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General Forestry => Sawmills and Milling => Topic started by: Bibbyman on July 25, 2004, 08:27:09 AM

Title: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on July 25, 2004, 08:27:09 AM
There are probably a hundred little and big mods to sawmills we’ve posted here on the Forum – but they are scattered out over lots of threads and topics.  I thought I’d start a new thread just for ideas and mods on mills.   If you’ve posted a mod before that’s buried out there some place,  please consider re-constructing the post here or posting a link back to it.

Here is a simple mod I made this morning.  Don’t know why I didn’t think of it sooner.

On the Wood-Mizer mill,  there is this plate about 5x6” that covers a cutout on the idler side of the blade housing.  Bless Wood-Mizer’s heart,  they used 6 5/16x3/4” long plated hex bolts and nuts with locking inserts.  Quality stuff.  The plate itself looks to be 1/8” thick.  Plenty strong.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsmillmod01.jpg )
"As built" outside

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsmillmod02.jpg )
"As built" inside

The problem is,  they assembled everything on the wrong side.  See…  The plate, nuts and excess bolt length is sticking inside the blade housing.  Ever struggle getting a broken blade out from behind one or more of these bolts sticking out?

I replaced the hex head bolts with button headed cap screws 5/16x1/2”.  I replaced the plate on the outside and put the button heads on the inside.  That should make broken blade removal a little bet easier I’m a’thinking.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsmillmod03.jpg )
Changed plate to outside of housing.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsmillmod04.jpg )
"Inside of housing showing button head bolts.

The button head bolts were not exactly what I was looking for.  Plain pan head plated bolts 5/8” long would have worked better.  A gripping type flat head bolt would have worked even better.  But this is what I found at Westlakes.  Even using the existing hex head bolts and turning them around and moving the plate to the outside would achieve quite a bit of extra clearance.


Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on July 26, 2004, 01:14:44 PM
Bibbyman,
Since I don't ever break blades I don't think I'll need to modify my mill  :D  I think I'll wait until I get one back there and can't get it out, cuss myself for not reworking the coverplate with button head bolts, kick the tires, and quit for the day.

On the other hand, I'm looking for suggestions on clamping short awkward pieces. I tried an I-beam bewteen the two manual back stops, It worked okay, but that only got me down to 8" from the deck. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Fla._Deadheader on July 26, 2004, 02:09:24 PM
 2 sacrificial boards for sawing short stuff. Lay 1 on the bunks for holding the piece, stand the other one up against the log stops to clamp against. You should be able to saw clear to the bunks, as long as there ae no weird knots or something stopping the clamping action.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Stump Jumper on July 26, 2004, 03:11:59 PM
I put an electric 12 volt  fuel pump in line for priming the 42 hp diesel engine when i change fuel filters or run it out of fuel.Pumping the manual leaver on the engine mounted fuel pump just dont get the job done.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on July 26, 2004, 04:34:19 PM
Good tip Stump Jumper,

Got any more details?

Like what kind of pump did you used - brand part number?

How did you hook it it the line and wire it up?  

Got any pictures?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: BBTom on July 26, 2004, 05:48:51 PM
That is a fantastic idea S-J, I got so upset with that idiotic fuel filter being before the pump ( manual fuel pump does not suck vacuum worth a crap), that I just removed it and threw it away.  I swear I get better fuel economy now, and I guarantee that it is easier to reprime after running out of fuel.  

Two weeks ago, I was able to saw 7500 bdft of mostly 4/4 hardwood ( elm, ash, oak, hickory) some poplar, and a little pine, using only 10 gal of fuel.  I thought that was fantastic!  Love that kubota engine!!!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: jdunmyer on July 26, 2004, 06:42:58 PM
IF you have compressed air available, one of the easiest ways in the world to prime a filter is with a suction blowgun. That's what I've used on my VW Diesels "forever".

Just put it on the outlet side of the filter and suck until fuel comes out. Connect 'er up and go.

Best 2 mods I ever made was the hydrostatic carriage drive and the small chain hoist for log turning.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: RMay on July 26, 2004, 07:07:05 PM
I put a R.V. level on the mill . I was always forgetting my hand Level when I as away form home. ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ElectricAl on July 26, 2004, 07:13:32 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/Electric.JPG )
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: EZ on July 27, 2004, 03:39:50 AM
jdunmyer, very interested about your hydrostratic drive. Pictures and more input would be greatly appreciated.
EZ
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ronwood on July 27, 2004, 02:37:18 PM
ElectricAl,

I gather from the picture that you added an electric motor to the saw. Is that a correect statement?

Not done any mods to my mill yet since it is still under warrenty. Might add the mod to the loader arms that are now on the 2004 Woodmizer.

Thanks
Ron
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: jdunmyer on July 27, 2004, 02:46:30 PM
EZ,
There's some pics on my website that show the mechanical connections on my home-made hydrostatic drive. Details are as follows:

Small Char-Lynn motor, John Deere 450 bulldozer pump, 15Hp electric motor drive on the pump (I'm sure it doesn't need that much, but I also used to use the hydraulic unit for my log splitter), and a standard 4-way open-center valve. There's also a pair of back-to-back pressure relief valves right at the motor.

The initial trial was not good, the valve acted about like a light switch. I removed the valve spool and gently ground on the edges of the lands so the valve would start leaking (internally) as soon as the lever started moving. It took 2 or 3 trys to get it right, making sure to wash the valve spool thoroughly before reassembly. Coupled with the long lever on the valve, it now works just the way you'd want it to, it's very smooth and controllable.

See:

http://www.oldengine.org/members/jdunmyer

click on Sawmill
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Stump Jumper on July 27, 2004, 05:09:09 PM
Got some pictures today hope this will explain things a little more for ya's.  


This picture shows a Napa fuel pump.  Sorry don't know a part number.  I salvaged it off an old pick up.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/mod1.jpg )

You can see that I don't have hose clamps on yet as it was a temporary test installation.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/mod3.jpg )

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/mod4.jpg )

The fuel pump is mounted right under the fuel tank to an existing back panel bolt.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/mod6.jpg )


I ran jumper wires from the power terminals in the sylenoid box.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/mod2.jpg )


I open up the bleeder screws at the filters and run it until they get fuel.  Close the bleeder screws on the filters and open the bleeder screws on the injection pump until they get fuel.  Close the bleeder screws and I start the engine with the electronic fuel pump still running for a few minutes.  Then I shut it off  disconnect the fuel pump wires and we are good to go.  The engine fuel pump will now suck fuel through the electric fuel pump with no problems.  I suppose I ought to put some hose clamps on and wire a fuse and switch in.

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ElectricAl on July 27, 2004, 05:31:36 PM
Ron,

Picture is worth a thousand words ;)

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ElectricAl on July 27, 2004, 05:45:10 PM
Ok, here is a mod that might be more useful to the WM walkers.

It's a platform to stand on as the sawhead moves throught the cut.

It bolts to the lower cam follower mounts and goes under the battery box.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/Saw Platform.JPG )

It's hard to see, but the bottom of the platform is 5" off the floor. This way you can walk if you want. Also, you won't hook your toes when walking past.




Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ElectricAl on July 27, 2004, 06:23:26 PM
Want to see our first attempt at not walking ;

We called it the Jolly Trolly

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/Jolly Trolly.JPG )

We used this off and on for over a year. The real downfall was the bearings broke at least every other month.
The Trolly would go into a high speed wable
(like your shopping cart)  then the wheel would fall off :o
.








Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on July 27, 2004, 08:21:39 PM
Electric Al,

Nice idea with the jolly trolly.   I assume that the electric version WMs don't have wheels?   To bad that won't work on the portable units..

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on July 27, 2004, 08:31:33 PM
A few ideas I'm considering for my LT40HD25:

Replacing the feed tube for the lubemizer with a longer tube that will follow the contour of the idler wheel when the blade guide is moved in and out.   This will keep the tube "UP" out of the way  and keep it from getting caught when trying to halve large cants.

The 2nd mod I'm considering is an idea courtesy of Rick, VA Sawyer.  And, that's add a second battery to power the hydraulic pump when the saw head is down the deck off of the electrical contact.  This will save lots of aggravation during those times when I discover I forgot to lower the clamp or dogs after I start the blade into the log.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Neil_B on July 28, 2004, 04:50:13 AM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/Autostop.jpg )
This is a pic of my switch that I installed for the carraige return.
I don't use it when the mill is running at full speed but it works well when idling back. I can go clean things up a bit or get another log ready on the arms and not have to stand there to stop the return.
I still have the clamp holding it on because I'm playing with the location of it due to the fact that there is some drifting in the hydraulics when the power is cut off to it.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ElectricAl on July 28, 2004, 05:10:31 AM
DrBuck,

You bring up a good point about the axle :o

It's been 8 years since we pulled ours off ;D

Guess I forgot about it ::)



Disregard :-/
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on July 28, 2004, 06:56:36 AM
Talk about removing axles from under Wood-Mizer mills.  

There are a number of Wood-Mizer owners who have evolved from mobile sawing to stationary setups.  Removing the axle assembly is pretty straight forward as it’s just held on by 4 bolts.  

BUT BEFORE YOU DO….  Get with Wood-Mizer on their recommendations of how to set up a stationary WM without the axle assembly.  The axle and tires on a mobile mill act as outriggers to prevent the mill from tipping over in case a large log hit the backstop too hard, etc.  

The support posts on stationary mills are different than mobile units.  They have plates with holes in them for bolting the mill to the floor.  The posts on a mobile unit could be used if plates are welded on and proper anchorage is done.

Link to earlier post showing how we set up stationary Wood-Mizer mill. (http://www.forestryforum.com/cgi-bin/board/YaBB.pl?board=sawmill;action=display;num=1012183341;start=0#10)

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: VA-Sawyer on July 28, 2004, 11:21:54 AM
I've made a number of mods to my mill since I got it. I have added the second battery as mentioned by Dr. Buck. I've also put on a tach and oil pressure guage. I've added a couple of micro switches on the clutch handle. One controls the water flow and the other keeps the engine from starting with the clutch engaged. I have it wired now so that the FWD/REV switch has to be in FWD and the clutch has to be engaged to get water on the blade. I use about half the water I used to use before the mod. I've also added 6 marker lights to the sides and backup lights on the back. That mill has had a few close calls while being pulled at night. I guess it was hard for other drivers to see it from the side. Shouldn't be a problem anymore.  Speaking of lights, I added a couple of spotlights so I can saw in the evenings during the wintertime.
Right now my mill is stuck in the woods at a customers site. With all the rain we have been having lately, my next mod might be a set of pontoon floats !
I will post some photos once I get it back home and cleaned up.
VA-Sawyer
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on July 28, 2004, 11:39:51 AM
Maybe you need to add 4WD?   ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Tom on July 28, 2004, 12:32:21 PM
One easy thing to do is add lights to the mill trailer.  All the lights are for the benefit of the following traffic.  If you put a drop off of your running lights to a small indicator light, or even white, downturned spotlight, next to the tires,  you can see where they are when you are turning a tight corner at night.  A small indicator on either side of the head of the mill and a couple on the top of the head Posts will help you feel more comfortable too.  Just some little lights to help you determine where everything is at night. :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on July 28, 2004, 12:38:22 PM
Here's a simple one.  After tearing off the original tube within five hours of use I decided it needed to be improved slightly.  I added a spring to keep the Lubemizer tube always pulled away from the log.

Here the guide is fully extended.  The lube tube is now a blue tube after replacement.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/Lubemizer Hose1.jpg )

Here is the guide fully retracted and the hose stays away from the log.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/Lubemizer hose3.JPG )
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Tom on July 28, 2004, 12:40:52 PM
Here is one I did to my Woodmizer that has been a good one.

Problem: When the hydraulic solenoid sticks (it will when it begins to go bad)  the hydraulic pump runs every time that the power button reaches the power strip.   Because of the noise and attention to other things, it is easy to miss.  The pump runs and bypasses the valves which are closed. That's a lot of wear and tear.

I wired a small light on the output side of the solenoid so that it lit when the pump was running. I mounted the light on the front of the hydraulic box and out of the way of damage.

Now, if my solenoid is going bad, I can see it.  If I know it is going bad and it is running the pump all of the time, it reminds me

Oh!  Sometimes the centering springs on the handle break and cause the pump to run also.  It's piece of mind to know what is going on by looking at the light.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Tom on July 28, 2004, 12:43:50 PM
Putting a glass sediment bowl in the fuel line has been a good move too.  I think everyone should have one.  It helps the filter last longer and keeps condensate water from getting from the fuel tank to the carburator or fouling the filter.  If you put in the open where you can see it all of the time, it is really handy.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Tom on July 28, 2004, 12:46:05 PM
There are all kinds of things sticking out of the frame of a sawmill that will hurt your leg or tear your pants.  The one that almost always gets me is the "all-thread" on the end of the travel chain on a Woodmizer.  I cut a piece of old garden hose and stuck it on there to save my legs as I walked by.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Tom on July 28, 2004, 12:50:13 PM
On the back of the loader of a Woodmizer, the hoses enter the Ram.  The fitting is solid tube and is next to the ground where it will break if it comes into contact with a scrap of wood, or the loader digs a hole.  When mine broke, I replaced it with two end fittings stuck into a piece of hydraulic hose that was as short as I could get it.  There is about 1.5 to 3 inches of hose between the fittings.  It gives the fittings just enough movement that they don't break if something gets under them.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Tom on July 28, 2004, 12:59:41 PM
Here is something that I always wished that I had done and didn't.  

I wished that I had put a sleeve on the loader side of the beam on my Woodmizer  (out of the way) to hang the fenders.  Many times I have driven off without them and had to go back.  Finding a place to put them is always a hassle.

If they were hung on the beam of the mill, they wouldn't get left and they would also create a small worktable to set wrenches, etc. on when working on the mill.

A small ammunition box bolted or tacked to the diagonals of the mill will keep those pertinent wrenches on hand too.  There are only 3 or 4 that are needed.  You could keep a few spare nuts and bolts in there too.  Keeps you from having to always go back to the truck.  Put one on the front and one on the back of the mill.  Use one big enough to get your hand into though.  :D

A few first aid items stuck in there might be a pretty good idea too. :P

And while you are hanging stuff on the mill......don't forget the coffee cup holder. :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Tom on July 28, 2004, 01:34:50 PM
Above the throat of a woodmizer, behind that door that you open to change blades, is mounted a bearing.  That bearings purpose is to dampen the vibration of the blade between the wheels on the top side.  It's a bad place for bearings. Hardwoods and water soon cause it to seize.  I replaced mine in the woods one day with a block of oak that I drilled a hole through.  Tilt it a little so that the corner is within 1/8th of the blade and tighten the nut. When it wears, loosen the nut, turn it closer to the blade and tighten the nut again.  It lasts a really long time. :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Tom on July 28, 2004, 01:37:46 PM
Woodmizer owners

Do you need to make a scale to do a special one-time job?  turn the moveable scale over and make your marks on it with marker.  Something you can clean off with alcohol, rust reaper or the like.  It's pretty handy to have the blank piece of aluminum handy like that.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Tom on July 28, 2004, 01:53:36 PM
Hit a Nail?

Keep a fine bastard file, one witha round edge if you can......a chain saw file is next best.

The blade mounted between the wheels makes a pretty good jig.  Run the head of the mill to the end of the mill where you can get to the blade easily and put it at a good working height.

Knock the metal from the face of the tooth where the nail welded itself to the blade.  Straighten any obviously bent teeth, fille the backs of those that have lost the very tip to try to sharpen it a little.  Don't worry about those that are broken completely off as long as the gaps created are no more than 3 or 4 teeth in one place.  (try not to disfigure the gullet)

The blade might get you through the rest of the log.  A customer will appreciate your making the blade go as far as you can when he's being charged for the blade. :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Tom on July 28, 2004, 02:03:37 PM
Have you ever gotten your mill trapped at a site with wood and slabs around it where you can't get out and you want to move it to the side?

What you need is a Moon Cap.  One of those old timey hub caps that is smooth and dish shaped.   Put it under the front leg, or jack of the mill, close to the coupler.  It will provide a smooth skid with turned up edges that will allow you to pull your mill into the open, with rope or chain, where you can hook the truck to it.

You can use a sheet of plywood or sheet metal too, as long as there is a "stop" in the middle for the jack and the edges get turned up so that it doesn't dig in.

In mud or soft dirt, a sled like this works better than a wheel.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Tom on July 28, 2004, 02:07:55 PM
One of the least maintained things on a portable mill ends up being the wheel bearings.   Install "buddy bearings" and it will give you more piece of mind on the road. :)

......and a spare tire isn't a bad idea either.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: slowzuki on July 30, 2004, 11:20:08 AM
I've been trying to think of a nice waterproof container to store spare blades in that can be attached to the mill, anyone have slick solutions?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: VA-Sawyer on July 31, 2004, 06:32:57 PM
I've been working on that same issue for 6 months now and still don't have anything for storing blades on the mill. If you get a good idea for it , you sure will be my hero.  ;D
VA-Sawyer
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: FeltzE on August 02, 2004, 07:54:14 PM

I added a licence plate light just above the scale index for when I've been stuck finishing the last log at sunset.

I clipped a utility light to the log side post at the top of the mill to illuminate the log (same reason as above... not to facilitate night sawing just finishing up)

I added an electric fuel pump to my wisconson in the same location as listed earlier. I have had some problems with the engine driven pump this fixed that.

The trailer brake battery box has been removed. (by inadvertant force) It was poorly mounted outside the pump box. I belive the new mills have fixed this problem.

I almost forgot I have most carefully trimmed some steel off of the clamp unit and the first adjustable stop as well.  ::)

Eric
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Tom on August 05, 2004, 11:18:37 AM
VA-Sawyer,  Some of the smaller blades will fit into a 55 gal drum.  use one with a removable lid that clamps on.

Eric,  That's a good discovery,  I have removed some excess weight from my log dogs too.  The best time to do it is when you are "testing" blades. :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on August 05, 2004, 11:40:53 AM
Has anyone used the original engine alternator (the one that isn't used) on their WM for lighting?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on August 05, 2004, 12:51:00 PM
Arky installed this light for night sawing.  He had another above the console but it got knocked off.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsarkyslight1.jpg )
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ARKANSAWYER on August 20, 2004, 07:52:59 PM
  Well Bibbyman got my lights which have saved me more then once.  They also help when backing up at night to get out of some where.
 Here is my brush to keep cedar bark from getting balled up around my rollers.  They save alot of work cleaning our the bark fuzz.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/DSC00803f.JPG )
  I travel alot of dirt roads and cross creeks with Wanda so I wipe down the bottom rail before I start sawing.  It only took once for my wrist to hit the corners of the power strip before they became rounded over.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/DSC00797f.JPG )
 Needed to put name on mill but there was very little space that was not taken or recived alot of wear.  So I filled in my fenders and put on sticker.  Has gotten me more then one job.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/DSC00798f.JPG )
 About all that is left to do is a dust free 12 v coffee pot.
ARKANSAWYER
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on August 20, 2004, 07:57:51 PM
Arkansawyer,
I like your way of posting your sign.  I had one made for my front guard, but that guard takes a lot of abuse.  I dont' see my sign lasting very long.  I think I need to modify my fenders and put my signs there.  Heck you can even face them towards the road when sawing.

Thanks!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: SawDust_Studios on August 21, 2004, 03:03:20 PM
What about one of them flat tools boxes that they used to use for the back of a pick-up seat. Don't know if they make em big enough, but they might work?  I might see if one of my boat boxes will fit on top of the HD control box on my lt40hd
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on September 04, 2004, 09:04:26 PM
We ran a manual Wood-Mizer for 7 years. Short logs, long logs, it didn’t matter as  we had to manually set the back supports anyway.  And,  as you walked along with the mill and had to use the cant hook to turn the logs,  logs shorter than 8’ were no more of a problem to saw – only they yielded less lumber per hour.  

But everyone that has sawn more than a few short logs on a Wood-Mizer hydraulic mill knows you have to use the manual back supports to saw short logs.  If you’ve got a good helper,  it’s not too bad.   If you’re sawing alone,  you’ll spend a good amount of time traveling back and forth returning the sawhead to the contract strip and setting the back supports and using the clamp and turner.  A few short logs or for that time you loaded an 8’ too far forward or back and need to use the manual back supports,  it’s not so bad.   But we’re running into the situation where we are sawing hundreds of short logs and some days nothing but short logs.

I’ve had enough and decided it was time to see how we can improve our short log production rate.

There are a couple of areas where improvements could be made to better handle short logs.  But the most obvious improvement would be to power the manual back supports.  But how to get power to them?   I “thunk” about it quite some time.  Last Monday I started off actually doing something.  I ordered out a new back support – the model that is used on the front and back with the lever that connects to the cylinder and tie rod.

I knew going into this that the front and back support would not work “as made” as replacements for the manual back support.  So I had to make some modifications.  

Here’s what I did.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsbacksupt01.jpg )

The lever on the new back support installed “as made” hits the frame well before the support is fully raised.   Also,  the lever is inline with the lever on the front back support – thus,  there is no clearance to install a bolt or yoke between it and the tie rod.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsbacksupt02.jpg )

I knew I had to keep the bottom hole in about the same position so that the “swing” would be the same as the other two supports.   I started by tracing a template of the lever on a piece of paper and making a few measurements.   I then scribed a line up the vertical edge (when standing) of the lever.  This edge appears to be close to the center line of the hole.  I also scribed a line on the horizontal edge of the lower part of the lever.   I repeated this on both sides while I was at it.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsbacksupt03.jpg )

I took the back support to my chop saw and cut the lever off along the vertical scribe line.  Then I took the severed end of the lever and flipped it over onto the loader side of the un-severed lever.  

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsbacksupt04.jpg )

I aligned the horizontal scribe mark with the horizontal edge of the lever and clamped it.  I used my template to check and adjust the two parts until the hole was back where it was.  

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsbacksupt05.jpg )

My welding won’t win any awards and it sure is not up to Wood-Mizer standards but I put a bunch on.  The overlap gave me a good chance to apply a lot of weld all the way around.

I painted the parts with AGCO Allis orange paint.  It looks a bit bright when first applied but once dry,  it very close.  And…  in a year,  I guarantee nobody’s going to notice the difference.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsbacksupt06.jpg )

The tie rod was made up of a 1/2” female tie rod end,  a 1/2” yoke,  12” of 1/2"-20 threaded rod, and a 12” section of 1/2" heavy pipe.   I replaced the 2-1/2” tie rod bolt with one 3” long – now that it had to pass thru two tie rod eyes.  A couple of extra washers were used to provide just a little more space.

I assembled the back support in place and then assembled the tie rod without the 1/2" pipe.   I kept trying the swing of the back support and adjusting the length of the tie rod until I got it where the new powered back support would not hit the frame on the full up position and the tie rod assembly was just loose.  I didn’t want the full force of the stopping of the back support travel to fall on this back support.  I cut the 1/2” pipe to the length to fill the space between the clevis and the eye end and added it to the assembly.  I tightened the eye and yoke until the pipe was a compress fit.  

Now…. For the OTHER manual back support.   I’ve got ideas.  But I’m still “thunkin”.. ???

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Linda on September 05, 2004, 07:09:26 AM
WoW Bibby,

That's some good thinkin' ;)



Best mod yet 8)




Linda
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Minnesota_boy on September 05, 2004, 07:24:36 AM
Nice job, Bibby.  Now design the linkage to raise one of the manual log stops on my extension.  If you think running around to set the manual on a short log is bad, try setting the end one for a 32' log. :o  

While you are at it, design a hydraulic roller toe board and control for it to fit at about 24' too. ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ElectricAl on September 05, 2004, 07:32:17 AM
Bibby,


Stop the competition, we have a winner 8)




Where is your order form ;D



ElectricAl


Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on September 05, 2004, 07:49:10 AM
Do you think WM would put me on their R&D staff and give me an account number and access to their material, machine shop and engineering talent? :D

Power back supports on an extension should be far less of a problem than the manual ones on the mill.  Just install the back supports with lever legs on the front and back locations and a cylinder and tie rod from an HD mill.  I would think they'd be a bolt-in fit with nothing in the way.

Then tap into the back support hose with a flow control valve and quick compilers.  You could use the same back support valve to run the supports on the mill OR the extension.   If you didn’t use a flow control valve,  then both would work.  May have to have some kind of flow regulators in the line to keep both working in sequence??  
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on September 07, 2004, 07:34:36 AM
Tuesday morning update...

We've sawn over 500 bf on the mill after adding power to one of the middle back support (see post #44 above) and all has worked well.   I even gave the new support a "stress test" by putting a heavy chunk of edging under it and closing it down on it until the hydraulic pressure maxed out.  Everything held.

While we've not sawn any short logs yet. And we've not got power to the other back support,  I've not found a problem or down side from making this mod..
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: MULE_MAN on September 07, 2004, 07:55:17 AM
The main thing with your modification  ???

Is Mary Happy  ;D ;D 8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on September 07, 2004, 09:54:00 AM
Bibby,
First off thanks for the R&D!  Free is a very good price.

Second, do you see any reason or situations where you wouldn't want to power all of the back stops?  
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on September 07, 2004, 11:48:49 AM
The only problem I can think of is…

Sometimes (well,  more than sometimes)  you get a rough log where you have bumps and knots sticking out.  And sometimes these bumps and knots will now have a chance to hit on the middle back supports – thus pushing them to the loader side of the mill.  On logs – say up to 30” – this should not be a problem.  On really big logs that may make it more difficult to get the blade through without bumping into the outer blade guide – if this should happen.  I think this would be a small chance and nuisance.  You’d just have to trim off the swell or knot or turn the log to another face.

The way I have this one linked,  it'd only take a couple of minutes to run the nut off the tie rod link and take the rod off.  I even thought about setting up with a clip style pin used on 3 point hitch so it'd only take a second to disable.  But I think I'm going to try it this way for awhile.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on September 07, 2004, 12:00:27 PM
I think you're right bibby, the pros will probably far outweigh the cons.  
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ElectricAl on September 07, 2004, 05:49:30 PM
If anyone is getting ready to order a new mill from WM. ;D

Try asking for option BB for Hydraulic sawmills. ;)


You know Bibbyman Backstops  :D




Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on September 07, 2004, 05:53:40 PM
Bibby how much did that back stop support cost?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on September 07, 2004, 06:28:40 PM
Something like $85 and shippin'..  

It's not the cheapest way to go but it worked out well in two ways.

1) Everything was there - just had to cut and reweld.

2) It left me with an extra manual back support I could go back to if this failed.  Or, if it worked,  I could use the extra manual back support to try ideas to build a replacement for the other manual back support.

Also,  my metel working equipment is limited.  I'd had to go to a metel fabraction shop to get the lever cut out, etc.

I almost have to do it this way because Mary would not allow me time to play around and disable the mill.  This way,  I could get the new back support ready and then sawp them out.

As it went,  I had Saturday morning planed to work on the back stop replacement.  Left Mary in the house watching a "chick flick" movie.  "You just rest dear.  I'm going out to work on the back support."  Out there 10 minutes and here she comes.  "I just want to get this order done before you work on the mill."  It wasn't until 7:00pm that I got to go back out and make the swap.

The tie rod, eye end, yoke end, threaded rod and pipe cost about $30 to make up.  Got the parts at an industrial supply place.  The paint less than $5.00.. got it at the local Farm and Home supply place.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on September 07, 2004, 06:34:07 PM
I could see her standing over you with her hands on her hips with a look of, "If you as much as scratch my mill..."

:D :D

I'd better and hurry up and make all my mods before Kathy starts running it.  After theb, the only way I'll get to saw is if I get her pregnant.  That way, I'll know she has to go to the hospital eventually, even if it does take 9 months.  ;)

I wouldn't make one for anyone for $85.00.  That's a reasonable price.  Did that come with the stainless pad?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on September 07, 2004, 08:06:33 PM
No pads,  no rollers.  Although it's the model that will take both.

I don't know about Mary.  I've done hundreds of projects - big and small.  We've built two homes togeather with our own four hands, the sawshed, etc.  I fix all kinds of things.  But I don't think there has been a time when she's not thought... "He's going to screw this up.  I just know it."
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on September 07, 2004, 08:19:26 PM
We'd better keep Kathy and Mary away from each other.

Her first apartment she moved into when we were first dating didn't accomodate a double bed up the stairs to the 2nd floor.  I removed the moulding and carved into the header a bit to fit the box spring though.

Once that sawsall fired up it was like leaving your pet outside on the 4th of July.  I thought it was going to be days before she came back to the house.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on September 07, 2004, 09:37:46 PM
Here's how I clean my drive and idler belts. I hold my left hand in place and pull the belt down with my right hand. Two trips around and it's clean. I just knew WM put that guard on there for something.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/DEG MtAngel034.JPG )
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: VA-Sawyer on September 08, 2004, 10:15:47 AM
Here are some of the mods I have made to my mill.

First up is the foward battery box. I added this so I could run the hydraulics without having to bring the saw head to the front of the mill.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/vasaw101.jpg )
I used square tubing to weld up a box frame. It is bolted to a couple of square tube stubs that were welded to the saw frame. The switch is rated 400 Amps and has a removable key. The switch, battery wiring, battery box and the fuse block are all from a marine store. I have a 225 Amp fuse installed for now, and it seems to be working fine.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/vasaw102.jpg )
This is a closer view. I installed the switch so as to prevent any arcing or sparking during transport or maintenance. I turn it off and remove the key to secure the mill.  The battery is charged whenever the head is at the front with the engine running. I have a 7 pin RV plug on the mill, so I wired it to charge the battery while towing as well.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/vasaw105.jpg )
Here is how I added an oil pressure pickup line. There is a factory plug in the oil filter adapter. I removed the 1/8" pipe plug and installed a 7" section of 1/8" pipe. I drilled a hole and installed a grommet in the baffle where the tube stuck out. I added a pressure guage with a remote oil line kit from the auto store. This picture also shows the fexible oil drain line you can get from WoodMizer.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/vasaw106.jpg )
I have the oil pressure guage mounted next to my tach so I can keep an eye on both while sawing. The tach is made by Tiny-Tach. It is their commerical unit. It displays Total Time, Current RPM ( engine running), Job Time ( Since reset), Max RPM ( since reset), and has two presetable countdown timers. It sells for about $80 from the company. In the bottom of the picture you can just see where the previous owner added pipe cross extensions to the toe-boards. These are handy when adjusting narrow logs or boards thicker than about 2 inches.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/vasaw107.jpg )
These are some three inch backstops I made for a special job. They are designed so you can drop them in or pop them out in a couple of seconds. Very handy when using the 3 inch clamp attachment with short boards.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/vasaw107a.jpg )
Here is a close up of the backstops.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/vasaw108.jpg )
This shows how they are made. (No comments from the welding critics please! I was dog tired and welding in the dark)
They are inserted into the 2 cross tubes closest to the clamp. The back has an inside corner that sits on the corner of the main frame tube of the mill. There is just enough slop so that you can tip up the back of the stop to install and remove it. The nut welded on the bottom of the insert is just a spacer/pivot to hold the top of the insert close to the inside top of the crosstube and allow the back to tip up when you grab them. Pressure from the clamp holds the insert securly in place. If I make another set, I will add adjustment bolts at the back so I can fine tune the vertical alignment.
Will post more later.
VA-Sawyer
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: SawDust_Studios on September 08, 2004, 04:59:31 PM
WOW!  There are alot of great mods here.   I wish I just had the time to do them all.  I guess my best mod was going from my LT30 to my LT40HD.  

Does that count?   ;D

I only have 75 hrs on it and I hope to add some of these mods in the near future.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: VA-Sawyer on September 08, 2004, 06:40:59 PM
One simple improvement you can make is to replace any nuts and bolts you remove with Stainless Steel ones.  This is more of a problem on older mills as WoodMizer seems to be using more SS on the newer ones. An important exception to this is any high stress points that call for Grade 8 bolts in the parts manual. Quality SS is about equal to Grade 5 hardware and may fail if used where a higher strength is called for. Use a good grade of Anti-Seize when putting a SS nut on a SS bolt to prevent galling. Use Nylon Locking ( Nylock ) nuts rather than lockwashers where possible. I get most of my SS hardware from Fastenal as our local store has a pretty fair selection of SS, and better prices than the other hardware stores in town.
VA-Sawyer
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on September 08, 2004, 07:01:12 PM
I’m really pleased to see so many useful mods posted on this thread.  Some I never thought of.   (where’s that wacky guy that put sled runners under his LT15?)

But I never intended this thread to be mods exclusively for and on Wood-Mizer mills.  Surely some of you Timber-King,  Baker, Peterson, Double Cut, etc. owners have made some mods to your mills also. Tell us about them..
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: VA-Sawyer on September 08, 2004, 09:02:26 PM
Here are a couple of more mods .  Sorry Bibbyman, but these are also for an orange mill.  ::)

Woodmizer suggests that if you have the single chain holding up the head, that you add a second chain for safety. On newer mills ( I think since '92 ) they went to an intergrated  double link chain. Trying to balance the tension on the two single chains wasn't easy to do. Here is my solution:
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/vasaw115.jpg )
The orange chunk of angle iron with the 2 bolts comes as part of the chain upgrade kit. It has slots to adjust the second chain ( right hand chain in the picture ) up and down so you can match it with the fixed position first chain.  I welded a stud onto the angle iron and added the u-channel on top of the crossbar. The stud passes through a hole in the u-channel and has a nyloc nut and washer on it. To adjust, loosen the bolts that go through the slots. Tighten or loosen the nut on top of the stud to even the tension on both chains. Tighten up the slot bolts. Haven't had to readjust since I installed it some 5 months ago.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/vasaw114.jpg )
Here you can see 2 of the lights I use for evening sawing.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/vasaw116.jpg )
I bought a cheap line level and broke off the little hooks . I glued this to the front of the main tube with some silicone gasket sealer. I level the mill by setting the leg behind the hitch to the proper heigth while looking at this level. I crank down all the other legs till they are just firm on the ground.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/vasaw117.jpg )
A previous owner had put crankdown legs on my mill in place of the factory style ones. I replaced the 2000 lb unit with this 5000 lb unit and welded on a much stronger mount. I need to do the same at the back, but I have to figure out how I'm going to anchor the head for transport on the new mount. Notice the second level for the cross direction.

More later,
VA-Sawyer
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Paschale on September 08, 2004, 09:46:18 PM
VA-Sawyer,

Those mods look great!  Thanks for posting the pics, and good job keeping the resolution high in the pics too!   ;)

Oh, and it's good to know about that single chain/double chain safety issue.  That's something I'll need to change on mine!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bruce_A on September 09, 2004, 06:23:29 AM
Are other mill so complete that they don't need these updates?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DansSawmill on September 09, 2004, 09:16:34 AM
hey va sawyer, how many , roughly, logs can you go thru with your battery without charging ? i'm in the process of changing to hyd on my woodmizer, ( have log lift, and now clamp ) and would like to go to a dc elect pump system, currently using a gas logsplitter motor/pump, and would like to simplify......
sitting in workshop, drinking coffee and pondering  :P
dan
ps a upgrade isnt a option at the current time
:-/
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: VA-Sawyer on September 09, 2004, 11:18:32 AM
Dan,

I am using a reject battery from my jonboat for the time being so it isn't very strong to start with. The altenator  charges the fwd battery anytime I have the head up by the front of the mill. It is also charged by the tow vehicle when going down the road.  I would say that even a new battery with a full charge would only be good for 15-20 minutes of pump run time. That might do 3 or 4 medium sized logs. When my mill left the factory it used the 35A altenator that was built into the engine for charging. That turned out to be inadaquate so WM developed the 60 A retrofit kit. Since adding the debarker, I sometimes wish I had even more charging capacity.

I got a PM asking about the lights.  They are made by Grote and have the number 6493 stamped on the back. I think they cost $10-12 at a local fleet supply parts house.

On the single/double chain thing......  WM wants you to have the upgrade installed using chains that have "usa" stamped on the sides before putting on a debarker.  It seems that some of the early chains were imports. When I got mine, it had 2 chains, but I couldn't see the "usa" so I bought a replacement set.  I had the head crash on me once. ( see report in safety section ) Don't want that to happen again. ( How do you link a different thread ? Someone that knows how, please feel free to remove this line and replace it with the link  to the mentioned report. )

Hey, I see a little sun shine outside. Guess I'll go out and play in the mud around my mill.  ;D

VA-Sawyer
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Paschale on September 09, 2004, 12:06:50 PM
Here's a link to the chain incident VA-Sawyer mentioned.

http://www.forestryforum.com/cgi-bin/board/YaBB.pl?board=safety;action=display;num=1077683416

The way I do a link, is just by going to that page, highlighting the address, copying it with Control-C, and then paste it into the text of the message with Control-V.  Don't know how to shorten the link, but it works.

I'm going to take a good look at my WM chains, looking for USA.  I appreciate this thread immensely, since it's opening my eyes quite a bit!  Thanks to all for all the useful suggestions.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: VA-Sawyer on September 09, 2004, 04:17:37 PM
Thanks for the link Paschale,

Somebody asked why we don't see any upgrades for the other mills. I've been giving this a lot of thought ( Yes, my head hurts ! ) I've come up with 4 possible answers:

       1. The other mills are perfect when they leave the factory and don't need any upgrades.  ::)

       2. The other mills aren't worth the time and money needed to improve them. The owners are saving their green to buy Orange.  ;)

       3. The other mills are upgraded for free by the factory. The owners get to spend all their time sawing instead of typing on computers looking for answers.  8)

       4. The other owners are not able to figure out what an upgrade is.  ???

There.... I've thrown down the gotlet, guntlet, gawtlet, glove of challenge.

Hey, Bibbyman, I'll bet we hear a little noise from them now !   ;D

VA-Sawyer
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ElectricAl on September 09, 2004, 05:59:20 PM
Well, it's obvious that I am not as inventive as WV-Sawyer ::)


But oh well, here are a couple ideas that have helped us.

Many years ago we had problems with the factory water hose getting hung up on large cants.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/WM Mod.JPG )
So we down sized the tube and moved it to the outfeed side.

Also, we put a duct tape deflector to keep sawdust and bark from getting under the V belt. The tape does the job without knocking the set out of the blade. The tape will last 10 to 12 thousand feet of grade lumber.



Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on September 09, 2004, 06:07:26 PM
I figured I invited that comment when I asked owners of other mill brands and types to post their mods.  But I figured we’re all big enough to take it.  

