these trees producing the cotton looking substance surrounding the seed was a few years ago while we were in Oklahoma at the FFA/4H National Land Judging Contest.  We had a few hours to kill after leaving the hotel and before boarding our flight so the students with us wanted to stop by a hot rod shop.  There was one of these trees nearby that was littering the area.

Some of you may recognize this truck.
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~332.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1494703282)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on July 21, 2019, 12:55:01 PM
Nice truck. Did you meet the owner?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Jack S on July 21, 2019, 01:03:39 PM
In June every year we were and they probably still are cleaning the air cooled ac condensers almost daily at my old job at Cornell university. it would be like a 1/2 thick blanket at times. Yep somedays looked like a snow storm.  dang ol cwood trees anyway.   Jack
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on July 21, 2019, 06:18:15 PM
They used to plant them in plantations along the Miss. River , Anderson Tully and some IP  They grew the saplings and would take sections of the branches or maybe the trunks and cut them in 1 foot sections and just stick the section in the ground and in about 10 years you had pulp size trees,  Any way they are a fast tree to grow but nasty with all the wind blown" cotton" seed fuzz but then again it is white on the roads and in the air from cotton harvest and ginning. I have as much desire to mill one as I do a mimosa.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 21, 2019, 09:10:52 PM
I did not meet the owner of Farm Truck but the year before we were out there and the owner of Murder Nova, Big Chief and his entourage were at his shop.  We stopped in since it was close to the airport and we had a little time.  He spent quite a bit of time talking to the kids and us.  We all had a good time.  I don't have a lot of respect for celebrities just because of who they are and would rather just hang out with my friends but the young folks and my co-worker enjoyed it, got autographs and overall it was a good experience.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 21, 2019, 11:50:10 PM
As most of you know today's tree was Eastern Cottonwood (Populus deltoides).  Tomorrow morning there will likely be one with compound leaves.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 22, 2019, 07:13:25 AM
Today's tree is...
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3571.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1563793650)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3572.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1563793648)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3574.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1563793652)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3575.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1563793654)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3576.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1563793656)
 There are also some other items in the pictures worthy of discussion- not the sidewalk or the plastic fence.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on July 22, 2019, 07:25:49 AM
It's a shaggy web worm tree.  :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 22, 2019, 07:53:57 AM
 smiley_devil
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 22, 2019, 08:05:47 AM
The squirrels go nuts over this tree.  When the crop is good, my dad will shoot dozens of squirrels trying to defend his trees.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: nativewolf on July 22, 2019, 08:36:19 AM
I am shocked you'd do this to danny on a monday morning.  Making him see the devil before noon on Monday. Shame shame...

Danny just go out to the storage area and find some nice flat smooth Walnut.  Just look at that nice flat board...forget all about the devil, only good for smoking bbq anyway
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on July 22, 2019, 09:23:04 AM
these things drive me nuts
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on July 22, 2019, 12:49:47 PM
As in the movie Gold Member todays tree says "Shag me baby"
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 22, 2019, 02:21:49 PM
I am shocked you'd do this to danny on a monday morning. Making him see the devil before noon on Monday.
I did give that some careful consideration.  He was not logged on when I posted the tree of the day this morning but within minutes he replied with an emoji. I am getting kind of close to the bottom of the barrel (old saying).  Kind of surprised that someone from Illinois has not chimed in.

I have not had an opportunity to go to the coast this summer.  Usually, during the summer I spend a lot of time at Anna Maria Island.  Although it is only 50-60 miles from here as the crow flies, there are many trees that grow there that don't here.  The next time I go I will collect some real and photographic dendro samples to share.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 22, 2019, 02:53:26 PM
I will make an effort this week to be able to post a few trees of the day.  I donít have a lot that you havenít done, but maybe a few.  We need someone from the ďWestĒ to post something.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 22, 2019, 10:24:31 PM
Today's tree was Pecan (Carya illinoinensis).  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 22, 2019, 10:39:24 PM
I've got another on the computer to give the barrel a break. This is a cousin of one from a week or two ago.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10017/cnut1.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1563849404)
 
 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10017/cnut2.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1563849446)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on July 22, 2019, 11:42:20 PM
Think I'm pounding my chest on this one
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 23, 2019, 06:11:36 AM
This one does not appear to be in a swamp.  Thank you for today's tree of the day submission.  I believe this is a picture of Customsawyer getting a swampy cousin of today's tree ready for a quartersawing demonstration at his 2017 project.
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_2551.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1563876454)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 23, 2019, 06:43:53 AM
Yup, this is an upland cousin. It's really not good for a barrel but it was a popular tanbark tree.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 23, 2019, 07:05:23 AM
We don't see it here in the upper coastal plain.  Have to go to the northern end of the Piedmont or mountains to see it. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 23, 2019, 07:59:46 AM
Has a somewhat confusing scientific name considering it doesnít grow there, but it does describe where it grows.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 23, 2019, 05:20:20 PM
Y'all got it, Chestnut oak, Quercus prinus, also goes by quercus montana but I think prinus is preferred, I do see both in gov't publications though. It's also known as sill oak and tanoak. It doesn't have many tyloses blocking the cell lumens so is a "leaky" white, no good for tight cooperage. The wood is coarser grained than white oak but still quite handsome, when you find a tree straight enough to cut. We have one up on the ridge behind the house we use as a landmark, "meet you at the Z tree". Still highly decay resistant, slightly weaker than a true white. Since they have little timber value they are some of the larger trees on our place and some of the oldest. Over the winter I harvested some reds that were around 36"dbh and 80 or so years old. We knocked the top out of a ~16" chestnut oak, it was the granddaddy there, from the ring pattern it had seen 2 forests come and go.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 23, 2019, 05:43:52 PM
What I read is that prinus was the name that included swamp chestnut oak and chestnut oak in the same species.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on July 23, 2019, 05:51:11 PM
Easiest to split for firewood tree if youíre going old school.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on July 23, 2019, 05:57:21 PM
I did threaten to throw in some Southern hemisphere oddballs, so here's one.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190707_093840.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1563918819)

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190707_093826.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1563918832)

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190707_093818.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1563918850)

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190707_093801.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1563918863)

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190707_093810.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1563918805)

Small tree, but check the size of the leaves...
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: lxskllr on July 23, 2019, 06:35:29 PM
No idea what that is Ian, but that's a neat looking tree. The shot by the house looks all out of scale due to the leaves. Like a kid mixed play sets to create a house scene  :^D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 23, 2019, 08:17:28 PM
Google is my friend.  Fruit takes a year to ripen?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: doctorb on July 23, 2019, 09:16:26 PM
Easiest to split for firewood tree if youíre going old school.
I am running a drying experiment with chestnut oak.  We originally thought it was red oak but the tree was ID'ed on a separate thread.  I did not find it as easy to split as red oak.  We will complete the drying experiment this December.

