The Forestry Forum

General Forestry => Timber Framing/Log construction => Topic started by: nebruks on May 13, 2012, 04:50:37 PM

Title: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: nebruks on May 13, 2012, 04:50:37 PM
Wished to share with you some of my latest modified traditional Japanese Shou-sugi-ban (焼杉板) wood burning methods applied on my upcoming timber frame and log construction union. I am working with rough sawn spruce that I have been harvested by my own 2 years ago in winter time. I have made all the joinery and before putting it all together I am doing following.... As I am, if I can say that - a "surface addict", I wished to make my frame look rustic and more medieval. So the question of the surface is the question of the feelings you can get when entering in any house or barn. So impressed by Japanese Shou-sugi-ban I decided to burn all the frame with a gas flame, take the burnt surface between the fibers out with a simple hand wire brush and finally treat it with hot linseed oil. And I got two things - the surface I wished to see and a natural treatment for longevity that fire and linseed oil did. I will be rising up only the sills and posts, then will come hand hewn log infill and only after that I will be putting up girts and rafters. Will post some progress shots here. So here you can see the pictures from my work site with my wood burning experience.

"Burn the frame, before you rise it..."

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0425~0.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0429~0.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0430~0.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0435~0.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0436~0.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0441~0.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0445~0.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0449~0.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0450~0.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0451~0.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0465~0.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0466~0.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0469~0.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0471.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0474~0.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0475~0.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0476~0.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0483~0.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0485~0.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0487~0.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0490~0.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0492~0.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0502~0.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26406/DSC_0505~0.jpg)
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: samandothers on May 13, 2012, 05:20:10 PM
Interesting looking finish.   Oil sure does cause the water to bead.  I look forward to following your progress!
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: AMB30518 on May 13, 2012, 05:38:02 PM
I like the dark look too.
Did you add something to the linseed oil to darken it also?
I bet it would make a nice frame contrast with some clean light colored tongue & groove ceiling and walls.
Thanks for sharing and I'll look for updates too.
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: nas on May 13, 2012, 07:20:44 PM
That is cool 8)  I might have to try it on some timbers.  I bet it will give a unique smell to the frame too.
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: Brad_bb on May 14, 2012, 10:42:04 AM
Will it give off an odor in the house? 
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: shelbycharger400 on May 14, 2012, 11:04:26 AM
I'm curious the difference in application of hot vs room temp. oil.
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: zelpatsmot on May 14, 2012, 12:27:45 PM
Thanks for sharing, also curious about hot vs room temp oil.....
Even if that linseed takes months to flash it will be worth it.
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: nebruks on May 14, 2012, 05:15:41 PM
I like the dark look too.
Did you add something to the linseed oil to darken it also?
I bet it would make a nice frame contrast with some clean light colored tongue & groove ceiling and walls.
Thanks for sharing and I'll look for updates too.

No, the oil darkens by the burnt surface.
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: nebruks on May 14, 2012, 05:19:06 PM
Thanks for sharing, also curious about hot vs room temp oil.....
Even if that linseed takes months to flash it will be worth it.

Hot (almost boiling temperature) linseed oil reacts with the wood better and goes deeper inside between the fibers. After the oil dries there is some spots where it did not dry. So I was heating those spots with the gas flame and the oil went into the wood and dried completely.
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: zelpatsmot on May 16, 2012, 09:54:08 PM
How long did it take to dry? Other than the odd spot as you said.
I have to try this... Grateful of your post.
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: Aikenback on May 23, 2012, 05:43:30 PM
nice look. is there any documented preservative advantage?
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: wdncno on June 03, 2012, 09:15:12 AM
I've been doing this on interior projects, but using sunflower oil.  Leaves a really nice finish and does not mildew.
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: Brad_bb on June 03, 2012, 09:59:44 PM
Nebruks,
Are you aware that Makita makes a power brush?  It has wire brush, synthetic brush, and flapwheel heads available for it.   If you like the finish, it might save you a lot of labor.

http://www.timberwolftools.com/tools/makita/M-9741.html (http://tp://www.timberwolftools.com/tools/makita/M-9741.html)

Watch the video demo of this tool on the webpage.
Title: Be cautious....
Post by: venice on October 31, 2012, 04:00:05 PM
i am a bit late to this party but,

if you are using this technique of "aging" wooden surfaces, use all protective measures you can. Full body suit, respiratory protection, gloves, goggles and the best ventilation you can get.

While the result looks really good, the process is extremely unhealthy even with an hand wire brush. Motorized hand-held equipment makes the situation even worse.

The dust of burnt wood you are kicking up is so fine, it's clogging the pores of your skin, is crawling under your mask and again, is extremely unhealthy. Working a coal mine is a joke compared to brushing burned wood.

Have had the "Luck" to work on a project a couple years back that had wood burning/ brushing involved.

Next time someone ask me to do something like that, I'll turn around and walk away...

Even though i don't remember the details, a couple years back i read an article about cleaning up burnt forests. Not sure who brought it up, the author or the cutting crew, there was a major concern about health issues as well related to the black dust...

If you decide to use it anyway, you can skip the linseed or any other chemical treatment. The burnt surface will protect the wood from the elements better than anything. It's a ancient technique protecting wood, that has been used for ages.