We got one of the best threads goin’ on sawmill here right now.  So pick up your gauntlet and put it back on and get back to work makin’ useful mods. 8)

Besides,  I ain’t starting any fights and risk Jeff or Tom kickin’ ME off the Forum… >:(
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Tom on September 09, 2004, 06:23:33 PM
I think we can all stand a little ribbing. :D   I'm kinda curious what others have done to their mills too. :)

I've still not seen the #1, jam-up, bestus, coffee cup holder yet. :D :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DanG on September 09, 2004, 08:00:10 PM
#1, pretty much. ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: VA-Sawyer on September 09, 2004, 08:02:35 PM
I hope everybody takes my challenge with a smile. The truth is that I would like to see more input from the circle mill folks. There are enough close-up photos of WM mills on the Forum that I think I could build one from scratch even if I had never seen one in person.  I'm pretty confident that if I had Tom's Baker or FDH's Home-Mizer parked here for a day, that I could figure out how to make 'em run well enough to saw a little wood. It might not be the straightest wood, and I wouldn't be bragging about my production rate, but I would have them sawing.  If you dropped of a Corley or a MD circular mill...... well, I wouldn't have any idea where to start. I'd be pretty afraid of getting some red sawdust as well. To tell the truth, I couldn't even tell if it was a Corley or a MD unless it was on a label somewhere. (I really need to spend a day watching Woodhaven run his mill.)  
Jeff, Please don't send me a nastygram ! Yes, I know that I'm stirring up a little trouble with this, and I'm on thin ice. I'm really trying to get their pride fired up enough that they will start posting some pictures to educate this big mouth Know Nothing.  ;D
Signed,
The Big Mouth Know Nothing   ;)
VA-Sawyer
 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bruce_A on September 09, 2004, 08:21:35 PM
One of the biggest differences between band and circle mills, is not apparent to band operators, there is no time to worry where to park that coffee cup with a circle mill.  When you are done sawing you have sawdust in direct proportion to lumber to clean up. ::)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on September 09, 2004, 08:36:16 PM
E-Al,  

Looks like a lot less water would be pulled into the cant with your mod. I’d like to know if you noticed any improvement or detriment in the performance of the water/detergent to clean the blade when the tube was relocated after the cant?  

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/WM%20Mod.JPG)

Also,  what’s that mud flap do that’s after the blade guide and before the drive wheel?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: VA-Sawyer on September 09, 2004, 08:58:11 PM
E-Al,
Don't feel bad Al. I just had to do a lot more inventing to get my mill up to snuff. You know...that thing about Necessacity (sp ) being the Mother of Invention. I had a lot of need and no money.  ;)
I'm interested in your relocated hose. I used to need water to help keep my blade from heating up too much and losing tension. Discovered that there was a slight mis-alignment between my two guides. With the heating problem fixed, I'm looking for a way to put less water in the wood. Like Bibbyman said, how well is it working for you?
I have a question about your "mudflap", is it just ducttape, or is it ducttape wrapped around something? I've been thinking of putting some kind of brass scraper just before the inboard guide. This would keep the sawdust from being crushed between the blade and guide roller. The mudflap sure looks easier...... is there much room for improvment in performance?  If the mudflap is solving 95% of the sawdust problem, I not going to spend the extra time needed to get that last 5%. What is your opinion ?
VA-Sawyer
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ex-racer on September 10, 2004, 06:43:20 AM
Quote
The truth is that I would like to see more input from the circle mill folks.

I would also like to exchange ideas and information with other circle mill folks.  It would seem that we are outnumbered. :D

I can't call this a mod, as my mill is home-built, but this feature, which we call a "breast roller", is what I use to set my board thickness, after the cant is slabbed. The distance the roller is from the saw is adjustable (1/4" per handle turn) and it flips out of the way for slabbing.

Do any of you circle sawyers use one?

If I were to add a modification, it would be some way to get rid of the sawdust (my main aggravation - don't suggest a bandmill  ;D ;D).
Which would you recommend - a blower or conveyor belt system?

Ed

(http://www.electric-ed.com/My%20Sawmill/images/100_0111x.jpg)

(http://www.electric-ed.com/My%20Sawmill/images/100_0112x.jpg)

(http://www.electric-ed.com/My%20Sawmill/images/100_0135.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: jdunmyer on September 10, 2004, 07:14:35 AM
X-Racer,
I personally use a sawdust drag (see the pics on my website) with an overhead return run. The latter is something that I've only seen on one other mill; that's where I stole the idea from. It's MUCH better than the usual, with both runs of the chain going under the track frame. The main reason is that it gets the tail sprocket well away from below the blade, where it almost never gets a piece of bark into it to knock the chain off.

Blowers are OK, but they take a lot more power; my drag uses a 1/3 Hp motor instead of the 5 Hp that a blower would require.

The reason you don't see your roller setup on other mills is because their setworks eliminate the need for such.

One very important feature of a circle mill is the table just behind the saw mandrel. It must be VERY close to the blade to prevent anything falling into the crack. Such debris will bind and end up going through the roof or worse, coming back atcha. Don't ask me how I know this.

See http://www.oldengine.org/members/jdunmyer for pics of my mill.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: VA-Sawyer on September 10, 2004, 09:25:01 PM
That's better.... that ice is a little thicker, but it's not safe yet. We need more posts from the others.....
VA-Sawyer
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ElectricAl on September 10, 2004, 09:32:21 PM
Bib,

Adding water to the blade after the cut actually helps cool the blade better with less water. The water also cleans and cools the roller. The roller helps distribute and apply the water across the band body. The factory system dribbles water on a slick metal surface moving a 5500 surface feet per minute. Not too much actually sticks. Our way the band gets wet and stays wet all the way around. We can see water spray coming off the movable roller. ;D

The biggest down fall of our system is if too much water is used, then wet saw dust will build up under the 19" wheel. It does not effect the cut, but must be cleaned out when changing blades.

With fresh cut logs we have no build up. But with old logs or Ash we really apply a bunch of water.


The new Lube-Mizer has addressed the application problem with a power mist. The smaller droplets are more likely to stick to the moving blade.


The mud flap keeps saw dust and bark from getting under the V belt and making a bump.

Like you and Mary, we saw a ton...well TONS of Walnut and Cherry and the bark was constantly getting under the V belt. 4 to 6 pieces a day >:(.  New belts, old belts did not matter.




VA-Sawyer,

The Handy Man's Secret Weapon Duct Tape

Four layers ;)

50 cents in tape will save an hour in cleaning per semi load ;D

100% effective for 10,000'  
But if in doubt, change it out :D


Many years ago we also added a water solenoid. It opens only when the saw head is moving forward. That helped save water. Then applying just enough water to the left side helped more.

The solenoid cost $70 back when ever WM started to add them to the new sawmills. I had heard about the new solenoid and tried to order it. WM had to issue a part number for it and have one transfered from the assembly shop to the shipping dept. Before CS could sell it.


Both ideas are cheap and easy to try. If you don't like it, just switch it back :)



Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ex-racer on September 10, 2004, 10:12:37 PM
jdunmyer,

I really enjoyed your website. Lots of good info there for the circle sawyer. Actually, I had visited it before, following a link from the "Old Engine" site.

Electric Al,
Quote
The Handy Man's Secret Weapon Duct Tape

Our buddy, Red Green, would be pleased. ;D

Ed

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Junior437t on September 11, 2004, 04:55:57 AM
Has anyone used a pump such as a winshield washer pump, to pressurize the water for the blade? I realize you can buy a Lubmizer but is it necessary?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: spokeshave on September 11, 2004, 07:01:23 AM
Quote
Has anyone used a pump such as a winshield washer pump, to pressurize the water for the blade? I realize you can buy a Lubmizer but is it necessary?


I did exactly that on my Norwood. I ran into a couple of problems, but they were easily solved. I rigged a roller switch on the carb throttle linkage that triggers the pump when I open the throttle, but I also installed a master cut-off switch  on the back panel so I can easily turn off the water completely if I want to.

I ran into the following problems:

1) The pump pumped *way* too much water through the 1/8" copper pipe that points down onto the blade. I was surprised at how much water the $19 universal washer pump could move. To solve this, I crimped the end of the pipe flat with a pair of pliers. This had two beneficial effects - first, it reduced the flow, and it spreads the water out into a fan shape that covers the entire width of the blade nicely. Also, it sprays with a fair amount of force that does a good job of cleaning the blade.

2) The pump does not have a positive water shut-off. Once you run the pump for the first time, and load it with water, it will continue to drip, even once the pump is shut off. In a car, the washer pump and tank are always below the nozzles, so gravity prevents continuous flow once the pump is shut off. On my mill, there was no way I could easily place the pump and tank below the nozzle. At first, I figured I could overcome this by running the supply hose out of the top of the tank, thereby letting gravity stop the flow as the water goes up out of the tank. That didn't work, since a siphon was created and the drip continued. To solve this problem, I placed a check valve in the water supply line. I got it from an auto parts store. The valve is actually designed to prevent air from coming back up a vacuum line, but it requires a small but sufficient amount of forward pressure to cause the valve to open. So, when the pump is on, there is enough water pressure to open the valve, but when the pump is off, the valve closes, and the siphon pressure is not enough to open it. Works great.

This has been a very helpful mod. As many people know, the lube system on the Norwood is not its strong point. This was a vast improvement.

One note of caution. The instructions that came with the pump said it should not be operated for more than 5 seconds at a time, and that it should be allowed to cool for 20 seconds between uses. I routinely exceed these guidelines, so I suppose the pump will not last too long. I anticipated this and made the pump easy to replace.

I have about 100 hours or so on the pump and so far it has not shown any signs of failure. So far, so good.

I will try to get some pics this weekend.

Tim
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on September 11, 2004, 08:42:52 AM
I'd like to see someone add to Spokeshave's mod and use a wiper delay.  That way you have ON/OFFand a variable pulse.   ???

If someone does it I want a photo of that switch mounted (without shortening switch extension) on the mill.   ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: AtLast on September 11, 2004, 05:58:01 PM
"But I never intended this thread to be mods exclusively for and on Wood-Mizer mills.  Surely some of you Timber-King,  Baker, Peterson, Double Cut, etc. owners have made some mods to your mills also. Tell us about them.. "



Um Bibby.....Us NON Orange guys dont have ta do any mods...our mills were built right the first time.... ;D :D :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on September 11, 2004, 06:28:39 PM
AtLast,  Bruce_A done hinted as such.  AND I expected someone would. :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: AtLast on September 12, 2004, 06:58:03 AM
 ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Kevin on September 12, 2004, 12:19:45 PM
Quote
(where’s that wacky guy that put sled runners under his LT15?)


That's one of the nicest things anyone has ever said about me.  :D

(http://www3.sympatico.ca/kvn.rob/LT15_1.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: VA-Sawyer on September 12, 2004, 04:36:57 PM
Kevin ,
How about some more info and close-up pictures on the sledmill.  How well did it work out?  How heavy is a LT-15 ?
VA-Sawyer
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on September 12, 2004, 04:42:05 PM
Maybe Kevin can link back to the old post.. That would tell all the story.. :P
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: jdunmyer on September 12, 2004, 04:49:13 PM
Spokeshave,
I've used this pump:

http://www.ares-server.com/Ares/Ares.asp?MerchantID=RET01229&Action=Catalog&Type=Product&ID=82089

from http://www.micromark.com to transfer water from a tote tank to my travel trailer for several years now. It's submersible, so runs cool as long as it's covered. It's 12VDC, so should work in your application just fine.

Electric Al,
There's only 2 items in my "emergency" tool box:

Duct Tape for stuff that moves and shouldn't

WD-40 for stuff that doesn't move and should

I seldom need anything else for normal emergencies.

                            <<Jim>>
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Kevin on September 12, 2004, 05:57:49 PM
I'm not sure I have any other pictures of the saw on skis but I'll have a look.
The LT-15 is a little heavy for a snowmoble as small as the Tundra but it will work on a groomed trail and a cold day.
I have since bought an Argo and it pulls the saw without hesitation.
The tires sit on the skis, they have a little box welded to the top of the ski and the tire just sits in it with a winch strap around the tire to hold it to the ski.
The ski on the front just slides in and out of a bracket bolted to the tongue.
It's cowboy simple and works good.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: MULE_MAN on September 13, 2004, 06:55:06 AM
KEVIN

A Saw Mill on  skis, Now that really takes the cake 8)

I wish I had a big picture of that . I would hang it in my Saw Mill Shed, That's really Neat  8) 8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on October 10, 2004, 06:33:14 PM
You may remember back a few pages on this post where I took on the task of linking in the manual back supports on our Wood-Mizer LT40HD Super mill.  I got the more forward one done and I’m happy to report it’s working well and we’ve had no failures or problems with it.  It’s been a big help – even when sawing 8’ logs that sometimes load a little too far back.

 
Here is the link to the earlier post on how I modified the first manual back support. (http://www.forestryforum.com/cgi-bin/board/YaBB.pl?board=sawmill;action=display;num=1090765629;start=40#44)

But the job was only half done.   To be able to make better time sawing short – 5-7’ logs,  the other back support needed to be powered too.  Well,  after much thought and planning and a few heartbreaks,   I’ve done it.  And here is how I did it.

First off,  I want to say I think there is a better way.  And I don’t think how I got it to work on our stationary mill will work on a mobile mill with an axle assembly.   I’m still thinking on that one.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsbacksupt201.jpg )

I started by “reverse engineering” the lever on the standard powered back support.  I sent a CAD drawing to a friend and customer who teaches at a technical school that teaches robotics, automation, etc.   He cut me out two samples to try on a CNC milling machine.   This one was almost done when the tool broke – leaving about 1/32” left to cut out.  He sent it along just in case.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsbacksupt202.jpg )

I next cut the friction stops off’n the manual back support and ground off the paint in the area to be welded.  I also pulled the grease fitting as it would be in danger of being welded over or at least too close to the lever to use.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsbacksupt203.jpg )

I then used the best fixturing I could rig to position the lever to the back support – square and aligned to the back edge of the support.  I tack welded the lever to the back support and went out for a dry fit.

At this point my little heart broke.  All the planning and measuring and figuring and it wasn’t going to work.   It was clear there was no way to fit the tie rod I’d planned to put between the existing tie rod and the main frame tube.  Just too tight.   Mary and I brainstormed a bit.  She said to put the manual back support back and think on it awhile.  I was about ready to agree,  then I realized,  there was plenty of room to put the tie rod on the outside of the existing tie rod.  But … how to get the transfer of push/pull from the outside to the inside?  I  came up with an idea to “saddle” the main tie rod.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsbacksupt204.jpg )

Here is the part I fabricated.   (Now you know why I wouldn’t think of building my own mill.)  

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsbacksupt205.jpg )

It started out as 4 pieces of  1/4”x 1-1/4” x 2” bar stock, and 1/4”x 1-1/4” x 4” bar stock.  I notched the 4 short pieces so I could set the head of a short 1/2-20 machine bolt into them and welded the bolts in place.  The two formed the right and left side while the 1/4”x 1-1/4” x 4” bar made up the top.   By trial and error,  it was trimmed and ground until it fit over the tie rod and missed everything on it’s swing.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsbacksupt206.jpg )

Here they are welded up but before the top chunk was welded on.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsbacksupt207.jpg )

Here are the modified parts – after many tries and adjustments here and there.  There is just not any room to spare.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsbacksupt208.jpg )

Here is a shot from overhead without the saddle and tie rod in place.  You can see the is scant room for movement. The existing tie rod runs right through everything like a water pipe under a tree.  It not only moved forward and back,  it also moves up and down as the levers swing.  As it is now,  the tie rod rubs in places.  

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsbacksupt209.jpg )

The cylinder would have cleared but the extra long pin WM used could slide an inch or more left and right – easily blocking the travel of the lever.   I replaced the factory pin with a shorter one of another design that I happened to have on hand.  It is pin retained by a snap clip in a groove.  Alas,  I had only one retainer clip and had to go to town and get another – plus a short stack of 1” washers to shim the pin as far to the outside as possible.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsbacksupt210.jpg )

After much dry fitting and checking,  I made up the tie rod.  Two 1/2" ball ends,  14” of 1/2"-20 threadall and 12” of 1/2" heavy wall pipe.  I used the two ends with just the threadall until I was happy with the length adjustment.   Then I took it off the mill and measured the distance between the ends and cut the rod to that length.  Then assembled the pipe over the threadall and screwed the ends down tight.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsbacksupt211.jpg )

Here is a shot from the inside.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsbacksupt212.jpg )

Here is the “4-up and 4-down” shot.  Looks like it’s going to work.   I’ll update you after we’ve ran with it a while.


8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on October 11, 2004, 04:29:10 AM
WOW!    8)


As a mechanically challenged person, all I want to know is when the WM retrofit kit is due to come out!

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on October 11, 2004, 12:05:49 PM
Way to go Bibby.  Thanks again for the design work. Could you get the G-Code for the new arm from your machinist friend?

This isn't a sawmill mod, but more of a safety concern.  A couple of week ago I broke the front jack off the trailer by not lifting it up when driving away.  The trailer is about 50 miles from my house and I just did a quick repair and only replaced the top two carriage bolts.  I didn't replace the bottom two because I would have to remove the hydraulic power strip to get to the old bolts out and the new bolts in.

Well, I was packing up the mill yesterday and brought the saw head all the way back to the tongue.  Here's where the excitement began.  The front jack buckled, spinning the frame towards me and falling until the frame hit the ground.  It woke me up better than a pot of expresso.  Good thing WM added those little carriage containment blocks to the bottom of the carriage.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Paul_H on October 11, 2004, 08:05:52 PM
You did good Bibbyman 8)
It even got a shiny coat of Yellowishred paint!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ElectricAl on October 11, 2004, 08:32:24 PM
Hey Bib,


Your the Man 8)



Really ;)



What else can I say ???


But,  WOW







Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on October 12, 2004, 03:22:07 PM
Just one more reason Pro-Sawyer Mary keeps me around.  ;)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on December 04, 2004, 08:07:42 AM
Bibby,
Thanks again for this thread, it's a great one.  I do have a request for you though, could you show me how to tie the back stops on a 24' extension to the two automatics on the main frame?  :D  I'm seriously looking into that one, if I do, I'll be sure and post it.

Here's a simple modification I came across by accident.  I got used to the hydraulic controls when it was summer time and either my hands were nice and warm inside gloves, or I wasn't wearing gloves.  Now that it is cold outside, I had trouble sometimes "feeling" the correct hydraulic lever.

The knobs are threaded really deep on the lever arms.  I backed the two toe board knobs off an inch.  After using them this way, I love it.  I haven't grabbed the wrong knob yet.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/DEGHami03.JPG )

Here's two more modifications, the switch was added to run the second pair of loading arms on the mill extension.  The best modification is NO Tongue!! to scalp my shins.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/DEGHami04.JPG )
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on December 04, 2004, 06:01:39 PM
Good mod on the levers.   I’m often grabin’ the wrong one even though I try to train myself to hold the left three in my left hand and right three in my right.  Mostly I mix up the two toe board levers.

On the power back supports for the extension. ..  While I’ve seen the extensions a number of times,  I’ve not studied them with the idea to link in the back supports with the ones on the main mill.

I kind of figured that the extension section was assembled about the same as a sawmill bed – just shorter.  Doesn’t it look like you could replace the manual back supports with the powered type ones with levers on them and then link them together with a tie rod - just the same as on the mill?   Then couldn’t you link the back supports from the mill to the back supports on the extension? Would there be some frame section in the path?

If you remove and reinstall the extension often,  I'd think the back support linkage between the mill and extension should use some kink of latch pin arrangement - like 3-point hitch pins.  That way you could remove the linkage without tools.

BTW.   The four power back support conversion I made on our mill has been working flawlessly.   No problems.  I thought we may run into some problems with rougher logs but so far,  they’ve been an asset.   Mary has thanked me a number of times. ;)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on December 05, 2004, 09:18:38 AM
Bibby,
The extension is a 24' extension.  Thus there is probably about 20' between the powered and unpowered backstop.  With that kind of span I'm a bit worried about buckling the tie rod.  If there is clearance I'd probably use a 2" sch 40 pipe.  If I add this feature I'll make sure I take some pictures.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: KENROD on December 05, 2004, 12:43:12 PM
Nope, my Timber King is perfect, well OK it's close.
My problem is turning big logs. You know 30" X 18'.Well I think I've got the solution. My log turner is the chain type on a pivoting arm. The arm has plenty of power to lift mentioned log clear of the deck, it's the chai I have trouble with. The heavy logs force the chain down into the top of the arm making it drag. There just isn,t enough power to turn log and pull chain against metal. So I an going to add an idler sprocket (or two) in between the existing sprockets to hold the chain off the top of the arm.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/krlogturner1.jpg )

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: GareyD on December 05, 2004, 04:31:05 PM
Kenrod

Ain't sure it would work, but, lookin at yer picture instead of idler sprockets, have ya thought about sum of that UHMW or other slickerey plastics like them white cuttin boards??

Had a feller give me a big sheet of that stuff a while back and been puttin it everywhere I want to reduce friction...

I works real good with plain ole woodworking tools  ;D  ;D  ;D

GareyD
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: KENROD on December 06, 2004, 08:52:07 AM
GareyD I hadn't thought of that, but I don't think it work very good. :-/ :P :-/ The way it is now, the chain pushs into the top of the tubing and has started to cut through the metal. So I think the UHMW would stand the presure very long. But it is something to consider.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Hobby_Saw on December 06, 2004, 09:03:41 AM
Might want to weld a solid square (1/2 by 1/2 ) on top of the tube. would do two things. 1- would lift the links off the tube    2- would give the rollers something to ride/roll on. Seems to work pretty well on large round hay balers
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on December 06, 2004, 09:41:16 AM
Welcome to the Forum Hobby_Saw.

Preddy good thinkin'.   8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: VA-Sawyer on December 06, 2004, 03:14:18 PM
Welcome, Hobby_Saw.... That's just what we need around here... more farmers telling us how to fix stuff.     ;D   ;D  
Truth is that farm equipment has to work in a harsh enviroment, any fixes that work well there should hold up pretty well here too.
That is a pretty good idea, but I would chamfer the ends of that bar a little so the chain rollers kinda ramp onto it.
VA-Sawyer
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: MULE_MAN on December 07, 2004, 10:51:13 AM
If a Farmer can't fix it. It's not Broke  ;D
                  MERRY CHRISTMAS  MULE-MAN
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: GF on December 07, 2004, 01:18:43 PM
KENROD,
   I kinda have the same type turner you have on the sawmill I built.  I used a high torque (3392 Inch Pounds) low RPM (160RPM) ADM400 Prince Hydraulic motor.  So far it has not had any problems turning 36" X 18' Red Oak logs.  Curious as to what type motor and the torque rating your turner may have?

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/GFTurner100.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on December 19, 2004, 03:12:28 PM
Here is another mod I made recently.  I’ve delayed posting it because I need to do some finish work on it.  It needs a couple of rough edges ground off and paint applied.

But the deal is…  If you got a Wood-Mizer Super with the drag back feature and ramp,  AND USE IT,   you’ve probably had a board or two fall short and hit the front edge of the ramp.  We saw a lot of short stuff so this has happened more than a time or two.  

One Saturday morning about a month ago I was sawing and using the drag-back to feed Mary the 6/4 walnut coming off the mill.  The log was 8’ long and normally this wouldn’t cause a problem.  But it was a little far back on the blocks.  Well,  there was only one more cut to make and I was dragging-back the board I’d just sawn when it just fell off the side of the cant.   It fell just right to hit the front of the skid ramp.  BAM! The other end hit solid against the roller guide arm assembly.

The wreck pushed the guide arm assembly off the V rollers that supports it.   The only real damaged done was that it broke the .25-25 roller chain that drives the guide arm in and out.  It would be repairable but one side of one link was missing.  Used a magnet to go through the sawdust but could not find it.  For the want of a nail!

It was before noon so we called Wood-Mizer support and got another chain on the way.  Got it Monday afternoon and had it installed before I went to bed.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsramp011204.jpg )

Anyway,  while we were waiting for the part,   I decided this had happened too many times.  So off and on Saturday afternoon and Sunday I worked on this plan.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsramp021204.jpg )

As with most of my mods,  there is no welding or cutting on the mill.  I used a 1-1/2x1-1/2” angle to slip under the front lip of the ramp.  I just took the existing bolts out and drilled holes to match and re-installed the bolts.  This made and ledge for the deck to set on.

For the support up front,  I cut a piece of 1” square tubing (sorry I don’t have the measurements but you can figure it out easy enough) just long enough to stick under the main tube about 1” and just reach to the outside of the frame tube brace.  I welded a small chunk of angle about 1” from the end so it would not slide under the main rail too far.  (If it did,  the sawhead would hit it as it passed by.)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsramp031204.jpg )

The support is held up by a 4” U-bolt – I was just lucky to have around.  (Note that I placed the U-bolt far enough forward to miss the swing of the bunk.)  I wanted the deck to be removable and didn’t want the support to stick out.   What you see past the frame is a smaller square tube 3/4”(?) that’s about 16” long and slips inside the 1” tube.

The deck is 4/4 white oak.  Just what I found handy.  Turned out perfect as the angle chunk I cut off the middle board fit just right to make the last section.   I cleated the boards together using galvanized deck screws.  The wood here was some select stacking sticks.  The two across the narrow end are placed so they will straddle the front support.  This prevents it from working forwards.  

5/4 would have worked better as the 4/4 does not bring it up quite to the level of the ramp.  But we’ve used it quite a bit and no boards have hung on what lip that is almost exposed.  I thought I may tack a little strip of metal or something under that edge to bring it up higher.

So far the ramp extension has worked great and has not been in the way.  If there would be a need to remove it,  All I’d have to do is lift it off and pull out the telescoping square tube.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on December 19, 2004, 03:35:29 PM
Thanks again Bibby,
This is something I've been meaning to do too.  I think the original design is a real pinch point hazard.  Definitely enough force to loose a finger(s).

I have some stainless sheet metal, so I'll probably make mine out of that instead of lumber.  I'm in no rush right now since I don't even have the stainless steel cladded ramp installed.  It took me over a month to figure out that all it did was get in my way.  When sawing the long beams we don't use the board return.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: gmmills on December 19, 2004, 06:54:51 PM
Bibbyman ,
   Thanks for this mod. It just got moved to the top of my long to do list. Like Gilman, when sawing 18' and longer logs i remove the table also.

  For those of you out there that have WM sharpeners that use flexible Loc-Line tubes to direct the coolant. Here is a newer style blade clamp that eliminates them. This clamp also allows you to easily adjust it for sharpening 1" ,11/4", and 11/2" blades.                

                                          (http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/Clamp pics sized.jpg )

    This clamp can be easily bolted on to older vintage sharpeners

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Hammerhead on December 19, 2004, 09:33:41 PM
Gmmills, I am trying to figure out how the coolant gets to the wheel looks from the picture it is piped into the side off the clamp? Is the clamp made by woodmiser and does it work much better then the original? Sorry for all the questions . Happy Holidays!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: gmmills on December 20, 2004, 06:34:35 PM
Hammerhead,
    The coolant hose runs in front of the clamp to the black flow control valve and turns straight into the front of the clamp plate. The coolant exits the clamp through a hole in the top edge of the clamp which is aligned directly with the grinding wheel. It is a WM clamp. The clamp in the picture is on my 2000 model year sharpener. I also updated my 1991 model sharpener to this style clamp. I think this is still the latest clamp style that WM offers.  
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on December 21, 2004, 11:29:06 AM
I asked Sparks and he gave me the following info on the clamp upgrade.

The part number for the blade sharpener clamp upgrade is
010654 and sells for $82.63.  

Thanks Sparks!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: wscott on March 22, 2005, 10:17:00 PM
keeping my tape measure handy is very useful around the mill. here is a picture where i keep my tape. the tape has a magnet mounted to it and i just stick it on the command control center.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10580/tape-measure-1.JPG)


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10580/tape-measure-2.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Tom on March 22, 2005, 10:19:53 PM
good show, Bill.   Did the tape come with the magnet or did you glue it on there yourself? :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: W on March 23, 2005, 10:43:52 PM
Definitely need a tape handy. I always carry at least two.  I clip them on the forward edge of the Hydraulic box cover.  Speaking of tapes, I've been meaning to apply a wide tape to the rail on the outside of the mill with '0' in the center and '1ft' thru '10ft' going left and right from there.  That way I can measure the length by adding the numbers at the two ends of the log.  Once I do it I'll post a photo.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: wscott on March 24, 2005, 07:38:18 PM
Tom
 got the magnet @ wally world just unscrewed the clip and scrrewed the magnet on. it works real good i never take it off even when i move the mill to a new site.have made 120 mile trip with it on the side never lost it.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: wscott on March 27, 2005, 04:21:00 PM
Here are some pictures of the board guide i made for my WM LT40HD with commad control and Kubota eng. It will guide about 90% or better of all slabs and boards 12 ft or less in length. Does not work as good on boards longer, maybe 65%.
 The only thing I have trouble with is when I edge on the mill. It is in the way. Have not figured out how to lift it up out of the way. Have tried a windshield wiper motor, was not strong enough.
 
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10580/board%20guide%201.jpg)
 The bar with all the holes I bought from Lowes. The fingers are made out of 1/4"X1-1/2" flat bar bought from local welding shop. Used 1/2" black pipe for spacers with a 7/16" cold roll bar in the center. The rod is supported by angle iron on each end, cut to fit and bolted on. The top half of the fingers are about 8" long and the bottom is about 10-1/2" long. Looking left to right, the first four spacers are about 6" apart. The last space is 4" apart. Have no reason why I spaced them that way.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10580/board%20guide%203.JPG)
Looking @ back of guide

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10580/board%20guide%204.JPG)
Had to make an offset mount to miss the radiator. Set it out about 3-1/2". Used 1/2"X5" grade 8 bolts. The 1/8"x1"x2" tubing is laying in a 3" piece of 3" channel iron.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10580/board%20guide%205.JPG)
Have it hinged on the end of the tubing with a 3/8" bolt so it does not have to be removed when I travel with the mill.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10580/board%20guide%206.JPG)
This is how it rides when in the travel position.

Looking for any suggestions on how to lift this up using 12 volts only. Have looked into using a 12v winch but was trying to get by without having to use a reversing mechanism. Have thought about a gearmotor but do not know anything about the specs on them. Looking for something inexpensive.

Thanks for any help!













 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on March 27, 2005, 04:41:18 PM
Outstanding! 8)

I think we have another winner!  I’ve been meaning to work on something like that. 

I was going to mount the female part of a light receiver hitch to the mill and then I could pull the whole thing off when not need. 

Maybe now that WM has offered a retrofit dragback for the LT40 series, they'll finish the job and add the guide.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ElectricAl on March 27, 2005, 08:10:53 PM
WScott,

Very nice "mod"  ;)


Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on March 27, 2005, 08:28:42 PM
Having never seen one in action, just what does this guide do?   I added the board return mod 2 weeks ago and it works GREAT.   
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pigman on March 27, 2005, 11:10:37 PM
Dr_Buck
The guide would keep the board on top of the cant while it was being dragged back. On my walk beside mill I just lay my right hand on the board to keep it on the cant.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on March 29, 2005, 10:44:37 PM
Thanks for the response PIGMAN.   My mill is a walk beside as well and I found the right hand does a good job.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on March 31, 2005, 03:03:11 AM
The only thing I have trouble with is when I edge on the mill. It is in the way. Have not figured out how to lift it up out of the way. Have tried a windshield wiper motor, was not strong enough.

wscott,

I’m awake at 1:30am trying to get the cherry sawdust out of my eyes and thinking on your board dragback guides.

I have a couple of thoughts on how to lift the guide up..

The main idea would be to try to take most of the weight off of the motor doing the lifting. 

A couple of ways…

Counterbalance it with some weight like a window weight down one of the sawhead vertical support tubes……. or….maybe assisted lift with a coil spring or two… or I thought maybe one of those gas assist shocks like they use to hold tailgates and hoods open...or...even one of those thingies that pull a storm door back shut  ????

Another thing I though of… How about using something like a power seat forward/back setup?  I’ve not studied one close up but with the gearing and ACME threads, maybe it’d be slow but it’d be powerful.  (At least the power seat in my Roadmaster pulls my butt back and forth.)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Randy on March 31, 2005, 07:58:08 PM
How about a motor/gear off of a kiddy car. They got some awesome tork---and are reversable----I been using one off of a thrown away battery operated kids toy for a year as a Solar Tracker motor for my Solar panels(5ftx10ft). Just took it apart-----cleaned it-----greased it GOOD------modified it some----Works GOOD. Randy
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: smwwoody on April 02, 2005, 01:39:33 PM
Another good way to build the guides is like fireman ed told me they use on the new lt300's.  they use pieces of heavy double roller chain.  this seams like it would be even better than the hinged flat plate since there are many more hindge points on the chain

Woody
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on May 15, 2005, 06:58:18 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wswmtension200401.JPG)

Start with a blade tensioning lever as it comes from the Wood-Mizer factory - a little too short and a little too hard to get my big hands around and turn without hitting my knuckles against the sharp edges of the tensioner body or the blade guide arm motor.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wswmtension200402.JPG)

Find an extra tall 3/4” (outside) nut.  (or, any such big nut – this is just what I found). Find a slug of steel 1/4" thick by so big and so tall. I found this slug on the floor in my shop. It was 1-1/4”x1”. 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wswmtension200403.JPG)

Grind a slot across the end of the nut about 3/16” deep.  I used a mill bastard file to square up the bottom and true it up.  It sure would really be nice to have a milling machine.

Take a drift pin and drive the roll pin enough to be able to remove the factory handle but not all the way out.  No need in doing any more work than necessary.

Weld slug into place in the nut and dress down with grinder to fit the slot. (Sorry,  I meant to take a picture of the finished nut assembly and just didn’t do it.  But you get the picture anyway.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wswmtension200404.JPG)

I used a 3/16” drill bit – the same size as the hole on the tensioner piston – to drill the hole in the new nut assembly.  I positioned the nut assembly in the slot and drilled just enough to make a location mark.  I didn’t want risk to increase the size of the hole in the tensioner piston.  I also used a 1/4” drill bit to chamfer the hole on each side so to make it easier to drive the roll pin back in.

I assembled the new nut assembly to the tensioner piston by driving the roll pin back in.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wswmtension200405.JPG)

Tested with a 3/4” boxed end wrench that clears nicely all the way around for a full cycle turn and gives twice the leverage.  The wrench fits very solid on the extra tall nut. 

FYI,  I don’t plan to leave the wrench on when sawing.  As we have a stationary mill, it’s no problem to have the wrench hanging on the wall.  If you saw mobile,  then you probably want to do some more thinking.  If you make this mod, you may want to make a holder to store a dedicated tool so you’ll always have it with you.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on May 16, 2005, 12:31:38 PM
Thanks Bibby,
That tensioner handle has been bugging me too.  I don't think I'll do the wrench handle because I've already lost my wrench, but at least make the handle big and round, or knoby or something.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Rockn H on May 22, 2005, 12:28:58 AM
E-Al,  

Looks like a lot less water would be pulled into the cant with your mod. I’d like to know if you noticed any improvement or detriment in the performance of the water/detergent to clean the blade when the tube was relocated after the cant?  
(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/WM%20Mod.JPG)


My '91 md LT40 seems to be factory with the water coming out on the stationary side.  It works good but I always figured the factory must have moved it on later models for some reason.  Am I wrong.  Does anyone know what side the '91 was on?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Tom on May 22, 2005, 08:14:34 AM
The hose was on the "pull wheel" side.  My '90 was the same.  I liked it there because the hose was shorter and didn't get in the way of everything.  I think it was moved to the Idle wheel side in '94.  I remember asking why and never got a good answer.  "Somebody figured it would work better on that side", I think was what I was told.  :D

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: MemphisLogger on May 22, 2005, 11:35:30 AM
Mine came with the water on the drive side too--I thought the previous owner just had it hooked up wrong and changed it  :)

I do believe it makes less mess having it on the idle side and cleans sap off the blade much more better  ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ElectricAl on May 22, 2005, 08:46:55 PM
Rockn H,

Our 93 came with the water lube on the idle side.  I did not like the hose in my view and it got hung up in some cuts. By moving the hose to the drive side those problems were solved.  Also water consumption was reduced by more than 1/2.

Sometime watch how much water bounces off the band on the idle side.

Watering on the drive side applies the water right in front of the blade guide roller. The roller spreads the water across the entire band.

The only draw back to drive side water is that wet dust builds up under the drive wheel in the housing.  But it can quickly be cleaned while changing blades.

It really is an operators choice.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Kirk_Allen on May 23, 2005, 06:10:53 PM
Having come across many jobs where the customer has SHORT logs I knew I needed to modify my lifting hooks.  Today, while having my neighbor weld a bracket back on my turner he also took care of my mod.  Its so nice having folks close that are willing to help out.  I give them firewood and he was kind enough to take care of my welding and even provided the steel!

With a little grinding and modifying the lower support arm everthing now fits like a glove. Now I have to come up with a way to stop the logs from falling between the bunks and the tire.  I think a couple peices of steal that rest over the two center bunks and onto the main bar on the hooks would allow the log to roll right onto the mill.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10851/Sawmill%20Mods001.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10851/Sawmill%20Mods002.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10851/Sawmill%20Mods003.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10851/Sawmill%20Mods004.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10851/Sawmill%20Mods005.jpg)


About all I did was the paint work!   8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on May 23, 2005, 06:22:35 PM
8)GREAT! 8)


What was the specs on the angle you used?  Looks pretty heavy.

I had about the same idea but was going to make it welded to the a couple of short sectios of tube steel so it could be slipped over the "toes" of the lifting arms.  This would keep with my goal of not welding on the mill itself - and could be slipped off when not used.

As our mill does not have axles OR wheels,  I could just put two in..
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Kirk_Allen on May 23, 2005, 06:28:37 PM
I used a peice of 1/4" 3x2 angle iron.  Strong enough to not give under heavy weight but light enough that I barley notice the wieght when lifting the hooks for traveling.  Other than the dimensions I dont know what kind of steel it was.  I could find out as the guy is a welder by traid. 

I lined up the 3" face parallel to the hooks.  The back 2" side would hit the bottom support so we ground out that section so that it fits snug and the hooks can go all the way down like they are supposed to.