http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=99759.msg1582986#msg1582986 (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=99759.msg1582986#msg1582986)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on July 23, 2019, 10:03:02 PM
Google is my friend.  Fruit takes a year to ripen?
The Google-Fu is strong in this one.  :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 23, 2019, 11:09:52 PM
I don't know jack about this tree but it somewhat resembles a Fiddle Leaf Fig.  If it is what I think it is, the fruit can attain a weight of 120 lbs.  I thought green oranges were dangerous. (back before citrus greening and rampant development in central Florida the landscape was dominated by citrus.  Green oranges were common projectiles among adolescent combatants).
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on July 23, 2019, 11:29:22 PM
If it is what I think it is, the fruit can attain a weight of 120 lbs


Nope, the little green berries are the fruit. That's about as big as they get, and after a year they turn black and the birds eat them. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on July 24, 2019, 10:00:36 AM
Green oranges were common projectiles among adolescent combatants)


We used to make PVC spud shooters growing up, just a tiny squirt of starting fluid and a snap of a grill lighter and you could practically send a potato into orbit.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on July 24, 2019, 04:10:11 PM
Last tree is called Puka. (Meryta sinclairii)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meryta_sinclairii (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meryta_sinclairii)

It originally came from some small islands off the coast of Northern NZ, but is now common around the mainland as a garden plant, in coastal areas. Salt spray doesn't seem to affect it, but it's frost tender. 

There are related species growing on many Sth Pacific Island from New Caledonia through French Polynesia etc. But it wasn't a species that I expected many Nth Hemisphere folks would have seen. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 24, 2019, 04:41:49 PM
Thanks, Ian.  That was a new one for me.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on July 24, 2019, 11:39:36 PM
Got some more locals puzzlers for you all.
These are taken in the park behind the kids school, the trees are only young, maybe 20 year or so.  They can grow a LOT bigger. The tree is native to NZ, but we are outside it's normal range, so it will only grow here if it's been planted in sheltered spot. Once it gets up above the frost it seems to do OK.
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190725_135812.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1564025545)

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190725_135841.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1564025590)


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190725_140011.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1564025527)
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190725_140026.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1564025519) 
It exudes a resinous gum to seal up any wound.
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190725_140036.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1564025504)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on July 25, 2019, 12:01:35 AM
I know not to monkey around with that tree! ;)  I was out taking a walk looking (down) at my phone when I ran my head into a dried up branch/leaves.  Razor sharp and hard... OUCH!
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on July 25, 2019, 12:36:29 AM
I know not to monkey around with that tree!


On the right track, but it's not Monkey Puzzle. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on July 25, 2019, 01:49:45 AM
Kauri tree?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on July 25, 2019, 01:55:30 AM
I have no clue what so ever but the leaves to me look like it may be a eucalyptus of some kind. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 25, 2019, 08:54:57 AM
I think John is right.....kauri.  A conifer.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on July 25, 2019, 09:46:00 AM
Blue Gum?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on July 25, 2019, 01:52:17 PM
Interesting reading about the Kauri (Northern NZ) and the Monkey Puzzle (Chile) trees.  They are from prehistoric times.  The Monkey Puzzle tree has the sharp "leaves" to protect themselves from grazing dinosaurs!
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: DelawhereJoe on July 25, 2019, 03:54:35 PM
I was thinking either bunya pine or kauri as already mentioned.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on July 25, 2019, 04:11:50 PM
NZ Kauri (Agathis australis) is the one. 

Same family (Araucariaceae) as the Monkey Puzzle and Bunya pine. Largest tree in NZ, but ~90% of them were cut down in the 1800s. This is the biggest surviving tree called Tane Mahuta in Northland. DBH is ~16 feet, and 58 ft to the first branch. 
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/ianab_tane_mahuta_1.jpg)

And yes, it's a survivor from the dinosaur times. There are coal mines in Australia where they dig up petrified remnants of kauri wood in the coal seams. It's not really "wood" any more, but it's recognisable as kauri. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 25, 2019, 08:47:35 PM
Monkey Puzzle was the tree of the day on May 13.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on July 26, 2019, 12:11:32 AM
Another local for you. 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190725_112920.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1564114021)
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190725_112955.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1564114049)

A young specimen tree at a friends farm, maybe 30 years old. Can grow into a big forest tree in a couple of hundred years, biggest are almost 200ft tall and pushing 6ft dbh. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on July 26, 2019, 01:47:32 AM
Looks like some sort of cypress, maybe a cedar?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on July 26, 2019, 05:05:49 AM
Looks like some sort of cypress, maybe a cedar?
Occupies the same sort of ecological niche as your bald cypress. But Sth Hemisphere has a whole different ecosystem.  We don't have the pine / cedar / cypress trees, but a whole other set of different species instead. 
Hint, it's a conifer, but the "cones" are like edible berries, to be better spread by birds. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on July 26, 2019, 07:56:28 PM
Tree was Kahikatea (Dacrycarpus dacrydioides).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dacrycarpus_dacrydioides (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dacrycarpus_dacrydioides)

It prefers swampy ground. Wood isn't durable but was the choice for making butter crates for export. The wood didn't impart any smell on the butter.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 26, 2019, 08:28:30 PM
That was a tough one to google.  I like it though.

Today I was fishing in MO.  I saw many of our trees of the day.  I even saw river birch.  Lots of walnut, ash, hackberry.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on July 27, 2019, 05:33:18 AM
OK, lets see what else I have in the phone. 

Growing in the park beside the Kauri. I think I see even a stray Kauri behind it. 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190725_135937.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1564219282)
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190725_135947.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1564219274)
Another "old growth" forest tree, but an ornamental yellow variety. Wood is light, quite soft, but very durable. Maori used it for carving and canoes. 

One of those trees that look cute in the native plant section of the garden shop. If you are in the long term garden plan crowd. Biggest one are pushing 2,000 years old.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: DelawhereJoe on July 27, 2019, 07:39:16 AM
Totara
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: DelawhereJoe on July 27, 2019, 07:40:47 AM
You should write a book on the trees or at least fill in Wiki with all of your knowledge.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on July 27, 2019, 04:15:50 PM
What is I Be?
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51812/IMG_0770.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1564258291)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51812/IMG_0771.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1564257989)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51812/IMG_0775.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1564258161)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: nativewolf on July 27, 2019, 04:27:38 PM
I Saw it and I'm pretty sure.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 28, 2019, 06:47:15 AM
Looks a lot like (Quercus acutissima) sawtooth oak.  It is a native of Asia.  

While looking in the bottom of the barrel I found another to use for today's tree of the day.
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_0435.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1416870321)
 I do not have a picture of the tree but it grows to well over 100' tall with a conical form.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 28, 2019, 08:51:25 AM
Does it grow in the southeastern appalachians?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 28, 2019, 01:21:36 PM
(https://www.dendroapp.frec.vt.edu/VT_Assets/Fact_Sheets/images/Picea%20rubens/map.jpg)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 28, 2019, 04:06:22 PM
Well, it does, but not what I was thinking.  Now I know what it is.  Blue spruce is blue, but red spruce is green?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 28, 2019, 09:11:52 PM
Red Spruce (Pinaceae (http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/DENDROLOGY/data_results.cfm?family=Pinaceae) Picea (http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/DENDROLOGY/data_results.cfm?genus=Picea)).


