The Forestry Forum

General Forestry => Forestry and Logging => Topic started by: orion388 on January 23, 2013, 02:31:23 PM

Title: Eastern White Pine
Post by: orion388 on January 23, 2013, 02:31:23 PM
Good day gents ..

Glad to be here. wealth of knowledge here.. I live in western part of Va on 150 acres of old family land. My great grand fathers steam powered mill remenants are still in the woods. I managed to salvage the Governor and blade off of it. :)
I say that to say this, my place is full of mature Eastern White Pines, by mature I mean 24 to 32"  butts and STRAIGHT as an arrow.

Suggestions please???

John
Title: Re: Eastern White Pine
Post by: Jeff on January 23, 2013, 03:19:05 PM
Well, I would say unless you have some sort of financial or material needs, let them stand tall!  A white pine has a life span up to a couple hundred years. If you don't have some dire need, perhaps one day your grandson can stand and look at those same trees.
Title: Re: Eastern White Pine
Post by: beenthere on January 23, 2013, 04:12:22 PM
And find the rest of the old mill and get it ready to do some serious white pine sawing.  ;D
Title: Re: Eastern White Pine
Post by: Bogue Chitto on January 23, 2013, 04:19:17 PM
This used to be a 200 acre field where we had a dairy farm.  Planted when I was about 19 years ago. First thinning taking place now.  When I thin them for the last time I will leave the remaining trees until I absolutely need the money. 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/28428/DSCN3109.JPG)
Title: Re: Eastern White Pine
Post by: Woodhauler on January 23, 2013, 07:29:56 PM
I worked in west virgina in 1998 and sent white pine back to searsmont maine!!!!!!!!!!!  Still have the record for the farthest away that they bought white pine from!
Title: Re: Eastern White Pine
Post by: Black_Bear on January 23, 2013, 08:10:38 PM
Suggestions please???

Here's a good place to start. A lot of good information in the silvics manual:

http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/silvics_manual/Volume_1/pinus/strobus.htm

Google white pine silviculture, there are dozens of research papers that may allow you to better understand the establishment and growth characteristics of the species. A local forester may be able to give you some suggestions that may be specific to your region.