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Randy on May 23, 2005, 06:52:01 PM
I don't have a Pic, but what I use is 2 1" solid boards about 10"to 12" wide 8ft long. One goes flat down the other side-butts that one also leaning against the tire, So when you pick up the loader the short log don't roll off on the tire side/ or inside of the loader. If its a bigger piece that wants to roll back off(if working by myself) I will place a third board on the front side after I roll the short log on. Hey I am Cheap------------ :D--------------and this works Good and is removable. Maybe if I had a 2ft to 3ft in dia. I might have to use some steel. Randy
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on May 23, 2005, 06:57:18 PM
Randy,

That's the way we handle it..  But we don't keep a borad around until we need one.  Then we grab what ever's handy.  I think a couple of good ash boards at least 6' long would work just dandy.  They'd be light yet strong.

But filling in the holes in the arms is a good perminet answer.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Kirk_Allen on May 23, 2005, 07:05:56 PM
I used to simply grab a pice of slab wood and use that to hold the short logs but that got old fast on these last two or three cutting jobs. 

This is permanent!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on May 23, 2005, 07:41:06 PM
I forget who's got-em... Have you got the 4-powered back support kit yet?

If you're sawing that many short logs,  you'll really appreciate them.

I seen a new LT40 Super down in Mt. Vernon, MO at their open house factory fitted with four powered back supports.  A dream come true for me..  Of all the design suggestions I've made to WM,  this is the first one that they have implemented.

I asked Archey how the field kits were saleing and he said they couldn't make them fast enough.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Kirk_Allen on May 23, 2005, 07:59:31 PM
Yes I have them and they are a HUGE time saver!  Thanks for the all the hard work in making the first one Bibby.  I am SO GLAD WM listned to you!   ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: SawDust_Studios on May 23, 2005, 08:21:00 PM
Bibbyman,

What are the field kits?  Did a search, but couldn't find anything.

Dave
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on May 23, 2005, 08:35:47 PM
Wood-Mizer came out in 2005 with a number of retrofit kits for the older Wood-Mizer mills.

The short list includes a board drag-back for the standard LT40 - not offered before.

Bolt-on hydaulic loading arms for maual LT40s,

and the four powed back support kit for all hydraulic LT30/40 mills.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wswmbcksupts0205.JPG)

Here is a prototype set of what you get in the kit.  It should be bolt-in but a few people had to do some "fine tuneing"..

Follow this link to some talk about them...

New from Wood-Mizer 2005! (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=10218.0)

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: SawDust_Studios on May 24, 2005, 09:51:04 AM
Bib,

THANKS!!

I actually already got those about 2 weeks ago. I have everything installed, except for the retro for the backstops.  I also finally put on an AUTOCLUTCH.  This is #2 for me next to the debarker.

I thought perhaps when you said field kits, WM finally put together a kit of commonly needed parts for repair, replacement in the field.

THANKS!

Dave
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on May 24, 2005, 11:21:43 AM


I thought perhaps when you said field kits, WM finally put together a kit of commonly needed parts for repair, replacement in the field.

THANKS!

Dave


They do... (or at least they did)   

They have kits for different machines and different levels of field repair.  The basic kit includes wear items like belts and guide rollers, fuses, etc.

The professional level also includes more expensive items like drive motors, solenoids, pumps, valves.  These kits are meant for the guys that saw a lot and have people on the payroll so they can’t afford to be down until “next day air” brings them a part.

Just ask the WM parts guy.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: SawDust_Studios on May 24, 2005, 10:12:01 PM
Yep, contacted them today

$338.29 for a complete, likely mid level, kit.  Most belts, filters, even switches, spark plugs, guide blocks, solenoid.  Purchased separatly, they are 10% more.

Dave
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on May 24, 2005, 10:19:02 PM
Yep, contacted them today

$338.29 for a complete, likely mid level, kit.  Most belts, filters, even switches, spark plugs, guide blocks, solenoid.  Purchased separatly, they are 10% more.

Dave


Yea!  And the shipping of all those items one at a time would add up to more than that!!

We've got a lot of spare parts.  That way you know that part will never break again!  8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on May 25, 2005, 11:11:16 AM
Mary makes a mod...

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsmarymod05.JPG)

The next day after I changed the tension lever out for a nut (see post above some place),  I came home to find Mary had added her touch to it.  After changing two blades and bumping the tension a couple of times,  she got tired of stepping around the mill to where the wrench was hanging and fashioned this hanger out of some VERY stiff wire.  I figured the wrench would rattle but it doesn't.  I'm thinking of replacing it with a scabard or at least a nicer looking hook. But for now,  it works just fine.


P.S.  3/4" was the right choice for the tensioning nut as it's the same size as the tracking bolts.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Brucer on May 26, 2005, 12:24:53 AM
I put a rack beside each of my machine tools that holds all the wrenches needed to adjust the machine. Ya don't need high quality wrenches to adjust machinery, so the cost was only a few dollars. The time I've saved by having stuff "right there" has paid for those wrenches many times over.

In a few days I'll be adding a hook under the control console on my mill to hang my ear-muffs from. The bent coat hanger just doesn't have any class  ;D. While I'm at it, I'm going to add a small horizontal bar there to hang my gloves over. Simple stuff, but the minutes saved add up over time.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Randy on May 26, 2005, 10:47:56 AM
This is a BIG help to me------------Keeps the saw dust blown off.(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12029/fan3.JPG)   I have it wired into the ign switch. I also used a flemsy piece of metal to attach it with, because when a board drops down there by mistake the metal will give. I had it bolted SOLID broke the fan off the first day. This has been on about 2 months now. Randy
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on May 26, 2005, 10:55:30 AM
More details please... 

Where did you get the fan? Looks like something out of a junk PC.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Randy on May 26, 2005, 11:11:30 AM
Its a 12 volt fan. I use these in the amplifiers I build. I am sure radio shack has them, but I buy mine a 100 at the time. A computer fan is usually 120 volt. I used a fan guard on it to keep things out the fan blade. I ran 1 wire to the ing. switch then grounded it where its bolted on. Hey it works GOOD, but using something flemsy(?) to bolt it to the machine is important-----------you know slabs and boards fall into that area all the time, but you could take time to build a SOLID case over the fan to protect it. I just throwed it on fast------------after the first solid mounted one broke off. Randy
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: OneWithWood on June 09, 2005, 07:37:37 PM
Here are a couple pics of a simple mod I made for my WM mill.  I got tired of looking around for my pencil, spacer block, etc so I purchased a basket made for regridgerators or closets for $2.47 at Lowe's, drilled a couple small holes and voila a possibles basket for all that stuff that falls out of your pockets or gets buried in the sawdust  8)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10273/BasketLT40.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10273/BasketLT402.jpg)

I still need to place a finer mesh in the bottom to keep the pencil from falling out.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on June 10, 2005, 02:19:58 AM
One,
What do you use the spacer for?

Bibby,
Thanks for designing those powered backstops.  Just installed mine last weekend and I love them.  No more worries about short logs, or those tumbly burls.  I think they help with edging too, helps keep the boards square.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on June 10, 2005, 07:05:07 AM
Quote
One,
What do you use the spacer for?


What he said ????

Dave
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on June 10, 2005, 07:32:02 AM
Here are a couple pics of a simple mod I made for my WM mill.  I got tired of looking around for my pencil, spacer block, etc so I purchased a basket made for regridgerators or closets for $2.47 at Lowe's, drilled a couple small holes and voila a possibles basket for all that stuff that falls out of your pockets or gets buried in the sawdust  8)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10273/BasketLT40.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10273/BasketLT402.jpg)

I still need to place a finer mesh in the bottom to keep the pencil from falling out.

I'll go out on a limb and guess he uses it to toe up short logs that do not reach the roller toe boards. 

How'd I do?  What'd I win? ;)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Rockn H on June 11, 2005, 04:26:48 AM
Doesn't the manual recommend using a block to check the blade and deck being parrallel or something? ???
If I win I'll be glad to except the cash value equivalent to keep the shipping cost down. ::)  ;)  ::)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Kirk_Allen on June 11, 2005, 11:53:19 PM
After yesterdays cutting I HAD to do something to get out of the sun.  It was just to miserable.  Even though I stayed hydrated it was too plum hot to work in the sun.

Today was much better  8)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10851/Cedar%20shots025.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: beenthere on June 11, 2005, 11:57:31 PM
I like to see those hard-working sawdust remover 'mods' like you have on the left there.  :D ;D ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Kirk_Allen on June 12, 2005, 12:23:17 AM
What this photo doesnt show is the HOLE that is at the front of the mill.  When I started the conrols box was even with my head the hole was so deap.  I had Daren rake the sawdust into the hole in the front of the mill and after two days of cutting, I was back on level ground! 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: OneWithWood on June 13, 2005, 09:43:53 PM
For those inquiring minds, the spacer block is used to level one leg of a carpenter's square with the bunks when I use it to set a pith dead center.  The spacer is set on the rail bringing the square up to the same level as the top of the bunk.  See Larry's thread on centering the pith when sawing cants.
Tom explained a simpler method of sighting down the dogs to achieve the same end to me at Sawlex so the block may not see much more use.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on July 08, 2005, 02:59:10 AM
Hey Tom,
I think I know what OneWithWood was saying on sighting down the Dogs, but could you give us your own explaination on how you do this?

Thanks in advance,
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Shamus on July 10, 2005, 10:59:17 PM
Can you call it a mod if you built the mill in the first place? ??? ???

Well I duct taped together a Procut style chainsaw mill, and got to work making sawdust. Didn't take long 'til the honeymoon was over, I got tired of stooping over to push most cuts, and sucking in exhaust. Borrowed a little bit of bicycular technology and welded this bad boy up. Much nicer, and the grips dampen the vibration.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10722/103-0361_IMG.JPG)

The brake lever with cable pulls on the drilled throttle trigger on the saw handle.

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Brucer on July 14, 2005, 12:36:55 AM
Here's the first, and simplest modification I made to my mill. Just some strips of adhesive-backed high-friction tape applied to the frame of the mill. This is where I stand to check the oil and service the engine.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11885/mill_mod_01-1.jpg)

When I was working for Louis last year, the only time either of us came close to being injured was when he climbed up on his mill (in the rain) to check the tension on the drive belt. His foot slipped on the wet metal and he very nearly went down  :(.

The strips have been torn up a bit by stray slabs, but they still provide excellent traction. I've since added them to the platform above the axle on the "driver's" side.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Brucer on July 14, 2005, 01:00:53 AM
I still remember one day last August when Louis was sawing dry pine with the wind blowing in our faces. We couldn't breath and we couldn't see but we had to get the job done that afternoon. When I wasn't pulling boards, I'd be running around with a roll of duct tape patching holes in the blade guards and sawdust chute.

When I got my new LT40, I was looking forward to having a nice, "tight" mill with everything fitting up snug and not much room for sawdust to blow out. The newer mills even have an extra sawdust "catcher" built into the drive side blade housing. But I was most annoyed to discover that the new design has a short bottom-less section between the blade housing and the sawdust chute >:(.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11885/mill_mod_02-1.jpg)

Fortunately there's a pair of matching holes on either side of this open section just behind the blade catchers. They seem to be begging for a cover to hold in place so I bent up a piece of galvanized sheet metal and made a retaining pin from galvanized rod.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11885/mill_mod_02-2.jpg)

The cover has a little extension tab that holds the retaining pin in place. Push the cover up over the open bottom, push the pin through the holes, and rotate the end of the pin down into the extension tab.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11885/mill_mod_02-3.jpg)

And there it is. Quick and easy to remove for cleaning, and the pin even makes a great tool for cleaning out bark and stuff that gets hung up in the blade catcher fingers. I eventually put on a coat of galvanized metal primer and then painted the cover with Tremco Orange -- almost the same as WoodMizer yellowish-red, and it gives the mod a professional look :).
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: fabrik on July 14, 2005, 07:13:58 PM
Here's a shot of the exhaust extension I put on my portable mill. It really makes work a lot more enjoyable. If your local muffler shop can't supply you with the fittings you need you can buy mandrel bent exhaust fittings from www.jcwtruck.com.  They sell 45 degree, 90 and 180 degree bends. They are well made and reasonably priced. The fittings are aluminized steel but they don't sell aluminized straight pipes. You will have to get that from your local muffler shop. The support bracket took a little while to make, but is easy enough to accomplish. I haven't made it yet, but will make a flapper cap on mine or maybe just a 90 degree bend to keep rain out of the exhaust. Safe sawmilling to all of you-Mike
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11725/tn_DSC00494.jpg.JPG)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11725/tn_DSC00495.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Brucer on July 15, 2005, 12:50:16 AM
These are my ramps for offloading timbers. There are two extensions (painted orange) that hook onto the main frame just about anywhere. A couple of ramps (painted black) hook over pins on the ends of the extensions. When I'm sawing heavy timbers I place a couple of 4 x 4's on the ground beside the mill. When a timber is finished, hook the extensions over the frame, mount the ramps, and roll the timber onto the extensions. Then roll or slide the timber over to the ramps and slide it down to the ground. Remove ramps and extensions (stack 'em on the pile of finished timbers) and I'm ready to saw again.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11885/mill_mod_03-1.jpg)

This is a closeup of the extensions. Man, that image compression software sure improves the quality of my welds ;D.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11885/mill_mod_03-2.jpg)

The angle that rests on top of the rail has a length of 1/8" neoprene glued to it. This acts as a bit of a cushion when I roll a heavy timber onto the extension. The neoprene also keeps the extensions from sliding along the rail if I have to push or pull the timber to line it up with the pile on the ground. I put a couple of strips of adhesive-backed low-friction tape on top of the extensions so I can slide the timbers around easily before sending them down the ramp.

It only takes a minute to mount these and remove them later -- far less time then it would take to jockey a timber off the mill. Saves my back as well, which at my age is getting more and more important :D.

I built these for a WoodMizer, but the principle will work for just about any mill that has the bed well off the ground.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Brucer on July 16, 2005, 01:35:00 AM
This is my favourite and most useful "mod" so far. The clamp on my manual mill is most easily accessible from one side, but with my bad shoulder it's hard to shift the side stops from that side.

The new WoodMizers have a 5/8" hole through each of the side stops near the top (they're used to mount bearings on the Super Hydraulic). It was a simple job to make up a removable handle to give me extra leverage -- just a piece of 1" square structural tubing and bit of 5/8" shafting. Drilled a hole through the tube near one end, pressed in the shaft, and ran a bead around the back side to hold it in place.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11885/mill_mod_04-1.jpg)

When I need some extra leverage to shift a side stop, I just grab the handle and push the shaft into the hole on the stop. Because the handle can pivot in and out, there's no worry about scraping my knuckles on the face of the cant as I lower the stop.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11885/mill_mod_04-2.jpg)

Best of all, WoodMizer even provided a handy storage rack for the handle. Here it is parked for travelling. Most of the time I leave it in a hole near the centre of the mill so I can reach it from either side.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11885/mill_mod_04-3.jpg)

I added one more feature after taking this picture. Since the bed of my mill is 2-1/2" above the top of the main frame where the side stops attach, I used a permanent marker to make a scale along the handle, starting 2-1/2 " from the end. That way I can rest the end of the handle on the frame and get a direct reading on how high the stop is above the bed. Just a little less chance of sawing more metal off a stop.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on July 18, 2005, 12:06:37 PM
I don't think this is a "Useful sawmill mod" but a overly useful.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11541/DSCN2967.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11541/DSCN2968.JPG)

I removed the down angle on the exhaust chute.  A bit too much.  If the wind is just right, it's great. You wouldn't have to shovel sawdust for weeks.  If the wind is bad, you can imagine what happens.

I'm going to modify the chute angle to be adjustable.  Better yet, Hey Bibby!, could you remove Marry's blower on her mill and design and test a adjustable exhaust chute for us?  You did such a great job on the powered backstops I figure you'd do a great job on this one too.  ;D :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on July 18, 2005, 04:34:00 PM
YEA!  The sawdust chute does need to be more flexable in direction.

Did you just change the henged angle part or did you have to change the chute on the sawhead?

The only thing I can think of is to cut the whole thing off and put on a bolted flange that can be turned up, down or left, right.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on July 18, 2005, 05:48:56 PM
I straightened the hinged attachment by cutting a pie section out of the stock chute.  In the bottom photo you can see two weld tackes next to the rubber tube.  That's where I cut out the pie section.

I just tacked it because I knew I didn't like the stock design but wasn't sure if my modification would work well.

Adjustable will be attempt #2.

I'll post some pic's of how I did it.

Anybody out there already made an adjustable one?

I also cut out the grizzlies when I was sawing for the local commercial sawmill.  When you get to cutting fir fast you end up with some 4-8" long fibers that pack in there pretty quick.  This creates a big problem when sawing 30'ers.  You plug up in the first 5' and have 25' of sawdust to pack into your mill.

After reading more on bands breaking I'm going to put them back but I'm going to make them easily removable for either cleaning out on the go, or removing them when sawing fibery logs.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: WH_Conley on July 18, 2005, 06:43:57 PM
22 1/2 degree 3" plumbing fitting with 2 or 3 ft piece of pipe gets dust out of the way and leaves everything original, could use the rubber hose but have not.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Brucer on July 19, 2005, 01:27:00 AM
I also cut out the grizzlies when I was sawing for the local commercial sawmill.  When you get to cutting fir fast you end up with some 4-8" long fibers that pack in there pretty quick.  This creates a big problem when sawing 30'ers.  You plug up in the first 5' and have 25' of sawdust to pack into your mill.

After reading more on bands breaking I'm going to put them back but I'm going to make them easily removable for either cleaning out on the go, or removing them when sawing fibery logs.

When I started sawing for Louis last year, the first thing he did was walk me around the mill and give me a quick safety induction. And the first thing he pointed out was a huge rip in the outside of the flexible sawdust tube. "Never stand beside the sawhead", he told me. "This is where a blade came out."

On the older mills the blade stoppers, or grizzlies, were made from 1/4" diameter rod. After stopping 2 or 3 blades, one of the rods broke off and the one beside it bent right over. It was after that that a blade punched through the heavy tubing.

Louis has over 5000 hours on that machine, and he's broken hundreds of blades (I contributed a few). Only half a dozen or so headed out the chute, but that's scary enough to make me want to keep those stops in there. The part of my anatomy that's level with the outlet isn't as strong as that reinforced rubber tube.

I've made myself a kind of fork with four prongs that fit between the stops. Ends are bent over at 90 degrees, and reach right into the band housing. Usually one push/pull motion cleans a plugged outlet. 'Course, I don't have a Super so I can't push through the wood quite that fast; don't have to worry about the chute plugging part way through a cut ;)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on July 19, 2005, 12:10:07 PM
Thanks Brucer,
I was going to use cold rolled 1018 1/4" diameter rods, but sounds like they aren't quite enough.  Or I could use the 1/4 inch rod but they are a wear item.  When a blade breaks and strikes it, I inspect the grizzly and either reinstall, or throw away and replace.  Gives me something to think about.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on July 19, 2005, 01:21:03 PM

I've made myself a kind of fork with four prongs that fit between the stops. Ends are bent over at 90 degrees, and reach right into the band housing. Usually one push/pull motion cleans a plugged outlet. 'Course, I don't have a Super so I can't push through the wood quite that fast; don't have to worry about the chute plugging part way through a cut ;)

Got a picture of that tool?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Brucer on July 20, 2005, 01:31:50 AM
Gilman:

I don't know when Wood-Mizer changed the design, but on my 6-month old mill, the grizzly / blade catcher is made from 3 pieces of flatbar that taper toward the bottom. Haven't measured them at the deepest point, but I'd guess they are 1/4" x 1" at the base -- considerably stronger than the original design.

Bibbyman:

No pictures. I just bent 4 pieces of metal coathanger to make the prongs of the fork. Then I twisted them together at one end to make a crude handle. Now that I know it works, I'll make something that looks a little more professional -- something I won't be to embarassed to post a picture of  ;D.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on July 20, 2005, 07:21:06 PM
Here's the first chute modification without the rubber tube. The triangle piece was cut out and then tacked back together.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11541/DSCN2971.JPG)

I thought I took pictures of the steps to make this, but I must have just mentally took the pictures. smiley_whacko

Here's the chute in the UP position
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11541/DSCN2972.JPG)

Here it is in the factory position
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11541/DSCN2973.JPG)

Here's the chute folded up and ready to be tested at Firedog's place tomorrow.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11541/DSCN2974.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on August 10, 2005, 08:51:19 PM
We had a minor breakdown this morning.  The cable that pulls the dragback broke at the end of one loop.

I knew it'd take a couple of days and some shipping cost to get a replacement from Wood-Mizer so I thunk of something to substitute for the cable.  My first thought was a piece of small chain.  Lucky I fund just what I was looking for at Westlakes hardware.  I got a couple of feet just in case it does not hold up.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsboarddrag02.JPG)

I don't have the specs on the chain but I'd say the links were about 3/4" long and 1/2" wide on the outside.  This was what I found in Westlakes that looked strong enough to work and small enough to fit between the frame and the pulley whell.  It worked out just right although I did have to stand the last link on end and bunt it a couple of whacks with a hammer to get it to open up enough to accept a 1/4" bolt.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsboarddrag01.JPG)

This bolt is a bugger!  It's about 1/4" too long to come out from between the pulley and the frame.  Rather than disassemble the whole kicker assemble (been there, done that,  don't want to do it again), I use a long screw driver to pry over the pulley.   Before re-assembling,  I cut about 1/8" off the bolt.  I should have cut more.  I assembled the bolt with clinch nut and washer but but found the extra thickness of the chain vs. cable left the chain link bolted too tight.  It's got to be loose so it can turn as the pulley turns.  So I took it apart and removed the washer. 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsboarddrag03.JPG)

The other end was no problem.





Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on August 11, 2005, 01:47:30 PM
It's good to see you're earning your keep at your new job Bibby.  ;)


The adjustable sawdust chute has been working out great.  I keep it in the up position until the wind is not in my favor.  Then I just loosen the thumb screw and lower the chute and tighten her back up.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on October 09, 2005, 08:11:14 PM
Here is not so much a sawmill mod but a handy way I've found to work on the belt on the board dragback on the Wood-Mizer mill.

Over the past three and a half years we've had to work on the drag back a number of times.  Little by little we got a little smarter on how to work on it. 

Yesterday the little set screw backed out of the pulley on the motor that lifts the dragback arm.  You've got to get the belt off'n the pulley to get to the set screw.  It can be quite a tussle lifting the motor against the spring that provides tension for the belt.  We have figured out how to use a stick between the mill frame and the motor and lower the head to provide the upward push so to be able to remove the belt from the pulley.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsdragback20051001.JPG)

Here is the stick placed on the mill frame and under the dragback motor - the head is lowered so to push up on the motor - thus allowing the belt to be taken off with some ease.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsdragback20051002.JPG)

Here is a shot of the end of the motor.  The belt can now be jumped off the pulley. 

This little trick can save a lot of fight and use of bad words. ;)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: gmmills on October 17, 2005, 10:45:51 PM
     Those of us with WM mills know what a pain in the butt adjusting the blade guide arm rollers are. Trying to get them aligned properly can be really time consuming. These two wrenches will make adjusting the rollers less frustrating.
   

                                      
                                                       (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10973/wrenches%20sized.jpg)

   

  The wrenches are Snap-on sizes are 15/16" and 1 1/8". They are a bit pricey, but well worth the money.  The angled heads on them allow you to get on jam nuts and cam bolt heads no matter what position they are turned to. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on October 18, 2005, 04:19:03 AM
gmmills,

Great tip! I've not bought Snap-on so I don't know where to look for them but I'm going to check out the Sears tool selection the next time I'm there.

Are they also thinner than regular open end wrenches?  One complaint I have with Sears tools is that they are so thick it’s hard to get them into some places.

It's 3:00 am and I got a wild hair and decided to read the thread from the start. 

What a collection of great ideas!

I got down to page 5 and found where I got the second back support on our Wood-Mizer linked in and working.  Happened to note the date was just a few days past a year ago. 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/wsbacksupt212.jpg)

Not much to update on my mod but say it’s worked great!  For the first few months I’d kind of check things out to see if anything looked like it was about to blow but have pretty much quite thinking about it. 

Wood-Mizer has come out with the retrofit kit and some have reported installing them.  WM has also made them standard on the LT40 Super and optional on the standard HD models.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsmarymod05.JPG)

Oh yea,  Mary’s mod of a place to store the wrench is still just like it was in May.  It works so why change it?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: SawDust_Studios on October 18, 2005, 12:14:05 PM
Bib,

I'm going to have to reread this thread.  Does that chain lift up the drag back?  I'm not familar with that part. I have a retro drag back on my LT40HD, but I don't remember those parts.  Was this one of your mods?

Dave
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: SawDust_Studios on October 18, 2005, 12:31:20 PM
I am not a welder or metal fabricator, I deal with wood.  One Mod I'd like to see

ATTN WOODMIZER

I'd like to see the board return have a lid on it so that it also serves as a tool box. It would be a great place to store wrenches, etc that I always seem to need and always seem to forget.  And it already has it's own place on the mill.   Of course, it is already heavy enough.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on October 18, 2005, 01:04:49 PM
I'd like the mill to come with a mounted fire extinguisher.  As an addition kit would be fine with me.  You can't insure the mill without one, at least with my agent.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on October 18, 2005, 01:26:26 PM
Bib,

I'm going to have to reread this thread.  Does that chain lift up the drag back?  I'm not familar with that part. I have a retro drag back on my LT40HD, but I don't remember those parts.  Was this one of your mods?

Dave


Just look up  ::) a couple of posts.  We broke the little cable that lifts the dragback.  It was on a weekend so I came up with the chain fix.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: gmmills on October 18, 2005, 08:59:50 PM
 Bibbyman,

   No need to go to Sears. Just go to snap-on .com. You can order them on-line. They are called 4 WAY ANGLE HEAD WRENCHES. The Snap-On part numbers are VS30B for the 15/16"and VS36B for the 1 1/8". Just type in the part number in the search box and it will take you right to them. The width of the wrenches is not an issue. Just a little bit wider than the width of the jam nuts.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: SawDust_Studios on October 18, 2005, 09:34:18 PM
Bib,

My dragback must be different, there isn't a chain or anything that lifts it. You pull a pin and let it drop.  If you want it up, you lift it by hand and put the pin back in.

Does the supers have a different drag back?  Mine is one of the retro kits they did this summer.

Dave
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on October 18, 2005, 09:44:00 PM
Bib,

My dragback must be different, there isn't a chain or anything that lifts it. You pull a pin and let it drop.  If you want it up, you lift it by hand and put the pin back in.

Does the supers have a different drag back?  Mine is one of the retro kits they did this summer.

Dave


Hummm??  smiley_headscratch I've not seen one like that.  Ours comes with a switch on the dash that drops it and pulls it back up. Your's must be an improved model. ???

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on October 18, 2005, 10:51:39 PM
The retro fits are manual.  No motor  :-[    No switch  :-[  Just a pin to hold it up.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Kevin_H. on October 22, 2005, 03:51:48 PM
Well this isnt a saw mill mod but we added an extra blade to the gangsaw/edger, it's a stake cutting monster now, got me thinking about a moving up to a 15 hp motor and one more blade...

You can never have too much power, (insert tim taylor grunt here!)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10067/gangsaw02.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10067/gangsaw01.jpg)

This is an old timber king edger by the way.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ElectricAl on October 22, 2005, 11:03:12 PM
Kevin,

Nice mod ;)

All you need now is some blue paint and a "Binford" STICKER 8)


Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Kevin_H. on October 23, 2005, 05:37:51 PM
The binford stake o' matic 3000 with the optional turbo and first aid kit. ;D

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Radar67 on October 23, 2005, 05:44:51 PM
And don't forget the FIRE extinguisher!!!!! :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: SawDust_Studios on October 23, 2005, 07:03:22 PM
Well, that just ain't fair.  >:(   I thought that was the way they all where sans the lt70.  I want a button and a chain.  Looks like I'm going to be another sawmill mod.   :P   It would save the time it takes to stop, lift the dragback and put the pin in place. 

The retro fits are manual.  No motor  :-[    No switch  :-[  Just a pin to hold it up.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Stump Jumper on October 23, 2005, 07:32:15 PM
Here is a modification that I made to get in and out of my tight pole barn.  I know I should just build a bigger pole barn.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10831/sawmill%20mod.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10831/sawmill%20mod1.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10831/sawmill%20mod2.jpg)

She rolls around nice on a clean floor.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DanG on October 23, 2005, 09:03:34 PM
By Jiminy Cricket, that's a fine idea, Jeff! 8) 8)  I LIKE it!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: stumpy on October 25, 2005, 07:04:28 PM
Stump Jumper
How do you raise the mill to put them on?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Stump Jumper on October 25, 2005, 07:22:33 PM
stumpy

My Wood-Mizer has outriggers which are also jacks I place the wheels on the pair in front of the axle first.  I then raise the saw head and roll it back this would be toward the front of the machine once I get past the 2 jacks with wheels on them the back end becomes light I can then put the wheels on the pair behind the axle and jack them up.  Put the saw head back in its park position and one person can roll this thing around easily.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: logwalker on November 10, 2005, 05:48:24 PM
Heres a thought for a usefull modification for any bandmill. Install a bicycle computor on the idle band wheel to check for blade speed and belt slippage or engine slowdown. The computors are adjustable enough to mount it well in on the wheel spoke or hub for protection and still give an accurate rpm in miles per hour. Mount head at eye level for instant readout. About 60 mph oughta get er' done. Any thoughts? Joe
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on November 10, 2005, 06:18:23 PM
Logwalker,  that's just what I was thinking about - some kind of tachometer on the idle wheel to see just how fast the blade is moving.  Engine speed is not enough - the main drive belt could be slippin' or maybe the blade may be slippin' on the drive wheel.  But I don't think there is any way the idle wheel would read anything but what the blade is moving.

On the more model Wood-Mizers, the axle on the idle wheel don't stick out.  How would you attach a mechanical tach to read the RPMS (or MPH)? smiley_headscratch
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: logwalker on November 10, 2005, 09:15:21 PM
Well Bibbyman,
I havn't played with one in a while but they are pretty simple to mount. I do have one on the rear wheel of my road bike and it never gives me any trouble. The heads are waterproof. They have a hard-wired (or wireless too) pickup that you zip-tie within a couple of millimeters of the hub or spoke near the hub. then you put the magnet on the wheel it self in line rotationally with the pickup. Some are more sensitive than others. They are pretty neat little computors in that they have lots of functions like a clock, elapsed timers,  resetable odometers(2), and other possibly useful functions. Any bike shop sells them and I think Walmart does also. I don't know about the placement but will look tomorrow. Cost is maybe $20 to 50. LW :-\
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Octoman on November 11, 2005, 01:40:09 AM
The bike computer is a very smart idea, top marks!  I have one on my road bike too, its an excellent piece of kit.  After fitting the sensor though you have to input the circumference of your own particular wheel.  For example my wheel is 2096mm.  From then on the computer just keeps score of the revolutions for distance, and works out speed from that.  Keep this in mind if you decide to proceed with this plan as the idle band wheel diameter or circumference will be less than the average wheel, probably more childrens bike size.  So go to the bike shop with your desired circumfernce in mind and get the corresponding computer.
IF.....you wanted to spend just a little more money!  You can get a computer that measures your own heart rate at the same time.  They normally measure max HR, av. HR etc.  Wouldn't it be interesting to know whats going on inside when you just miss the dog or clamp by a few mm!! ??? ???  :D 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: edsaws on November 13, 2005, 05:55:20 PM
added gearmotor to lower and raise the head (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10896/Dsc00293a.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Radar67 on November 13, 2005, 07:24:48 PM
Hey Ed,
     Can you go into a little more detail about the parts you used and how everything is set up? Maybe some pictures from different angles. This looks like it would be an easy mod.

Stew
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Plowboy on November 13, 2005, 08:28:25 PM
I wanted to add roller toe boards to my Woodmizer.  I have a aftermarket hyd pump that does not have enough valves to add hyd roller toe boards so I came with this.  I purchased the rollers from Woodmizer and the rachet binders from Nothern tool. 

This is the rear roller toe board.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10468/wmrollertoeboard_1.jpg)


This the front roller.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10468/wmrollertoeboard_3.jpg)

Here is the rachet binder that I modified, when I upgrade my hyd. I think I can find a hyd cylinder that will fit into the brackets that I made.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10468/wmrollertoeboard_2.jpg)


This is my current pump and valves, so far this setup works but I want to upgrade to a Woodmizer setup someday. 
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10468/wmhydpump.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: edsaws on November 13, 2005, 09:17:15 PM
Hey Ed,
     Can you go into a little more detail about the parts you used and how everything is set up? Maybe some pictures from different angles. This looks like it would be an easy mod.

Stew
Well Stew basiclly its a couple of pillow blocks with a axle or rod with a sprocket that runs across the top of my mill that attach to the gearmotor. I got the gearmotor off ebay. I believe it came off one of them scooter chairs. The motor is pretty beefy. Then I drilled a couple of holes thru axle rod to attach the cables. The cables go around a couple of garage door pulleys. One on each side. Then back up and atached to some eye bolts. You can adjust the eyebolts a little to adjust the height from side to side. Heres some more pics.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10896/Dsc00287a.jpg) the gearmotor

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10896/Dsc00292a.jpg) one of the pulleys

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10896/Dsc00291a.jpg) Cable gets rapped around the axle. The eyebolt is towards the bottom left.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10896/Dsc00288a.jpg) Looking from the front nat a very good shot.

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Minnesota_boy on November 14, 2005, 07:10:34 AM
I wanted to add roller toe boards to my Woodmizer.  I have a aftermarket hyd pump that does not have enough valves to add hyd roller toe boards so I came with this.  I purchased the rollers from Woodmizer and the rachet binders from Nothern tool. 


When you get ready to add the hydraulic cylinders, you could use a diverter valve in front of the main valve bank to supply hydraulic to the valves for the toe boards.  You don't often need power to any other hydraulics while you are operating the toe boards.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Frank_Pender on November 14, 2005, 09:57:00 AM
For me one this thread, I go back to what DanG said on page 4: "#1" 8)

The only modification I made was getting Sawmill John to help me design the adaptive device to the bottom edger blade so that I could attatch a Lucas slabbing device to one of my Mobile Dimension mills.   8) 8) 8)

  There was also the building of the outer track upon which the outer part of the sabbing saw had to ride.   ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: raycon on November 14, 2005, 10:55:52 AM
Plow boy what year is your woodmizer?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Plowboy on November 14, 2005, 06:29:53 PM
My woodmizer is a 1991.  Minnestoa Boy thanks for the idea I may try and do that yet. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: PawNature on November 20, 2005, 03:34:00 PM
Don't know how useful this will be to someone else but to me its handier that pockets on a shirt.
I took a full size load lock ( for those that know what a load lock is) and cut it down to use as a log dog on my Lumbermate. Still got a little tweeking to do but very useful as is.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12628/Log%20Dog%20001.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12628/Log%20Dog%20002.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12628/Log%20Dog%20003.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12628/Log%20Dog%20004.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12628/Log%20Dog%20005.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: woodbowl on December 25, 2005, 01:45:41 AM
Well I've searched the forum over in hopes of finding someone that has successfully mounted the highest HP motor on their WM LT40. I am on my 4th motor now and will wear this one out very soon. My first was a Briggs, then a 24-Onan, now on my 2nd 25-Kohler. I am concerned about the weight as well but I really need that extra HP. Help
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on December 25, 2005, 05:12:14 AM
I'd get on the phone with WM customer service.  They've got kits made up for engine swaps.  They have a list of engine replacement kits (engines included) on their web site.  But this is a list for just replacing the old engine with a new one of similar size. 

Wood-Mizer replacement engines (http://www.woodmizer.com/en/support/engines.aspx)

They can also advise you if your mill can be SUPER SIZED with a larger engine.  Even if you get an engine from another source, they can most likely provide shields, belts, linkage cables, etc.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Minnesota_boy on December 25, 2005, 07:43:18 AM
Well I've searched the forum over in hopes of finding someone that has successfully mounted the highest HP motor on their WM LT40. I am on my 4th motor now and will wear this one out very soon. My first was a Briggs, then a 24-Onan, now on my 2nd 25-Kohler. I am concerned about the weight as well but I really need that extra HP. Help
I'm wondering how you wore out that many engines.  I'm on my second and I'd still be on my first if I hadn't had a situation where it cost more to make a timely fix than to replace the engine.  I've switched to fully synthetic oil in my Onan and really like it.  I run twice as long between oil changes and the engine seems to be doing just fine.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: woodbowl on December 25, 2005, 11:37:29 AM
I'm wondering how you wore out that many engines. 
After 10 or 11 years of sawing and after 2 million BF behind me, it kinda' wears on everything. I've also replaced every moving part on my LT40 several times over and upgraded  several things also. The rigid frame is the only thing not replaced, however I've welded things all over it, you can see it in my gallery. Since I will need a new motor soon, it makes since to get as much power as possible without over stressing the headrig, chain ect. I need to stay safe and within weight limits. So ............ who's got a big hoss motor on their little LT40?  8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on December 25, 2005, 12:37:51 PM
Sounds like that old LT40 has paid for itself a couple of times over and ... a new one. 

Don't you think a new LT40 Super or LT70 would be just the fix?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: woodbowl on December 25, 2005, 12:53:14 PM
Sounds like that old LT40 has paid for itself a couple of times over and ... a new one. 