Not seeing spruce frequently, I struggle with this one and White Spruce.  If someone wants to, post a tree of the day for tomorrow and we may avoid a possible repeat.  I am sure I have some I have not used but I have not gone through the list in quite a while.   

    
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on July 28, 2019, 09:20:31 PM
It's been too long but if memory serves me correctly the bark makes the distinction a lot easier.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 28, 2019, 09:27:55 PM
You can see by the map why I sure don't consider myself any expert on it. We have a few remnant colonies on the highest peaks left over from the last ice age. I've sawed one load when southern pine beetle somehow got into a stand in the Nat'l forest. The best of it went to a guitar maker, it makes good tonewood for tops, and a local architect sent the rest over here to be sawn for a house he was doing.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 29, 2019, 07:35:35 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~173.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1477273493)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~174.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1477273497)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/image~175.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1477273498)
 Today's tree of the day.  I do not think we have used this one but the leaf is very similar to one we previously used.  The bark on this tree is a little rougher than that of the tree that is similar and, to me, the leaf petioles on this one appear to be slightly shorter than its look alike.  WDH showed me a way to definitively i.d. this one.

There were a lot of oaks discussed in another thread that could help this thread along if any of you have time to add them.  Also, there are a lot of trees from out west and in the northwest that have been neglected as well.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on July 29, 2019, 09:28:24 AM
Probably way off on this one, but, "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a darn".
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 29, 2019, 12:39:58 PM
 smiley_applause
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: lxskllr on July 29, 2019, 03:54:31 PM
I guess the look-a-like is pin?

edit:
BTW, I can contribute one tomorrow if you like. I only have a very young example, and it'll probably be easy for the pros here, but I don't think it's been used yet.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 29, 2019, 08:40:02 PM
Oh yea little concentric circles....
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 29, 2019, 11:13:19 PM
Texas Ranger was all over today's tree of the day.  It was the Scarlet Oak (Quercus coccinea).  The do look similar to the Shumard Oak and the Pin Oak.  The acorns of the Scarlet Oak has the concentric rings as shown in the picture - that is a dead giveaway.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: lxskllr on July 30, 2019, 05:11:37 AM
Today's tree is a NA native. This is my own special tree, and I don't have a full grown specimen for a picture. I planted it 9 months ago, and I'd guess it's 2 years old.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/49990/IMG_20190729_155841.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1564452779)

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/49990/IMG_20190729_155951.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1564452752)


Sorry about the green wash. My phone takes terrible pictures, and so do I. Better phones in the past compensated for my inadequacies.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 30, 2019, 05:37:20 AM
Thank you for doing the tree of the day today.  I think I know what it is but I will wait for verification.  This one is new to me.  Does it produce an edible fruit?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: lxskllr on July 30, 2019, 06:13:55 AM
Yup. The fruit's pretty good.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 30, 2019, 07:28:29 AM
Fruit tastes sorta between a banana and a mango. 


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14370/IMG_2001.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1222182869)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on July 30, 2019, 08:30:49 AM
Lindy bought 4 of them from the local nursery. I've never actually seen one in the wild. I hope they survive. Most that know where any wild ones grow keep it close to the vest.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on July 30, 2019, 09:19:19 AM
Have not seen one of these in years, many back in Missouri growing up, have not seen one in Texas.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 30, 2019, 09:20:14 AM
You might call it a grandfather tree I think.  Thereís a road a few miles down the road of the same name.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 30, 2019, 10:33:03 AM
I have shared a title with this tree since last December.    

The posting of this tree reminded me of a couple of others that have not made the tree of the day.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on July 30, 2019, 11:35:01 AM
Looks like an avocado tree but the fruit does not look like the store variety (Haas).  I did see one in Florida and I thought it was called a Florida Avocado, but the fruit was HUGE - 10 to 12" long.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on July 30, 2019, 11:39:58 AM
ďPa? Is that you pa?Ē
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: lxskllr on July 30, 2019, 05:51:52 PM
Today's tree was a pawpaw. From wikipedia...

"
Asimina triloba, the papaw, pawpaw, paw paw, or paw-paw, among many regional names, is a small
deciduous tree (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deciduous_tree) native to the eastern United States and Canada, producing a large, yellowish-green to brown fruit (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fruit).[1] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asimina_triloba#cite_note-ncsu-1)[2] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asimina_triloba#cite_note-layne-2) It belongs to the genus Asimina (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asimina) in the same plant family (the Annonaceae (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annonaceae)) as the custard-apple (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Custard-apple), cherimoya (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cherimoya), sweetsop (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugar-apple), ylang-ylang (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ylang-ylang) and soursop (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soursop).
The pawpaw is a
patch-forming (clonal) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cloning) understory (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Understory) tree found in well-drained, deep, fertile bottom-land and hilly upland habitat, with large, simple leaves. Pawpaw fruits are the largest edible fruit indigenous (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigenous_(ecology)) to the United States (not counting gourds (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gourd), which are typically considered vegetables (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vegetable) rather than fruit for culinary purposes, although in botany (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Botany) they are classified as fruit).[3] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asimina_triloba#cite_note-KSU-3)
Pawpaw fruits have a sweet,
custardish (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Custard) flavor somewhat similar to banana (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banana), mango (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mango), and pineapple (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pineapple), and are commonly eaten raw, but are also used to make ice cream and baked desserts."

Asimina triloba - Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asimina_triloba)

