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General Forestry => General Board => Topic started by: clww on May 14, 2019, 06:16:24 PM

Title: New Countertops With Recycled Materials
Post by: clww on May 14, 2019, 06:16:24 PM
Iím thinking of using some slabs of previously used bowling alley wood at the cabin for kitchen countertops. The pieces I have are about 10í L X 42Ē W x 2Ē thick. Iím going to need to sand these, then perhaps stain them darker, then cover with several coats of polyurethane.
Thoughts on this and any recommendations will be highly appreciated.
Title: Re: New Countertops With Recycled Materials
Post by: alan gage on May 15, 2019, 10:10:23 AM
How are they for nails?

I thought about getting some of the flooring from a local bowling alley that was closing down but after some research it sounds like they use a tons of nails to hold the floor together. Decided I didn't need the headache.

Alan
Title: Re: New Countertops With Recycled Materials
Post by: clww on May 15, 2019, 12:23:47 PM
Lots of nails and glue holding the segments together edgewise, but nothing that Iíve noticed vertically. These are all still tight together, even though theyíve been in storage for years. I didnít see any gouges, deep scrapes or ridiculous staining.
These are still in a building at the sellers location, in an ďas isĒ condition. These are made of pine, with maple edges on the two lengthwise sides. Each piece is heavy, but nothing like granite countertops. Iíve got a mess of granite tops, but itís not going to work with the size or layout for the kitchen. Additionally, I can work with wood much easier than with the granite.
Title: Re: New Countertops With Recycled Materials
Post by: tule peak timber on May 15, 2019, 01:26:08 PM
We went with wood in our new kitchen for the same reasons you describe.
  Some thoughts on finishing: If you stain the parent material and break through the stain later , it will look like heck versus looking at parent material of the same color. We cook with glass, cast iron, stainless etc that is pretty tough on kitchen surfaces.There are two basic types of finish-surface forming and penetrating. Surface forming is easy to keep clean, but if you break through the finish you are in trouble.Penetrating is less durable but far more forgiving and easy to touch-up.
  There are several types of poly with different characteristics, as there are different penetrating oils, some with film like finish. Your choice will depend on your application, but I bet your counters will come out looking like a million bucks.
Title: Re: New Countertops With Recycled Materials
Post by: curved-wood on May 15, 2019, 03:50:54 PM
Speaking of recycle countertop: the last house I've built, I had put some recycle stainless sheet that came fromÖ...a floor of a topless bar !!!!!! Dont fantasize when your are cutting your cucumbers  :)  Very good heavy stuff, I guess  they have the money to pay.(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/48698/_JPV6102.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1557949031)
 
On the left, stainless countertop scratch with a grinder. In centre the kitchen island is in maple and it is oil with several coat of tung oil (not tongue oil ! ).
Title: Re: New Countertops With Recycled Materials
Post by: tule peak timber on May 15, 2019, 04:18:01 PM
Nice, nice , nice ! I would love to see more details on your "woven" door panels.Great looking work... but I hate the whitewashed beams in the middle of all that beautiful wood. ;D
Title: Re: New Countertops With Recycled Materials
Post by: clww on May 15, 2019, 04:31:11 PM
Thatís why I posted...to get some ideas from the experts. Thank you. :)
Title: Re: New Countertops With Recycled Materials
Post by: curved-wood on May 15, 2019, 06:35:02 PM
 

Nice, nice , nice ! I would love to see more details on your "woven" door panels. Great looking work... but I hate the whitewashed beams in the middle of all that beautiful wood. ;D
The white beams were not the original intention. But I broke a couple of ribs in a bad timing while constructing, so the beams were left all winter exposed to the weather and the stains were quite difficult to get rid, so I painted white. Finally I like the final product; it enhance the curve in the ceiling.  I could understand that some people dont like it but that is OK .....it is a good thing that we are not all the same because we will love all the same women !


Title: Re: New Countertops With Recycled Materials
Post by: tule peak timber on May 15, 2019, 07:13:39 PM
Your photo doesn't show the curve in the ceiling.As far as women....I married a Canuck that discourages talk about women period. :D :D :D
Title: Re: New Countertops With Recycled Materials
Post by: curved-wood on May 16, 2019, 06:32:43 AM
The curve that you see in the photo is what it is. The ceiling is higher 24'' in the center. You could use the doors headers as a reference. Here is another point of view : (http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/48698/Salle_principale.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1558002598) 
Title: Re: New Countertops With Recycled Materials
Post by: tule peak timber on May 16, 2019, 09:15:10 AM
Yes, now I see the curve. Your work is terrific! I've done a little "twisting " myself.
(http://forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/35190/tuscan6post.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1558012476)
 
Title: Re: New Countertops With Recycled Materials
Post by: low_48 on May 17, 2019, 12:08:53 AM
The only bowling alley I've worked with was not glued and was nailed with hardened nails. Some kind of shallow tongue and groove to register the boards together and the groove was much deeper than the tongue. The end of the lane looked horrible with those big gaps. Hit one of those hardened nails and every tooth is gone off the saw blade. Cut too close to the end of a short piece, and it falls out. If you aren't going to leave the bowling alley finish on it, I'd suggest glueing up a new countertop. There is no way you'll get a sink cutout in a bowling alley lane without destroying some blades. And since the nails are hardened, no metal blade will touch it either. Despite the appeal, just not worth it in my mind!
Title: Re: New Countertops With Recycled Materials
Post by: fishfighter on May 20, 2019, 03:33:20 PM
I agree 100% of the post above. I had used some in the pass. Really was APITB. Bad thing, the wood was rock maple. It didn't like getting wet. Even after sealing it, water did make it's way in and in no time, started to rot out.