Don't you think a new LT40 Super or LT70 would be just the fix?
It would indeed Bibbyman! ........ Problem is, I'm fresh out of $46,000 thousands. I've been eyeballing that LT70 pretty hard. I can make things work if the headrig will take it. It may look like a chinese laundry going down the road, but if it's making me money that's the bottem line.  OH ......... MERRY CHRISTMAS ........... We're all heading to Grandma's house now tear into some more presents.  :D :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Woodwalker on December 25, 2005, 11:47:01 PM
OK folks, this one isn’t orange. I purchased this manual mill second-hand a couple of weeks ago. Figured out some improvements would save me a lot of work. Due to the existing roller chain set-up to raise/lower the head, it wasn’t hard to add the gear motor.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/13206/Sawhead%20Motor%202.jpg)
The handle in the right foreground was the moving force of the raise/lower.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/13206/Sawhead%20Motor1.jpg)
The variable speed controler is yet to be mounted.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/13206/Sawhead%20Motor%203.jpg)
Far side.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: treedog on December 26, 2005, 06:40:41 AM
Looks good Woodwalker! ;) I also operate a manual mill and want to do the same thing. What and where did you purchase the add-ons (motor h.p. ect). My mill is set up near elec. but have been thinking to stay dc if operating on back 40. maybe using a atv winch or something; but don't have a problem with ac.  Any ideers?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Woodwalker on December 26, 2005, 09:52:58 AM
Treedog, I’m setting this one up to run on AC and this is all “Cowboy engineering”.  The gear-motor is a Dayton, Grainger model #4Z383. It is 90V DC (120V AC source), 1/8 HP, 58:1 ratio, 31 RPM. Raise/lower travel on the head is about 1” per 4 seconds. The variable speed control is made by Dart, #253G-200E. Found both the control and motor on Ebay. Counting the chain, sprockets, bolts and nuts I have about $180.00 invested.
This motor could be powered off a inverter/portable generator for out in the woods. The factory uses DC gear-motors  on the new mills.
This head uses 2- sets of double roller chain for raise/lower. It is a heavy sucker. I don’t see anyway to use a winch to move it. Some other mills I’ve seen use a hand crank boat winch that could be replaced with a electric winch. I don’t know anything about the speed or durability of the ATV winches.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on December 28, 2005, 02:58:59 PM
After 13 years of knocking my knuckles against the end of the blade guide motor when I worked the blade tensioner,  I decided to do something about it. 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsinoutmotorcover.JPG)

I noted that the motor that runs the debarker is the same as used on the blade guide.  But for some reason, Wood-Mizer put a rubber cup over the debarker motor.  Sinse we're under roof and I didn't see a need for it on the debarker motor,  I just took it off an put it over the end of the blade guide motor.

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: logwalker on December 28, 2005, 03:04:56 PM
Bibbyman, I bet that helps protect those light gage wires feeding the brushes on the end of that motor. Mine was missing when I bought my mill and those wires were nearly broken. I am going to put on my order parts list. Thanks, LW
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on December 28, 2005, 03:10:48 PM
I've never seen a WM mill with one on the guide motor and never seen on without one on the debarker swing motor. 

I asked why in one place and not the other.  The answer I got was that they thought the guide motor may over heat.  Maybe Sparks can reserch this and give us a better answer.

BTW,  I had the wires chewed off the blade guide motor by cows one time.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ElectricAl on December 28, 2005, 07:15:18 PM
After hitting or nearly hitting several of our off-bearers over the last 12 years, we added a 2" convex Mirror.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10103/Mirror.JPG)


Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DansSawmill on December 29, 2005, 06:40:56 PM
on the subject of more horsepower......
I saw a amish mans rig in ohio once that had a hyd motor mounted for the reg motor then hyd lines on swing arms to a LARGE motor skid mounted on the floor with a radiator... he was sawing at a circle saw site , they woould debark the really good logs and bring them to him to saw....
just a thought
dan
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Woodwalker on January 02, 2006, 09:44:00 PM
I got the parts in and installed for forward and reverse travel. It consists of a gearbox driven by a reversible variable speed three-phase motor. VFD drive for the three-phase and DC drive for the raise/lower motor are mounted in a removable control box. 
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/13206/VFD%20Drive%205.JPG)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/13206/VFD%20Drive%202.JPG)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/13206/VFD%20Drive%206.JPG)
I need to clean up the wireing a bit. Maybe add some indicator lights? Over all, the rigging works better than I thought it would.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on January 02, 2006, 09:50:01 PM
How about some covers over those chains and sprockets?  They look like they could eat fingers by the dozens. :o
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Woodwalker on January 02, 2006, 11:10:18 PM
Chain guards are on  the list, along with a little paint to cover up my welding.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on January 04, 2006, 05:24:55 PM
Those aerosol gussets will make it stronger too.   ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: karl on January 10, 2006, 08:16:13 PM
Here's a few modifications to my ole MD

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10773/MVC-003S.JPG)
This balanced guide crank doesn't viborate to the down position and back away or crowd the main saw like the original
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10773/MVC-002S.JPG)
This ice tea bottle keeps my palm from gettin' stabbed by cable wires or all grease when I grab the post to get on/off the mill. It's first,er second use was as a funnel to add oil, but it became a hand hold after I added a gas filler and cap from a pickup to the top of the oil filler with a rubber sleeve so the oil fill is tall enough to fill without a funnel.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10773/MVC-006S.JPG)
This is the plug hanging down from the battery on the mill and the cord to the 12v motor to raise/lower the carriage.
This solves the juggling of 2 batteries to start the mill and raise/lower

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10773/MVC-007S.JPG)
a window cut in the back of the mainsaw guard allows me to sight the blade along the log when setting up for first vertical slab off

Learning all the time......

karl
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Frank_Pender on January 10, 2006, 09:39:22 PM
Thanks for sharing, Karl.  You have some good ideas.  Could you show a photo of how you changed the oil intake site?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: just_sawing on January 11, 2006, 08:07:45 AM
Bibbyman
 I use a 3" channel iron bolted down. It is better to burr or make teeth on the top but I can catch small cedars this way and not throw them as I have in the past.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on January 11, 2006, 08:51:05 AM
Bibbyman
 I use a 3" channel iron bolted down. It is better to burr or make teeth on the top but I can catch small cedars this way and not throw them as I have in the past.


I'm getting old.  What was my question you answered?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: GregS on January 11, 2006, 04:48:16 PM
Question for Stump_Jumper
I was going back in this tread looking for ideas and came across this picture by Stump Jumper...

Is this a special quick-disconnect for a fuel line or just a common compressed air quick-disconnect?  If so has it held up ok?


(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/03_21_04/mod4.jpg)



Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Stump Jumper on January 11, 2006, 06:28:35 PM
Greg s
 to be sure you would have to ask wood mizer because it is factory .it is not like any air line coupling i have ever seen . it probably has seals in it to handle off road diesel fuel .
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Minnesota_boy on January 11, 2006, 07:28:05 PM
I put those kind of disconnects on my fuel tank after the second time I broke the original style.  I found them in the sporting goods section of Walmart.  They are labeled as fuel connections for a Honda outboard.  They have seals on both parts of the quick coupler so fuel doesn't leak from either end.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: GregS on January 11, 2006, 07:50:55 PM
Thanks for the help Stump_Jumper.

I put those kind of disconnects on my fuel tank after the second time I broke the original style.  I found them in the sporting goods section of Walmart.  They are labeled as fuel connections for a Honda outboard.  They have seals on both parts of the quick coupler so fuel doesn't leak from either end.

Minnesota_boy that is great information thanks a bunch!  I put a removable gas tank on my Timber Harvester but it does little good without the quick-disconnect.  I will take a look next time I am at Walmart.

Greg S.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Minnesota_boy on January 11, 2006, 08:05:01 PM
You might be able to find them at an outboard motor dealer too.  Sometimes there is a slight price differential though.  ::)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: wiam on January 11, 2006, 10:14:40 PM
I have an air quick connect on my homemade mill.  It has not leaked yet after about 3 years.

Will
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: gmmills on January 11, 2006, 10:30:01 PM
   On my old LT 40 I used small hyd quick disconnect fittings. The type used on pickup snow plow lines. Found them at my local NAPA.   
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: GregS on January 12, 2006, 02:30:32 AM
Excellent ideas guys thanks.  I knew I shouldn't have given up on this so quickly  :).

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: karl on January 12, 2006, 06:15:07 PM
Thanks for the kind words Frank-here's the oil fill extension-
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10773/MVC-009S.JPG)
a 1 1/2"x 2" No-Hub plumbing connector and a gas tank filler and cap from a '72 Ford Pickup. 2" side fits over oil fill tube on engine and clamps- ditto for extension.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10773/MVC-010S.JPG)
Here's a better pic of the dust chute. That plastic jug behind it replaces the 1.5 gal gas can that was original- we made a plywood base that sits in the original bracket and supports Teat dip jugs(available for free at your local dairy farm) This way I can saw for 3 times as long before refueling, I can see when it is getting low, by having a bunch of jugs I can fill them all with gas and only switch the caps to put them directly on the mill- no spills, no funnels and they can even be changed without shutting down the mill as enough gas remains in the line to keep the engine running while I swap- that was real handy for the couple of months I was starting the ole girl with a rope start!

karl
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DanG on January 12, 2006, 09:04:08 PM
Great mods, Karl! 8) 8) :P  The oil fill and dust chute are 2 things that have been bugging me, but I just hadn't addressed them.  I think I'll try it your way. :) :) :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on January 19, 2006, 09:25:37 PM
We’ll today I implemented what I hope is a final solution to the contact strip corrosion and contactor button wear and adjustment problem.  I just took them off!

As we have the Remote Station,  we have a cable track that carries the control cables from the station to the sawhead.  But the hydraulic pumps still require the contact strip and contactor to get power from the battery. 

We’ve change out more than a few contact buttons since we’ve got the mill and clean the strip and button quite a few times.  This change, though pretty drastic, should eliminate those maintenance problems.

I made a number of mistakes while making this mod just so you wouldn’t have to. Ain’t I a nice guy?

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wscontactchange01.JPG)

Here are the parts I started with - 100' of 1/0 welding cable, 4 tin plated aluminum lugs, and two 5/8" grommets.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wscontactchange03.JPG)

The first mistake was getting way too much wire.  Rather than take the time measuring what I needed,  we had an extra control cable that went from the Remote Station to the sawhead.  I measure it at 54 feet.  I deducted 4’ for the extra length the cable ran to the Remote station and to the sensor behind the head.  As I needed to double the cable,  I ordered 100 feet of 1/0 cable.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wscontactchange02.JPG)

Here is what the inside of solenoid box looks like as it comes from the factory.  Every time I have to work in here I mutter a few words I wouldn't say in front of my granddaughters and loose some blood.

If you get to studying the cable on the mill,  and if it’s like ours,  you’ll find it has a single #1 cable running from the solenoid box to the contact button.  So why did I replace it with two 1/0 cables?  I was told to…  It has to do with losses over a distance.  Apparently the losses are much greater when dealing with lower voltage. Anyway,  the #1 cable is rated at 250 amps where the 1/0 is rated at 300 amp – then times two would be 600 amps.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wscontactchange04.JPG)

I found it easier to push the cable into the bottom of the cable track with my right hand.....

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wscontactchange05.JPG)

While pulling and guiding the other end with my left.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wscontactchange06.JPG)

The second mistake was getting the wrong cable lugs.  All the electrical supply place had was tin plated aluminum.  I got the smallest they had that would fit a 1/0 cable.  When they were stacked on the stud, there wasn't enough room for the nut to go on.  Also, there wasn't going to be enough clearance between the lug and the box cover plate.  I had to make a run back to town to get some more lugs.  The other electrical supply place I tried didn’t have any lugs that would work in stock.  I ended up going to a well stocked auto parts store and getting crimp style tin plated copper lugs intended for battery cable.  Then it was back to the electrical supply place to rent their crimping tool.  (They didn’t loan out the crimping tool at the auto supply place but they would have crimped them on the cables for me – if I brought the cables in.)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wscontactchange07.JPG)

At this stage I could see there was no way I was going to be able to bring the cables into the box and get them on the solenoid terminal.  I solved this problem by moving the solenoid over to the left about an inch.  I just drilled one new mounting hole in the bottom.  It’s only fastened on one side but as I don’t expect the mill will ever have to past a 50mph crash test,  I’m not too worried.

The forth mistake wasn’t as bad.  I got a 5/8 grommet I didn’t need.  The 1/0 cable would slide through the hole that was already there as you will note in the picture above.  I just needed another hole.  I win one!

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wscontactchange08.JPG)

That comes to mistake number five – I only need to drill one hole so I bought a Buffalo brand large hole saw kit for $5. and change.  It was junk.  Maybe it would work on wood but not on metal. 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wscontactchange09.JPG)

I ended up drilling an array of holes and then going back and drilling them out larger until I could break out the middle. 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wscontactchange10.JPG)

I then used a stone on the electric drill to grind down the sharp edges.  I worked and most of the ugly is covered by the grommet.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wscontactchange11.JPG)

Removing the old contact strip was easy. Just take out about a half dozen small screws and detach the terminals from the solenoids and work the cables out.  I lucked out again as the 1/0 cable could be forced through the grommets the old cables came out of.  (But wouldn't if the terminals were already crimped on.)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wscontactchange12.JPG)

Here is the cable left over.  Looks like about 30'  What?  You never seen a red-neck cut cable before?

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wscontactchange13.JPG)

The only problem in the hydraulic box was that the bigger terminals rode up on a casting on the solenoid.  To get around this I used a heavy bronze washer to elevate the area around the stud.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wscontactchange14.JPG)

Here is a clearer picture of the bronze washer on the stud.  I had to file a flat on the washer to get it to clear the protruding ridge on the solenoid.

I could not fit the cables into the covered duct part of the cable tray track.  I ran it along side of it and affixed a cable tie at each support.  After looking at what I’d done,  I think I’ll take that part up again and re-run it through a section of plastic conduit pipe.  Again, our mill is stationary so there is no concern about it snagging as it’s pulled down the road.  But someone could get carried away with a shovel cleaning out fallout from under the mill.   I piece of 1x 2 rectangular tubing would work nicely too and could easily be fastened to the other cable duct.

If you’re considering making this mod,  here are a couple of other things I learned.  A well stocked welding supply store carries the welding cable and the lugs and will crimp the lugs on the cable for you.  The price I was quoted was $2.19/ft.  I got my cable from Graybar.  It cost $1.59/ft. They didn’t have it in stock but had it the next day and would cut it to length. (Your electrical supply place may have it in stock.)  Other electrical supply places didn’t have it in stock and would only sale 500’ rolls.

The auto parts store had cable and lugs and would make up any length but the cable wasn’t welding wire.  It had a stiffer plastic insulation.

My suggestion is,  figure out exactly what lengths you need and shop at your welding supply place and let them make them up for you.

What took me all day and cost about $200 should have only taken a coupe of hours and cost under $150. 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wscontactchange15.JPG)

Here are the parts left over after the operation.  The patient survived!  8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Stump Jumper on January 19, 2006, 10:49:37 PM
LEFT OVER WELDING cable makes nice jumper cables  ;)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: jpgreen on January 19, 2006, 11:46:32 PM
Looks good Bibby.

You can take it one step further by sealing the contacts.  A proven poorman's anti-corrosion marine technique would be to spray the joint (exposed copper wire) lightly with your favorite lube such as WD-40.  Wipe of the excess.  Wrap with PVC black electrical tape, then coat the PVC tape with PVC pipe glue such as multi purpose gray that's used on all types of ABS and PVC.

A few coats drying somewhat between each will give it a professional seal... smiley_beertoast

Any contact on a trailer, truck etc., will greatly benefit from this proceedure.  Wire it once, and be done with it.  It's even impervious to salt water launchings...  ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on January 20, 2006, 03:14:14 AM
Good tip JP.

I was just finishing up when a neighbor came by to pick up some white oak for a truck deck.  He works as a mechanic for a company that does power line cleaning.

He was commenting that the battery cables on the equipment kept breaking at the connection due to the extreme vibration of the chipper machines, etc.  He said he’s fixed that problem by repairing the connections like this - slip a section of heat shrink tube up the cord and then solder the connector on the cable. Then slip the heat shrink tube back down over the connection and shrinks it in place.

I don’t expect our stationary mill setup to see much salt water and all the factory connections are just crimped and all these connections are under cover so I think I’ll be OK in this application. (I’m getting pretty old so I don’t go the trouble of fixing anything to last a long time.)  I did leave at least a foot of extra cable length so I could repair the ends if need be.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Minnesota_boy on January 20, 2006, 08:34:05 AM
I just finished crimping ends on some cable similar to that yesterday, but I didn't have a cable crimper handy, so I used an old cross-peen hammer to make the crimp.  3 light swings and the cable was crimped tight.  ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: woodbowl on January 20, 2006, 10:51:24 AM
Good tip JP.

........ cables on the equipment kept breaking at the connection due to the extreme vibration of the chipper machines.........



I've had that problem on my alternator several times and was a booger to find. The continued low batt output  was not solved with a new batt. and the alt was still putting out 13.5V. The wire comming out of the alt. had vibrated itself into and had only a few strands inside the insulation that was still connected. I taped as many wires together, and as close to the alt, It works for now. I should probably bump up to a larger size wire.


 (I’m getting pretty old so I don’t go the trouble of fixing anything to last a long time.)


Bibby, I'm not getting old ............. I just don't want to do it!   ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on January 20, 2006, 08:27:11 PM
I thought I’d taken a picture yesterday of the “after” mod on the solenoid box but I hadn’t.  I did today.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wscontactchange02.JPG)

Here is the "as built" by Wood-Mizer.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wscontactchange16.JPG)

Here is the "as modified" by Bibbyman!


I’ve also decided I’m going to get a section of 1x2 tubing and mount it beside the cable track return duct to run the two cables in.  The cables are just too droopy being wire tied to the cable track mounting brackets.

I sawed up 9 hickory logs today and I’ve very pleased with the change.  No more “hunting” for the end of the contact strip to use the hydraulic functions.  No more wishing there was another foot to the contact strip for shorter logs.  I almost feel the hydraulic functions are crisper and smoother.  You know sometimes when the contact strip and or contactor is starting to get crud on it how the hydraulic motor won’t kick in?  Well,  that won’t happen now.

Also,  when using the dragback,  I can saw through the last cut,  release the clamp and lower it,  the lower the head and drag back what ever is left on the mill – including the last board.  I’ve fund that even a big stack on the mill will slide easily on the stainless steel bad rails.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: VA-Sawyer on January 20, 2006, 10:24:16 PM
Now you know why I have the front battery on my mill. It has really spoiled me having hydraulic power any time I want, no matter where the head is.  It is really handy when I have a second person that knows how to run the hydraulics working with me. They can flip the cant while I gig back for the next cut, or loosen the clamp so I can flip it down as I walk by on the return.  It's kinda nice when I get about 1/2 way through the cut and realize I need to put the clamp down or lower the backstops a little more. Last fall, I blew that 225A fuse (forget just how it happened ) and had to do things the old fashioned way. Boy, was that frustrating, having to wait on the head to return to front so I would have hydraulics to do something. I didn't realize how much I took advantage of the front battery till I didn't have it for a while.  I now carry 2 spare fuses in my parts kit.  :)
VA-Sawyer
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Woodwalker on January 21, 2006, 01:04:44 AM
Billeyman,  I would be interested in knowing what amps that motor is pulling. Do you have a clamp around amp meter and if you get a chance, amp it under load?
Thanks
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on January 21, 2006, 03:05:11 AM
Billeyman,  I would be interested in knowing what amps that motor is pulling. Do you have a clamp around amp meter and if you get a chance, amp it under load?
Thanks

I think it's a bunch or maybe a little more.  Or as Brooke would say "Boonch" and for even more than a "Boonch" it be "Boonches and boonches".  :D

I don't have that kind of meter.  I should get one.  Then have someone show me how to use it.

Sparks can probably tell you what they normally pull. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Woodwalker on January 21, 2006, 09:25:22 AM
Just curious to the amp draw. All my experience is with high voltage, never put an amp meter on a 12V motor.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: VA-Sawyer on January 21, 2006, 02:46:19 PM
Woodwalker,
The Monarch Hydraulics ( makers of the Hydraulic pump on my Woodmizer ) have a load vs. current graph on their website for my pump. It maxes out at 200 amps @ 2000 psi. I have a 225 Amp fuse on my foward battery and it hasn't blown due to any load I've been able to put on the pump. I was suprised how linear the graph appeared. Right at 10 psi per amp throughout the pressure range.
Bibbymans' hydraulic system is heavier duty than mine. I don't know if they have a bigger pump or use two pumps like mine. Either way, his should pull about twice the current to get twice the performance.
VA-Sawyer
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on January 21, 2006, 04:54:53 PM
Woodwalker,

Bibbymans' hydraulic system is heavier duty than mine. I don't know if they have a bigger pump or use two pumps like mine. Either way, his should pull about twice the current to get twice the performance.
VA-Sawyer

It's got two pumps.  I've always figured they were the same as on the Standard HD - just two of them. 

Besides being something like twice as fast, if one goes out,  you can keep going on the other.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: woodbowl on January 21, 2006, 07:17:15 PM
It's got two pumps.  I've always figured they were the same as on the Standard HD - just two of them. 

Besides being something like twice as fast, if one goes out,  you can keep going on the other.

  Hmmmmmmmm ........... Now I'm starting to think again.  Bibby, is that two pumps and one starter motor or two pumps and two starter motors? If it's twice as fast, it would seem that the same cylinders could be used on every model.  ???
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on January 21, 2006, 08:06:03 PM
  Hmmmmmmmm ........... Now I'm starting to think again.  Bibby, is that two pumps and one starter motor or two pumps and two starter motors? If it's twice as fast, it would seem that the same cylinders could be used on every model.  ???

I don't know nothing about no starter motors.  A pump units = 1 motor + 1 pump + one tank all built into one unit. 

It looks like something that could be found under a PU frame to raise a dump bed.   Or behind a snow plow blade to raise and lower it.

I don't have a picture handy but I bet someone does.

I think the cylinders valves,etc. are the same on the standard vs. Super model.  I've never noticed any difference.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: woodbowl on January 21, 2006, 08:39:17 PM


It looks like something that could be found under a PU frame to raise a dump bed.   Or behind a snow plow blade to raise and lower it.

I don't have a picture handy but I bet someone does.



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12431/manualtohydraulic%20003ff11%25.JPG)

I've got one.  ;D  This is the unit on my mill that I bought from Northern hydraulics. Well .......... it's kinda' hard to see but it is under the valve banks and to the right. It is one motor, one pump and one tank.  .........   I'm trying to understand the two pump system. Does it sound like it is two of these units, side by side and feeding one common line?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on January 21, 2006, 08:57:02 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12431/manualtohydraulic%20003ff11%25.JPG)

I've got one.  ;D  This is the unit on my mill that I bought from Northern hydraulics. Well .......... it's kinda' hard to see but it is under the valve banks and to the right. It is one motor, one pump and one tank.  .........   I'm trying to understand the two pump system. Does it sound like it is two of these units, side by side and feeding one common line?

Yea, just side by side like a team of horses.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: woodbowl on January 21, 2006, 09:20:47 PM

Yea, just side by side like a team of horses.


Hmmmmm ................. I've only got 47 questions to ask now. Since twice the fluid is traveling to the cylinders, I wonder if THOSE lines are larger or if the regular size will still work.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on January 25, 2006, 05:35:36 PM
A quick update on the removal of the contact strip project.

I’ve sawn several days with it converted and feel that the hydraulics works better. It didn’t add any power or speed but there is no more hunting for the end of the strip or no more jerky motion you get if there is not a good contact.

Mary got to saw with it yesterday and today and she’s pleased.  We got to were we can cut through the last cut and then loosen the clamp, drop the head a little bit and use the dragback to pull the last boards off’n the mill. Even a big stack slides easy on the SST rails.

I’d like to thank Sparks and acknowledge he was the brains behind this conversion.  I didn’t let this be known right up front because I wasn’t sure he’d want everyone to know that he assisted in this project.

I think you’ll find that Wood-Mizer will be helpful to the owners of their mills in providing information even beyond normal service and maintenance.  I wouldn’t expect them to be responsible for the outcome of such a project that alters the mill or how it operates.

Thanks again Sparks.    smiley_clapping
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: sparks on January 26, 2006, 07:37:49 AM
 :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: D._Frederick on January 26, 2006, 12:17:01 PM
Bibby,

An interesting change, I think that I would have bought a battery and a charger and set it under the tongue of your WM.  Since your mill is all electric, you would have NO problem getting 120 volt ac to the charger.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on January 26, 2006, 06:05:13 PM
Bibby,

An interesting change, I think that I would have bought a battery and a charger and set it under the tongue of your WM.  Since your mill is all electric, you would have NO problem getting 120 volt ac to the charger.

I think that's what ElectricAl does.  Maybe he can comment on how his is set up.

You'd still need the battery on the head to run all the head motors. 

As our mill has two hydraulic pump motors that pull quite a few amps,  it'd drain a battery pretty fast - maybe faster than a regular trickle charge chager would keep up with.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ElectricAl on January 26, 2006, 08:48:18 PM
We use to use two Interstate Battery Deep Cycle batteries and a charger. We ruined those new batteries in less than 6 months. I called the tech line in Texas and they said to try the Workaholic. So, we ordered 2.  They lasted 8-9 months before the lead plates rotted out. The charger was on a timer to keep from boiling the water. Once a month we had to add distilled water and check with a hydrometer.

We saw a lot of big Oak logs and really work the pump and batteries hard.
After 5 sets of batteries we decided to switch to an AC powerpack.

We removed the factory pump and tank. Then added a 3 HP 220v pump and tank. Hoses go from the pump to the WM manifold and valves. The WM valves trigger a bypass solenoid on the pump to pressurize the the manifold. We let the pump run on bypass while we saw so we don't have to wait for the pump to get going every time a lever is pulled.

The pump is from Monark, the same supplier for the factory WM 12v DC pumps. Our AC pump flows more oil at higher pressures than the 12v DC pump.  The motor, pump, and tank assembly cost $1000 delivered, and another $100 for hoses. 12v DC power is supplied to the valve bank from a 120vAC to 12vDC converter from Radio Shack. The converter turns on when the pump is started.

The conversion took one big full day :-\


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10103/WM%20hydraulic%20upgrade.JPG)


Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: customsawyer on January 26, 2006, 09:16:06 PM
Just a quick note to the folks that have the lubemizer on there mill I have had trouble when the top nozzel gets plug and you try to get it out to clean it and it runs into the blade guide roller. You can take a hand file and take about 8-10 strokes across the top and it will then go in and out very easily.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dana on January 26, 2006, 10:34:13 PM
 If you have a Woodmizer LT-30 with a manual log turner and forgot or lost the handle you will appreciate this one. My 7 year old son Noah, came up with it. :) :) Drill a hole in the shafts where the winch handles go to accept a roll pin of the same size as your toeboard cranks. Install roll pins and you will never be without a means to use the log turner.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Larry on February 03, 2006, 06:56:36 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10125/2006_02020003.JPG)

Little piece of 2" structural pipe, couple of bearings, and some cold rolled.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10125/2006_02020011.JPG)

Help from the die grinder and bearings are a press fit for a roller.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10125/2006_02020026.JPG)

Few more pieces of scrap.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10125/2006_02020033.JPG)

Stuck it all together with my “senior dopper” welding technique and presto...a roller toeboard.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10125/2006_02020037.JPG)

I could only get 4-1/2" of up and keep it inside the bunk for a little protection.  That will be plenty for the stuff I saw.

Guess by now you guys have figured out my bunks are removable from the mill...how ya like that fancy new stainless steel?


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10125/2006_02020042.JPG)

The bell crank end.  I made it where I can power it with a hydraulic cylinder, or a winch.  I think there might be enough mechanical advantage that I can use a lever...that should be the fastest.  Gonna go with a hand winch just to see how it works.

Gonna dress up the welds with the right angle grinder tomorrow and splash a little flat black paint on it...just to show I’m professional...well sorta. ;D



Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: woodbowl on February 03, 2006, 07:30:27 PM
Larry, that is just too good.  8)   I bought a few light duty rollers at Hooties the other day but I still need to build some HD's. Did you turn the inside of your pipe and provide a backstop before pressing the bearing or was it necessary?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Larry on February 03, 2006, 08:08:56 PM
Well ya caught me...backwoods machine shop.  I tapered the pipe bore with a die grinder.  Little JB weld just in case.  It was a tight press fit and I kept the collar's to bout zero clearance if the bearings ever do come loose.  Course were talking bout something that doesn't turn much at all.

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: woodbowl on February 03, 2006, 08:42:31 PM
Well ya caught me...backwoods machine shop.  I tapered the pipe bore with a die grinder.  Little JB weld just in case. 



Well, ....... it's a good trick anyhow.  Hope you don't mind if I borrow it sometime.   ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Grappletractor on February 03, 2006, 10:28:17 PM
Well ya caught me...backwoods machine shop.  I tapered the pipe bore with a die grinder.  Little JB weld just in case.  It was a tight press fit and I kept the collar's to bout zero clearance if the bearings ever do come loose.  Course were talking bout something that doesn't turn much at all.




What is  a die grinder and JB weld ?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Radar67 on February 03, 2006, 10:41:45 PM

What is  a die grinder and JB weld ?

Hello Grappletractor,
     A die grinder is a hand held air tool similar to Dremel tool, just on a larger scale. A straight shaft grinder if you will. JB Weld is an epoxy based compound that hardens up as strong as steel, you can even drill and tap it. When it first came on the market, farmers used it to repair cracks in the blocks of their tractors, this stuff is tough.

Stew
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Grappletractor on February 03, 2006, 10:54:30 PM
Hello Grappletractor,
     A die grinder is a hand held air tool similar to Dremel tool, just on a larger scale. A straight shaft grinder if you will. JB Weld is an epoxy based compound that hardens up as strong as steel, you can even drill and tap it. When it first came on the market, farmers used it to repair cracks in the blocks of their tractors, this stuff is tough.

Stew

Thank you for answering my questions .

I found the die grinder,,,
http://www.faybutler.com/diegrinders.htm
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: woodbowl on February 03, 2006, 10:56:20 PM

What is  a die grinder and JB weld ?

 :D :D :D ..... Your pulling our leg ...  :D :D  ................ aren't you?   :-\
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Radar67 on February 03, 2006, 11:02:16 PM
WB, I don't think he is.

Grapple, here is the site for JB Weld http://jbweld.net/index.php

Stew
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: woodbowl on February 03, 2006, 11:29:21 PM
If it wasn't for JB Weld, I would be out of buisness.   ::)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Radar67 on February 03, 2006, 11:37:53 PM
I know what you mean WB. I've used it to patch gas tanks and radiators before.

Stew
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Radar67 on February 04, 2006, 08:55:39 AM
Larry,
     Great mod. What size bearings and cold roll did you use for the axle?

Stew
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Larry on February 04, 2006, 04:38:22 PM
Bearings were 2" while the cold roll was 1".
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dale Hatfield on February 04, 2006, 09:10:52 PM
(I’m getting pretty old so I don’t go the trouble of fixing anything to last a long time.) 


  :D  ;D  :o

 The same  old  feller that lived here had that same train of thought , awe shucks that aught outlast me. 
 Most of it did.  But my what a cobbled mess he left for the next person. Said part was he was top notch when it came his job working and welding for others, but not on his own.

Dale
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: gmmills on February 12, 2006, 10:48:23 PM
  For those of us that know how frustrating it can be to operate the Accuset setworks with gloves on. Here's something I have come up that really works well . 


                          (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10973/Setworks%20Pics%20003%20sized.jpg)
                           (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10973/Setworks%20Pics%20002%20sized.jpg)

   Used clear raised center rubber buttons .  These buttons are used as cushions on my kitchen cabinet doors. They are 3/8" in diameter and are 3/16" in height.  Used clear RTV silicone sealer to glue them to the panel.  Very easy now to push the keypad on the setworks with gloves on your hands.  8) 8) 8) 8) 8)



                           
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: jpgreen on February 12, 2006, 11:27:29 PM
Great Idea GM,

I'm thinking of putting accuset on my mill next year or so.  They want $2300 for the kit.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chris Burchfield on February 13, 2006, 07:40:58 AM
GM, now that's sweet. Had not noticed during the summer or fall. I was out sawing last weekend. It was cold so I kept my gloves on for warmth.  The guy I was sawing for was doing the tail work. I realized some difficulty pushing the buttons for the Accuset. I'll be off to the Hardware Store today. Thanks for sharing. Chris.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: jkj on February 13, 2006, 08:24:50 AM
Those little hemispheres are also used as rubber feet for electronics and other things to protect furniture.   I bought a few sheets of them once - there are at least 50 per sheet.  Radio Shack also carries (or at least carried) black rubber feet for the same purpose but I like the clear better.

BTW, they are also good for other cases where buttons are hard to press.   I equipped the electric wheelchair controls and garage door opener with these for a handicapped friend some years ago.  He has extremely limited use of his hands and no finger control, but he can press the buttons with his knuckles now.  These are self adhesive and should stick OK if the buttons are cleaned well with alcohol.

JKJ
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: sparks on February 15, 2006, 10:02:29 AM
That is a good idea. I don't want to put a fly in the ointment but there is one issue to remember. The rubber pieces will need to be able to be removed easily. If there is a panel failure we require the old panel to be returned. They are reprogrammed and reused. If the rubber buttons are on the panel we cannot do this and credit for the panel will not be issued to your account. So make sure they can be taken off with no glue left on the panel. Thanks
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Larry on February 23, 2006, 01:34:32 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10125/2006_02220002.JPG)


I've tried out my toe board for a while now.  Biggest log so far has been 20"...might have to use a snatch block when a 30 incher shows up, or take some of the excess cable off the winch to give it more power.

The winch is the $20 Harbor Freight model.

It was well work the effort to make it...lot better than the hydraulic jack thing I had before.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on March 31, 2006, 07:51:33 PM
Just an update on my project of removing the contact strip on our LT40 Super.

It's been working quite well -  except I started catching a glimpse of a flash under the sawhead.  I figured it out.  Now that I had the power to operate the hydraulics anywhere,  I was running stuff like the toe boards and clamp as the head was returning.  This wasn't letting the ground contact make to make a good connection.  Not good.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsnegcable200603.JPG)

So as I had enough cable left over, I ran a cable from the ground stud in the hydraulic box back through the cable tray to the where the battery cable connected to the contact button.

While I was at it,  I re-ran all the cables through a 2" PVC conduit where they return down the side of the cable tray.

Much better...  ;)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: iain on April 04, 2006, 06:35:04 AM
Excuse me being lazy on the searching front
but has any one added an extra (filler) arm to their WM loader

i was thinking of just in front of the road wheel to help with short logs and the stupid shaped stuff (that absolutely must have stunning grain)

i think there is enough room, as for the stupid stuff it gets loaded onto a piece of 3/4 ply and hoicked over to the clamp



Iain
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 04, 2006, 06:01:47 PM
Kirk Allen did a pretty good job of fixing the hole in the loader arms - but he went the other way.

Here is a link to his post..

Loader arm mod... by Kirk Allen (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=7789.msg171993#msg171993)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10851/Sawmill%20Mods003.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: iain on April 07, 2006, 09:27:12 AM
Thanks bibster i think i will make a template of one of the ends and whack it on with some of that sticky mig wire stuff



iain
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: chet on April 07, 2006, 04:40:18 PM
Squaring arms I've added ta da Norwood. A great addition to the flip up ones.  :)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10134/s%20pics%20159opt.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10134/s%20pics%20161opt.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: jpgreen on April 07, 2006, 10:51:38 PM
THose are nice Chet.

I've designed some adjustable leg extensions for my LT 40 with feet to use on various terrain. 

I wish you could come by and help me get my woodmizer sharpener and setter set up, and show me how to use it. Jeff said you would probably come by for some extra gas money..  :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: chet on April 07, 2006, 11:02:23 PM
 With da price of gas it would be a pretty sizeable investment ta get me dat far.  :D  Dat's not ta say I'd turn down da offer.  ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 15, 2006, 07:21:59 PM
We just installed a BIG mod to LT40 Super.   We made it into an LT40 Super-Duper! 
  
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsnewpump200604.JPG)

We bypassed the two factory hydraulic pumps and connected up a new 6 gpm @ 2000 psi pump.   It’s powered by a 7.5hp 3ph motor and has a 20 gallon tank.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsnewpump200604x.JPG)

As the new pump assembly sets in a little 8x8 shed behind the sawshed,  we ran the hoses under ground and cased them inside a section of 2” pvc.

The connections inside the Wood-Mizer box was pretty uneventful.  I just undid the little wire that goes from the micro switch to the solenoids and pulled the hoses from the pump and return side and hooked up the hoses from the new pump.

Zip, zip, zip!  The hydraulic functions go without the “winnnng” sound of the 12v motors in the box.  It’s kind of fun!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: jpgreen on April 15, 2006, 07:30:15 PM
Bibby... and the Bionic Wood-Monster..  :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: woodbowl on April 15, 2006, 08:27:44 PM
Oooooooohh  Bibby, you have truly out done yer self now. How much faster is it than the double pump system? Did you have to bump up to a bigger size Hyd line? How much have you operated it now? Are you using the same banks as with the 12v units? And a bunch of other questions. 

Well .............. I wuz doing a pretty good job of keeping this quite untill I saw your "Super Duper".  I've been working on a little upgrading myself. Here's a pic of the extra pump I put on my LT40 "manual" ready to be hosed up.
I think I'll call it the "super duper manual monster".  ;D  If you keep on doing stuff like this, I may have to put on three pumps.  ::)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12431/SM%20upgrades%2004ff13%25.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 15, 2006, 09:13:30 PM
We've not really done much with it yet.  I just got it up and going just afternoon.  At 6gpm and 2000 psi it was meant to equal - not necessarily be faster or more powerful than the factory pumps.  (I don’t want to be breaking things and Mary doesn’t want it throwing logs over the mill.)

The major difference is..  the factory 12v pumps may pump near 6 gpm when not under load but will "pull down" under load so the gpm drops off to something like 2.5 gpm.   That’s both pumps performance added together.

This pump will pump 6gpm until it hits the setting on the bypass valve.  The pump was set by the builder at 2000 psi but can be adjusted up to 2500 psi.   There is a pressure valve on the valve body that's set at something like 2200 psi.

I’m not sure if it’s going to be a good thing or bad thing.  Sometimes when you have something under load – like turning, you’d maybe be better off with it going slower as it was lifting more weight.  The peak psi should remain the same so the job will get done either way.

I made no modifications to the mill.  I just ran the in/out hoses form the new pump up through the bottom of the existing box and bypassed the 12v pumps.  I did run 1/2" lines from the pump and back but the builder said 3/8” would carry 6 gpm just fine.  I just happened to have one 1/2" line that already had one 1/2” connection on one end and a 3/8” on the other.  The return line didn’t need fittings as it was just a slip on connection.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsnewpump200604.JPG)

If you notice on the left end just behind the drain valve handle,  I had the builder to add an extra bung plug.  It’s for a heater element.  We didn’t have the heater put as it would have taken couple of weeks to get it.  We won’t need it until winter for sure and maybe not then.  But we got the hole incase.  I added a gate valve in the drain plug hole so I could attach a hose and open the valve to drain it.