I have two of them planted, and I'm hoping I'll eventually get some fruit. I infrequently find them at work, but it's been a few years since I've seen a pawpaw tree. The fruit's best when it's at it's ugliest. If you think "that doesn't look like food", it'll probably be amazing.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on July 30, 2019, 06:13:46 PM
Yep, in the hills of Missouri we called them custard apples.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 30, 2019, 09:30:53 PM
If someone wants the next two days, have at it.  I will be out of town for work.  I went by my old workplace today to get a picture of a tree we have not used but it was gone like the wind. Where are the west coast contributors?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on July 30, 2019, 11:43:39 PM
When I was but a youn'en I bought a couple of those from one of those seed catalogs.  Remember the type? Send your order form in an envelope and the UPS man would show up one day with a COD package?  Anyway I planted it at my folks place and never got any fruit from them.  Years later I visited and discovered it was actually a maple or something like that they had shipped as the trees were still where I planted them.  Oh well - still want to try one of the fruits.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on July 31, 2019, 08:25:40 AM
This tree lives in the bottomlands of the delta and has thinner and slicker bark similar to water oak what is it?  (http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51812/IMG_0810.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1564371530)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51812/IMG_0811.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1564575914)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on July 31, 2019, 09:23:18 AM
This tree is 16 inches DBH and was planted by me about 30 years ago.  About 15 years ago it started producing massive crops of medium size acorns much larger than water oaks.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on July 31, 2019, 02:37:21 PM
Believe I may have falcon hunted under that tree
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 31, 2019, 07:19:36 PM
The best I can come up with is cherry bark.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on July 31, 2019, 09:34:25 PM
Nuttall oak, it has basically scarlet red oak leaves but the bark is like water and willow oak, grows in the river regions and it is  very fast growing and acorn producing, has usually a main straight trunk. Dendrology teacher use to get everyone with this one as well as the devils walking stick and the toothache tree.  I have not seen a toothache tree since college, maybe some can post one.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on July 31, 2019, 09:41:05 PM
I'd like to see that one ???. The devils walking stick I know too well, we had another name for them :-X  :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on July 31, 2019, 09:55:26 PM
Thanks for posting the Nuttall Oak.  It is not one I was familiar with.  I know where there is a toothache tree at O'Leno State Park, the site of Florida's FFA Forestry Camp, but I was unable to attend this summer.  It has a unique taste and will make one's mouth a bit numb.  If someone were to set up a dendro test using Pin Oak, Scarlet Oak, Shumard Oak, Nuttall Oak and Pin Oak with just the leaves it would be a challenging test for me.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 31, 2019, 10:10:43 PM
Never heard of that one and itís not in my book.  Must have been named after 1937.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on July 31, 2019, 10:13:11 PM
Devils walking stick is the one you grab when jumping the creek, don't ask how I know.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on July 31, 2019, 10:15:46 PM
You would think a Texas boy would know that one.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 31, 2019, 10:16:13 PM
Iíve got one that I can post, though itís not something youíre gonna mill lumber from.  I can do it tonight for tomorrow.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on July 31, 2019, 10:18:00 PM
The leaves are definitely similar.  Pin oak has more lobes and very finely divided at the bristlely tips.  Nuttall (also called texas oak) has fewer lobes and not as divided at the bristley tips.  Scarlet and shumard are in between.  The definitive seperator among them is the acorns.  They are all different with scarlet and nuttall having the most similarity.   
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on July 31, 2019, 10:27:12 PM
This small tree feeds birds in the winter as the red berries(drupes) stay on for a long time.  Since mine donít have any fruit yet, the picture with fruit is from google.  Mine are about 20 feet tall.  I donít know how tall they can get.  They are native to Missouri and many other southeast states.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/36921/F6DBB406-518A-449E-A54C-AF5C1842D72F.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1564626320)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/36921/98D88E56-3E7D-4344-8FFB-C1870ACC3702.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1564626305)
 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/36921/80EBAF0B-278E-4863-815E-3F5B35D98B05.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1564626413)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: DelawhereJoe on August 01, 2019, 12:44:27 PM
Is that winterberry holly ?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on August 01, 2019, 12:51:18 PM
Very close, but no.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on August 01, 2019, 02:28:07 PM
Possum up a paw paw tree?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: pesaventoc on August 01, 2019, 07:08:17 PM
youpon?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: pesaventoc on August 01, 2019, 07:15:14 PM
never could spell!!! yaupon holly
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on August 01, 2019, 09:44:00 PM
It is a holly and a I think Texas ranger knows what it is.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on August 01, 2019, 10:20:47 PM
This was ilex decidua, otherwise known as possum haw or deciduous holly.  Very similar to the others mentioned.  I think this one is a little more tree like than the others.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on August 01, 2019, 10:21:52 PM
Iíve got nothing for tomorrow unless I can find something new in this campground and actually identify it myself.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on August 01, 2019, 11:10:55 PM
Another well known local. 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190725_135903.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1564715048)

Small specimen in the local park, 20-30 years old. 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190725_135918.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1564715100)

Mature tree in the forest, after 300+ years. 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/P1010157.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1564715128)

And another old tree growing roadside. The vine clinging to it is an epiphyte that starts out in the treetops, extends roots down to the ground, and often remains standing as a large tree in it's won right after the host tree eventually dies. 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/P1010161.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1564715162)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on August 01, 2019, 11:43:01 PM
Here is a picture of the Devils walking stick, it is the small stalks around this down hickory it has compound palmate leaves I think, I seem to remember this term but do not hold me to it any way the way I remember these is when climbing up very steep gulleys you want to grab hold of something for stability and if you ever grab this stick you will remember it the rest of your life.
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51812/IMG_0821.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1564717320)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on August 02, 2019, 01:09:52 AM
They do have one redeeming quality. Today this one was covered in bumblebees and butterflies.


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/34297/KIMG3178.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1564722575)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on August 02, 2019, 08:30:43 AM
I believe the leaves of Devilís walking stick are pinnate compound.  

Ian, Rimu. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on August 02, 2019, 09:26:18 PM
I think Danny may have it.  Looks right.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on August 02, 2019, 11:44:37 PM
bi pinnate opposite
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on August 03, 2019, 08:34:20 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3547.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1563451442)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3548.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1563451446)
 Today's tree of the day.  Sorry that I do not have a good sized tree to show pictures of.  I am sure several will recognize it right off.  Feel free to include some better pictures.  They don't really grow here but they are prevalent north of here. 

I have another tree of the day sample for another day that many will recognize but most probably do not know that they get to tree size.

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on August 03, 2019, 08:57:35 AM
Oh gosh - easy one - Potted Oak, which if set on top of a fence post becomes a different kind of Post Oak, closely related to a Post Turtle.   :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on August 03, 2019, 01:04:21 PM
DanG seedling leaves, can we get a macro?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on August 03, 2019, 09:31:24 PM
This is a VT picture.  (http://dendroapp.frec.vt.edu/VT_Assets/Fact_Sheets/images/Quercus%20velutina/leaf1.jpg) (http://dendroapp.frec.vt.edu/VT_Assets/Fact_Sheets/images/Quercus%20velutina/leaf1.jpg)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on August 03, 2019, 11:30:40 PM
I keep coming up northern red, but have been wrong a time or two. (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=unread;c=2)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on August 03, 2019, 11:39:44 PM
Here's a different kind of trees. :D


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10046/DSC06349.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1564889776)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on August 04, 2019, 06:42:54 AM
Texas Ranger, you were right on the VT picture that I posted (it has been modified to what it should be).  The tree was supposed to be a Black Oak (Quercus velutina).
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: lxskllr on August 04, 2019, 06:51:08 AM
Didn't know other trees were on the table. There's an iron sequoia on my way to work, but I might get arrested collecting a needle sample  :^D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on August 04, 2019, 07:03:16 AM
LeeB, I am guessing that since you are in the oil industry, soon to retire I think, it is a Christmas tree.

