The Forestry Forum

General Forestry => Sawmills and Milling => Topic started by: trhill on June 12, 2013, 11:23:57 PM

Title: Setting up lt40 stationary
Post by: trhill on June 12, 2013, 11:23:57 PM
I've searched for quite a while but not found much on setting up my lt40 stationary. Any tips?  I want it to be a lot more sturdy and level than I can get with the original outriggers. Thanks
Title: Re: Setting up lt40 stationary
Post by: drobertson on June 12, 2013, 11:26:03 PM
If it were me, I would use the original outriggers, set some piers under them, and bolt it down to the piers,  david
Title: Re: Setting up lt40 stationary
Post by: rooster 58 on June 12, 2013, 11:35:54 PM
Also, you will want to drill and tap your posts and run a bolt I to them so your lock pins don't give out
Title: Re: Setting up lt40 stationary
Post by: wwsjr on June 13, 2013, 06:32:30 AM
When I bought my new Electric mill, I got a set of stationary legs at no extra cost. Top of legs are closed, no plastic caps, no sawdust can get inside leg. I plan to bolt down to concrete (10'X30' slab) and remove axle and wheels. Remove adjustable and bolt on stationary on same brackets. I would call WM and check on cost, might be worth the price.
Title: Re: Setting up lt40 stationary
Post by: Chuck White on June 13, 2013, 06:41:09 AM
Wood-Mizer makes special legs (outriggers) for stationary setup!

Title: Re: Setting up lt40 stationary
Post by: bandmiller2 on June 13, 2013, 07:41:48 AM
Its very handy to set up a stationary bandmill on a concrete floor,makes cleanup so much easier.If you have 110/220v so much the better you can have lights fans and blowers and keep a battery conditioner hooked up to the mill.Stationary legs are best but if you level and lock the portable legs they work OK.Myself I would drill through the square tube into the sliding tube and bolt on one side.Mills will tend to move on a smooth floor,you can bolt down or just move it back once in a wile.helps if the legs are on wood or better thin rubber matt.Be aware of exhaust even dilute long exposure is not good. Frank C.
Title: Re: Setting up lt40 stationary
Post by: Dave Shepard on June 13, 2013, 10:26:56 AM
My mill was set up stationary for about a year and a half. You either have to by the stationary legs, of bolt/weld the adjustable ones. If you remove the axle,  you have to bolt the mill down or there is a very good chance you will flip it over. I would pour a slab,  and I will be for mine soon, although Bibbyman has his on timbers.
Title: Re: Setting up lt40 stationary
Post by: pineywoods on June 13, 2013, 02:19:15 PM
If you have electric power, going with ac powered hydraulics is well worth the cost. Gives you hydraulic power at all times, and does away with some maintenance problems.
Title: Re: Setting up lt40 stationary
Post by: wwsjr on June 13, 2013, 02:36:53 PM
I am moving slowly, mill wired and cutting. Do not have it bolted to concrete yet. Working on shed. I plan to add AC hydraulics as soon as I can.
Title: Re: Setting up lt40 stationary
Post by: Piston on June 13, 2013, 11:05:56 PM
Forgive my ignorance, I don't know much about the LT40, but why can't you just "park" it like you normally would in a mobile job and not move it?  Wouldn't it then be "stationary"? 

Why does it need to be permanent, does the mill know that it won't be moving anytime soon?   ;D
Title: Re: Setting up lt40 stationary
Post by: trhill on June 13, 2013, 11:42:19 PM
For me, it's about stability. I haven't run my mill for long, but if I don't take the extra time to get it level and stable it seems like that really affects the beams I saw. I would like to remove the axle, but that's down the road. It really came down to the fact that I enjoy sawing at my place so much more than going portable. It seems more efficient, and running a manual mill means I need all the help I can get.
Title: Re: Setting up lt40 stationary
Post by: Brucer on June 14, 2013, 01:06:03 AM
... why can't you just "park" it like you normally would in a mobile job and not move it?  Wouldn't it then be "stationary"? 

Well, that's what I did. No one told me I couldn't :D.

I chose the location carefully and dug down through the topsoil to solid earth under the wheels and the outriggers. Then I put solid wood blocking under all the support points. I cut myself a bunch of shim stock of various thicknesses so I could level the mill precisely. And there it sits. I unbolted the hitch and stashed it and the fenders in my basement.

It would be nice not to have to walk around the wheel, but that would mean pouring foundations and fastening the mill down. (For those of you who wonder if it's really necessary to fasten down a mill without the axle, the answer is a resounding Yes!. The guys at the pole mill down the road rolled their stationary electric WM when a big log got too much momentum. The mill is welded down now).

Title: Re: Setting up lt40 stationary
Post by: Magicman on June 14, 2013, 07:42:10 AM
The wheels provide additional stability.