I think a 20 gallon tank is way overkill but the builder insisted it was needed for cooling.  I don’t think so in this application as the hydraulics are really not used that much – only a few seconds then with a good time to rest between.  But we may someday add a log deck and who knows what else.  The bigger tank didn’t add much to the cost but getting an extra 10 gallons of hydraulic oil was a bit.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: iain on April 16, 2006, 03:28:05 AM
So you've deffinetly decided that you want a stationary mill then?


nice going there with the pump



iain
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 16, 2006, 03:59:19 AM
So you've deffinetly decided that you want a stationary mill then?


We decided on that some 10 years back.  This 2002 mill is 3ph and set up stationary from day one. 

We're just trying to make it into an LT200 one part at a time.  :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: iain on April 16, 2006, 04:29:29 AM
I'll try that again

So you've deffinetly decided that you want a stationary mill then ;)?


iain ( what you doing out of bed at this hour)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: MULE_MAN on April 16, 2006, 06:19:56 AM
LT200  Gary you crack me up  :D :D :D


But if anybody can do it,  You can  smiley_sidelightbulb

                        Good Job    smiley_clapping
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: wiam on April 16, 2006, 07:28:36 AM
Who is Gary? ??? ??? ???

Will
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: MULE_MAN on April 16, 2006, 08:34:35 AM
BIBBYMAN  is Gary Warden    as in Warden saw mill


Actually it's probably Mary's Saw Mill, But we won't go there  :D   :D  ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: iain on April 16, 2006, 08:43:06 AM
Gary   Mary  its only one letter  ;)



iain
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 16, 2006, 08:44:26 AM
For sure, we’re not the first to give a Wood-Mizer mill a heart transplant.  ElectricAL has run his on a power unit for some time.  I bet he wasn’t the first either.

I think he’s mentioned something about his setup before but maybe he’ll give us an overview of his hydaulic system mod.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: logwalker on April 16, 2006, 12:52:53 PM
I think your hydraulics person was correct to size the 20 gallon tank to handle the constant use of the pump versus intermittant use as before. The pumping action will generate considerable heat over time. I am assuming that you will leave the pump running while sawing. Is that correct? LW
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: jpgreen on April 16, 2006, 01:00:54 PM
Now for the ultimate "Cat's Meow" in systems oil filtering...

http://www.bypassfilter.com/photos.htm

-wipe your rear and filter your oil at at the same time..  :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 16, 2006, 01:31:30 PM
Son and I just came in from sawing a dozen 8x8s x 10’.  Mary came out to inspect our work and check out the new hydraulics system.   I got a big  smiley_thumbsup and  smiley_kiss from the boss.

The hydraulics are plenty fast - maybe a little too fast on some operations like the log turner.  You have to ‘feather’ the valves to ease things along so it’ll take a little getting use to.  We could put a flow reducer in the line I guess.

Probably 4-5 gpm would be more equal to the performance of the LT40 Super.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: red on April 16, 2006, 01:39:51 PM
sounds great !

glad to hear the woodmizer R&D shop is still going strong.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ElectricAl on April 16, 2006, 07:14:32 PM
Bibbyman,

6 GPM is a lot of oil :o

Now you can lift a log, move the clamp out and swing up the Bibbyman Backstops all at the same time ;D




This is from an earlier post............
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10103/WM%20hydraulic%20upgrade.JPG)

Quote
We use to use two Interstate Battery Deep Cycle batteries and a charger. We ruined those new batteries in less than 6 months. I called the tech line in Texas and they said to try the Workaholic. So, we ordered 2.  They lasted 8-9 months before the lead plates rotted out. The charger was on a timer to keep from boiling the water. Once a month we had to add distilled water and check with a hydrometer.

We saw a lot of big Oak logs and really work the pump and batteries hard.
After 5 sets of batteries we decided to switch to an AC powerpack.

We removed the factory pump and tank. Then added a 3 HP 220v pump and tank. Hoses go from the pump to the WM manifold and valves. The WM valves trigger a bypass solenoid on the pump to pressurize the the manifold. We let the pump run on bypass while we saw so we don't have to wait for the pump to get going every time a lever is pulled.

The pump is from Monark, the same supplier for the factory WM 12v DC pumps. Our AC pump flows more oil at higher pressures than the 12v DC pump.  The motor, pump, and tank assembly cost $1000 delivered, and another $100 for hoses. 12v DC power is supplied to the valve bank from a 120vAC to 12vDC converter from Radio Shack. The converter turns on when the pump is started.

The conversion took one big full day



More info :

Our power pack is at least 4 years old and we are on our 3rd electric motor ::)
The first two had the capitors go up in smoke and burn the windings.
The by pass is set at @ 2000psi and we hit it every day.
Our sawmill is a 93' and that era 12volt pump produced 1.2 gpm @ 2000psi
The power pack makes 2.04 gpm @ 2000psi.
We could have handled a little more gpm because the factory valves are rated @ 2.8 free flow.

4-5gpm would be nice for three handle operations.

When the motor or pump fails we'll order a bigger pump and motor, but not a 6 gallon unit. Way too much for our antique.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Tom on April 16, 2006, 09:46:19 PM
having all that oil is a good thing.  It keeps the oil cool, which is important for the longivity of the oil and the hoses as well.  Hot oil will deteriorate the hoses.

The volume and the shape of the container is important to protect the pump.  If your bulk container is too small or too short, a whirlpool can develop that will cause the pump to draw air.  Air bubbles cause cavitation and will ruin the pump by eroding the metal.   It is a good thing to have a lot of oil in a narrow and tall tank.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 16, 2006, 10:47:15 PM
The builder explained that this tank has the intake on one side and the return on the other side.  Down the middle is a baffle so the oil will circulate.

It's also got a combination oil level and temperature gauge.  I noted today we ran it about 4 hours and it got up to about 120 degrees F.  It was 80 when we were running it.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: VA-Sawyer on April 17, 2006, 11:06:55 AM
Bibby,
Do you have some kind of electrical connection between the pump and the mill to operate an unloader valve ?  You don't want the pump making pressure except when you are moving a hydraulic lever. Electric Al has one on his setup, but I didn't see where you said anything about one on yours.
VA-Sawyer
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 17, 2006, 12:47:58 PM
Bibby,
Do you have some kind of electrical connection between the pump and the mill to operate an unloader valve ?  You don't want the pump making pressure except when you are moving a hydraulic lever. Electric Al has one on his setup, but I didn't see where you said anything about one on yours.
VA-Sawyer

I don't have.  Is there some reason to think I need one?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ElectricAl on April 17, 2006, 08:59:27 PM
Bibbyman,

Just checking.....you do not have a zero pressure dump circuit,
and your WM valve manifold is pressurized all the time.

That may explain why the oil is heating up.

If you are constantly on a pressure by-pass, several negative effects happen. High amp draw is one and extra wear on the pump is the other.

VA-Sawyer is pretty sharp, he picked up on information given and not given ;)


We have a 5 gallon tank and the temp gauge is room temp at the end of the day.

The way we are set up is the oil exits the pump and goes to a 12v dump valve. The oil goes back into the tank with no pressure through the dump valve. When we pull the WM hydraulic lever 12v power goes through the contact and to the dump valve on the power pack. Once the dump valve gets the 12v it closes and pressurizes the line to the WM valve manifold. It takes less than a full second to get something to move. Our 93' requires around 500psi to get things moving. Once the WM hydraulic lever is released, the dump valve opens and the oil goes right to the tank.

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: VA-Sawyer on April 17, 2006, 09:49:26 PM
Great explaination there, Al. Couldn't have said it any better myself.  Bibby, you need to get some form of unloader because the WM valves are not open-center type as far as I know.
VA-Sawyer
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 17, 2006, 10:08:27 PM
Great explaination there, Al. Couldn't have said it any better myself.  Bibby, you need to get some form of unloader because the WM valves are not open-center type as far as I know.
VA-Sawyer

I was told it was.   I'll check it out again. 

There is no pressure on the line when no valves are being pressed.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: BBTom on April 17, 2006, 11:21:15 PM
Bibby is right about the open center valves ( on my 2001 LT40HDD42RA), but the friction caused by running the oil to the valves and back to the tank probably causes the oil to heat up. 

Bibby, did you not just recently do a mod involving welding cable to the battery for the 12V hydraulic motors?  What happened to that mod?  I was thinking of doing the same thing, but if there is a problem with it, I would like to know ahead of time.  I am mobile a fair amount of the time so a stationary pack would not be a good solution for me. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 18, 2006, 04:31:36 AM
Bibby, did you not just recently do a mod involving welding cable to the battery for the 12V hydraulic motors?  What happened to that mod?  I was thinking of doing the same thing, but if there is a problem with it, I would like to know ahead of time.  I am mobile a fair amount of the time so a stationary pack would not be a good solution for me. 

I was very pleased with that mod.  If you go back a couple of pages you'll find a post where I came back and added a ground cable to the system also. 

I found that working the hydraulics 'on the fly' was not good as the ground button setup was not grounding very well when on the move.  I'd see a flash coming from under the mill. :o  Good buddy Sparks advised me that when there was not a good ground at the button, it'd find another way to ground - though the head cam rollers or chain drive.  And that tended to weld up bearings, etc.

So,  if I were to do it all over again,  I'd figure from the start to cable the positive and the ground side.  And if I were going mobile,  I'd figure on running the cables inside a light steel tube along side the cable track return.

The major reason for the new remote pump was for reliability.  We had the first set of brushes burn out of one motor at about 1800 hours.  The second went at about 2000.  I hear that's real early.  Others have told me they've got much more life out of the brushes on their pump motors.  The second sets didn't last 500 hours.  At about 2600 hours we're on our third set and one motor was down and out again.  Now we're looking at replacing the motors as the commutator are worn pretty bad.

At this point I need to add that I'd been saving money by having a local motor repair shop replace the brushes.  They only charge about $15 and the motor comes back clean as new.  But I'm beginning to think their brushes are not very good.  When I opened the motor up after they failed,  what was left of the brushes appeared to be very soft.  When the last pair failed,  I had one set of replacement brushes from Wood-Mizer that I put in myself (with Mary's help - looked like two monkeys fighting over the same banana).  At the time of the pump conversion,  the one I repaired using brushes from Wood-Mizer was still going but the one repaired by the local guy was out again.  So.... That leads me to think the WM brushes good,  local guy's bad...

I’d also like to thank Sparks and Burl at Wood-Mizer for answering technical questions on this project.  For sure they didn’t tell me to go out and do this.  I’m sure their advice would have been to leave it alone.  But they were very helpful when it came to answering the questions the pump builder had so we could spec this system.  This project sure gives me new respect for how much effort it takes to design and prove out a system like this so it works and works well.

I also had help from an electrical engineer where at my former office job.  He reviewed my homework on the electrical spec side and ‘splained things to me about fusing and motor starting, etc. Now I know why I move slabs and fix things - I didn't understand what he was telling me.  :D

I'm going to try to get back with the pump builder today and review the project.  I'll ask him about the heat rise and the unloader valve.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: BBTom on April 18, 2006, 07:22:39 AM
Thanks for the information, Bibby.  I will be doing that mod soon.  Dragging the mill through all the salt and slush up here in the rust belt makes for contacts that don't contact. 

Thanks for reminding me to order brushes for everything on my mill.  I have 2550 hours and as of today every brush on the machine is original.  I have heard the up/down motor "chattering" lately, I better call them today!!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 18, 2006, 07:52:49 AM
Thanks for the information, Bibby.  I will be doing that mod soon.  Dragging the mill through all the salt and slush up here in the rust belt makes for contacts that don't contact. 

Thanks for reminding me to order brushes for everything on my mill.  I have 2550 hours and as of today every brush on the machine is original.  I have heard the up/down motor "chattering" lately, I better call them today!!

The bruses on the up/down motor are real easy to get to to check and replace.  I checked our a few hundred hours back and they were only worn about 1/4.  Lots of life left in them.

We bought a set of brushes for everything maybe a couple of years ago.  Only used the one set on the HD motor just about two months ago as we had both pumps out!  The local guy takes a week to get new brushes put in.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: VA-Sawyer on April 18, 2006, 08:36:16 AM
Bibby,
Maybe WM went to open-center valves on the newer mills. I must confess, I haven't had any real experience with the 6 lever valve bodies they are using now.  If the pump isn't 'working' to produce pressure except when you have a lever moved, then it should be fine.
Just keep an eye on the oil temps for a while. Working it hard on a hot day will be worst case conditions. As long as you can hold your hand comfortably against the lower part of the tank, I wouldn't worry about having an unloader valve.  Congrats on the upgrade!

I agree about the WM brushes being better quality. Not sure why it looked like "2 monkeys fighting over a banana" when changing pump brushes. Didn't they include the cardboard ring in your brush kit? I find it makes the job pretty easy myself.  The motor that I have the most trouble putting back together is the 'feed' motor on the sharpener.
VA-Sawyer
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: woodbowl on April 18, 2006, 09:02:14 AM

The hydraulics are plenty fast - maybe a little too fast on some operations like the log turner.  You have to ‘feather’ the valves to ease things along so it’ll take a little getting use to.  We could put a flow reducer in the line I guess.


Bibby, are you getting the hang of the faster GPM yet? I'm thinking that it would be simular to a sensitive sports car in the hands of an unfamilar driver VS a familar driver untill the feel is found and then it can out perform all the rest. I would like to see you be able to effortlessly controll as many functions as possible. ............ A portable Woodmizer with an industrial booth with joystick controls.  ::)  ::)

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: slowzuki on April 18, 2006, 11:21:43 AM
Just something I noticed, if you haven't already buy a 0.25$ pipe plug to thread into the drain valve port.  It does a couple of things, keeps it clean and keeps it from leaking or accidently being opened.  Standard in industry.
Ken

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsnewpump200604.JPG)

If you notice on the left end just behind the drain valve handle,  I had the builder to add an extra bung plug.  It’s for a heater element.  We didn’t have the heater put as it would have taken couple of weeks to get it.  We won’t need it until winter for sure and maybe not then.  But we got the hole incase.  I added a gate valve in the drain plug hole so I could attach a hose and open the valve to drain it.

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 18, 2006, 12:12:21 PM
Just something I noticed, if you haven't already buy a 0.25$ pipe plug to thread into the drain valve port.  It does a couple of things, keeps it clean and keeps it from leaking or accidently being opened.  Standard in industry.
Ken


Yep,  managed to think of that!  I used the bung plug the builder put in.  I even got a section of hose on a reducer ready to screw in when I'm ready to drain it.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: GF on April 18, 2006, 04:37:32 PM
Bibbyman, is the man with a plan.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 18, 2006, 06:29:01 PM
I had a follow up meeting today with the hydraulic guy that built this unit. 

As the mill has an open valve system,  no unloader is required.  The heat build up to 120f I've seen so far is no problem and he said he'd expect it to get to 150 on warmer days and to not to start to worry until it reached 180f.

We talked a little more about some fine tuning - maybe dropping the pressure a bit.  It's hitting the max flow setting on the valve body of 2200 psi.  It's plenty strong.  If I could back that off,  it'd be easier on the mill and easier on the pump.  I could keep the 6gpm and be just as fast.  I could do this at the valve body (assuming it's adjustable) or add a flow control valve.  That may just be the best way.  Never know when some day you got a real biggie to handle.

Right now I've got the hose on the new system connected in the HD box on the WM to the hose on the WM.  The WM hoses are smaller than what I've used to connect to the pump.  They are 3/8" on the WM. But they 'neck down' to 1/4" at the guage.  It may lower the heat a little if I change out those sections of hoses.  Changing out hoses on the rest of the system would not be of any benefit - heat wise or speed/power wise as the cylenders use very little oil.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: D._Frederick on April 18, 2006, 07:39:11 PM
Bibby,

If you have a open system,  only one control at a time will work. With a closed system that is pressured all the time, all controls will operated at the same time. To operate a closed system, you need to have a variable displacement pump. Just some info.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 18, 2006, 09:17:35 PM
Bibby,

If you have a open system,  only one control at a time will work. With a closed system that is pressured all the time, all controls will operated at the same time. To operate a closed system, you need to have a variable displacement pump. Just some info.

Well,  now I am confused.  I know more than one valve will work at one time yet when none are working, there is no pressure on the line.  I suspect it has to do with all the valves are on one bank.   The builder said I couldn't have more than one valve bank unless they were setup with 'work beyond'. Whatever that is...

The more I know.... the more I find out I don't know.   smiley_headscratch
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: wiam on April 18, 2006, 09:53:24 PM
I run a gaurdrail post driver.  It has about 8 valves on one bank that is open center.  I can run several functions at once.

Will
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: D._Frederick on April 18, 2006, 10:57:42 PM
If it is a "true open system", no control will work down stream from the section that is being used.

The work beyond means that the output of one section of controls can be connected to the input of another section.
 On an open system, all control sections must be connected in series. On a closed system the control section can be connected in parallel. They all see the same pressure.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 29, 2006, 10:31:28 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wspumpout200604.JPG)

Well,  my last mod is working so well,  I decided it was time for another.   ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pigman on April 29, 2006, 10:39:22 PM
You took the hyd pumps out of the box and and you are putting in a cooler to keep the drinks cold. smiley_beertoast
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: amberwood on April 30, 2006, 06:29:58 AM
For those without a tacho on their mill I have just fitted a bike computer -AUD$30, and it works a treat. It reads out in km/hr, but really just serves as a reference for bandspeed overall. It is easily programmed to suit the diameter of the bandwheels and in my case the sensor is fitted on the undriven wheel with the readout next to the throttle.

DTR
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 30, 2006, 06:56:17 AM
For those without a tacho on their mill I have just fitted a bike computer -AUD$30, and it works a treat. It reads out in km/hr, but really just serves as a reference for bandspeed overall. It is easily programmed to suit the diameter of the bandwheels and in my case the sensor is fitted on the undriven wheel with the readout next to the throttle.

DTR

Did you do it like logwalker did his..?

Bicycle computer on bandmill. (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=7789.msg215173#msg215173)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Qweaver on April 30, 2006, 10:08:24 AM
Here are two items that I've built to make sawing and handling logs easier. 

I was fed up with slipping and difficult to tighten log dogs so I built this one using a s/s bolt and nut.  It works great and never slips.

I looked at several forks for the loader on my tractor.  They were expensive and I really didn't like the design, so I designed and built these.  They go on quick and stay tight.  They are made from 4" channel and they will bend under too much load.  I'm going to weld in a spring leaf to the under side to stiffen them up but they work fine as they are, as long as a little care is used.  i.e., don't try to lift a 3000 lb log with the forks, 1.  the tractor can't do it and 2. the forks will bend.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/13195/Log%20dog-1.JPG) 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/13195/log%20dog-2.JPG)


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/13195/forks-1.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/13195/Fork-2.JPG)


Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods-bike computer
Post by: amberwood on April 30, 2006, 07:12:25 PM
Exactly the same installation...and now I know that I stuffed up the belt calcs somewhere..only running a bandspeed of 70kph..should be about 100kph. Will need a bigger drive pulley before the next job.

DTR
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Larry on April 30, 2006, 07:30:20 PM
Well,  my last mod is working so well,  I decided it was time for another.   ;D

Ok...I'll bite.  Ya got rid of the electric over hydraulic?

BTW send me all the parts ya don't use no more.  I'll put em on my mill, buy a can of orange, and call it an LT38.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 30, 2006, 08:06:36 PM
Glad you asked Larry...

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsbaterychange200604a.JPG)

Wonder what's under this cover that's all covered with sawdust and bark?

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsbaterychange200604b.JPG)

A big honkin' battery.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsbaterychange200604c.JPG)

Now I've removed the battery and I'm cutting the junction box off the battery box.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsbaterychange200604d.JPG)

And now it's gone!  Where did it go?

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsbaterychange200604e.JPG)

It's back here in the hydraulic box.

More to come..  ;)


Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: jpgreen on April 30, 2006, 10:07:46 PM
You gonna make some room to ride that thing Bibby?..  ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Kevin_H. on April 30, 2006, 10:19:58 PM
Bibby, ya need to just break down and buy a 300, Really we would all understand  ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on May 01, 2006, 05:13:14 AM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsbaterychange200604a.JPG)

I'm trying to eliminate one problem area of the LT40 Super.  Note the buildup of debris on top of the battery box and the rail cover.   That's just where the sawhead comes down within an inch or so of the battery box.  If that area is not kept clean,  the sawhead will mash against the debris and cause the head to drag.  The problem is aggravated when you saw old logs with lose bark as we tend to do a lot of.

I don’t think this is nearly a problem area on the standard LT40 or the new LT28 and LT70s.  Most of the problem is caused by the location and size of the head drive unit on the LT40 Supers.  It forms a pocket for the debris to start collecting.

We’re not ready for an LT300.  I’m just making this one into a prototype of an LT200.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: WH_Conley on May 01, 2006, 07:29:53 AM
I don't know Bibby, the top of my battery box on the LT40HD is bent all to pieces. I can see where the drive motor on your mill would make it worse.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on May 01, 2006, 07:57:09 AM
I thought about turning the battery side ways.  This would give the debres an opening between the battery and the drive unit to fall through.  It'd work on our mill as we don't have an axle or tire but wouldn't work on a moble mill.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on May 01, 2006, 09:02:36 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsbaterychange200604d.JPG)

Note the wiring is right in the way now – kind of dangling out there like a cloths line.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsbatterymove200605a.JPG)

Yesterday’s progress was to re-route the wires.  The wires to the head motor had to run back under and along the frame.  The existing wires were not long enough.   I didn’t do my homework and when I got the wire,  I got #6 when #8 was what was on the existing connection.  In addition,  while I wanted to buy stranded cable,  all I had available on Sunday was some heavy cable with about 6 strands that would be used for a stove or water heater, etc.  But it already came with some shielding and the stiffness worked out well once it was trained into the right shape.  Mary even commented on how neat it looked.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsbatterymove200605b.JPG)

To figure out the shape I needed for the cover, I made a template out of cardboard.  I subcontracted out the making of the cover to a neighbor with a plasma cutter.  While it worked,  not all was as planned.  For one thing, the old sheet of steel had been painted on one side and the other had been against the ground for a couple of years.  I intended to have the 'clean' painted side up but the neighbor got it upside down so now I have the ‘rustic’ side up.   Oh well.   After I got it back rough cut,  I still worked on it for an hour with the grinder to relieve it here and there for a final fit.  1/10” steel don’t fold into places like cardboard.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsbatterymove200605c.JPG)

This morning I fabricated an angle bracket and bolted it to the junction box.  The cover plate was then bolted to the angle with a couple of carriage bolts.

It’s not done done but I’m ready for a field test.  I may have to come back and do some more mods before it gets painted.  We've got to get back to sawing.

One side note.  I had some input today from Sparks.  He was concerned that the distance from the alternator to the battery may be too far.  I checked and I was getting 14.9 volts at the alternator and 14.8 at the battery.  We think that’s ok.  I think maybe because I have the alternator wire connected in the junction box and two big 1/0 cables running from the hot side to the battery from there. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Minnesota_boy on May 01, 2006, 09:22:40 PM
My mill collects sawdust there too, but it hasn't always.  It really started when I replaced the track wiper when the felt got too worn to suit me.  The new track wiper has the metal extending on both sides of the track while the old one was extending on only the inner side.  This left more of a gap on the battery box side and most of the sawdust and bark would find their way down to the chain and out onto the ground.

I still don't clean that area all that often as I saw more 2" material and a little build up doesn't bother me much.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on May 04, 2006, 02:33:42 AM
I always thought of that extra sawdust binding up when the head was lowered as my, "emergecy brake."
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: OneWithWood on May 22, 2006, 11:55:10 AM
After setting up the dust collection system and using it while I milled out some sassafrass I had a brain fart and came up with this mod so that the fine dust that usually collects on the rail guard and battery box gets sucked into the blower.

Now this is only the proto type and it has not been sufficiently tested.  If it works well enough I will fab something out of metal with less duck tape  :)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10273/Dust%20Collector%20Mod%20X.jpg)

That is a 6" line going to the blower and a 4" line to the under head collector.  I may need to reconfigure to a 5" and 3" or something similar if I don't get enough suction under the head.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10273/Dust%20Collector%20Mod%202%20X.jpg)

What I did was use an old floor sweep attachment from a shop vac with a 4" to 2" adapter.  I made the extension for under the head out of cardboard for now.  There is only 5/8" clearance under the head at the lowest height so it took some figuring to get it right.  If I am satisfied with the set up I will fab it out of sheet metal and incorporate some tabs so it can be mounted using the existing studs and nuts on the head assembly. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on May 22, 2006, 01:56:21 PM
Sure works good!  I can't see a speck of sawdust anywhere!   ;)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: OneWithWood on May 23, 2006, 10:37:50 AM
It is amazing what can be accomplished with a shop vac and leaf blower!   :D

What you can't see is the dust piled up on top of the rafters and blower exhaust pipe.  ;D

check out the wannabe thread for my philosophy on a clean shop . . .  :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: jpgreen on May 31, 2006, 01:52:39 AM
Gotta love the orange crew..  ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: dad2nine on June 01, 2006, 08:52:03 PM
Ok first sawmill mod, well not really, put some trans fluid in a cheap spray bottle, makes coating down the mill easier than soaking a rag.

I do have a question, is it cool to weld on a wood mizer, is the frame hardened? would welding make it weaker?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: jpgreen on June 01, 2006, 10:11:25 PM
I heard WoodMizer's were titanium so better be careful..  ;D

It certainly can be welded on, and weakened, or flexed out of plumb by heat if you don't know what you're doing.  Hardening that monster would be expensive fo sho, so you don't need to worry about that.

For instance, I'm going to update the end supports where they went to a larger box tubing.  To keep heat down, I'm grinding, not cutting on the main rail.

Also, I took pictures of exactly where they made their welds.  Copy cating it..  ;D  8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: dad2nine on June 01, 2006, 10:19:49 PM
JPGreen thanks much for the laugh (titanium)  :D - you made my evening.

We will weld away...
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on July 17, 2006, 12:36:10 PM
Bibby mentioned a long time back that he wanted to see mod's to mills other than WM's.  Here's a little one that makes reading the height scale a little easier.

I got the opportunity to run a MD mill for a friend of Frank's.  He's building a Swiss Chalet and ran out of time to mill his logs.  I hated bending over to read the scale once the head got down to 12" and below.  I like to read scales at standing eye level.

It's pretty simple to make, two 1/2" diameter set collars, some 1/2" dia rod, a thumb screw & a smashed wire.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11541/DEG%20LT70%20%281%29.jpg)

The other thing I added was some flat magnets and a metal scale.  If I go back and saw again I'm going to take my 18" ruler instead of the 12"
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11541/DEG%20LT70%20%282%29.jpg)

The scale  addition simply mounts to the stock needle mount.  If it were my mill, I'd weld the rod to the 3" dia pipe to beaf it up a bit, and add a "L" piece to the top of the 1/2" rod to protect the needle from the scale.  The scale flaps back and forth quite a bit when you start the head forward or when returning it.

Hey Pender, I've got an extra scale extension for sale if you need one  ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on August 04, 2006, 08:37:36 AM
I’ve been having some off-line conversation with a Forum member about how well the four powered back supports were working out and any disadvantages I’ve encountered.  Since it’s been almost two years since I made the mod I thought it time for an update.

The following is my report after using them a couple of days.  The only thing I can add is that I've never unhooked the middle two back supports.  In short, they continue to work well.

The only problem I can think of is…

Sometimes (well,  more than sometimes)  you get a rough log where you have bumps and knots sticking out.  And sometimes these bumps and knots will now have a chance to hit on the middle back supports – thus pushing them to the loader side of the mill.  On logs – say up to 30” – this should not be a problem.  On really big logs that may make it more difficult to get the blade through without bumping into the outer blade guide – if this should happen.  I think this would be a small chance and nuisance.  You’d just have to trim off the swell or knot or turn the log to another face.

The way I have this one linked,  it'd only take a couple of minutes to run the nut off the tie rod link and take the rod off.  I even thought about setting up with a clip style pin used on 3 point hitch so it'd only take a second to disable.  But I think I'm going to try it this way for awhile.


Another reason to bring this mod up again is that I’ve noted that Wood-Mizer has lowered their price on the back support mod kit.   

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wswmbcksupts0205.JPG)

Here is what the kit looks like - at least one of the first ones.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on August 08, 2006, 05:13:48 PM
Mine still work great Bibbyman, I'm even on my second set.  :-\

Could you design a quick release model for the lt70's?   ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on August 08, 2006, 06:26:02 PM
Second set?  Why would you need a second set? smiley_headscratch

I've looked at the LT70 and can't come up with a way to link in the manual supports. (At least yet.)  We've dreamed about someday having an LT70 but Mary says the four working back supports are more important than all of the improvements the LT70 has to offer.

Maybe if Wood-Mizer would loan me one for say a year,  I could come up with some useful mods for it also.  smiley_thumbsup
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Gilman on August 10, 2006, 08:37:13 PM
I was sawing for a customer that has a MD mill.  He's used to being a little rough loading logs with his forklift.  He was a bit puzzled how a 9,000 lb forklift could damage a 5,000 lb mill.  :o

I'll talk to my people at WM and see what they can get you Bibby. ;)  Too bad they didn't have an LT70 toy, I'd send you one of those to sleep with.   ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ElectricAl on August 10, 2006, 09:05:53 PM
A couple years ago we added a WM Lazer to speed production. At the same time we added an aluminum splatter shield to keep the Lazer clean.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10103/WMLazer.JPG)

The Splatter shield is getting pretty beat up with all the sawing we do.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10103/WMLazer2.JPG)

The biggest problem we have with the Lazer is the wet sawdust that sticks to the lens of the Lazer.

Today was the day for a new Splatter Shield.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10103/WMLazer3.JPG)

A new Lazer cover was bend and fitted.
We also added a piece of flat stock that sticks forward of the lazer lens. This should keep the lens cleaner. At least until a big piece of bark hits it :-X

If we like this set up, we'll make one out of heavier stock.

Time will tell ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on December 07, 2006, 01:49:14 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wshydtankheater20061201.JPG)

Two days ago I made a mod to a mod.  I installed a 500 watt heater in the oil tank on the pump unit we had built last summer.  The builder and I talked about it when it was put together and decided to wait to see if it was really needed.  He did go ahead and put in the bung coupling for the heater just in case.

I sure wish I'd had it install when the unit was built.  It was no real problem but draining out all the oil took time.  I’ve got it temporarily wired in.  The junction elbow they provided couldn't be put on without removing the drain valve.  I'll make a run to the hardware store and get something that will work. 

I was worried at first because it was 40f outside when I got it installed and turned on.  I could not tell it was working.  I checked an hour later and the temperature hadn't come up.  I put a call into the company that made it and got transferred to someone that didn't answer the phone.  I left a message.

The next morning I went out early and the oil temperature gage was reading 80f.  It works!  We sawed until noon and when I came in there were three messages from the tech support guy.  I called him back and told him it was working ok that I'd not waited long enough.

It has a built in thermostat that kicks in at 50f and out at 80f.  This morning the temperature was down to 7f and the oil in the tank was 80f.

Now even on a cold morning the HD will ZIP,ZIP,ZIP....   ;)

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: beenthere on December 07, 2006, 02:12:48 PM
Bibby
Now what ya doin with all the heat radiatin from that tank? Melting the snow?  warmin the saw shed? or ya goin to wrap the tank with insulation?

How warm does the oil get on a 70° day when you are sawin a lot? 

Just wonderin here.  :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on December 07, 2006, 03:20:45 PM
The builder explained that this tank has the intake on one side and the return on the other side.  Down the middle is a baffle so the oil will circulate.

It's also got a combination oil level and temperature gauge.  I noted today we ran it about 4 hours and it got up to about 120 degrees F.  It was 80 when we were running it.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: WH_Conley on December 07, 2006, 05:03:59 PM
Not as complex as Bibby, but I have a 150,000 heater pointed at my mill, with hydraulic tank built in, if it feels slow, stand a little closer :D. Makes a big difference on a cold morning.

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on December 07, 2006, 09:54:21 PM
Bibby
Now what ya doin with all the heat radiatin from that tank? Melting the snow?  warmin the saw shed? or ya goin to wrap the tank with insulation?

How warm does the oil get on a 70° day when you are sawin a lot? 

Just wonderin here.  :)

I came back and noted I hadn't answered all your questions.

I don't see too much radiation heat from the tank.  Keep in mind that the heater is just 500 watts.  That's not very much heat.  Think 5 100 watt light bulbs.

I hadn't planned to insulate the tank.  Most of the time it'll need the exposed surface for cooling the oil.  That's one reason it hold 20 gallons of oil.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: derhntr on December 08, 2006, 09:45:31 AM
Well, I just read the whole thread Wow lots of info. I made one simple mod that is really a help to me.

I seem to saw lots of small logs 12" and smaller. Cherry and such. At my dads suggestion I ran a strip of duct tape on my log stops facing the command station. I marked them of in 1/2 inch messurements with a black marker. This lets me get a quick reading of where to make my opening cut and where to make the first cut on fletches.

It is also a quick taper gage for using the toe boards.

This simple mod has saved lots of time with a tape measurements and walking back and forth. Has save many useless cuts and run out on tapers.

It only take 5 minutes and .03 cents of duct tape.

Brian

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: BBTom on December 08, 2006, 10:42:22 PM
This won't help Bibby or ElecticAl, but may help the guys that drag their mills from place to place.

I got tired of buying bulbs for taillights, it seems as though every time a turn a big cant and it bounces the mill a bit, a filament would break in one or more of the taillights.  I was driving around half the time without proper lighting. 

I saw that Harbor Freight had some LED taillights for 14.95 each(catalog shows them at 19.95), so I bought two of them and mounted them on the mill.  It now looks like this:
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10217/Taillights.jpg)

and for a closeup of the modification:
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10217/taillights2.jpg)

Don't be too hard on me for not color matching the paint, or for not having the greatest welding skills,  the end result is that they are on there, and should be extremely resistant to shock problems. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: BBTom on December 08, 2006, 11:11:26 PM
Quite often I would have to chase a board or flitchthat slid off the cant to the left of the operators station ( Remote ).  I designed this little contraption to stop it:
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10217/dragbackguide.jpg)

The framework just holds the little bit of roller chain in place so it can catch the board when it starts heading the wrong way, thereby holding it on top the cant for the trip back to the operator.

here it is doing its job keeping the flitch from falling off the left side of the cant:
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10217/dragbackguide2.jpg)

Sorry the pictures are not real clear, but I think you can get the idea.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ElectricAl on December 10, 2006, 09:21:43 PM
BBTom,

When you post an idea that makes your life safer, you never know who will use your idea. ;D









Maybe ???




Me 8)


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10103/Tail%20Light.JPG)

Our light lasted 12 years intact.  I busted the lens first, and 3 weeks later I busted the mount :-\   

Thanks for the idea ;)

ElectricAl

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on December 10, 2006, 10:06:05 PM
Our mill came with lights too.  They're all busted up.  Not from direct hits but from flippin' heavy cants.

Maybe this would be a good idea to send along to all mobile mill manufactures?

Along with that, how about rubber lenses?   I remember one of the last time we shipped out some cattle my bother-in-law backed his stock trailer up against the loading chute.  I tried to stop him but one board hit the lens dead center.  But it didn’t break, it just smushed in a little and spring back out.  I commented to him about it and he said he’d be replacing hard plastic lenses every week if he didn’t have the soft kind.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Furby on December 10, 2006, 10:08:11 PM
They make a soft kind?
Got a source?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Tom on December 10, 2006, 10:16:54 PM
Mount the light inside of a piece of round tubing and it helps to protect it too.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on December 10, 2006, 10:33:07 PM
They make a soft kind?
Got a source?

Somebody makes 'em.  Maybe Tupperware?  :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: logwalker on January 17, 2007, 07:24:07 PM
After a year of walking between the Hyd. controls and the flapper clamp on my LT40 I was through. The worst was edging boards individually. I had already extended the toe-boards so I could level the board easily. As you can see from the picture they aren't quite heavy enough. But they work great.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12957/Pict0039a.jpg)


But the distance from the clamp area to the control valves did not allow me to hold the board and clamp at the same time. I would try to balance the board and then run to the control and watch the board topple over when I tried to clamp. I thought there had to be a better way to remotely control the clamp. Here are the pictures of my solution.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12957/Pict0036a.jpg)


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12957/Pict0037a.jpg)


If you look closely you see two wood handles dangling from the beam. The smaller one advances and the larger one returns the clamp. Fortunately I had the beam overhead to attach the pulleys to. I am finding so many ways to save steps now with the remotes. One advantage is being able to hold the log in the correct rotation with a peavy while clamping. Another is unclamping and turning small logs without returning to the controls. But edging is the real timesaver. It almost makes it a pleasure to edge. Next I am considering adding a remote to the back supports. At least one way.

Joe
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on February 20, 2007, 12:37:43 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsgearboxdrain200702a.JPG)

Sometimes things just don't work out for the best. I had to drain the gear oil from the gearbox and hunted all over for the plug. Guess where I found it? Right behind the bracket that the engine clutch linkage mounts. (see arrow)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsgearboxdrain200702b.JPG)

I could barely get an angled allen tool onto the plug but couldn't turn it. So I looked the situation over and decided the design needed a mod. I drilled a 3/8" hole through the clutch linkage bracket just below and centered with the pivot on the linkage. You can see the hex socket on the plug through the hole. I don't know if my picture is a little off angle or my hole was too far to the left but it was close enough for horseshoes and hand grenades. As they say....

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsgearboxdrain200702c.JPG)

Now I could insert my T-handled allen wrench and screw out the plug with ease. The plug stuck well to the wrench so I just left it there until the box was drained and the plug replaced.

I've been told by Sparks that the newer units have a gearbox with the plugs where they are easier to get to.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on May 10, 2007, 12:44:24 PM
With over 35 years of mechanical design experience I’ve always been impressed with the Wood-Mizer mills.  One thing that stands out is their use and application of hardware.  Almost every bolt, pin or fastener has some kind of corrosion protecting finish and some means of locking.  At many pivot points they use a polished hardened steel rod though tight fitting bosses and bushings and fitted with grease zerks.