Today's tree was one I took the pictures of yesterday morning in a waiting room.  It is frequently used as a foliage plant but given the proper growing conditions it will reach tree size (nearly 100') and will drop down roots from the trunk and branches.  It is very easy to propagate using stem cuttings.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3610.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1564835263)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3611.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1564835263)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3612.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1564835265)
 Another hint: Thrips is the main insect that attacks these trees in the nursery or landscape.  They are native to Asia and Australia.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on August 04, 2019, 07:08:42 AM
Caveman, you are correct. They are called christmas trees. 

Lindy used to have a few of today's trees as potted specimens. One go fairly big but nowhere as large as you mention.  :o
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: DelawhereJoe on August 04, 2019, 07:43:33 AM
I'm surprised that tree in the office wasn't fake.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on August 04, 2019, 12:24:02 PM
Itís hard to come up with any puns for this tree.  How about....a guy named Benjamin might like it.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on August 04, 2019, 02:35:59 PM
I would not give a fig for the doctors visit
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ESFted on August 04, 2019, 03:55:08 PM
I canned a bunch of fig jam today, but they didn't come from this tree.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: btulloh on August 04, 2019, 04:01:41 PM
Rhymes with ďlike usĒ
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on August 04, 2019, 08:13:26 PM
Y'all got it.  Produces latex and has edible berries.  Benjamin Fig (Ficus benjamina).  I have seen it grown as a hedge.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on August 05, 2019, 04:29:16 AM
I do not have anything for today.  A few we have not used and I do not have around here are Balsam Fir, Sitka Spruce, Redwood, Western Redcedar, Spruce Pine, Jack Pine, Lodgepole Pine, Ponderosa Pine, Pin Oak, Mesquite, Cuban or Florida Mahogany, Red Mangrove, White Mangrove, Black Mangrove, Douglas Fir, Scotch Pine, Western Hemlock, Melaleuca, Eucalyptus, River Birch, Quaking Aspen, Buckeye, and a host of others.

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on August 05, 2019, 05:26:14 AM
Careful what you wish for, there are ~300 species of Eucalyptus  :D

Rimu (Dacrydium cupressinum) was the last one I posted. Brilliant timber, but very slow growing and legally protected, so very little is harvested these days. 

Anyway, another local. 

Leaves
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190725_112833.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1564996067) 

Trunk / branches with a local Honey Eater strutting his stuff (early spring is mating season) and the birds come down from the Mt to hang out in the town gardens where there are more flowering trees. 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/IMG_3054.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1564996668)

Closer up of the flower. The pic is right way up, the bird isn't  :D
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/tui1.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1564996716)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on August 05, 2019, 06:21:50 AM
Thanks, Ian.  I think I know what it is, even though I cannot pronounce it, but I won't go out on that limb quite yet.  

Years ago, Florida's Forest Service had Eucalyptus spp. listed on the FFA forestry contest list.  I guess they could have used any of the 300.  I only saw it show up once and the leaves the collecting forester used were red.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on August 05, 2019, 07:38:43 AM
Hint on the pronunciation. 
The Maori alphabet has no F.   "wh" is the equivalent. Not exact. but if you say it that way you will be close enough. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on August 05, 2019, 10:09:18 AM
 http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=25171.0 (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=25171.0)

More info on black oak.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on August 05, 2019, 01:55:02 PM
I may be able to do a few of the trees listed by caveman.  I have a few specimens of 2 of those.  Young though they be.  No cones yet.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on August 05, 2019, 03:27:38 PM
Best I can come up with is Kōwhai
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on August 05, 2019, 03:54:31 PM
I am with Texas Ranger on Ian's tree.  It evidently has some medicinal uses.  

Danny, I followed your link on the Black Oak, realized that I had read it before and was a good way thorough it when I noticed that it was from several years ago. Thank you for linking that to this thread. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: lxskllr on August 05, 2019, 08:22:00 PM
Here's my tree...

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/49990/BlackOak.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1565050694)

It's health issues got worse since it was last reported  :^P

This thread got me interested in trying to find the bicentennial book that got produced back in 76. It appears nobody made a pdf. We're supposed to have a plaque too. Wonder if that's around anywhere?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on August 06, 2019, 01:39:16 AM
Best I can come up with is Kōwhai
You got it.  The flowers are pretty distinctive. It's not a large tree, and usually grows on riverbanks etc, where it's not overshadowed by taller trees. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LIL on August 06, 2019, 02:36:49 AM
Pronunciation of kōwhai (https://maoridictionary.co.nz/search?idiom=&phrase=&proverb=&loan=&histLoanWords=&keywords=Kowhai+)

For those interested in how it is pronounced.  This is of interest to me as I am currently learning to speak more "Te Reo Maori"  One of the official languages of New Zealand.  

LIL   
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on August 06, 2019, 01:54:57 PM
Well, since we donít have a tree yet for today and the fact that I found this tree on a hike, Iím gonna post it.  The trouble is that Iím not sure what it is.  Maybe one of you does.  I found the fruit on the trail and thought someone had dropped a grape.  I looked up and saw the fruit in the tree.  Iím assuming itís not native. This was on a hike in Branson MO.   The photos are the best I could do.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/36921/9CD8542E-46DE-4057-B4CF-2070D87C377B.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1565114062)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/36921/3CC9CB3B-D3CA-48A9-8CE8-9546826707E5.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1565113989)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/36921/903521DD-C82A-4FBA-B775-96553C06129A.jpeg?easyrotate_cache=1565113987)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on August 06, 2019, 02:08:50 PM
cherry or fruit tree bark, beyond that, nope.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on August 06, 2019, 02:15:55 PM
crabapple?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: JohnW on August 06, 2019, 11:37:32 PM
Does the fruit have a pit like a cherry?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on August 07, 2019, 12:28:02 AM
Looks like Mexican plum to me.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on August 07, 2019, 03:07:08 AM
X2 on Mexican Plum.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on August 07, 2019, 07:59:06 AM
I am in the plum camp.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on August 07, 2019, 08:35:27 AM
I think Iím gonna call that a winner....Mexican plum.  Interesting that itís mostly growing in the US and not that many in Mexico.  Iíve never heard of it, but it sure looks like what I saw.  My wife said the fruit smelled like a plum.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on August 07, 2019, 08:54:32 AM
Around me there is Chickasaw plum and Mexican.  The Chickasaw is smaller and thicketer the Mexican to me sometimes is more thorny looking, both have white flowers in the spring. Most of the Chickasaw I have planted are dying due to age and scale but in the past man those plums were delicious .
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on August 07, 2019, 01:55:54 PM
That was something I forgot to mention.  This tree looked thorny.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on August 07, 2019, 03:53:21 PM
Does anyone have something to submit for today's tree of the day?  Where are all of the west coast FF members?  It is still relatively early out there.

I am temporarily tapped out.  I may be able to come up with some by necks weak, um, next week.

We may have to resort to a multiple guess/choice dendro test to keep us entertained until additional trees are posted.