Be safe. Venice
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: K.B. on February 23, 2013, 07:08:53 AM
Just wondering if there is an update to this project, or if there is a burnt smell if used in the interior?
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: creativecarpenter on February 24, 2013, 10:47:00 PM
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/31750/DSCN0700.JPG) 


 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/31750/DSCN0016.JPG) 


 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/31750/DSCN0717.JPG) 


 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/31750/DSCN0759.JPG)
 I love the look of burnt wood! I definately plan on burning some or maybe all the timbers in my next home. posting a few pics of signs I made by burning the wood, brushing and sanding to highlight.
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: venice on March 13, 2013, 02:54:09 PM
Sweet. Did you seal it?
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: Aikenback on May 05, 2013, 01:36:13 AM
Maybe this is a good thread to explore other natural finishes as well. I am interested in the steel wool and vinegar aging technique. also, I have seen a video where extremely strong black tea was used. The steelwool and vinegar can be applied after where it reacts chemically with the tannins in the tea and the wood and "ebonizes" the fibers. It apparently turns the wood very dark. I am just wondering how these techniques hold up to uv etc. I am planning on trying all these techniques and applying some clear landark exterior finish with the fungicide and uv blocker over top. Is there any one out there that has tried these other methods?
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: S.Hyland on May 06, 2013, 10:56:13 PM
Funny you mention that you mention the steel and vinegar technique. I am working on a White Oak frame right now that is using that. The first coat went on today, still too pale and blueish. So more coats will go on. I'll get some pics up in the next couple of days...
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: Aikenback on May 07, 2013, 10:49:46 AM
In the video I watched they used pickling vinegar, I dont know what difference it makes. When she added that mixture to the wood with the tea in it, it really darkened. I like the idea of actually changing the colour of the wood fiber rather than adding colour particulates for some reason.
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: FalconFan on March 03, 2016, 03:03:57 PM
Looks like there is now a video to go along with this post.

https://youtu.be/ErGQ0rXkn74
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: Seavee on March 03, 2016, 09:08:26 PM
That is a true craftsman.  Thanks for posting.
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: fishfighter on March 04, 2016, 06:14:23 PM
Now that is a build. Outstanding craftsmen's work.
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: jdtuttle on March 05, 2016, 07:56:30 AM
That's impressive, great job.
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: Fundyheather on March 05, 2016, 08:55:55 AM
wabi, sabi, kensho
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: samandothers on March 05, 2016, 12:36:09 PM
WOW!

What craftsmanship, what time commitment!  Great video and enjoyed the pictures of the family sprinkled in to help show the reasons for the home. The age of the girls also gave some idea of the time. 

Thank you for sharing.
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: robmelby on March 10, 2016, 08:19:12 PM
 Great Video! very inspiring. I have two covered porches that I plan on installing new porch flooring this spring. I'm going with WO 4/4x6 rough sawn. At first I didn't know how I wanted to finish the floor (paint or stain/seal). After seeing the video on Shou-Sugi-ban it peaked my interest. I've done some research and have only seen it done on siding. Does anybody have any knowledge on this technique being used on porch flooring ? Also does it raise the grain and would I torch all four sides?

Thanks for your consideration,
Rob
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: fishfighter on March 13, 2016, 06:41:33 AM
To me in that video, it looked like it did raise the grain of the wood. Kind of burn off in between the growth rings of the wood. I like it a bunch and I'm thinking if I could do it with timbers already raised, building already closed it. I might do it. Would have to have a fire watch, I guess. ;D
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: WLC on March 13, 2016, 11:58:37 PM
WOW!  Well worth watching that video.  Amazing craftsmanship!
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: rjwoelk on March 14, 2016, 01:52:46 AM
Supurb
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: frwinks on March 14, 2016, 01:45:41 PM
wow, Nebruks, my hats off to you sir.  After doing just a couple of crucks and about a dozen braces, I had enough  ;D  To do siding on your entire house....just wow smiley_thumbsup_grin
The process definitely raises the grain, here is a shot of what it did to a 300 year old chunk of doug fir
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18964/045.JPG)
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: fishfighter on March 14, 2016, 08:49:53 PM
I wonder if one could get away using a drill with a wirewheel? Going to give that a try once things dry up around here on some scrap lumber.
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: Chilterns on March 16, 2016, 09:44:30 AM
Hi,

I have followed this thread with some interest and yesterday I was fortunate to observe first hand a very simple demonstration by Professor Terunobu Fugimori in which he produced charred planks using nothing more than a newspaper, some wire and a match.

I have posted some
photos of this process] (http://oxfordshirewoodlandgroup.co.uk/forum/?mingleforumaction=viewtopic&t=380.0#postid-700) illustrating how this is achieved.

Chilterns


Chilterns
Title: Re: Burning the frame. Preparing for rising...
Post by: Howdy on March 17, 2016, 07:55:53 AM
I have just watched this video and with tears streaming down my cheeks I understand the true beauty of craftsmanship.  I will never have the experience of building my own home (not house) nor will I ever be able to create something so meaningful with my own two hands and this makes me sad for my loss. 

The wonder of taking trees God has provided us from standing timber to logs and crafting necessary building materials that with skill culminate into a structure resplendent in artistry and strength.  Seeing how this results in a dwelling that embodies the witness of a strong family and humanity is truly a wonder to behold.

The video is first rate as well as a delight to listen to.  Thank you for posting this to share.