But I’ve got one place that has caused me problems off and on since we’ve had the mill.  And that is the pivot joint on the dragback arm.  I’ve tried everything to keep it lubed and working.  A little motor and cam affair lifts the arm but gravity drops it back down.

About a year ago I had to get physical with it and take it off and drive out the pivot pin.  The roll pin holding the pin in was so hard I couldn’t cut it with any drill bit I had and it was too tight to budge when I tried driving it out.  I resorted to sheering the roll pin by driving the pin out.  The pin and holes were caked with a black powder that I assume was some accumulation of lubricants and rust.

I cleaned out the holes and sanded them clean and re-assembled the arm and gave it a light shot of gun grease.

It worked fine all through the winter.  But about a month ago it started dragging again and then again would not fall at all under its own weight.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsdragbackpin2007051001.JPG)

This time I thought I’d try a new approach.   I hammered out the old pin and found it was pretty well gunked up again.   The pin is made of 5/8” polished and hardened steel rod.  I went to a welding shop and bought an 8” section of 9/16” diameter hot rolled steel rod.  The shop guy went overboard and cut it more like 10” long.   I then drilled a 3/16” hole to put a cotter pin through to pin it in place. 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsdragbackpin2007051002.JPG)

After an hour searching for my assortment of cotter pins,  I gave up and used a 16d nail to secure it in place.

With the extra 1/16” loose fit, the arm falls with no problem now.  I’m debating if I even want to grease it.  I’ve not sawn with it.  It may rattle.  If it does,  I may try greasing it.




Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: olyman on May 10, 2007, 05:52:52 PM
gibby--when you want to replace that heater in your oil tank--if it ever dies--and dont want the oil leaking out--go get your shop vac--duct tapethe hose  to the oil fill pipe after you take the cap off--and turn on the vacuum--no oil leaks----- ;D  works on cars,trucks,tractors------and--one of the last mods--where you drilled the hole for the gearbox drain--to make the drain stay tight on the allen wrench---hold a piece of elec tape against the plug--and push the allen wrench in--stays tight--so  no loose--same to put back in
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: thecfarm on May 10, 2007, 08:49:21 PM
Also works on oil heating tanks too.My brother broke his filter off,what a mess almost,called up one of his friends that was into oil buners and told him the same thing about the vacum.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: olyman on May 10, 2007, 10:10:57 PM
 ;D ;D ;D--only thing--it has to be a good vacuum--not one about ready to die!!!!!  and--how in the world did he break it off----carumba!!!!!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on May 10, 2007, 10:21:03 PM
Yea,  I remember the vacuum trick real well.  I worked for 33 years in a factory that built oil-filled transformers – hundreds a day.  When ever they had a leaker or needed to change out a fitting,  it was common for them to pull vacuum on the unit and repair it.

I just didn’t figure it could be done with a home or shop vac.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: thecfarm on May 11, 2007, 08:30:50 AM
Oil tank was right by the cornor of the house and a group of friends was playing something.Well he got over by the tank and did not know it and some how playing around jumped and came down onto the filter-outlet tube,broke it clean off.That stopped the game real quick.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: amberwood on May 12, 2007, 07:50:27 PM
home grown lube-mizer

The original solenoid died..so in went a $10 washer pump( I had one on a box) powered off the solenoid circuit and the earth return was run back to the control panel and a new switch installed. I have used a garden tap as the flow control as the WM version is long gone. The pump is 1/4" and the tubing in 3/8" so a short section of 5/16" acts as an adapter. Very little pressure involved so no clamps just pushed together. the tap aslo means I can use a use a snap on garden fitting. To refill the tank you just unsnap the connection.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/13684/control%20panel.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/13684/flowcontrol%20tap.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/13684/lubepump.jpg)

All up including a new water drum, hose, tap, pump and switch the whole job may have cost $50 if you had to buy it new.

DTR
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on June 28, 2007, 12:05:41 PM
Here is a sawmill mod I didn’t want to do but kind of got pushed into it.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsbladeguidemountrebuild20070601.JPG)

Last Friday I was sawing a half-moon log.  A nice white oak that had been split up so only little more than half was left.  The split face was a bit twisted.  I put the split side against the back supports and as I sawed down the log the inside guide bound against the section of log that was sticking over the top of the back supports.

The next day we only needed about 200 bf to finish up a large order.  No problem.  We started to change the blade and Mary noted that the blade guide assembly on the inside (drive side) was loose.  Sure enough,  the bottom bolt that holds the blade guide on was broken.  BIG PROBLEM!

I took the assembly off and drilled a hole deep in the broken off set screw.   No problem.  Mary had bought a new set of easyouts a couple of years ago and we hadn’t used them yet.  So I screwed in the 1/4" easyout and tried turning out the screw with the power of an open end wrench.  I couldn’t get it to budge.  I then found a 1/2” drive socket and ratchet that would give me MORE POWER.  Still not enough.  I went and found my 18” breaker bar and that did it.  Yep,  broke the easyout in the hole.  I found out after about a half hour of working on it that easyouts are not easy to get out!

I took the part to a welding shop and he used a torch and punch to finally drive the broken off easyout out.  There were still parts of the screw left in the hole so he drilled it out and we ran a tap though it to clean up the threads. 

He didn’t have a 3/8”-24 by 1-1/4” SST set screw so I had to go to a machine supply place to get one.  They didn’t have one either but had a machine bolt that would work.  But,  then again, big problem.  I could screw the bolt in and then pull it out with my fingers.  That was not going to work.  As this place does a lot of machining for the auto re-builders, they could drill and re-tap to 7/16”s.  This they did and I got new bolts and nuts and went home and put it back together.

I had to redrill the holes in the mounting block to take the 7/16” bolts.  They supply place didn’t have 7/16” jam nuts so I had to settle for standard nuts.  There is barely enough room to get the larger bolts and nuts assembled.  There is not enough room to use a wrench on the top jam nut.  I have to loosen the lower one and move the upper one by using my fingers.

I don’t think the hole that was re-drilled and tapped was any to straight as I had to do a lot of adjustment to get everything back aligned.

But it worked.  Four hours later we were up and sawing again and we got the order done and out.

What I did was not my first choice.   But being Saturday and pressured to get this order out,  so it was the right thing to do.

This morning I exchanged some e-mail with Sparks.  He said they have an upgrade kit to go to 7/16” bolts.  Next time I order something I’ll probably (if I remember) order replacement parts for this guide assembly.  I should probably do it sooner rather than later as these bolts are not SST.

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: TexasTimbers on June 28, 2007, 12:42:42 PM
The guides are one of the few things on my WM I don't like. The female threads for one of my adjustment screws on the adjustable guide side are stripped. I think I am gonna try that Cook's Mega Roller assembly.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on June 28, 2007, 01:07:43 PM
This is the first time I’ve ever had a breakdown on a guide assembly other than replacing rollers and or bearings.   And I don’t suspect this one just failed because of its design.  I just banged it into something too many times.

I get the Cook’s catalog and studied the roller guide assemblies.  They look very similar to Wood-Mizer’s.  At least I didn’t find anything that would indicate that they would work or last any better.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: TexasTimbers on June 28, 2007, 02:14:40 PM
 I liked the idea of having the jaw. So I called them. They said they have the same number of adjustments it's just that they are much more heavy duty and will last longer, and they said for my application they would not suggest I get them.  I am just gonna order WM replacements. I just ordered them from WM.
While I had him on the phone, I asked if a scale was available that would take out the krf for 1/2", 3/4, and 4/4 and he said no. Has anyone made their own? I have 2 customers in specific that order alot of 1/2 stuff. Got one buy who buys 1/4 even for covering tack rooms for his horse buddies. I have just been eyeballing it for him and he  has been happy, but I'd rather have a scale.  I guess it's just a simple matter of adding the thickness of the kerf and whatever thickness i need, I just figger there is bound to be an easier way than marking each one off a tape. Probably cutting a slice of wood on the chop saw and using it to scribe. But what makes a good material to use for the scale itself? Woukd I want to be able to attach it to the scale on the machine now, or make a new scale altogether?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: sparks on June 28, 2007, 03:19:13 PM
Here is a picture of the upgrade. 038971   Thanks
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on June 28, 2007, 03:29:34 PM


Quote
I asked if a scale was available that would take out the krf for 1/2", 3/4, and 4/4 ......

I had the same question about 2 years ago.   Just about the time I bought the aluminum strip to make a few custom scales I decided to add the "accuset".   Haven't looked back since.     So much easier just setting in the finished thickness and cutting.   :)I
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: TexasTimbers on June 28, 2007, 03:34:26 PM
Where did you get the aluminum strip. I don't want to have to go through the Accuset upgrade yet. I am dreading that. I am gonna do it but not until next year. Mine has a simple setworks on it but they are T.U.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Tom on June 28, 2007, 03:44:16 PM
Kevjay, you can use the back of your quarter scale till you find some aluminum.

I found it at ACE.  It was with the all-thread.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: tomboysawyer on June 28, 2007, 07:46:54 PM
I liked the idea of having the jaw. So I called them. They said they have the same number of adjustments it's just that they are much more heavy duty and will last longer, and they said for my application they would not suggest I get them.  I am just gonna order WM replacements. I just ordered them from WM.
While I had him on the phone, I asked if a scale was available that would take out the krf for 1/2", 3/4, and 4/4 and he said no. Has anyone made their own? I have 2 customers in specific that order alot of 1/2 stuff. Got one buy who buys 1/4 even for covering tack rooms for his horse buddies. I have just been eyeballing it for him and he  has been happy, but I'd rather have a scale.  I guess it's just a simple matter of adding the thickness of the kerf and whatever thickness i need, I just figger there is bound to be an easier way than marking each one off a tape. Probably cutting a slice of wood on the chop saw and using it to scribe. But what makes a good material to use for the scale itself? Woukd I want to be able to attach it to the scale on the machine now, or make a new scale altogether?


Engineer laughs at me because my mill just has a ruler and I do all the scale stuff in my head. A scale doesn't work for me because with the lumber I'm cutting, I am working each log for so many different size boards...

I kept thinking of my mom in the 1970's - at the grocery stores she'd have one of those clicker things to track how much money she owed for what was in her cart. I thought building one of those with a 1/16 scale instead of dollars and cents would be cool... but all you guys out there with scales, who would buy it.

So I went to the hardware store and got myself some cheap tape measures. I glued two lengths of 36" of tape measure to my mill. Then I got some flat magnet material and made markers. You need two to plan each of the two directions of any given cant.

I measure the log and study the center at either end and plan the log. Then I mark my cuts on those glued on tape measure pieces with my magnet pointers (after all, the mill is steel). I adjust my sawhead to the big 36" ruler that is riveted to the saw head and follow my math on the tape measures.

Maybe its too much work. But my mill came with a ruler instead of a scale and I just learned to work with it. Pob'ly 'cause I just didn't know any better and fractions never bothered me.

Frankly, if you're just looking for material - go buy yourself a ruler in aluminum or stainless and use the back!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: WH_Conley on June 28, 2007, 08:26:05 PM
After some inventive language one time trying to align my blade guides, now once a year, need it or not I take all of the adjusting bolts out, one at a time and coat everything with anti-seize.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Faron on June 28, 2007, 09:36:04 PM
I made a strip for 1/2 and 3/4 material sometime ago.  I just had the local machine shop shear off a piece of aluminum.  I marked it off with a pencil, then etched it a little bit with a dremel tool.  Works fine.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Tom Sawyer on June 29, 2007, 09:01:23 PM
I've had 2 of those bolts break off in the first 100 hours of my brand new Lt40 Super.  I am pretty sure that mine has the bigger bolts too.  The first time I had to get it drilled out.  The second time I managed to get it to turn out.  It seems that there is a lot of stress on those bolts.  A friend of mine had the same thing just before my first one broke.  Hmm... maybe a different design is needed???
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Jim H on July 01, 2007, 10:53:10 PM
When I need a scale for 1/2, 5/8 and 3/4 I turn the Woodmizer scale over to the grade side and make a mark half way between their marks.  The extra 1/8 inch on this side makes it work out just right.  Plus, it's one less thing to keep track of.  :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on July 14, 2007, 07:36:35 PM
OK,   here's a mod I've been sitting on for a while, working out a few technical glitches.     

Last summer (July 2006)  I milled just over 11,000 bf for a customer.   It was all done in the direct sun and I almost got my brain fried  :o   (There are those that will confirm I did)  ;D

After that job, I mentioned to my wife that I need to figure out some way of having portable shade while out doing custom jobs.    That evening during a trip to the local Walmart, she found part of a picnic table umbrella on the clearance shelf.   $5 later she had it home and asked me if it would work.

After a quick look at mounting options, I settled for a couple u-bolts  mounted on the side of the accuset box.    Now I'm no dummy  ::)  Before drilling into the box, I opened the front panel to make sure I didn't drill into anything.    After deciding on the exact drilling location I drilled two pairs of holes  for installoing double nutted u-bolts on a slight offset so the umbrella would tilt and the bottom would rest on top of the Lubmizer box.    Note the two pairs of bolt heads in the photo below plugging those holes.  ::)   Everything worked great untill I tried to close the cover.   The u-bolts were in the way of the hinge.   :D :D

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11043/_DRB4304.jpg)

My second (and final) attempt worked much better.   In this photo you will notice only one u-bolt and it is mounted in the lower front corner of the accuset box.   I added a stud (1/2" bolt ) sticking up through the bottom flange to sit the umbrella pole down over to keep it in place since there was no easy way to add a u-bolt to the bottom control box.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11043/_DRB4308.jpg)

In the next picture, similar as the 1st you can see the pole installed.  The hitch pin through the pole is to keep the wind from lifting the whole thing up and carring it away.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11043/_DRB4305.jpg)

The remaining pictures show the umbrella installed for use.   The particular one that I used can be tilted 45° or used straight.  The photos show both configurations. When it is tilted, I can rotate the pole to block the sun from just about any angle.   If you look close, you will see that I had to extend the pole about 1ft so that it will not hang up on the water lube jug and manual scale when I use it in the "straight" configuration.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11043/_DRB4312.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11043/_DRB4301.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11043/_DRB4309.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: jpgreen on July 15, 2007, 01:10:40 AM
Looks good.  I've been wanting to do the same thing..  8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: WH_Conley on July 15, 2007, 07:30:50 AM
Get you one of those 12 volt fans and you wont want to stop sawing. Course your offbearer might not be happy. ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Qweaver on July 15, 2007, 07:33:12 AM
Here is a sawmill mod I didn’t want to do but kind of got pushed into it.
 
I took the assembly off and drilled a hole deep in the broken off set screw.   No problem.  Mary had bought a new set of easyouts a couple of years ago and we hadn’t used them yet.  So I screwed in the 1/4" easyout and tried turning out the screw with the power of an open end wrench.  I couldn’t get it to budge.  I then found a 1/2” drive socket and ratchet that would give me MORE POWER.  Still not enough.  I went and found my 18” breaker bar and that did it.  Yep,  broke the easyout in the hole.  I found out after about a half hour of working on it that easyouts are not easy to get out!

Easyouts rarely work on bolts that are tight in the hole. As you torque down on the easyout it tends to explan the bolt in the hole making it even harder to turn.  I've removed hundreds of broken bolts by using a TIG welder to weld a knot on the top of the broken bolt using SS filler rod.  The welding process heats up the bolt and that helps loosen any corrosion.  When the knot is big enough, I use vice grips or a small pipe wrench to turn the bolt out.  I've even been able to reach down into the hole for bolts that are broken off below the surface and just keep adding filler until I get it above the surface where I can get a grip on it.  Works everytime unless someone has drilled it out so far trying to use an easyout that there is nothing to weld to.  Also cast in bolts with a spur on the bottom are a problem...I can usually get them out but it will destroy the threads in the process.  In this case jut retap oversize.
One caution note here.  Don't try this using plain steel filler rods because you will almost certainly weld the bolt into the hole and then you really will have to drill and retap.
Quinton
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on December 17, 2007, 10:23:01 AM
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsLubeMizerDec200701.JPG)

When we bought our mill in some six years ago we got everything we wanted.  The only options available we didn’t get were the LubeMizer and laser site. Since then we’ve considered adding the LubeMizer but for one reason or the other never really got the decision made. 

We’ve made a number of mods and improvements to the mill and have it about the way we want it.  One area we thought could stand improving is the lube system.  Water is cheap and easy for us to come by with our livestock watering tank catching rainwater from the roof of the shed.  But sometimes we have to run a lot of it to cut the sap buildup on some woods.  That tends to get messy and does not always work as well as we’d like.

So anyway,  week before last we got a LubeMizer retrofit kit.  I worked on installing it early last week.  It took much longer than it should have because of the nasty, cold weather.  Also,  the manual and instructions that come with the kit covered off how to install it on different model mill and different revision levels.  I exchanged a couple of E-mails with Sparks and he got me on the right path.  Thank you Sparks!

The LubeMizer is installed on the power box on the sawhead on our model mill.  Newer models with Command Control have it mounted on the control box.  This added a little to the initial confusing but made the installation simpler.   It was mostly a plug and play installation – requiring only three holes be drilled.  The hole and mounting provisions for the LubeMizer controls (pre-wired on a plate) were already there.  The wiring plugged right into where the old water shut off valve was wired.  I only had to cut off one ring terminal and crimp on one spade connector.  The connector was provided as well as wire ties, nuts and bolts, etc.  I had a bag of hardware left over.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsLubeMizerDec200702.JPG)

Because our mill was older,  I had to drill two holes in the pan the water tank sets on to mount the hose and filter.  Another hole was drilled in the back of the blade housing shield to mount a retainer to hold the tube in place.

The weather broke for the better on Friday and we got to saw for a couple of hours.  It looks like the LubeMizer is going to do a lot better job of keeping the blade clean of sap off both sides. 

I noted we hardly used any water/lube and far less was on the mill and lumber.   As we have to run at least one gallon of windshield washer fluid to a tank of water,  this should save us some money as well as time.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on December 19, 2007, 10:30:40 AM
We've got a few hours of sawing in using the LubeMizer and it's working well.

I got some questions for people with experience with the LubeMizer...

1) We tend to want to pull the water jug off the mill at night and take it in the house to keep warm rather than keep enough windshield washer fluid in it to keep it from freezing.  Then we may not start sawing again until its above freezing the next day.
How do you purge the LubeMizer system to assure it won't freeze over night with the water/lube/windshield washer fluid that's in it? 

I've been disconnecting the hose from the tank and turning on the pump until it pumps dry and then dribbling some straight windshield washer fluid back in the line for a bit to flush out any of the old mix.

2) Are there any spare parts I should keep on hand?  For example,  I cleaned the settling bowl and was concerned about loosing the o-ring or damaging the screen.  Also,  do you ever have to replace the flow control valves in the lines?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: jpgreen on December 19, 2007, 10:43:13 AM
Bibby you could take an air nozzle to it and blow it out I would imagine.  That's the first California Hillbilly thought that comes to mind..  ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on December 19, 2007, 11:23:54 AM
Bibby you could take an air nozzle to it and blow it out I would imagine.  That's the first California Hillbilly thought that comes to mind..  ;D

That would work with the gravity flow system but I wouldn't want to do it with a pump and directional flow valves in this system.  It just may blow something out!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ShowMeSawyer on December 19, 2007, 11:59:22 AM

How do you purge the LubeMizer system to assure it won't freeze over night with the water/lube/windshield washer fluid that's in it? 


Bibby, I flush the lines with windshield washer fluid. Take a 8-10 oz cup and fill it with washer fluid, take the disconnected line and immerse the end in the cup and turn on on the lubemizer on full flow to suck the fluid out of the cup until empty. Make sure you have the feed control knob on the remote station turned all the way to the left and the forward/return feed lever turned on (forward) to activate the Lubemizer.

SMS
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pigman on December 19, 2007, 04:43:58 PM
I do about like ShowMeSawyer execpt I just stick the disconected hose in a gallon jug and let the pump suck the full strength windshield fluid into the system.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on December 19, 2007, 05:08:30 PM
Good info.  Thanks guys.   I thought about trying to find a smaller bottle that would screw onto the hose coupling just to up windshield washer fluid in.  But you're ideas are easier to deal with.

How about spare parts?  As nobody come up with any,  maybe I won't really need to worry about stocking any.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on December 19, 2007, 05:35:02 PM
Bibby,

I keep my tank on the mill all the time.   Most of the time I use 1 gal of washer fluid to 4 gal of water.  When it gets really cold, January around here, I use 2 gal of washer fluid.   Of course here in VA it's not as cold as long as it is there.  ;D

As far as spare parts go, go to lowes and get a couple of the 1/4" plastic tubing splices.   Also keep one of the plastic 'T's used on the output side of the pump as a spare.    The one time I didn't get enough washer fluid in the water, the 'T' froze and broke.   The splices are for when you catch a cant on the line and break it in two.  ;D    Chances of this can be minimized if you use a longer tube and route it around the far side of the blade guide motor and then back to the spray nozzles.  Tie-wrap the tube to the blade guide arm up close to the nozzle and the tubing will move in and out with the blade guide arm keeping it up out of the way of the cants.   I'll see if I can get a picture and post it for you.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on December 19, 2007, 05:49:53 PM
One thing I really like about the LubeMizer system is how the plastic hose connects to the fittings on the blade guide.  On our system, the hose was softer and fit over the end of the fitting.  It wouldn’t be long when the hose lost it’s memory and would fall off.  If you cut a bit off to get it to fit tight again, it was hard to get onto the fitting.  We fought with this about every day.

BTW,  I just came in from pulling the tank and letting the LubeMizer "snarf" up some straight windshield washer fluid from the jug.  We should be good to stay the night.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on December 19, 2007, 06:03:49 PM
Here's a picture of the longer tubing showing how I have it currently routed.   (Note, the 90° splice is all I had around the last time I snaged and broke the line.)  You can see that I run the tubing thru the clamp for the blade guide motor wiring harness to keep it up out of the way of the cants.  There is a tie-wrap with a big loop in it just above the pressure gauge.  The tubing 'slides' back and forth thru this loop as the blade guide moves in and out.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/11043/Tubing.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: gmmills on December 19, 2007, 10:01:46 PM
   I purchased a second 5 gal water bottle from WM. I keep straight windshield washer fluid in it. At the end of the day just exchange the bottle on the mill with the mix of fluid and water with the bottle with straight fluid. Then flush the system while cleaning the last blade of the day before taking it off the mill.

     The only spare parts I keep for the lube-mizer is an extra length of 1/4' tubing
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on December 21, 2007, 10:15:46 PM
I put a standard shop air nipple on the tank, and a quick coupler on the hose. Makes it really easy to take the tank off.

I must not have the sappy logs everyone else has. I have been sawing for a year on this mill, and I have only used about 7-8 gallons of diesel fuel. I only run lube when I see pitch on the blade. I now WM doesn't recommend the diesel, but it is all this mill has seen in ten years. :o I have probably sawn at least 35mbf of pine so far.


Dave
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on March 24, 2008, 07:05:54 PM
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsramproller2007032403.JPG)

I try to keep Mary happy.  She said she needed something to help her move the lumber from the milll to the stack and flitches from the mill to the edger.  We talked about all kinds of mods.  I got ideas from her as to what she was thinking.  While she wasn't looking,  I nailed up this table top.  It's not hooked directly to the mill.  It can be lifted off to get to the HD box that now hides the battery.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsramproller2007032401.JPG)

I decided to put a cherry on top by adding a roller on the end.  I remembered I had an assortment of gate hinge straps.  I found this small pair and thought they just may work.  I thought about the axle assembly and went to the hardware store and bought a couple of pipe bases for 3/8" pipe.  I also got a 3/8" pipe nipple about 5" long.  This I cut in two.  I found a 1/2" bolt would just slide through the 3/8" pipe and the 1/2" bolt was just the right size for the hinge.  I assemble with washers and tack welded the bolt to the pipe.  I didn't feel the strap was long enough so I cut a couple of 1/4" x 1-1/4" by 12" bar stock to help support it.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsramproller2007032402.JPG)

The roller is a section cedar we had turned on our Lathe-Mizer.  I didn't do the best job of squaring the ends or getting the bores centered and straight but it works.  Note,  I drilled four new screw holes in the pipe base flange an counter sunk the holes for the four wood screws.

Its kind of a prototype design. We've not tried this setup yet. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on March 26, 2008, 08:59:09 AM
Update...

Mary and I sawed yesterday despite 20mph - gusting to 30 winds.  The new table worked Ok sometimes, and better other times.  With 8' stuff, it was as I expected. Mary had to reach across the table to get the board.  She wanted to make the table even wider than I made it. I wanted it narrower.  But with the one 12' log we sawed,  the boards came right out over the roller and she could pull them right onto the stack.  They happen to be light cedar 5/8”x6”s but you could tell it would really help with heavy oak stuff.

One thing is clear,  we really need some kind of dragback guide.  Even with the much bigger target,  some boards wanted to miss to the left and one fell on the floor to the right.

We're not ready to give up yet.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: StorminN on March 26, 2008, 01:51:20 PM
Bibbyman, does your mill not have the fingers or chains that other dragback band mills have?

-N.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ronwood on March 26, 2008, 01:53:41 PM
LT40 Super does not have any guides to direct the board. LT70 has them.

Ron
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on March 26, 2008, 03:15:35 PM
Bibbyman, does your mill not have the fingers or chains that other dragback band mills have?

-N.

Yea,  like Ron says.  LT40s no,  LT70 yes.  I guess the deal is.. when they first started putting dragbacks on the LT40s, they were all walk-along or ride-along mills.  With either,  you don't need guides as the sawyer can just rest a hand on the board to keep it on top of the cant.  But with command control,  you have to depend on the offbearer to grab the end and keep it running straight.  Problem is,  often times they're off doing something else.   

They had gained experience with the LT300 mill before they brought out the LT70 and borrowed some of that design and put in a better dragback system and guides.

Update on the update.  We're sawing 10'rs today (until the thunderstorm came up) and I figured that I could square out the cant,  move it towards the hitch end until the end is on the first swing bunk.  Then saw it down and drag back the boards.  The boards ended up 2' past the end of the table and roller.  Mary could just pull and roll them right off onto the stack.  She looked a little impatient waiting for the next board.  I told her it was a problem as she had nothing to do half the time.  She gave me one of those looks every married man knows. no_no
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: beenthere on March 26, 2008, 04:46:31 PM
............  I told her it was a problem as she had nothing to do half the time.  ........

She could find just the right length stick, and poke you in the ribs that other half the time.... 8) 8) 8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on March 26, 2008, 05:38:49 PM
LT40 Super does not have any guides to direct the board. LT70 has them.

Ron


I took a good look at the LT70 dragback during the 25th tour.   It looks like it would work fine as an add-on to the LT40.   You could also make one up if you're so inclined (as we know Bibby is   ;D)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on March 26, 2008, 05:56:12 PM

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10217/dragbackguide.jpg)

This one by BBTom

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10580/board%20guide%201.jpg)

And this one that more resembles the LT70 design by wscott

I think CustomSawyer has one on his LT40 also.

We’ll be going down to Mt. Vernon here in a couple of weeks to the open house there.  I plan to take a harder look at the LT70 design and see if I can come up with more ideas.  It would be nice if there was a way of hinging it out of the way when not in use. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on March 26, 2008, 07:47:50 PM
Quote
It would be nice if there was a way of hinging it out of the way when not in use. 

Yea,  I thought about that as well.   I think it would have to flip up.   There is no place to either side where it wouldn't be in the way.


I really like BBTom's use of the roller chain.   Less parts and drilling with the same end result.   I'd hang more chains though.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: BBTom on March 26, 2008, 08:15:32 PM
DR,  That was the intention when installed, however, I just never have gotten a round tuit.  The one chain worked pretty good, so the rest of them never got installed. The chain needs to be a fairly heavy chain so it can withstand the side pressure. 

When I am doing something that does not require the guide, I can just flip the chain over the bar and it is out of the way. 

I promised Bibby some more pics and some measurements, so I better go get them.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Brucer on March 27, 2008, 12:49:34 AM
As I recall, you can flip up the individual guides on an LT70 to keep them out of the way.

I've been looking at the hanging chain idea. Rather than using the heavy chain with a large pitch, I was planning to use a double-wide chain. The extra width should make it stiff enough to withstand the sideways pressure from the log.

Guess I better buy a drag-back first ;D.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: BBTom on April 01, 2008, 08:20:24 AM
Ok, I finally got busy and took some pictures.  The guide is 34 inches in front of the dragback.  Why 34" you ask??, cause that was the length of the scrap angle iron I got my hands on.  Much longer and it may be in your face when you bring the head all the way back.
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10217/dragback_guide_1.jpg)
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10217/dragback_guide_2.jpg)
I drilled and tapped two holes to bolt the angle iron onto the engine mount angle iron.  The other side is held by the bolt for the autoclutch cover.
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10217/dragback_guide_3.jpg)
The chain is lined up so that it just clears the side of the cant when sawing,  the length of the chain is about 2 inches below the blade.
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10217/dragback_guide_4.jpg)
The chain can be flipped up out of the way if it is not needed.
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10217/dragback_guide_6.jpg)
I catch the end of the board and set it on this bit of rollcase. After starting the next cut, I turn around and run it thru the edger to the stacker.
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10217/dragback_guide_7.jpg)
Sorry that picture was so dark. 

Hope that helps guys.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pineywoods on April 11, 2008, 11:04:13 PM
This ain't exactly a modification, but it saves me some time and frustration. I saw dead pine with loose bark, cypress and cedar with stringy bark. Plugs up the sawdust chute, then the dust goes everywhere. Never can find the right sized stick to clean it out. Made this handy tool out of coat-hanger wire and keep it hanging on the strap for the water tank.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14000/scratch1.jpg)

It just fits up the sawdust chute on WM Lt40, clears the teeth inside.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14000/scratch2.jpg)

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on April 11, 2008, 11:19:24 PM
What kind of pine, yellow? I don't know what cypress bark looks like. I saw a lot of white pine with loose bark and haven't had a plug, but the fingers are not in the chute anymore. I thought the pipe would stop a broken band, I guess not. ::)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14240/brokenband.jpg)


Dave
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: zopi on November 19, 2008, 11:49:11 AM
I had to align the guides on the mill yesterday, so I wnet ahead and swapped holes...moved the water lube to the drive side..I like it alot...i'm not fond of having to wring the water out of the boards as I offbear.. :D I also added a junk needle valve I "liberated" to control the flow of water a bit more precisely than eyeballing the globe valve position..let's me concentrate on getting into the cut rather than on how much water I'm dumping...

After having become interested in upgrading the mill, I went back and red this thread through again...I love the fact that alot of these mods are features of the new mills coming out...Good stuff there.

Should this thread maybe be a "sticky?"
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Papa1stuff on November 19, 2008, 02:22:00 PM
I have thought about putting my automatic levelers from my motor home on to my mill,Just hit a lever and your mill is level!!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: zopi on November 19, 2008, 04:28:30 PM
No kidding, I moved the LT-15 this afternoon...god but they are a pain to level...the wife was laughing at me, because instead of cussing it, I'd mutter "Hydraulic mill" about every three minutes...
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: sandmar on November 19, 2008, 05:09:34 PM
Bibbyman said: "I try to keep Mary happy."

That is the bottom line my friend,'nuff said  ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: beenthere on November 19, 2008, 05:09:50 PM
Papastuff.
Burlkraft did that hyd. leveling mod on his WM mill. Slick mod.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: backwoods sawyer on November 19, 2008, 08:39:31 PM
I have thought about putting my automatic levelers from my motor home on to my mill,Just hit a lever and your mill is level!!
Even a bang cylindar on the front of the mill would be a big help for the "Hydralic" mills that are doing portable milling.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: jpgreen on November 19, 2008, 09:39:32 PM
My LT-40 is seriously a pain to level.  I can't believe such a well engineered machine has such a horrible jacking system. I've got to design something else..  ::)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: WH_Conley on November 19, 2008, 10:10:16 PM
Well, you can worry a lot or do what I do. Drop the 4 center down solid and jack the last two on the end up 1" and forget about it.

I have set my lt40 up on area's that  I was afraid that it was going to run me down on tha return.

With the frame these mills have they don't have to be level, square or anything else.. Take that from a  guy that has worked with a lot bigger machinery than  these mills.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dan_Shade on November 19, 2008, 10:23:15 PM
there are a few tricks to setting up an LT40.

first off, I drop the 4 center posts and lock them into place.  then I raise the one at the tongue about 2 holes up, then run the head down to the front, this raises the back up in the air, then I go back to the back two (not the far end), and jack them up one hold past where they are, using shims if needed, then I lower the back one down 2 or so holes from the ground, maybe 3, then roll the head all the way back to the end. and jack up the front two so they are solid, then drop the one at the tongue.

it's not hard to set the mill up, you have to use the head of the mill for leverage.  you can actually lift it up so the wheels are off the ground without much hassle.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on November 19, 2008, 10:34:08 PM
there are a few tricks to setting up an LT40.

first off, I drop the 4 center posts and lock them into place.  then I raise the one at the tongue about 2 holes up, then run the head down to the front, this raises the back up in the air, then I go back to the back two (not the far end), and jack them up one hold past where they are, using shims if needed, then I lower the back one down 2 or so holes from the ground, maybe 3, then roll the head all the way back to the end. and jack up the front two so they are solid, then drop the one at the tongue.

it's not hard to set the mill up, you have to use the head of the mill for leverage.  you can actually lift it up so the wheels are off the ground without much hassle.

Dan,

You confused me with the UPs, DOWNs, LOWER and DROP.  smiley_headscratch   Am I extending the legs towards the ground (lowering)  or retracting (raising) them?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: backwoods sawyer on November 20, 2008, 03:04:49 AM
This process is repeated 10-15 times on some sets. I have had customer scratching there head as I set the mill up this way.  I was all ready to stick a bang cylinder at the front of the mill but the valve is froze up so will need to get another one before I can install it.
My plan is to set it up like a tongue jack that pivots out of the way. It will mount right behind the hydraulic box, making for easy connections. I may need to add a second hot rail at the other end of the mill so it is more stable by not having to lift the head of the mill as well.
The way it will work is set it down with the weight on it and lower the front of the mill set the two legs behind the wheels then use it to raise the front of the mill. It will save steps and not wear out the back lifting and lowering the front of the mill. The process may need to be done 3-4 times if on a side hill.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Papa1stuff on November 20, 2008, 07:23:18 AM
Like I said ,use the leveling system like motor homes use ,just hit one button and machine is level.
Just need to put blocking under the low side !
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: LeeB on November 20, 2008, 09:19:18 AM
Pardon my dumb, but what's a bang cylinder?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pineywoods on November 20, 2008, 09:27:36 AM
I'm with WH, don't have to be level. Just so there's support under all the jacks.  Mine's set up permanent but it's no where near level, mill don't know the difference, still works just fine.  I know one sawyer who deliberately sets his LT50 up so it's tilted toward the head side.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on November 20, 2008, 09:35:44 AM
there are a few tricks to setting up an LT40.

it's not hard to set the mill up, you have to use the head of the mill for leverage.  you can actually lift it up so the wheels are off the ground without much hassle.

Dan is pretty-much going by-the-book in his method of setting up the LT40!
Move the the head to either end, then adjust the jack(s) at the opposite end, then, reverse this procedure.
Moving the head to one end really makes it a simple task to raise the other end.

The first thing I do when I unhook the mill from my truck is to place an RV level (the one with a centering bubble) on the tube that the log clamp is on, it just makes set-up quicker and easier!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: jpgreen on November 20, 2008, 11:54:46 AM
I will replace the word "level" with "Stabilizing" my LT40, which is what I meant. I don't think operating the machine un- supported at every point is a good idea with large logs no matter how strong the mill is built.

It is a pain in the butt on uneven ground regardless of the technique used.

If those jacks were variable- ala screw feed there would be no issue at all, and it could be done in 5 minutes.

The notch and spring pin are fine if you do not have to setup multiple times, or you are on flat ground.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on November 20, 2008, 12:01:44 PM
If I remember right,  the Wood-Mizer team that won the first Shootout just stated the engine mill to get it  warmed up, hand rolled the mill in front of the logs,  dropped the front two supports and clicked them in and rolled a log on. They were sawing wood within a few minutes or less.  But like they say on TV, they were trained professionals – don’t try this at home.

I never worried about getting an LT40 more than eye-ball level.  I did keep the front two and the center back two up tight and supporting the mill.  I didn’t worry about the end supports being tight. 

One other note,  on a portable LT40, the tire on the back side should have some weight on the ground.  It makes a safety outrigger incase a big log hits the back supports too hard!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on November 20, 2008, 12:46:27 PM

One other note,  on a portable LT40, the tire on the back side should have some weight on the ground.  It makes a safety outrigger incase a big log hits the back supports too hard!



Good point Bibby!  A couple years ago, I was running my FIL's LT40 Manual and I had the tire off the ground (only about 1.5 inches mind you) and a log rolled against the stops kind of hard and the whole mill tipped until that tire hit the ground again.  It didn't take long for me to find a piece of board to put under that tire and it hasn't been off the ground during operation since.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: LeeB on November 20, 2008, 07:48:55 PM
Use your lube water jug for a level. Quick and easier to see than a bubble level.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: gmmills on November 20, 2008, 11:20:21 PM
    WM now offers a new outrigger,leg, system. It's called the fine adjustment outrigger, FAO. Uses the spring loaded pin with integral threaded screw jacking system. Makes leveling the mill alot easier. They are direct replacements for the original legs. Have all six legs on my mill updated to the fine adjustment outriggers. They are a difinite improvement over the old system. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: jpgreen on November 20, 2008, 11:45:36 PM
That's what I was thinking about doing with my legs... adding a screw feed foot.

What do they cost GM?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dan_Shade on November 21, 2008, 06:28:36 AM
It's about $1000 to outfit the entire mill, if I remember correctly
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: backwoods sawyer on November 21, 2008, 10:21:44 PM
Pardon my dumb, but what's a bang cylinder?

Just a cylinder with a foot on the end with no flow controls ect.