 
1.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3576.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1563793656)
 
2.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3421.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1561750025)
 
3.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3386.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1560823773)
 
4.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3332.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1559904493)
 
5.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/Black_Walnut_2.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557586931)
 Confounding compound leaved tree Choices: Green Ash, Mockernut Hickory, Pignut Hickory, Tabebuia, Black Walnut, Pecan (you get one extra just to make it a little challenging).
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: nativewolf on August 07, 2019, 05:04:49 PM
I have something I'd like to get the forums input on.  As well I thought a refressher of different hickory, white oaks, and red oaks would be interesting.  

Anyway,
@caveman (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=12883)  I could post a tree of the day first thing in the AM if you'd like.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: nativewolf on August 08, 2019, 05:31:36 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/34089/IMG-1312.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1565225540)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/34089/IMG-1309.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1565225573)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/34089/IMG-1307.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1565225558)
 

A tree of the day for folks.  Hope this one is ok, if we need better pics that can as I'll be on that site today.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: nativewolf on August 08, 2019, 09:29:19 AM
No thoughts yet on this tree?  Hint, in Northern VA this is likely an out population in the extreme.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on August 08, 2019, 12:32:06 PM
Iím stumped.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on August 08, 2019, 01:09:15 PM
under story leaves are tough, but, best I see is burr oak.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: nativewolf on August 08, 2019, 02:20:20 PM
under story leaves are tough, but, best I see is burr oak.
I didn't feel up for the climb to get leaves that weren't shaded.  There are about a dozen of these along a drive and scattered in some woodlands.  Some trunks are near 40" DBH.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: DelawhereJoe on August 08, 2019, 07:44:36 PM
Swamp chestnut oak
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: nativewolf on August 08, 2019, 08:30:10 PM
I think @Texas Ranger (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=7) is right...we have a swamp chestnut oak and the leaves just look more chestnut like and the the bark looks like white oak but for Burr they are out of Range.  I was hoping @WDH (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=4370) @Don P (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=17) or midwesterners like @barbender (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=1286) or @Jeff (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=1) or @Ron Scott (http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=2) would chime in on this tree.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Jeff on August 08, 2019, 08:35:05 PM
Doesn't look like our whiteoaks, but i agree its at least a whiteoak.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on August 08, 2019, 08:44:31 PM
Swamp chestnut oak.  Also called cow oak because cows love to eat the big, sweet, acorns. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on August 08, 2019, 09:31:27 PM
I was going to guess a swamp white oak or swamp chestnut oak based on the leaf shape and the bark.  Thank you for posting the pictures.
Swamp white oak pictured below. 
(http://dendroapp.frec.vt.edu/VT_Assets/Fact_Sheets/images/Quercus%20bicolor/leaf1.jpg) (http://dendroapp.frec.vt.edu/VT_Assets/Fact_Sheets/images/Quercus%20bicolor/leaf1.jpg)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: barbender on August 09, 2019, 01:23:02 AM
When you southern fellas start naming off oaks, it reminds me of Forrest's friend Bubba talking shrimp😂 In my area, we have 3 oaks- Northern red, Northern pin, and Bur. Sub-arctic temperatures helps to keep a lot of things simple for us😁
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on August 09, 2019, 02:32:54 AM
Here's another unusual local. 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190809_134404.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1565332047)

Close up of the leaves

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190809_134329.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1565332057)

And another. 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190809_134335.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1565332069)

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on August 09, 2019, 05:32:07 AM
When you southern fellas start naming off oaks, it reminds me of Forrest's friend Bubba talking shrimp😂 In my area, we have 3 oaks- Northern red, Northern pin, and Bur. Sub-arctic temperatures helps to keep a lot of things simple for us😁
You think that's bad, I looked up the Maori name for the tree I just posted. Turns out it has about 20 different names, depending on where it grew, what you used it for, or what part of it you ate. 
Lil has her own name for it, but it's not very polite. As a kid she had to pick up the fallen leaves of the one outside her parents house so they could mow the lawn...  smiley_furious   :D
The leaves can be used to make rope, so they aren't very lawnmower friendly. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on August 09, 2019, 06:07:28 AM
I am guessing an Australian could use it to make cord or line.  Thanks for posting.  I think I have seen some of these growing along our coast but I had no idea what they were.

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on August 09, 2019, 07:28:42 AM
Is it a monocot?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on August 09, 2019, 08:32:03 AM
I remember a Bur Oak on the campus of Ms. State I recall the acorns were the size of golf balls massive.!!
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on August 09, 2019, 08:33:57 AM
I
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on August 09, 2019, 08:51:06 AM
Looks kinda like a yucca. Is it related?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on August 09, 2019, 09:32:36 AM
Does its name sound like something you could make a salad with?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on August 09, 2019, 11:13:04 AM
Does its name sound like something you could make a salad with?
Can't think of any tree that rhymes with "buffalo chicken".... :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: DelawhereJoe on August 09, 2019, 01:04:40 PM
Cabbage tree
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on August 09, 2019, 01:05:53 PM
Can't think of any tree that rhymes with "buffalo chicken".... 
 

Are you sure your name ain't Gonzo?  :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on August 09, 2019, 07:49:37 PM
Cabbage tree
Yup, that's it's common name, because the leaf bud can cooked and eaten, and tastes a bit like cabbage. 
Cordyline australis is the scientific name, so Caveman's guessing is right, and it was actually used by the Maori people for making "cords and line", or at least ropes and fish nets. 
Quote
Is it a monocot?
Yes. 
Quote
Looks kinda like a yucca. Is it related?
Distant cousin, same family.
It's doesn't actually produce wood, but it was an important food for the early Maori. They found that if you steamed the trunks or roots for a day or so in an umu (earth oven) it turned into a sugary fructose that could be dried and stored for later. It would also grow in the colder areas where their kumera (sweet potatoes) couldn't. The leaves have very strong fibres, so that was used for cloth / rope and even sandals. And a bonus, when it seeded it attracted the wood pigeons that could be snared or speared.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on August 09, 2019, 09:13:19 PM
Who puts cabbage in salad?  Heck, I am half Polish and even my grandma didn't do THAT!  She did cook it about every other way possible though.   ;D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on August 09, 2019, 10:15:26 PM
I hope someone has something for tomorrow.  I have one I am sure I have not used but it is not impressive at all.  Also, tomorrow morning I have to get the crew together early to get to middle Cavedaughter's graduation at UF, which is a couple of hours north of here.

It is amazing to me that we have such a diversity of trees and the uses that have been found for them.