I have to disagree on having the wheel off the ground as the springs would have give as well. I get the wheels just off the ground so the springs are stretched out, giving the head more clearance on the cattle guard that is on the axel. I place a 6” level on the mill and get it close but some locations require digging out under a leg just to get the top of the leg below the bed height while another leg can be fully extended. Setting up in a location like this can take a bit, as when the mill is first pulled into a spot the head is raised to clear the loading arm it can be a bit tippy. Not having to move the head from one end to the other during set up would make for a safer situation.
The last set up I made I had to drive the lower tire of the mill up onto a 6” tapered wedge to get the mill level enough to unhook from the truck.
I set the four center jacks so that they are all solid with the head in the middle of them, if one is loose drive a wedge under it, then set the front and rear so that they are solid as well even if it requires using a couple more wedges. Not having the front and rear legs planted solidly on the ground will put undue stress on the frame. I always check all the legs after the first log and thru out the day and tighten them as needed.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on November 21, 2008, 11:01:31 PM
backwoods sawyer;
But, that wheel on the operator side of the mill "is" an outrigger!

I'll bet it wouldn't take much to roll the mill over on it's side if that tire was very far off the ground.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: zopi on November 21, 2008, 11:06:10 PM
i sawed on the -15 in it's new home this morning...cut six cypress pecker poles into random cants ready to be barn siding next summer...anyway, moving the water feed to the drive side and adding
the regulator valve works about like I figured...I sawed all six logs on a tenth the water I was using before..the one drawback is that I get more wet sawdust built up on the lefthand rail..it can interfere
with the head unless I sweep it off every log or so..no big deal.

Has anyone ever considered mounting a lawnmower deck wash fitting inside the wheel housings on a badmill? seems like it's be a decent washdown solution...hook in the hose, wash and blow down to
dry...maybe add a corrosion inhibitor...I'm a freak for CPC...must be the sailor coming out...
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: backwoods sawyer on November 22, 2008, 03:14:06 AM
backwoods sawyer;
But, that wheel on the operator side of the mill "is" an outrigger!

I'll bet it wouldn't take much to roll the mill over on it's side if that tire was very far off the ground.

However, it is a spring loaded out rigger not much of a stabilizing force unless you have all the weight on the tire. Keeping the mill relatively level side-to-side makes for a solid platform.

Besides, I was having a problem with the head binding up as it crossed over the axel, and after talking with woodmizer in-depth about the issue and considering that my mill was built before they started adding the third rail bearing. Getting the weight off the wheel and loosening the leading bearing on the bottom rail was the fix to get past the crown in the frame with out binding up.

I have not had the mill try to tip over on the operator side but I have had an 18’ x 36” log go over the log turner and land on the loading arms while they were in the full up position that just about tipped the mill over. The loading arms went down, and the bed of the mill buckled up, then the log went over the loading arms and rolled 20’ away.

I carry a set of dog extenders so I do not loose a big log off the operator side.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on November 22, 2008, 04:32:23 AM

I have not had the mill try to tip over on the operator side but I have had an 18’ x 36” log go over the log turner and land on the loading arms while they were in the full up position that just about tipped the mill over. The loading arms went down, and the bed of the mill buckled up, then the log went over the loading arms and rolled 20’ away.


I’ve had that happen to a minor degree a few times and a major degree once. 

From then on, when turning a big logs or odd cant that may flop back over the turner,  I’d raise the loading arms up as high as practical in an attempt to keep everything contained.  Falling 6” over against the loading arms is not nearly as eventful as letting it fall two feet!


Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: backwoods sawyer on November 23, 2008, 12:37:52 AM
Yep that was with the loading arms all the way up.
I would rather have the arms fully up or fully down with a deck of logs lined up, when a log goes over the chain log turner like that. With a big old Doug fir log like that the turner and dogs are not near as high as I would like them to be. Nevertheless, they are what they are, and a set of dog extenders help.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods home-built autoclutch
Post by: pineywoods on March 31, 2009, 01:09:29 AM
Finally finished the home made autoclutch for my WM LT40. It's an aold manual model, the factory parts won't work. What I came up with is a wheelchair motor with built in gearbox driving a jackscrew. The jackscrew is a piece of 1/2 threaded rod with a big square nut inside a piece of 1 inch square tubing. The manual clutch lever was left intact.

pic of the complete unit ready to install
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14000/1037/DSC00604.JPG)

rear view
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14000/1037/DSC00605.JPG)

It bolts on to the head cross member right behind the water tank
view from sawyers position
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14000/1037/DSC00606.JPG)


back side view
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14000/1037/DSC00608.JPG)

autoclutch control switch mounted on right side of control box
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14000/1037/DSC00609.JPG)

The bottom end of the jackscrew is bolted to the motor mount plate.
No welding on the mill. The only mods to the mill itself were drilling 3 mounting holes, plus mounting the control switch on the side of the control box.

The whole works is hooked up to my home-made remote control unit. A handheld infra red controller that fits in a shirt pocket. controls head up, head down, guide arm in and out, head forward and reverse, and clutch in and out.  Next item is a nice comfy seat right above the hitch...
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: logwalker on March 31, 2009, 02:58:54 AM
That is pretty good. How long does it take to engage after you throw the switch? Joe
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pineywoods on March 31, 2009, 08:29:09 AM
That is pretty good. How long does it take to engage after you throw the switch? Joe

Never timed it, I'd say 3 to 4 seconds. Didn't want it so fast I'd burn a flat spot on the drive belt.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on September 25, 2009, 02:45:30 PM
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsbacksupportrollers200926.JPG)

I’ve sawn with this mill for 7.5 years now and I’m not yet sure if the rollers on the tops of the back supports help or hurt.  Seems as many times as the help rolling a cant onto the deck, they will help with pushing the cant over the back side of the supports. 

One thing I do know is that the rollers on the front side of the supports take away about 1” of blade clearance when half or more the way down.

A couple of years ago the bolt holding the front one fell out.  I just gathered up the parts and “stored” them on a shelf in the shed.  Everything worked fine just that I had to keep judging the height of the back support furthest away as it still had the rollers in place.  A few months back I restored one roller to the down side of the first back support.  I don’t know if it helped or hurt.

The other day I was in the hardware store getting some other things so I picked up two 5/8”-3” hex bolts and locking nuts.  Last evening I removed the pair on the last back support and then reassembled one on the down side of each.  Let’s see if this works better.  I know I should be able to miss the rollers with the blade better now.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: backwoods sawyer on September 25, 2009, 04:08:02 PM
I have not had the rollers on my mill since I bought it. There has been a few times where it would help the log to roll on past. My concern would be if it would push the top of the cant out of square, when in various positions, and how it would hang up on the bark when raised and lowered.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on September 25, 2009, 04:27:34 PM
The rollers don't come past the front face of the back support so they shouldn't push the cant out of square.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: customdave on September 26, 2009, 10:55:26 PM
Speaking of sawmill mods , I just finished building & welding 2 custom tool boxs for my mill. Made from 3/16" polished aluminum checker plate, 1 measures 10"x12"x50", 2nd one measures 10"x12"x56". Should be ideal for cant hooks,tools,spare parts etc . Will take pics when I get them mounted on the mill ,oh & I have to buy a camera!



                                                                      Dave
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: backwoods sawyer on September 27, 2009, 01:50:26 AM
A while back, my fuel tank sprung a leak, and for less, then the cost of a replacement plastic tank I was able to put together this aluminum tank. Then I reshaped the tray to fit the new tank and wrapped the areas where it would rub with an old bicycle tube split in half. Then strapped the whole thing down and plumbed it in solid. (the old tank had been plumbed in solid as well)  While I had the tray off I reshaped the water tank end as well, so that it would hold the wider blue tanks that I can pick up locally. I also had to raise the tray an additional ½” so that the hoses would run under the tray and stay out of the way. This 5-gallon tank holds enough fuel for a 10-hour day.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17725/fuel_tank.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ScottAR on September 27, 2009, 02:36:44 AM
That's some great looking fab work there... 

TIG process?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on September 27, 2009, 08:28:51 AM
Sure is a nice looking tank!   

How do you put fuel in it?  You got a bulk tank with pump? 

Did you put in any kind of gage?  Or do you just keep track of how many hours you saw?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: jpgreen on September 27, 2009, 11:17:50 AM
Nice tank.

Looks like woodmizer will be ready for NASCAR soon..  :D

Did you TIG or MIG weld it?

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pineywoods on September 27, 2009, 01:49:20 PM
Neat, I ain't busted my tank yet, but if when I do---- I go through water tanks pretty regularly, leave water in them and they freeze. I get free replacemnts from restaurants, dishwashing detergent comes in square 5 gallon jugs. For a gauge, look for the filler cap off older john deere mowers, gauge is built into the cap.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: backwoods sawyer on September 27, 2009, 02:17:30 PM
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17725/fuel_tank_on_mill.JPG)
Here it is aged in place.
As far as filling goes, every morning I just lower the head down to the 1” setting, step up on the rail, and top it off using a five-gallon diesel jug that I modified by drilling a vent hole and plugging it with a course thread screw.
I keep my bulk tank out behind the barn and just carry the five-gallon jug with me when I am off site. I have not found a real need for a gauge, as most of the time it only takes 3-4 gallons to run for the day and I leave the mill idling most of the day unless I will be away from it for more then just a few min. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on September 27, 2009, 04:47:00 PM
You are the "Man with the Can".  That is a really nice fuel tank !!!  I use the same re-filling procedure (except I always fill everything up when I finish the day).  I also drilled my fuel jugs to vent and use a screw..... :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on September 28, 2009, 05:32:17 PM


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17725/fuel_tank_on_mill.JPG)
Here it is aged in place.
As far as filling goes, every morning I just lower the head down to the 1” setting, step up on the rail, and top it off using a five-gallon diesel jug that I modified by drilling a vent hole and plugging it with a course thread screw.
I keep my bulk tank out behind the barn and just carry the five-gallon jug with me when I am off site. I have not found a real need for a gauge, as most of the time it only takes 3-4 gallons to run for the day and I leave the mill idling most of the day unless I will be away from it for more then just a few min. 


That thing sure aged a lot in 13 hours.   ???   I'd build a dozen more if I were you just to have them ready.  ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on September 28, 2009, 08:40:41 PM
Bibby, I have one of my backstops that looks like that, but only because the band dipped hard and sawed the bolt head off. :D Found the roller, just need a new bolt.

That's a really nice job on that tank. That is TIG welding at it's finest. ;)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: backwoods sawyer on September 28, 2009, 08:48:17 PM
Well when you work them a lot they age very quick. I put it on this spring and it has not so much as wiggled since.


The fist job I took my mill out on was up on top of a mountain, from the point we left the paved road, where I locked in the four wheel drive, we climbed over 900ft up a partly gravel partly dirt cow trail, they called it a road,  the head bounced off the travel pin as the tire went over a protruding hunk of rock as I looking straight down the face of the bluff to the valley below.
Woodmizer had addressed the problem of the head coming off the travel pin by adding a safety chain, which I was thankful that it was there and attached. When I parked the mill on the lower of the two landings I found that the saw was damaged but the head was fine. About two weeks later when the job was finished and having drove twice a day over the same narrow cow trail along the bluff where the log truck driver had decided he was going to quit driving log truck ever again and had walked down off the mountain. I decided that I wanted to find a way to hold that head on the pin as I did not want that head moving around back there on the way down off the mountain. Therefore, I took a ratchet strap and tied the head down to the frame, and ever since, I have always strapped the head down every time I put the mill in travel mode.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17725/IMG_0717.JPG) 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17725/IMG_0724%7E0.JPG)


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17725/IMG_0727.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17725/head_tie_down.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on September 29, 2009, 05:34:18 AM
When I was using my FIL's LT40 Manual, the saw-head bounced off the travel pin a couple of times while going in to a job!
When I got the mill home next, I got my drill out and drilled a hole through the travel pin and put a washer over the pin and installed a large "hair pin" through the hole!
To this day, my FIL uses the washer and hair pin!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on September 29, 2009, 07:36:14 AM
I got my drill out and drilled a hole through the travel pin and put a washer over the pin and installed a large "hair pin" through the hole!

Now that is a slick idea..... :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on September 29, 2009, 09:02:34 PM
One good mod deserves another.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wskneeknocker20090929.JPG)

I was always bumping my knee on the corner of the hydraulic decal plate.  I had developed a constant sore spot on the inside of my legs just below each knee.

After sawing 4,000+ hours on it I decided I could do without it. So while was having some welding done, I had the welding shop guy cut the plate off.



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wskneeknocker200909292.JPG)

Here is the control box with the decal plate removed. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on September 29, 2009, 09:48:41 PM
I had the welding shop guy cut the plate off.  Here is the control box with the decal plate removed. 

Now you done went and done it....Now you don't know which lever to move...... ;D ;D :D :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: zopi on November 01, 2009, 04:24:44 PM
Log turner for the LT-15....I went to an auction awhile back and bought a tripod the guy used to pick up logs to
buck for firewood....set it up over the mill fram and hang an electric wich from it...wrap the cable around the log, drive in a short spike to hook to and winch..just turned a 1500 lb pine log....and my back doesn't hurt...it's a pain to set up, but I'll come up with something more elegant later....
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: zopi on November 04, 2009, 08:04:31 PM
Lt-15 owners who do not move their mills..do yourself a favor and build yourself a dead deck..being able to load six or eight logs at a time is so much more relaxing that stopping every log and getting the ramps out and rolling the log up..now I can load enough to keep cutting for a few hours...is nice.

I do need to figure out something a little stronger than what I have...1500 lb pine log was a little shaky on it...
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dan_Shade on November 04, 2009, 08:10:52 PM
why not saw out some bunks, using 8x8's or 10x10s or whatever you need?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: caver on November 04, 2009, 09:39:14 PM
No pictures but Baker uses a bungee cord to hold the battery down. I bought two  battery clamp hooks with wing nuts at the farm store. I cut a small piece of angle and then tapered the ends down to meet the threaded rod coming up from the j-hooks. Drill a hole in each side of the battery tray. Bend a small v in the battery box wall at the hole as you barely have enough room for the battery and these j-hooks. The angle was close to my battery terminals so I slipped a piece of vinyl j-channel under the angle. It was some left over vinyl house siding material I had handy at the time.
Another thing I did was install an el-cheapo battery isolator to stop the milliamp drain from the Honda engine.
Something I want to add in the future is a few ladder brackets for nudging the log against the back stops. A guy over in the area of my property has an EZ Boardwalk
mill. He had used a Baker HD18 before he bought this mill and liked the ladder brackets on the EZ Boardwalk. Cutting my first big log I quickly understood why he liked those brackets or whatever you want to call them.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on November 05, 2009, 06:25:12 AM
Quote
After sawing 4,000+ hours on it I decided I could do without it. So while was having some welding done, I had the welding shop guy cut the plate off.

   Why not just bend it down out of the way?   I know I've sure bent a few things on my mill.   Not  all of them were planned or thought out.   :D  :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dan_Shade on November 05, 2009, 06:29:22 AM
see, that's where we differ, Dave.

When I got my mill, I took one look at it and said "It sure won't look like this when I'm done with it."  Now, when I bend something, I got "See, I was right."

:-)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: bandmiller2 on November 05, 2009, 06:36:27 AM
Zopi,mentioned a dead deck for a stationary mill,why not for portable??I made two real heavy saw horses to use for a dead deck.One man can move them[actally one old duffer] yet they will hold several good logs.If you walk beside your mill leave a gap and use oak pieces to roll the logs on the mill.Frank C.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on November 05, 2009, 12:02:27 PM
No pictures but Baker uses a bungee cord to hold the battery down. I bought two  battery clamp hooks with wing nuts at the farm store. I cut a small piece of angle and then tapered the ends down to meet the threaded rod coming up from the j-hooks. Drill a hole in each side of the battery tray. Bend a small v in the battery box wall at the hole as you barely have enough room for the battery and these j-hooks. The angle was close to my battery terminals so I slipped a piece of vinyl j-channel under the angle. It was some left over vinyl house siding material I had handy at the time.
Another thing I did was install an el-cheapo battery isolator to stop the milliamp drain from the Honda engine.
Something I want to add in the future is a few ladder brackets for nudging the log against the back stops. A guy over in the area of my property has an EZ Boardwalk mill. He had used a Baker HD18 before he bought this mill and liked the ladder brackets on the EZ Boardwalk. Cutting my first big log I quickly understood why he liked those brackets or whatever you want to call them.

I found one of those little "roll-up" snow sleds that the kids use, it was in the dumpster at work and cut it to fit up the front and across the top of the battery and kind of force it into position when I put the cover on the battery box!
It keeps the battery terminals covered and safe from shorting out!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: zopi on November 05, 2009, 04:40:17 PM
why not saw out some bunks, using 8x8's or 10x10s or whatever you need?

MY mill is elevated a couple feet off the ground...easier to handle the lumber off of it...
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: zopi on November 05, 2009, 04:43:35 PM
No r
Zopi,mentioned a dead deck for a stationary mill,why not for portable??I made two real heavy saw horses to use for a dead deck.One man can move them[actally one old duffer] yet they will hold several good logs.If you walk beside your mill leave a gap and use oak pieces to roll the logs on the mill.Frank C.
No reason why not, most guys I know that have portable WM's just put a couple bunks on the ground and roll the logs up to the loader arms...
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on November 05, 2009, 06:43:03 PM
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsFarmfestBaker200909.JPG)

When Mary and I were at the farm show in Springfield, MO. last month Baker was there with one of their little mills.  They had a "dead deck" there to roll logs right onto the mill.  It looked like it could be knocked down something like a scaffold frame.  I’ll look to see if I can find a better picture.  Maybe Adam can provide more info.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: WH_Conley on November 05, 2009, 08:11:08 PM
If I go portable I will use the customers logs and build a dead deck, if they have a loader of some sort. These are the last logs sawn. Use a dead deck at the house.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: zopi on November 06, 2009, 02:20:24 PM


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsFarmfestBaker200909.JPG)

When Mary and I were at the farm show in Springfield, MO. last month Baker was there with one of their little mills.  They had a "dead deck" there to roll logs right onto the mill.  It looked like it could be knocked down something like a scaffold frame.  I’ll look to see if I can find a better picture.  Maybe Adam can provide more info.

Would appreciate it..I don't see anything on their website...I just put three bunks on top of power pole sections and pull logs up the ramps either with the tractor or with an electric winch....something like what is in the picture with
a modified tommy lift tailgate would be alright...
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: zopi on November 08, 2009, 09:24:31 PM
The best yet...electric lights in the sawshed! Next up, a toolshed for all the crap the mill collects...with acorner for my forge and anvil....but that must wait until
mama's storage shed is built...
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on November 08, 2009, 09:53:48 PM
but that must wait until mama's storage shed is built...

Priorities ???   :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: paul case on November 08, 2009, 09:55:43 PM
this may sound like a brag ok it is . my e-z boardwalk is set up stationary and has been there a year and a half the ONLY mod i have had to make is to hang a bucket on the sawdust discharge. thats the side that you push from and walking thru all that sawdust was more work.the bucket will hold serveral cuts worth of dust and keeps the walk path clear a lot longer. makes for less shovel work  is anyone else using an e-z boardwalk?     pc
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: zopi on November 08, 2009, 09:57:39 PM
you'll notice I have a sawmill shed and she doesn't yet have a storage shed...mine are in order.

besides, the big downstairs bedroom in the house is taken up storing crap we don't need but won't get rid of..I wont to get the shed done so i can finish remodeling it and move into it...
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: backwoods sawyer on November 09, 2009, 12:12:40 AM
 
Not having a sawmill shed, I needed a place to keep all of my sawmill tools organized and together. I built this little 4’x 8’ shed that I can move around with the forklift. When I am milling here at home the tools are all handy, when I am milling on the road I back up to the shed and load the truck up and then hook onto the mill and head down the road. I put in a shelve on each side if the doorway that is deep enough and stout enough to toss a couple off heavy toolboxes, 3 chainsaws, and still have room for grease and oil. All my long tools hang from the walls, and the floor is where the crates with the chains, fuel jugs, water jugs ect, all fit. About the only thing that goes with the sawmill that I do not keep in the shed is my saws. I have a couple hanging in there for home use but all my saws are kept in the shop with the sharpening equipment.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17725/tool_shed.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: bandmiller2 on November 09, 2009, 05:33:05 AM
Backwoods,add a 5 gal pail and you could turn it into a comfort inn.Nice shed sorta like your field headquarters.Frank C.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on November 09, 2009, 08:04:43 PM
No r
Zopi,mentioned a dead deck for a stationary mill,why not for portable??I made two real heavy saw horses to use for a dead deck.One man can move them[actally one old duffer] yet they will hold several good logs.If you walk beside your mill leave a gap and use oak pieces to roll the logs on the mill.Frank C.
No reason why not, most guys I know that have portable WM's just put a couple bunks on the ground and roll the logs up to the loader arms...

Good idea if you have a loader of some sort at the customer site.   8 out of 10 of my customers are lucky to have equipment to stack their logs before I arrive.     I don't know how many of you guys that go portable take a loader along,  but that takes a 2nd truck or at least 2 round trips to get everything there and back.    I just roll the logs with a Logrite cant hook into the loader arms at ground level.


Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: zopi on November 09, 2009, 08:13:21 PM

Good idea if you have a loader of some sort at the customer site.   8 out of 10 of my customers are lucky to have equipment to stack their logs before I arrive.     I don't know how many of you guys that go portable take a loader along,  but that takes a 2nd truck or at least 2 round trips to get everything there and back.    I just roll the logs with a Logrite cant hook into the loader arms at ground level.




I was just talking about two 6x6 or whatever next to the loadr arms to roll the logs up on to...if the ground is soft it helps get them up, and makes it easier to clean/trim, etc...
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dan_Shade on November 09, 2009, 08:57:18 PM
I've found with portable sawing, the less junk to haul around the better.

sometimes, depending on the setup, i'll toss a slab or two down near the arms to make the logs roll onto them better.

I've determined my biggest problem in portable sawing is getting short logs to line up right for the loader, bunk supports, and backstops.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on November 09, 2009, 10:00:40 PM
Quote
I've determined my biggest problem in portable sawing is getting short logs to line up right for the loader, bunk supports, and backstops.

You should know by now that you can't get all 3 to line up.  Best is 2 out of 3.   :D :D :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dan_Shade on November 09, 2009, 10:13:01 PM
the easiest way is to just say "no".  That's not in my nature, though  :-[
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: vadimo on November 26, 2009, 04:26:29 PM
Hello, my mods on Oscar 28:

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20321/Fotka001.jpg)
Little cuting on blade cover. Better saw dust lose. From this time i don`t must clean it and is still safe.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20321/logdog-tune.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20321/logdog-tune2.jpg)
I weld the nut on top of the squaring arm on logdog. This is for adjusting/tune straight square.


Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Coalsmoke on December 02, 2009, 04:37:02 AM
Wow, great thread guys. This kept my spare reading time taken up over the last few days. :P I'll have to get a few of my mods on my Norwood posted in the coming days.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on December 02, 2009, 12:14:02 PM
I posted this somewhere, but not on the "mod" forum.

It's just a sticky back rubber sheet that I planted on the hydraulic cover.  It keeps "stuff" from sliding off (including me when I stand on it).  Came from Harbor Freight.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0245.JPG)

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0247.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on December 02, 2009, 06:03:04 PM
I posted this somewhere, but not on the "mod" forum.

It's just a sticky back rubber sheet that I planted on the hydraulic cover.  It keeps "stuff" from sliding off (including me when I stand on it).  Came from Harbor Freight.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0245.JPG)

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0247.JPG)

Good idea. But, if you use a board drag-back, it will get torn off.   The boards slide across the top of the hydraulic box.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on December 02, 2009, 08:31:38 PM
Good idea. But, if you use a board drag-back, it will get torn off.   The boards slide across the top of the hydraulic box.

Good point if you use/have it.

We have to modify to meet our own needs.  I took that board dragback off of my mill so that I could cut a larger cant.  That's been over 7 1/2 years ago.  It won't be put back.  But, that's meeting my needs.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on December 02, 2009, 09:49:56 PM
Good idea. But, if you use a board drag-back, it will get torn off.   The boards slide across the top of the hydraulic box.

Good point if you use/have it.

We have to modify to meet our own needs.  I took that board dragback off of my mill so that I could cut a larger cant.  That's been over 7 1/2 years ago.  It won't be put back.  But, that's meeting my needs.

You are correct.  What ever meet our needs.     I added the drag-back option to my mill and use it all the time.   I do most of my sawing by myself ans having the drag-back has probably doubled my speed and eliminates lots of walking around the mill.   I drag the board back, start the next cut into the cant and while the head is traveling, I stack the board and get back to the mill in time to drag back the next board. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Slingshot on December 03, 2009, 06:13:17 PM

On the LT15 I bought recently the previous owner had put a one foot extension on each end of the
drive side held on with a short round bar stock bolted like the original joints. The mill has the two original
bed sections but these two short sections gave the mill 2 extra feet log capacity with no additions to the
idle side rail. The hind leg rolls out on the start end and the front leg rolls out on the other end. Here is what it looks like. He didn't bother to paint them......

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18700/2460/DSC02647.JPG)

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18700/2460/DSC02649.JPG)

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18700/2460/DSC02651.JPG)


Here is the Mod I am doing to it, building a 7 foot bed section. Putting in 3 bunks, 2 welded in and one bolt in
like the original. I have the one bolted in the center and the other 2 ready to weld in...

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18700/2254/DSC02642.JPG)

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18700/2254/DSC02641.JPG)

________________________________
Charles
 sling_shot


Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Coalsmoke on December 15, 2009, 01:03:24 AM
Ok, I think I may have this photo posting figured out. My mill is a late model Norwood Lumbermate 2000. The previous owner bought it, ran a few logs through it and decided milling was too much work.

First is an hour meter that I added in order to have a good idea of maintenance intervals, component longevity, and board footage. I'm not sure why Norwood, who labels this as a commercial mill, would not include this.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20686/2576/PB270008.jpg)


Next up is an exhaust turn up with a flapper. The mill came with just the standard side mount exhaust, which exited right around head level. Instead of sucking fumes, this turn-up shoots the fumes up above head level.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20686/2576/PB270010.jpg)

The Honda is an excellent engine. Why Norwood has decided to discontinue it in their new machines is beyond me. It costs more, but has plenty of power and as most know, these little red engines run forever. It is however cold blooded and there is apparently a cold weather kit made by Honda for it. I made this up quick and dirty style and it works very well. The rags block off the cold air intake ports that are fan injected from the motor. It leaves open the 4 warm air intake ports on the hot side of the engine. I will leave it like this for all of winter and much of spring, until about April or May when temperatures stay above 10*C.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20686/2576/PB260003.jpg)


Here is a picture with the precleaner foam installed.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20686/2576/PB260004.jpg)


I have also disconnected the choke cable. The factory system uses a solid steel core with a wound steel sleeve choke cable which really does not work very well as it binds up in the dusty sawmill environment. I found that much of the problems were caused by the choke sticking on, even when it appeared to be off. This in turn caused a lot of cold weather idling and stalling problems and spark plug fouling. By removing the choke cable, I only use the choke for about 2 seconds when first starting the Honda, and it works like a charm. I was really pulling my hair out for a while there trying to get this mill to run in the cold and damp weather. Norwood was of little help, but they were sympathetic.

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Coalsmoke on December 15, 2009, 01:22:49 AM
Another mod I made to the mill was the sawdust exit chute. Norwood had an open chute, that is to say, an open rectangular hole for the sawdust to exit at its own accord. They also had a very light gauge expanded metal screen in there, which I suppose is to stop a broken bade. I suspect a blade would go right through that screen. More importantly, that screen was constantly plugging up if you were sawing hard through spruce and fir, which are fibrous and tend to produce some little stringy bits in addition to the sawdust. The second problem with this screen is that when a blade does break and gets stuck in there, you have a bit of a mouse trap there to try and get everything all straightened out. Lastly, (yes, there is another problem with it), the open chute allows sawdust to be sprayed out up to 20' away. Its great to watch, but other than that, its not very practical and makes a bit of a mess of the mill site.

My solution was to remove the factory screen and replaced it with a heavy truck mudflap, made of chord impregnated rubber. It is ridged enough that it directs the sawdust into a neat little strip about 4' wide at the side of the mill, and it is flexible which is great because when a blade breaks, you merely lift the flap up, pull the band-wheel cover off, and remove the broken blade from the wood. Simple and effective.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20686/2576/PB260005.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20686/2576/PB260006.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Slingshot on December 15, 2009, 08:21:07 PM
  Coalsmoke;

    That mudflap looks like a good idea. That sawdust not only blows out 20 feet but on a windy day it showers
the sawmiller real good.  bath_smiley
     I need one of those on my LM 2000. I ripped the screen out of the chute opening the second time it crammed
full of stringy shavings sawing green poplar. I realized it was stopped up when the bandwheels started re-cycling
the saw dust back through the mill. 


__________________________
Charles
 sling_shot
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Coalsmoke on December 15, 2009, 10:12:00 PM
Thanks. I just held it in with a couple of pop rivets and fender washers. Works well and doesn't interfere with the aluminum covers.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: edwardj_ on December 16, 2009, 12:39:22 AM
I work at a honda shop and up here we have guys running engines down to minus 40*...  never seen the ports on the air cleaner blocked off before though...  our fix is fairly easy and red green would be proud of us.  We tape off at least half of the fan intake up to pretty much all of it depending on how cold it is.  The engines are designed to stay coolish at 40*C...  a little overkill for most areas.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Coalsmoke on December 16, 2009, 03:11:39 AM
I wasn't sure of the repercussions of blocking off the fan and how much might be too much. I was concerned with uneven cooling for the cylinders. However, I figured this way I'd just eliminate the cold air from the intake and not the rest of the engine. It works well for this application. If its gets really cold out here I'll contact you for specifics on the Red Green method  :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: edwardj_ on December 16, 2009, 07:44:55 PM
Our rule of thumb for it is if it is below freezing block half of it off...   The cooling still seems to be even.  We block the lower half of it off.  Doesnt seem to matter what HP or application the engine is used on.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Coalsmoke on December 16, 2009, 08:59:35 PM
Ok, thanks for the information. I'll make note of it should I need it in the future.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: deeker on December 17, 2009, 01:20:26 AM
I wasn't sure of the repercussions of blocking off the fan and how much might be too much. I was concerned with uneven cooling for the cylinders. However, I figured this way I'd just eliminate the cold air from the intake and not the rest of the engine. It works well for this application. If its gets really cold out here I'll contact you for specifics on the Red Green method  :)

Sawyer Rob is not on this site....but I am....now to cause trouble....

Kevin
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Coalsmoke on December 17, 2009, 01:26:25 AM
He's no trouble, he just doesn't want to get too swayed (or corrupted) by us non-conformists is all :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: deeker on December 17, 2009, 01:35:44 AM
Robert and I have been friends for about four years.  Until now....he is mad at me.  Oh, well.  I don't like the new mill.  I will go to a bigger hydraulic next time.  The new one is a bit of a joke....with out my saying too much....you know what I mean.

Kevin
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: coyotebait on January 15, 2010, 04:45:35 PM
Hello
I was reading your easyout problems.
If you buy some left hand drillbits,alot of the time the broke bolt will come out as
you are drilling. if not then stick in a easyout.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on January 15, 2010, 07:02:37 PM
coyotebait.....Welcome to The Forestry Forum.  There are many post/threads concerning home built mills on here.  Good luck.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Engineer on March 05, 2010, 01:52:20 PM
So far, in this thread and many others, I wonder why nobody has replaced all of their mill supports with crank-style trailer jacks, the heavy-duty Bulldog ones that support a few thousand pounds.  For the cost of replacement, you can fine-tune the mill height and never have anything sticking up above the mill bed?   If I had kept my WM, I would have replaced all of them.  Plus they are almost completely removable with the through-pin, so you could place extra mounts if needed for support on soft ground.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: fishpharmer on March 05, 2010, 03:08:17 PM
Engineer, outstanding idea.  That is something I considered when building my mill.  Now that it is ten feet wide, decided not to try portable (yet ;) )
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Engineer on March 05, 2010, 03:52:25 PM
Part of the reason I mention it, is because there's been several times in the past few years that one of two things have happened when I've gone to set up my mill:

1.  All of the mill legs are stable, but there's a hump in the ground or something and one leg sticks up above the mill bed, so all of them have to be lowered one more notch and it gets the wheels up off the ground, or:

2.  One or more legs are just plain loose, so the mill is wobbly and is really only supported by some of the legs, not all.

Rarely you get both.  Most often I got #2.  Using the trailer jacks could have both tires on the ground and just enough downward force on each leveler to make the mill perfectly stable.  I've never had a chance to see the fine adjustment legs which are an option on newer woodmizers, but with the old style legs, it seems like you'll always have at least one that isn't quite touching the ground. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Brucer on March 06, 2010, 02:31:06 AM
Wood-Mizer's original fine-adjust legs were basically the drop-down legs with a crank that would adjust the leg over one notch of adjustment. You weren't supposed to adjust them while loaded, either ??? ???.

The new ones are completely different. Nothing sticks up above the bed and you can crank away to your hearts content.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on March 06, 2010, 08:58:54 AM
Milling on level ground  ???  Say what  ???

It's a very rare occasion when I don't have to "dig in" at least one stabilizer jack.  Also, I carry a supply of 1" and 2" blocks to  take care of low spots.  A couple of 2'- 2X12's to pull a wheel on to level the mill.  One side of the loader almost always has to be "dug in", and sometimes both sides.

With soggy ground, I usually have to readjust the stabilizers after the first couple of logs.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dan_Shade on March 06, 2010, 09:40:13 AM
after I learned "how" to level my LT40 by running the head back and forth to take weight off of the jacks, I can do it pretty quickly.

I'd be afraid of the mill being "wobbly" using the bulldog style trailer jacks.  The mill is very stable with the woodmizer jacks.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: BAR on March 06, 2010, 05:04:28 PM
Milling on level ground  ???  Say what  ???

It's a very rare occasion when I don't have to "dig in" at least one stabilizer jack.  Also, I carry a supply of 1" and 2" blocks to  take care of low spots.  A couple of 2'- 2X12's to pull a wheel on to level the mill.  One side of the loader almost always has to be "dug in", and sometimes both sides.

With soggy ground, I usually have to readjust the stabilizers after the first couple of logs.




Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: BAR on March 06, 2010, 05:10:16 PM
Sorry for the above ommission, ment to add......

I do as above, but I also made a batch of wedges about 12 in long tapering from 1/8 in to 2 in thick and 4in wide.  Works well for equalizing the load on each support but doesn't do much for keeping all the post tops below the bed.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pnyberg on March 11, 2010, 09:09:10 AM
I want to be able to bring my Logrite Fetching arch with me to customer sites. It's too wide to fit inside the bed of my Toyota Tacoma pickup.  It could perch on the tailgate, but this arrangement would be suboptimal for several reasons.  I've noodled over trying to carry the arch on the mill, but couldn't figure out how to do it, until it occurred to me last week that the arch has this big space between the wheels that might allow it to go over the command console.

My tape measure said it would work, so I cobbled together a quick prototype to test the theory, and by golly it did work, slick as a whistle. 

I scratched my head a little more to come up with the final design, and now we have the Log Arch Mill Deck, Mark I.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/19920/2553/WM_Arch_deck1.JPG)

I flip the log tongs up onto the arch's back for loading and unloading.  They swing free during transport.

I can't quite manage to push the arch up the ramps without a bit of a running start.  Maybe if I made longer ramps...

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/19920/2553/WM_Arch_deck2.JPG)

The deck is cantilevered over the track side of the mill, but the center of gravity is on the loader side of the rail, though not by much.  There's a bungee cord that you might be able to make out near the closer tire.  That's to hold the mill track up, not to hold the arch down.  It's in lieu of the track support gizmo that came with the mill, which no longer fits. 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/19920/2553/WM_Arch_deck5.JPG)

A ratchet strap holds the arch down and pulls it back against the screwed down chocks.  The strap passes under the mill's forward-most fixed bunk, so it helps keep everything firmly attached.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/19920/2553/WM_Arch_deck4.JPG)

The rear cross piece wraps under the bunk to prevent tipping.  Cleats on the underside of the fore/aft runners prevent the cross piece from moving towards the rear.  This outrigger dictated the left/right positioning of the arch deck.

Initially, I had the arch deck all screwed together as one large cumbersome unit.  I added cleats to the runners and cross pieces, so it will break down without tools into four easily managed pieces.

I took this setup on the 140 mile round trip to my first customer this past weekend.  I stopped to check on it four times on the way down, and found it still quite secure each time.  I only stopped to check it once on the way home.  :)

--Peter
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pineywoods on March 11, 2010, 10:04:16 AM
 smiley_clapping   smiley_clapping. Deserves a Bibby award.....
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: fishpharmer on March 11, 2010, 10:12:39 AM
pnyberg, that must be some of that "yankee ingenuity" coming out.  Great idea and work. 8) 8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: stonebroke on March 11, 2010, 10:20:41 AM
Slick, I bet having the arch around helps when you are milling?

Stonebroke
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: coastlogger on March 11, 2010, 10:26:59 AM
Looks like a great idea.Is there some way you could use the mill hydraulics etc to help it up the ramp? Maybe attach it to the head and activate feed?Longer ramps will definitely help for manual operation.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Jeff on March 11, 2010, 10:31:48 AM
Be aware, that in a state like Michigan, as soon as you do that you are required to have a trailer plate on the mill, because now it is a trailer.  If you are only hauling the mill down the road, then it does not require a plate.

But I like it! :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pineywoods on March 11, 2010, 10:39:03 AM
Be aware, that in a state like Michigan, as soon as you do that you are required to have a trailer plate on the mill, because now it is a trailer.  If you are only hauling the mill down the road, then it does not require a plate.

But I like it! :)

Paint it all orange..Then It's part of the mill   ::)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Jeff on March 11, 2010, 10:40:39 AM
I bet that would work. :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pnyberg on March 11, 2010, 10:46:06 AM
In Connecticut the mill needs to be registered as a trailer regardless.  It has a plate.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on March 11, 2010, 01:33:42 PM
I would use 2" straps and a separate one for each tiedown.  That way, if one malfunctions the other two would keep the arch secure.  With any bounce, I have seen 1" straps break.... :'(

Looks good..... :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pnyberg on March 11, 2010, 05:49:03 PM
Redundant tie-down straps definitely sounds like a good idea.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: sgschwend on March 11, 2010, 07:10:01 PM
Some mills use a hydraulic motor to feed the saw.  The hydraulic motor uses the sawmill hydraulic system but the speed control may be a hand turned manual valve which is often inconvenient to operate.