Thank you for introducing this one to us, Ian.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on August 09, 2019, 11:00:16 PM
Who puts cabbage in salad?  Heck, I am half Polish and even my grandma didn't do THAT!  She did cook it about every other way possible though.   ;D
Red cabbage is often shredded and added to salads.  Coleslaw is a salad made with cabbage.  I would say though, that it is best when cooked with some corned beef.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: firefighter ontheside on August 09, 2019, 11:02:42 PM
Iíll try to get some pictures of a tree here in the campground tomorrow morning that has not been posted yet.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on August 09, 2019, 11:03:56 PM
If I never smell boiled cabbage again... ;D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on August 10, 2019, 12:42:10 AM
Here's another from the local park. Lower leaves, and it's winter, so they are a bit rough looking, but I had to find ones I could reach.  :D

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190809_133714.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1565411537)

This one is growing on the banks of the Patea river, which is running a bit higher and dirty from the recent rain.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190809_133742.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1565411545) 

Other side of the path there is a small stand of them, showing a more normal forest form. The tree produces good timber, but is highly protected and can only be sawed with a permit. 

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10460/20190809_133805.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1565411525) 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on August 10, 2019, 08:39:50 AM
Kahikatea?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on August 10, 2019, 03:52:59 PM
Kahikatea?

Nope, we did that back on page 42. This ones an evergreen hardwood.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on August 10, 2019, 04:58:47 PM
I would say Rewarewa, but the leaves are wrong.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: doc henderson on August 10, 2019, 05:27:18 PM
i have been looking up, how about Puriri,  Vitex lucens?  having trouble with the leaves
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on August 10, 2019, 10:04:51 PM
This one is probably tricky, and wouldn't be known outside NZ. 

Tawa, or Beilschmiedia tawa.  The scientific name is the same as the Maori common name, and it's actually from the Laurel family.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beilschmiedia_tawa (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beilschmiedia_tawa)
http://www.terrain.net.nz/friends-of-te-henui-group/table-1/tawa.html (http://www.terrain.net.nz/friends-of-te-henui-group/table-1/tawa.html)

The tree is quite common in the local forests, but it's hard to establish outside the existing canopy. The seedlings are very delicate, but shade tolerant. They are able to germinate and survive for decades until a "light tunnel" opens in the canopy and they start growing normally. 

The other guesses reminds more of a couple more trees I need to find...  ;)

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Texas Ranger on August 11, 2019, 08:19:59 AM
I looked at Tawa, but nothing fit.  Dang it.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on August 12, 2019, 11:55:27 AM
Brain Twister for the day, Name this from the bark, hint root stock was used in France.
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51812/IMG_0827.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1565625301)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: LeeB on August 12, 2019, 12:37:31 PM
Grapevine :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on August 12, 2019, 01:22:30 PM
Bingo!
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51812/IMG_0829.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1565630494)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/51812/IMG_0829.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1565630494)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: doc henderson on August 12, 2019, 03:00:50 PM
Bingo?  Bingo!!! i never heard of Bingo trees.... :D :D :D.  I bet you wine when you have to mill those.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Don P on August 12, 2019, 11:17:33 PM
That was an early case of transporting a bug that caused trouble. Our grapes are resistant to an aphid borne grapevine root disease and when some of our vines were shipped to France for grafting experiments the aphids went along for the ride. Once there they destroyed the French vineyards. The solution was to graft their vines to American rootstock. So I guess you could say that fancy French wine is really just imported American wine.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on August 12, 2019, 11:27:30 PM
I have a bunch of grapevines that seem to be very old.  Some with long brown air roots to the ground, I usually have a good crop of muscadines in late summer, have to beat the deer to them though, oh well with the hard life they live I guess  they deserve them more than me.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: KEC on August 12, 2019, 11:41:56 PM
Hope you guys don't mind me jumping in at this point with a tree that is planted here in Central New York, but not native.
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/50283/RSCN2990~0.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1565667095)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/50283/DSCN2987.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1565665510)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: KEC on August 13, 2019, 12:22:03 AM
I'm still having trouble with posting photos. I have more photos of this tree.
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/50283/RSCN2990.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1565665415)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/50283/DSCN2986.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1565665608)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/50283/DSCN2985.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1565665701)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/50283/DSCN2988.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1565665802)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on August 13, 2019, 02:09:05 AM
The leaves remind me of elm but the bark reminds me of sycamore.  Hmmm.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on August 13, 2019, 08:02:08 AM
Siberian elm.  Ulmus  zelkova
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Woodpecker52 on August 13, 2019, 09:01:51 AM
I would guess they were planted in response to the Dutch Elm Disease killing the native elms.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: DelawhereJoe on August 13, 2019, 11:27:32 AM
I was thinking Japanese elm  Zelkova serrata
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on August 13, 2019, 01:59:06 PM
I was thinking Ulmus parviflora or Drake (Chinese) Elm.  
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Jeff on August 13, 2019, 02:48:22 PM
Tammy and i are sitting at the marina in Detour Village so we can chrmeck messages before coming back to cabin. This just reminded me of a tree on the other side of the village i believe is some sort of elm. Ill navifate over there and depict it.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Jeff on August 13, 2019, 02:56:36 PM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10001/20190813_145243.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1565722413)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10001/20190813_145314.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1565722479)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10001/20190813_145329.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1565722551)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10001/20190813_145336.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1565722585)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: KEC on August 13, 2019, 03:36:58 PM
I had to ask a tree service guy what this was a few years ago and he said zelkova. Sometime I'll get photos of a tree in my neighbors' yard and see if WDH gets that one so quickly. You guys are good. I'm quite sure Jeffs'  tree is a Specimen Tree. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on August 13, 2019, 03:52:14 PM
I was going to guess Chinese elm (Ulmus parvifolia) because of the bark. It's other name is Lacebark Elm, because of it's flaky look.  But then I wouldn't know the difference between that and a Zelkova, I suspect they are similar?

Jeff's tree is probably a grafted ornamental. 6ft of normal straight sapling with a contorted variety grafted on top? There is a similar tree still growing at a house I used to own (20+ years ago) It was big then, and it's still growing strong. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Jeff on August 13, 2019, 07:26:05 PM
Here is one. This year I'm  getting to it before  the critters  I've never had a harvest because im always a day late and dollar short. This year i started picking them as soon as i saw them and hope they dry okay!  I think it is technically a tree.


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10001/20190813_185507.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1565738715)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10001/20190813_190035.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1565738734)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10001/20190813_190309.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1565738738)
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: stavebuyer on August 14, 2019, 03:17:35 AM
I can't recall if this one has been done yet; this one is growing in central KY. Leaves were too high up to get ahold of.


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/25189/20190810_093559.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1565766668)
 


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/25189/20190810_093703.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1565766394)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/25189/20190810_093703.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1565766394)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on August 14, 2019, 08:08:12 AM
Bark is typical for ash. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on August 14, 2019, 10:01:24 AM
Bark is typical for ash.
There he goes again... :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: stavebuyer on August 14, 2019, 01:37:31 PM
No its not Ash. Here is a slightly closer view of the leaves/branches(the one with the tent worms)


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/25189/20190810_094310.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1565803350)
 

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: stavebuyer on August 14, 2019, 01:42:34 PM
It has white flowers in spring, brilliant red leaves in the fall, and used for honey.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: DelawhereJoe on August 14, 2019, 02:19:15 PM
Only one I know like that is black gum
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: DelawhereJoe on August 14, 2019, 02:20:28 PM
Im am interested in figuring out what Jeff posted...looks intesting
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on August 14, 2019, 08:42:40 PM
I believe that you are right, Delaware.  Blackgum, probably even tupelo given the size of the leaves. 

I believe that Jeff's tree is a heavily top-pruned american elm.  Top of leaf surface should be smooth.  If red elm or slippery elm (same tree), the top of the leaf surface should be scabrous (rough like sandpaper). 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Southside on August 14, 2019, 09:11:37 PM
So you are saying Jeff collected hazelnuts from an elm tree? How warm has it been down your way?  ;D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Jeff on August 14, 2019, 09:13:26 PM
 :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on August 14, 2019, 09:28:50 PM
The man is gifted, I tell you...
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on August 14, 2019, 10:05:25 PM
I, too, was thinking Jeff's tree was an American Elm.  I could not see the leaf petioles or the buds and I am only familiar with three elms.  The flowers, fruits or seeds that he was collecting and posting pictures of I am not familiar with.  

If no one has anything posted by 6 a.m. tomorrow when I get to work, I'll try to post a new one I got a picture of today.  I saw a couple of others today that I have not posted but I did not get pictures of them.

Thank you to all who have been contributing to this thread.  I have learned a lot.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: DelawhereJoe on August 14, 2019, 10:45:33 PM
Corylus cornuta, beaked hazelnut unless my Googlefu skills have let me down.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: stavebuyer on August 15, 2019, 02:47:14 AM
My tree was a Sourwood; some call it Sorrel. Oxydendrum Arboreum.


(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/25189/20190810_093559.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1565766668)
 



Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: Ianab on August 15, 2019, 05:22:19 AM
Jeff's Elm tree makes me think this.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulmus_glabra_%27Camperdownii%27 (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulmus_glabra_%27Camperdownii%27)

The contorted version is often grafted to some regular root stock. So the tree has a normal trunk for 6-8 ft, then the grafted part goes wild. Popular as an ornamental, as it doesn't try to grow to 100 ft and become a problem. The original tree is still growing in Scotland, and is only ~10ft tall after nearly 200 years. 

I can find some more trees, but not tonight, so if anyone else has something, jump in. 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on August 15, 2019, 06:12:47 AM
That was a good sized Sourwood.  It was also tree of the day on July 7.

Today's tree was found growing on a small sand hill not far from a swamp.  Their were a lot of gopher tortoise burrows close by, sand live oaks, longleaf pines, black cherry and laurel oaks.  I had gone to this site to collect a turkey oak sample but it had died since last year.  The range of this species is from Texas to Virginia.  This is probably too many hints to make it a challenge.

This tree species tops out at around 30' and the leaf shape is similar to a laurel oak but the texture is similar to a live oak.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3622.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1565823195)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3623.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1565823197)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3624.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1565823197)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ellmoe on August 15, 2019, 06:30:30 AM
Is jack feeling down in the dumps?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on August 15, 2019, 07:38:16 AM
Stavebuyer, that is a nice one.

You ever seen an oak run?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on August 15, 2019, 09:16:56 PM
Ellmoe knows today's tree (he's a sharp feller).  With the hints and a tree which should probably be utilized in landscape more, I would expect more to chime in. This is a pretty cool tree and easily overlooked. If I did not live in a low area, I would probably plant at least one in my yard.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: curdog on August 15, 2019, 09:22:04 PM
I snapped some pictures earlier today of a few out of place trees that I can post when there's a day running a little short for the T.O.D.. one may be a repeat and the other might be a brother of today's tree....
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on August 16, 2019, 05:21:03 AM
Yesterday's tree of the day was Bluejack Oak or (Quercus incana). 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on August 16, 2019, 07:29:50 AM
Also called runner oak.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: curdog on August 16, 2019, 11:07:25 AM
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/32389/20190815_083901.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1565967834)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/32389/20190815_084013.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1565967824)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/32389/20190815_084148.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1565967802)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/32389/20190815_084137.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1565967794)
 

I'm pretty sure one of these has been posted before,  but the other should be a new one. One is definitely not from the foothills of NC, and the other is found but not common.  It's like taking a trip to the sandhills without ever leaving home.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: samandothers on August 16, 2019, 11:50:54 AM
Happy Birthday Caveman!  Enjoy the thread you started here.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: ljohnsaw on August 16, 2019, 12:47:21 PM
Looks like an oak and a pine... ;) :D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: curdog on August 16, 2019, 12:58:17 PM
Looks like an oak and a pine... ;) :D
Winner, I made it too easy  ;D
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: WDH on August 16, 2019, 05:19:15 PM
Blackjack oak.
Slash pine.
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: curdog on August 17, 2019, 11:54:18 AM
WDH got it bonus points because I meant to post the picture of the longleaf next to it....
But this farm has a wide variety of trees found on it.. longleaf, shortleaf, Virginia, loblolly,  eastern white and pond pines and numerous oak species including Bur which is not a local species...
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on August 17, 2019, 05:59:31 PM
The slash pine we have here tend to have longer needles than those north of here.  Also, slash pine usually has fascicles with two and three needles and they tend to grow down the end of the twig further than longleaf or loblolly.  

Pictured below are some slash pine logs we sawed several years ago when we still had a liveoak to shade our mill in the afternoons.  Hurricane Irma split it.

(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/photo_28329.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1333425450)

Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on August 18, 2019, 06:45:24 PM
Today's tree of the day is a sad example but it is what I have.  This tree used to be the epitome of the species - no longer.
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3634.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1566167985)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3636.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1566167979)
 
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3635.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1566167976)
 
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: DelawhereJoe on August 18, 2019, 07:46:54 PM
Naval orange ?
Title: Re: Tree of the day
Post by: caveman on August 18, 2019, 09:35:58 PM
It is a seedless variety but it is not a navel.  This one has greening or huŠnglůngbžng as do most of the remaining Florida trees not grown in greenhouses or under protective mesh.  This variety has an oval shaped fruit with small dimples or a roughness on the peel.  It is a late ripening fruit (April,May or June) and is one of the best for juice.  This tree still produces edible fruit but they are much smaller than they used to be.
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22883/IMG_3640.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1566167986)
 These little bugs on this lemon leaf (short petiole, serrated, and pin holes), Asian Citrus Psyllids, have devastated Florida's citrus industry.  Polk County, where I live, used to be the citrus capitol of the world.  When I was a kid, every piece of land around that was not swampy had a citrus grove.  Now I do not know of a decent citrus grove within 20 miles of my place.  There are still some good looking groves in the east side of the county near Haines City or Lake Wales but the trees do not live long and need to be replaced often.