Recently folks had suggested a hydrostatic pump for this purpose.  Sounds like a very clever idea but the cost of this solution would be high ($600). 

It is also possible to use a Proportional hydraulic valves but those prices are in the 5-6 thousand dollar range, not at all practical.

This solution uses a 12V DC gear motor (150:1) reduction, that turns the manual valve knob.  A simple momentary on switch is used to control the motor.  I purchased all the parts I needed from Grainer for less than $50 (motor, DPST switch/cap, and coupling).

A simple cable was added to remote the switch to my sawmill remote.  The speed control is operate it by jogging the switch up for faster and down for slower. 

DC motor, shaft coupled to the manual valve:
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17635/2208/005.JPG)
Sawmill remote with speed switch added at the top:
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17635/2208/003.JPG)

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: fishpharmer on March 11, 2010, 07:16:37 PM
SG, nice setup.  Very clever of you.  Now I need a hydraulic mill to apply it ;) :D ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pa_of_6 on March 19, 2010, 01:00:37 PM
Hello All

I have been reading the forum for quite awhile now but have not posted....until now anyways.

I have thought about the hydaulic mods that ole bibby did, but I do not have grid power where I saw.
By the way I have a Woodmizer LT70 with a 62 hp Cat.
I did run # 2 welding cable down the wiring track to the hydraulic pumps to get rid of them dam power strips....that was a huge improvement! It also allows for the longer lasting of the 12 volt hydraulic pump motors. The brushes burn up on them more because of the lack of good grounding than the lack of a good positive from the power strip.

So the mod I want to do is to add a hydraulic pump on the motor and then get the feed system using hydraulics instead of 12 volt electric.
I find that the 12 volt motor just does not cut it when it comes to the drag back of big flinches. By big I mean 3 inches thick by as wide as the throat of the mill is...24 inches.

I upgraded to a 1 hp from the 3/4 that came with the mill....and by the way, Woodmizer puts the 1 hp on all of the 70s now, but it still doesnt have the poop required.

For the mod....
There is a port just below the fuel injection pump on the Cat engine that you can install a hydraulic pump that runs off the crank gear....it is designed for that purpose.

I will then mount a orbit motor to drive the feed/return.

I can get a hydraulic valve that uses pulse modulation for the control of the flow to the orbit motor.
Pulse Modulation is what woodmizer uses to control the speed of the 12 volt power feed motor.

My problems and kunudrums are
1- I need more info on the pulse modulation that woodmizer uses to be able to get the  proper valve. I can then hook the two leads off the 12 volt power feed motor and use the same control system for the hydraulic flow.....It could be that easy.

Although I really like that electric actuator that thae fellow about 5 posts prior used....looks like it would work great.

2- Should I drive thru the gear box with a high speed orbit motor or drive directly with a high torque low speed orbit motor...I am swaying for the latter.

3- I am also thinking of running hoses down the wiring track to the hydraulic control valves and elimanate the 2 12 volt hydraulic pumps. My only concern is that the weight added to the cutting head may be too much....the hydraulic tank  needs to be about 10-15 gallons. I can put on a hydraulic oil cooler and mount it on the front of the rad to lower the volume of the hydraulic oil tank.

So anyone have any comments or thoughts????

I figure this mod will cost me about 5-6000$

I just want to be sure I have it well thought out before I break open the piggy bank.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on March 19, 2010, 01:41:00 PM
Welcome to the Forum!  Glade you made it!

If you put the pump on the engine and run the hoses down the cable track, then you could pull the heavy cables that you had running to the 12v pumps - right?  Looks like it'd about equal out.  The copper cables are pretty heavy.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pa_of_6 on March 19, 2010, 02:04:09 PM
I think it would work great...but I am worried about the extra weight that would be on the cutting head due to the oil tank. I figure about 10 gallons...so an extra 100 puonds at least.

I really need to get info on the variable speed control system of the LT 70. Exactly how the pulse modulation works.

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on March 19, 2010, 03:01:37 PM
Your project is way out of my league, so I'll just say Welcome to The Forestry Forum.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on March 19, 2010, 03:18:33 PM
I think it would work great...but I am worried about the extra weight that would be on the cutting head due to the oil tank. I figure about 10 gallons...so an extra 100 puonds at least.

I really need to get info on the variable speed control system of the LT 70. Exactly how the pulse modulation works.



Would you necessarily have to put the oil reserve tank on the sawhead?  Where did they mount it on the LT50 with all hydraulic drive?  I don't remember seeing it on the sawhead?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pa_of_6 on March 19, 2010, 04:01:31 PM
Yep, the tank was on the sawhead....and the pump was driven via v-belt of the front pulley. It was only a gallon and a half tank.
There were two pumps stacked together....one for the power feed and one for the raise lower function. The pumps share a common shaft but different housings...neat little pumps, but the canadian dealer couldn't find a price for it. (I think it would have been a little too small for the LT 70 also)

I chatted with woodmizer the other day about what ever happenned to that mill...seems that it has vanished from their production line....wonder why?

Does anyone out there have one of them?

Thanks for the welcome...And you just never know who is on line that has that little tidbit of info to make it all happen.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on March 19, 2010, 05:43:33 PM
I chatted with woodmizer the other day about what ever happenned to that mill...seems that it has vanished from their production line....wonder why?

Does anyone out there have one of them?


I don't think they built over a couple of them.  Don’t know if they ever got one sold. The talk I overheard was that they were trying to get some Amish market.  But I suspect there was still too many other things dependant on electricity to qualify.  Also,  the total price of the mill may not have made it competitive – being based on the high-end LT50 model.  Amish are funny.  The ones in our area will run a gas engine but not diesel.

Didn't the pump on the engine just run the head functions?  Did it still have the two 12v DC pumps to run all the bed functions?

Something to consider with your attempts to make the head travel more robust – what kind of strain would you be putting on the mill that it wasn’t designed to take.  (Thinking of Tim Taylor the Toolman – MORE POWER.)

I’ve always liked the 12v dc motors with belt drive (LT40 Super) because when the head hit something that wouldn’t move, or something fell in the way and bound the head,  the belt would just slip. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on March 19, 2010, 06:00:06 PM
Correction...

The LT40 LT50 Hydrostatic drive is still on WM web site so ... wouldn't that mean it's still available?

http://www.woodmizer.com/us/sawmills/options/hydrostatic.aspx
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pa_of_6 on March 19, 2010, 08:58:36 PM
Well so it is....but not on the Canadian website.


and that answers one of my questions....which engine option the pump fit on....this may be easier than I thought.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: sgschwend on March 19, 2010, 09:18:21 PM
My mill uses a Hyster type dual hydraulic line reel to transfer the hydraulic fluid to the table and back.

The reservoir is part of the saw frame and holds 5 gallons.

Certainly your idea will work but the valving and its control will be very expensive.  I think I was quoted $3000 for the valve, I didn't bother to ask about the cost of the controller.

It is important to deliver full pressure to the motor and regulate the speed on the return side, otherwise your motor speed will vary with load.

The hydro-stat motor looks clever, you would just need to adjust the control arm length to change speeds; don't know how well the speed is regulated with load, probably not a problem.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Brucer on March 20, 2010, 01:31:16 AM
My recent price list from WM Canada West shows one hydrostatic model -- LT40HDD51-H. It's a super hydraulic with the Cat 51 HP diesel.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: zopi on April 14, 2010, 09:39:08 PM
Be aware, that in a state like Michigan, as soon as you do that you are required to have a trailer plate on the mill, because now it is a trailer.  If you are only hauling the mill down the road, then it does not require a plate.

But I like it! :)

Attach it with u-bolts....part of the structure that way...
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: zopi on April 14, 2010, 10:00:12 PM
I just took one of those cheesy little chinese trailer kit axles and welded a piece of square stock
to it at a right angle...tractor has a 3pt boom..lift the end of the mill, slide the axle under, set the mill down with the axle snugged against the mill feet...drop a ratchet strap across the frame,
tie the little square tube up to the frame to keep the axle from turning, roll the head up and stow it over the axle, lift the other end of the frame with the tractor boom, and gently move the mill around with the tractor..obviously not a highway set up..but makes moving the mill around much easier...could trundle it up a set of ramps onto the trailer I bet...might make a quick tongue for it later...
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on May 19, 2010, 08:06:53 PM
Here's a little something that I had kicked around for a while.  Sometimes while sawing 20' logs, I'll hit the rubber bumper too hard.  A couple of hard licks and it will split open.  I've used a heavy duty zip tie for years, but figured that a metal collar would be better.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0833.JPG)
This is what can happen.... >:(
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0827.JPG)
This had been my fix.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0828.JPG)
2¼ ID steel tubing was the nearest fit that I could find.  I split it.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0830.JPG)
I overlapped it around the rubber bumper to get the correct size.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0831.JPG)
Here they are welded and painted.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0837.JPG)
Finished job.  I've sawed two days with the mod and so far very good.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on May 19, 2010, 08:50:58 PM
Mary went through a couple of those black baby bumpers in the early years.  For some reason, we've just not had that problem for quite a while.  I think because we have a spare in our parts collection.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: LeeB on May 19, 2010, 08:53:45 PM
Best go dig it out now. You'll likely need it since you said you don't.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on May 19, 2010, 08:57:31 PM
I have a rhythm and generally don't hit the stop, but without the seat and sawing 20' logs......well, it took some getting used to.  Last couple of days I've had better control.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Brucer on May 20, 2010, 01:45:09 AM
I've never split one, but I've removed it a few times to squeak an extra 2" of travel out of the mill. (As in, I loaded a big log and it was too close to the hitch end so I couldn't lower the blade.) It's a trick I picked up from Arky.

You really do not want to forget the bumper isn't there when returning the carriage.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: KyTreeFarmer on May 20, 2010, 09:38:45 AM
Magicman
Nice temporary fix, those "zip ties" sure come in handy for much more than their intended use. Much nicer permanent fix.
KTF
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on May 20, 2010, 02:36:42 PM
I'm going to do one other thing when I get the mill back home.  That is to make the end a full 2" in diameter.  That way, it won't try to penetrate down through the rubber bumper.  You can see this in the 1st picture.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ARKANSAWYER on May 20, 2010, 03:33:51 PM

  Sometimes I remove the bumpers from both ends to get a little more wiggle room.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: schlep on May 20, 2010, 09:45:58 PM
I just did a mod to the lift on the new burg mill I just bought. The oridginal one was at the very top of the mill and of a boat trailer winch design with a manual lock. I removed it and replaced it with a sprocket and welded a 30-1 worm gear 4' lower with another sprocket ,put a chain to link them up and now I do not have to worry about a lock and it is easy to turn and stops anywhere. It is shown under burg mill.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on May 21, 2010, 08:01:33 AM
 :)  Yup, I love a worm gear.  It moves when you move and stops when you stop.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on May 21, 2010, 09:02:12 AM
I added a mod to my mills loading arms a couple weeks ago.

I used to get aggrivated when I'd roll a log up to the loader arms and the arms not being absolutely at ground level, the log would spin on the end of the arms instead of climbing onto it.

I welded three 5/16 nuts on each of the arms.  I welded one on the end of each arm and another about 1½" further up and the 3rd one another 1½".

Logs don't spin anymore.  ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Papa1stuff on May 22, 2010, 10:14:56 PM
I finished installing the extra contact strip on my LT40SH today also had added the blade guides .
Haven't cut a lot since installation but so far both mods are worth the effort!
I have some pictures to add as soon as I can get them loaded ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: paul case on May 23, 2010, 12:02:31 AM
i added a low cost log taper toe board to my manual mill. i put blocking under the mill in the two places that i most often need a lift to acomadate a 12 ton hyd jack. i just clamp the big end then jack up the lil one and clamp it . works like a charm, it is better than a pry bar and so far hasnt caused any smashed bloody or beat up knuckles .  pc
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Papa1stuff on May 24, 2010, 07:14:55 AM
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17774/1953/Bev___Dave_051.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17774/1953/Bev___Dave_052.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17774/1953/Bev___Dave_053.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17774/1953/Bev___Dave_054.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17774/1953/Bev___Dave_055.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17774/1953/Bev___Dave_056.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pnyberg on May 24, 2010, 10:38:14 AM
What's the need for the flat blade guides pictured in the last post.  The roller guides seem to do the job OK by themselves for me.

Thanks,
    Peter
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pnyberg on May 24, 2010, 11:09:43 AM
Way back in the archives somewhere there was a discussion about improving the usability of the WM manual dragback arm. Someone suggested that a rope with a knot in it would probably allow you to quickly lower the arm when needed.  My mod was inspired by that comment, but I added some additional hardware.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/19920/2553/Dragback_Down.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/19920/2553/IMGP0029.JPG)

The thing holding the rope is a bit of nautical gear called a cam cleat for pretty obvious reasons.  That and the two stainless steel U bolts came from West Marine.  A simple screw-eye above the cleat serves as a keeper for the rope when it's released from the cleat.

My prototype version of this didn't have the U bolts, and wasn't attached as securely.  It loosened up over time, and was able to slide right and left.  When it slid far enough to the left (rail side), it prevented the auto-clutch from completely disengaging, which resulted in the blade continuing to spin when it should have been stopped.  I won't tell you how many hours I spent fiddling with various adjustments to the auto-clutch and brake strap before I figured out the cause of the problem.   :-[ 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Papa1stuff on May 24, 2010, 11:12:08 AM
What's the need for the flat blade guides pictured in the last post.  The roller guides seem to do the job OK by themselves for me.

Thanks,
    Peter
They stablize the blade allowing to cut faster and smoother!
Maybe someone who has more experience with these could explain better!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: vadimo on May 24, 2010, 01:10:02 PM
My little electronics mods on Oscar 228:
Calculator and Cyclocomputer attached to one wheel.


Cyclocomputer and Calculator:
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20321/calculator.jpg)

Only Calculator before installing Cyclocomputer:
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20321/2474/Fotka%28035%29.jpg)

And one big feature, whitch i do and programming is application for java phones for calculating blade position. The my unfinished website is here: http://bsc.gejdos.sk (http://bsc.gejdos.sk). I this programming in free time cca 8 months :-)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20321/logo.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on May 24, 2010, 08:08:26 PM
They stablize the blade allowing to cut faster and smoother! 

Looks like to me that they would reduce the size of the log that you could handle.  If that is the case, they would not work for me.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on May 25, 2010, 09:02:20 AM
Band saw computer is interesting, but I don't know about the cell phone connectivity though.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on May 28, 2010, 05:53:18 PM
My old operator's seat had gotten badly worn and with holes in the cover, soaked up water when it rained.  I had it re-covered once, but the cost was high and the workmanship poor.  Anyway Command Control has really put WM out of the seat business.  I did internet searches and found the exact seat from the same builder that WM used, for half price.  UPS delivered my new seat Thursday.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0858.JPG)
New seat next to the old worn one.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0859.JPG)
Same manufacturer and model #V900

Now comes the workshop part.  I had welded the umbrella bracket on the old seat.  I didn't want to do this with the new seat.  I had found a "Nut Rivet" kit at HF a couple of years ago, and now was finally the time to see if it worked.  Sheet metal screws simply would not work for this application.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0867.JPG)

When drilling the holes in the metal seat back, I used 3 sockets on the drill bit as bit stops.  I didn't want a fresh hole in my fresh seat.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0862.JPG)

Next, I installed the nut rivets with the supplied tool.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0863.JPG)
This gave me a threaded nut inside of the seat.  I used liquid thread locker on the bolts.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0866.JPG)
Old bracket now bolted instead of welded to my new seat.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: paul case on May 28, 2010, 06:05:11 PM
kewl, or cooler im sure  pc
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on June 03, 2010, 07:45:35 PM
That new operator's seat and umbrella bracket worked like a charm.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0874.JPG)
And the Sun was shinning today.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on June 03, 2010, 07:59:05 PM
 But..! But...! Where's the cup holder? ;D

I don't remember,  does the seat rotate out 90° to aid in getting in/on?

I think I climbed in one at a show or something and it was a bit of a struggle for me. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on June 03, 2010, 09:07:51 PM
That cup would only have sawdust in it.  Especially ERC sawdust.

The seat does not swivel.  I just keep bringing sawdust to that end and build it up high enough so that I can easily sit on the seat. The left leg generally swings.  On really big logs, I usually sit up on the seat back so that I can watch things.

Of course, with 20 footers, the seat has to come off, and the WM walk begins.  The majority of that last SYP job was 20's.

The only real drawback that I have is when the wind is in my face and I'm sawing dry logs.  Especially ERC !!!  I have had to just quit sawing.

I love my seat, and would not want to saw without one.  Of course, I've never used a Command Control. ;)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on June 03, 2010, 09:31:35 PM

The only real drawback that I have is when the wind is in my face and I'm sawing dry logs.  Especially ERC !!!  I have had to just quit sawing.



That's a simple fix.  Get a 12v fan and mount on the umbrella stand right behind your head. 

I have a $10 box fan mounted above and behind me to keep some of the dust out of my face and cool the back of my neck.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on June 03, 2010, 10:14:32 PM
That's a simple fix.  Get a 12v fan and mount on the umbrella stand right behind your head. 

What !!!   And then the Vortex of the Ambidexter Thermostropter will jump out of alignment with the Ampitilirator, and will really screw things up !!!   :o :o :o 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: PineNut on June 03, 2010, 10:28:41 PM
Not if you power it with UHF AC. That will force realignment of the Vortex of the Ambidexter Thermostropter and it should work properly.

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on June 04, 2010, 09:26:36 AM
Aahhh, and I was always a VHF varister thermocouple guy.  That always took care of the counter-electromotive backdraft.  Oh well, back to the drawing board.    ;)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ljmathias on June 05, 2010, 10:50:41 PM
Are you guys speaking English or yooper or what? Oh, and the main thing missing from that chair setup is a touch-screen computer/game boy interface so you can multitask while cutting- play some online games, send some email while cutting, keep up with the forum contributions.  Just think how much more fun, complicated and rewarding life would be!

I love multitasking- gives you a great excuse for screwing things up   ;D

Lj
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: paul case on June 05, 2010, 10:57:59 PM
me2 :D :D :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on June 09, 2010, 01:30:05 PM
NOTE: This post moved by Magicman to Handy things around the mill.

http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,258.200.html



Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on June 09, 2010, 01:38:40 PM
Good idea..  Even the right color.

I started the topic "Handy things around the mill" quite some time back that has a collection of tips like this.

http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,258.0.html

It's not been added to in a while.  Maybe some of the new members may find something of use in it or something to add.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on June 09, 2010, 01:52:05 PM
I've read that thread, but had forgotten about it.  I'm going to try to move the above post over to it, which will "bump" it up.  Maybe that's legal?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on June 23, 2010, 12:17:21 AM
HI every body
I have been reading trough a few of the treads and will contribute some of my mods as soon as i have the picture up load figured out. On "mod" doesnt need pictures though.

The leveling jacks o nthe LT40 i am sure were designed in LA and I am sure the winning entry came from "Mickey Mouse Engineering Inc."

Mine are going to get a re work in short order but it will have to wait till winter.

For now I use the back and forth head technic and a jack that i am sure most every one has chucked in the corner and swore they would never use a again. It has different names all across the NA continent but it got a not so good name where I grew up when I was about 6 years old.

My step Grandmas first husband got killed using one them to change a tire on a loaded hay rack the summer of 61 and ever since then it has been known localy and the suicide jack.

Any one that hears it called that seems to give it a lot more respect then they ever did before they heard the story and I tell it here to make sure any one that uses my method has the same respect that I have for it. With a healthy respect for the risks it presents it is still a very useful tool.

A 36 Inch JackAll/FarmJack  is what I use to speed the process of leveling for now. The 36 inch version does help to keep you out of trouble with the jack but still needs the same respect that longer versions require.

works like a charm with the head positioning technic.

   
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on June 23, 2010, 08:38:54 AM
BB,  Do some more reading on posting pictures.  They have to be loaded into your "Gallery".  From there, they can be added to your posts.  And, welcome to The Forestry Forum.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: carykong on June 23, 2010, 10:58:01 PM
Has anyone fabricated removable extentions for their log stops (WM)?  I have an LT 25 and think it would be useful for turning cants over 20" or so.  My manual log turner tends to push the cants over the log stops on the last turn rather than turning them the last 90 degrees.   I remedy the problem with my cant hooks or nudge the cant with my FEL but not really happy with the pause to correct. Like to keep sawing. Thoughts?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: kderby on June 24, 2010, 12:16:50 AM
The first mill I rented came with a couple of pipes that slid over the log stops.  I did use them when milling large pine logs.  I have now owned a mill for five years and have not made a set for my self.  I have hydraulics and use the log clamping post in partnership with the nasty claw. 

I agree with your point about the time it takes to fix a log when it goes sideways.  With my degree of experience I seem to have out grown that type of problem......I hope ::) ::)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on June 24, 2010, 01:08:59 AM
Has anyone fabricated removable extentions for their log stops (WM)?  I have an LT 25 and think it would be useful for turning cants over 20" or so.  My manual log turner tends to push the cants over the log stops on the last turn rather than turning them the last 90 degrees.   I remedy the problem with my cant hooks or nudge the cant with my FEL but not really happy with the pause to correct. Like to keep sawing. Thoughts?

Many years ago..

(http://www.forestryforum.com/images/YaBBImages/userpics/BackStopExt2.JPG)

I started a topic "Handy things around the mill" with that same idea.

http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,258.0.html

It's still being added to.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on June 24, 2010, 09:13:22 AM
I do that last turn with the log clamp. works like a charm cause you can pull the log back from the og stops a couple of inches and just raise the clamp. take a bit of practice to get it right but it is faster then the claw in most cases. in fact after i get to the cant i amost always use the clamp to turn. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on June 24, 2010, 09:35:09 AM
BB, you can also use the clamp to move the log away from the side supports (stops), lower the clamp and then move it to the side support side of the log and raise it a bit.  The clamp will then keep the log away from the side supports and the turner can roll the log over the clamp.  Just a little trick to practice.

Caution:  You never want a heavy log to land on top of the clamp.  The downward pressure could cause seal failure in the hydraulic cylinder.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on June 24, 2010, 10:08:15 AM
yea i do that quite often too. but when i am doing a real big cant I raise the the claw just enough so the cant  will catch it as i move the log back from the side supports to open it up. then i drop the clamp , go back the the stop side, raise the clamp about a 1/2 inch and back it right up against the cant and then use the claw to start the roll. As soon as i hit blance point i drop the clamp. I have got so i can do it without stopping the claw. works pretty good. i know one day i will probably wish i had stopped the claw to get the clamp down but so far it has not been a problem.  I do aim to have the cant hit the sidesuports/stops on the turn to slow the drop so the cant doesnt hit on the bed so hard. you get so you dont miss very often. I have even discovered that on the relly big ones the weight of the log and the position of hte clamp will let you lift the log clear of the deck. then you slide the clamp out and the rollers on the top of the side supports let he log roll as you move the clamp out and the log drops on the deck real nice.
   
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on June 24, 2010, 11:57:51 AM
I love the power and options that full hydraulics give a sawyer.   ;)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: carykong on June 24, 2010, 03:38:07 PM
Bibbyman, thank you for picture on log stop extensions.  I am thinking your extensions will do a better job of keeping the cant square to the deck as opposed to a couple of generic steel pipes. Will take your picture to my local weld shop and get a couple for myself.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Larry on September 16, 2010, 08:11:19 PM
Before I bought my TimberKing B2000 I recognized several issues up front that would need to be addressed before I would be totally happy with the mill.  One issue was better dust control down towards the bottom of the list.  After sawing dry oak yesterday with breeze out of the wrong direction, better dust control moved to the number one spot.

A little scrap aluminum from an old sign.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10125/ff1%7E1.jpg)


Dust collector hose coupling from Grizzly.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10125/ff2%7E1.jpg)


Bolted together.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10125/ff3%7E1.jpg)


A bit of sticky one side neoprene to seal a crack.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10125/ff4%7E0.jpg)


And installed with a few self tapping screws.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10125/ff5.jpg)


More dry oak was on today’s menu and I was much more comfortable.  Cedar is on the menu for tomorrow and if it works ok I may need to hunt up a can of TimberKing orange paint.  Have to maintain my image ya know. :D

Btw, who carries TK orange paint?

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: backwoods sawyer on September 16, 2010, 09:25:31 PM
Try TK black ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: fred in montana on October 03, 2010, 09:07:46 AM
Hinged unloading ramps. This is a real backsaver and timesaver for getting bigger timbers off of the mill. I just flip the ramps down, turn the timber and they slide down to the bunks. They are up and out of the way when sawing and I don't have to bend over to set them when I need them. A few screws and they can be removed when I am sawing smaller lumber.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21439/2700/FILE0001.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21439/2700/FILE0002.JPG)

Just completed a 6' bed extension. Cost about $50 worth of materials. Some 6 inch bolts, piece of 2x2x3/8 angle and 1/4 x 2 1/2 flat steel. The idea was just to extend the track and not support logs. There are some removeable bunks if I need to support boards.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21439/2700/FILE0013.JPG)

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21439/2700/FILE0007.JPG)

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21439/2700/FILE0012.JPG)

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: paul case on October 03, 2010, 09:22:04 AM
finally got some pics to load so i wanted to post one of my manual hydraulic toeboard. no patents yet so i just thought if any of you manual millers havent thought of this yet it is too simple not to do and having toeboard abilities are a big plus. the log needs to be clamped at one end or at least blocked so it cant roll.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20540/2953/sawmill_021.JPG)

yeah i know i am a real genious to figure this one out  just kidding.  stan snider has a toe board added on his mill that uses a trailer jack and works pretty spiffy. he may be seeking a patent so i cant share too much on his ideas.

this toe board however as you can see is a 12 ton hydraulic bottle jack sitting on some blocks. total project cost $0 if you can borrow the jack from a neighbor or get one for christmas like i did.

oh by the way fred i like your cant skid idea and the use of wood for the extra track for the lt15. thay used to do a lot of that kinda thing. even though metal is much sturdier in the long run,  i am a big advocate for using what ya got. pc
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: terrifictimbersllc on October 03, 2010, 11:33:16 AM
how about just put a shim under it after you jack it up?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: paul case on October 03, 2010, 02:07:14 PM
that works to shim it i mean. i worry about the log rolling off the jack and on to me. smiley_swinging_board smiley_swinging_board smiley_swinging_board smiley_swinging_board

i dont want anyone getting hurt over my idea. i used to roll the smaller ones on the mill onto blocks on the little end. that works too. pc
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: terrifictimbersllc on October 03, 2010, 04:25:22 PM
Your coop rafters strong enough for chain hoist and logging tongs?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: paul case on October 03, 2010, 04:56:56 PM
no not enough beef to accomadate that. i opted for the turning winch setup. pc

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20540/2953/sawmill_011.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on October 03, 2010, 07:39:39 PM
And then I opted for the turning laptop setup.   :D

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Don K on October 03, 2010, 09:27:15 PM
All I could do was a 60 degree angle of the head. :D :D

Don
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: paul case on October 03, 2010, 09:41:44 PM
what can i say?

some of us are pleased easier with cheaper toystools and less options than others.

my simple setworks looks like me writing in pencil on the back of rhe mill head sometimes!    smiley_computer_monitor
 
pc
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Stan snider on October 03, 2010, 09:51:40 PM
Paul: I doubt my idea is new and would post a picture if I knew how. Stan
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: paul case on October 03, 2010, 09:57:06 PM
Stan,
keep trying we(anita mostly) would work at it till frustration set in and walk away for a week. last night we got serveral posted and i wonder if it can happen again?
did you ever get the truck bed i sold you put on? i see your piece of equipment is gone from north of peoria, did you fetch it home?  pc
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Stan snider on October 04, 2010, 10:19:42 PM
No paul I haven't mounted that bed yet but am thinking about parking them real close so they will be better acquainted!  :D I got the root digger home.  Stan.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: paul case on October 04, 2010, 10:25:10 PM
i am not counting but i have had my mill 2 years now.  some of your projects move about as fast as mine. pc
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on October 05, 2010, 02:34:07 PM
Paul, I don't see your pictures in your gallery??
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: paul case on October 05, 2010, 07:19:04 PM
i dont know whats up with that. i have to peck sround to find them too. i am sure it is something i have or havent done, i just dunno  what! pc
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: nas on October 30, 2010, 07:48:29 PM
Chuck White says I should post this here ;)  I put a piece of a broken blade under the washers of the backstop of the log clamp.  After cutting a flitch of two off the top of a small log, I flip it 180° and clamp it.  The piece of blade holds the log from pushing up out of the clamp.  It worked great for a bunch of little sumac logs I had to livesaw for a customer.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/16789/Mill_jig_1.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/16789/sumac_3.jpg)

Nick
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Wrangler55 on December 19, 2010, 01:34:51 PM
I've been trying to think of a nice waterproof container to store spare blades in that can be attached to the mill, anyone have slick solutions?

 A rubbermaid tote or action storage box works great. My son had one of the action storage boxes he used to pack his Boy Scout stuff in to take to camp... He's 30 years old now, so it's held up great.  I use it to store my blades.  It's water proof and oil and gas doesn't seem to hurt it at all.  I seperate each blade with a piece of cardboard.  I use one of the cheeper rubbermaid boxes I picked up at a discount store to store the dull blades.

 http://www.rubbermaid.com/Category/Pages/Category.aspx?CatName=Storage

Hal
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: redbeard on January 02, 2011, 07:28:51 PM
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22539/2903/2011-01-02_12-50-09_98.jpg) Half pipe sawdust collector works great for catching a majority of sawdust. It is a trip hazzard for the off bearer but its easy to move out of way. I originally cut several of these culverts for a contractor buddy that needed some shutes for a tricky concrete pour, Yes  i sliced em with the mill.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: fred in montana on January 17, 2011, 08:28:51 PM
12 volt winch powered log turner. My first welding project so don't look too closely at the welding!

There is a rope attached to the vertical arm that I can pull to position it under the edge of the log before lifting.

Also am adding a winch powered clamp and winch powered backstops.



 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21439/2700/IMG_0226.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21439/2700/IMG_0227.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21439/2700/IMG_0228.JPG)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21439/2700/IMG_0231.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on January 17, 2011, 09:34:00 PM
Is that enough teeth?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pineywoods on January 18, 2011, 11:36:05 AM
I've been there. My hat's off to anyone who tackles a project like this. I just about gurantee you will bend or break something when you start using it.  ;D Show us some pics after you mess up that nice paint job re-enforcing and adding stuff ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: sgschwend on January 19, 2011, 11:40:16 PM
I added a saw luber solenoid valve between my lube tank and the saw blade.  The solenoid is connected to the two speed engine rpm controller.  High speed the lube is on, low speed off.  Pretty simple just two 1/8" NPT to barb fittings, a short length of tubing and the valve. 

I used it today, it was nice just to set the flow valve and not needing to change a setting or shut it off until the end of the work day.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17635/2209/Solenoid-Valve-6JJ54_AS01.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: terrifictimbersllc on January 20, 2011, 05:04:08 AM
Steve, can you give some id for that valve? can't find it with those numbers.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: sgschwend on January 20, 2011, 09:27:36 PM
I picked up this one from Grainger.  It is an Ingersoll Rand model number: P251SS-012-D

The remainder of the parts came from ACE hardware.

http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/INGERSOLLRANDARO-Solenoid-Valve-6JJ52 (http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/INGERSOLLRANDARO-Solenoid-Valve-6JJ52)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Brucer on January 20, 2011, 11:48:09 PM
I bought one from Wood-Mizer. I was too cheap to add a lubemizer setup, but I bought the solenoid for it. There's already bolt holes for it and the mill was prewired for it as well. I just had to hook up the wire to the feed switch and now the solenoid opens whenever the carriage is traveling forward.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: barbender on January 21, 2011, 01:05:29 PM
That's how my '97 super is set up, just a solenoid that is activated by the carriage feed. I don't believe Lubemizer was available back then.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: fred in montana on February 05, 2011, 08:36:31 PM
Well, I got the mods done.

winch powered:
claw turner
clamp
2 backstops

And a log leveling bracket that is powered with a 12v scissor jack.

I will get some photos later but I have a video:



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=he2a7eR8Uuw (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=he2a7eR8Uuw)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on February 05, 2011, 09:10:05 PM
Another plan comes together.  Looks good.   :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: fred in montana on February 05, 2011, 09:26:49 PM
Quote
Is that enough teeth?

No it wasn't!

I had to cut them off and add bigger ones.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on February 05, 2011, 09:46:40 PM
I went back and looked.  Those were larger unpainted teeth in the video.  Well, it's perfection in progress.   :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: POSTON WIDEHEAD on February 05, 2011, 10:13:21 PM
I've been trying to think of a nice waterproof container to store spare blades in that can be attached to the mill, anyone have slick solutions?

Try an old or new cooler. You know the coolers you open up to get you a cold one. Coolers come in different sizes and will keep moisture out.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pnyberg on April 07, 2011, 05:38:04 PM
People are always saying that they like pictures.  This post may test their patience.

Many other people have posted about modifying the WM Lube-Mizer tubing. This primarily involves adding more of it.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/19920/3421/IMGP0138.JPG)

The factory configuration has the definite possibility of catching on a log or a cant. This hasn't happened to me, and on my mill there's an outer tube that protects the inner tube to some degree. But still, if there's a chance that I could improve things, I have to at least try.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/19920/3421/IMGP0139.JPG)

So I tried just adding some tubing, but no matter how i arranged it there seemed to be an even greater likelihood that the tubing would snag on something.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/19920/3421/IMGP0140.JPG)

Plus if there's nothing preventing the arm from running out to a full open position, the tubing will get pinched between part of the outer guide assembly and part of the C frame.  This apparently happened to me before I started modifying anything, which is what started me down this road. 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/19920/3421/IMGP0141.JPG)

One way to avoid the pinching problem would be re-route the plumbing.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/19920/3421/IMGP0142.JPG)

But this looks a little vulnerable to me.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/19920/3421/IMGP0144.JPG)

So, I went to Home Depot and picked up some 'off the shelf' hardware.  The vertical pipe is a 1 1/2" nipple, and the horizontal piece is 2" long.  The last piece in the assembly is the original connection fitting supplied by Wood-Mizer. 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/19920/3421/IMGP0145.JPG)

If you were the inner guide, this is what it would look like to you.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/19920/3421/IMGP0146.JPG)

With the guide arm all the way open, we just clear the C frame.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/19920/3421/IMGP0147.JPG)

Another view with the guide all the way open.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/19920/3421/IMGP0148.JPG)

And with the arm all the way in.

I'm not sure what my maximum clearance from the side supports to the outer guide assembly was before I started, but it is now 24 1/2". 

This mod has been in place for several weeks, and seems to be performing well. 

--Peter


Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on April 07, 2011, 10:28:07 PM
Now you have made me start wondering how mine is routed.  It's a WM field added on unit and I re-routed it some myself.  I know that I don't have as much tubing showing as you do, but your installation looks very professional.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 08, 2011, 04:59:44 AM
Before we upgraded to the LubeMizer we had a lot of trouble with the tube pulling off the slip-on connection point on the guide roller block.  It was just an aggravation as it just slipped on and off so no real damage was done.  I lengthened the tube and re-routed it a number of times to find some optimum length and routing to keep the tube out of the window area but still not droop or get caught behind something like the guide arm motor.   

After we upgraded to the LubeMizer we’ve not (yet) had a problem.  I’ll look again but I think the tube on our LubeMizer is a bit longer than the one on your first picture.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: SAWMILL BUDDY on April 08, 2011, 06:28:11 AM
Peter, Great job on the water line. What I would like to know is how you keep the mill so clean :o 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pnyberg on April 08, 2011, 04:34:34 PM
What I would like to know is how you keep the mill so clean :o 

From the picture next to your post, I'm guessing you're stationary.  One of the benefits of being portable is that most of the mess gets left behind when you leave the customer's site.  Once I get home, a few minutes with a garden hose will clean things up pretty well. 

There was some speculation somewhere back in the archives as to whether Wood-Mizer changed the paint they use on the mills at some point.  The newer models don't seem to fade as much as the older ones.  This one has been outside for the year and a half I've owned it, and it doesn't seem to be fading much, if at all.

--Peter
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: SAWMILL BUDDY on April 08, 2011, 05:04:47 PM
I'm portable, I just use the mill inside milling for myself plus keeps out of the weather. Only thing is I dont have running water on the backside of the farm where I'm set up. I've had the mill 5years now. Guess it probley looked a little cleaner 3 years ago.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 08, 2011, 05:51:57 PM
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsbandbreak200603.JPG)

Our mill looks like it went through the War in the Pacific.   ::)

This picture was taken in 2006.  It’s not got any cleaner. This picture does shows how I redirected the hose on the old gravity flow water system.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsbandbreak200601.JPG)

A view of the other side.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pnyberg on April 08, 2011, 07:50:10 PM
Bibby,

I can see how the hose goes in the first picture, but not so much in the second.  But I have to say that the way you've got the blade mounted seems a bit unusual.  But you've been doing this much longer than me, so maybe I'm doing it wrong.

--Peter
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 08, 2011, 09:05:33 PM
Bibby,

I can see how the hose goes in the first picture, but not so much in the second.  But I have to say that the way you've got the blade mounted seems a bit unusual.  But you've been doing this much longer than me, so maybe I'm doing it wrong.

--Peter

These pictures were taken of an eventfull blade brake.  I just used it to show how much crud was on our mill.   One just happened to show how the lub-tube was ran.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pnyberg on April 08, 2011, 09:33:29 PM
If you go to my picture gallery i did a mod for that little problem too . there a few pics there. I tried to put the pics in here but this computer is smarter then i am.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/2883/IMG_2354.JPG)

Yes, I think we ended up with different approaches to a similar solution.

--Peter
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Brucer on April 09, 2011, 01:37:25 AM
...  The newer models don't seem to fade as much as the older ones.  This one has been outside for the year and a half I've owned it, and it doesn't seem to be fading much, if at all.

Wait a couple more years :( :(.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: thecfarm on April 09, 2011, 07:39:18 AM
Bandmill Bandit,the hard part with the pictures is done. I like to open up my gallery first,than start a reply,

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/2883/IMG_2905.JPG)

I like to hit the enter key a few times,than click on to a thumnail picture,it will get bigger,than scroll down a little,in green it will say,Click here to copy this photo code directly ........,click on to it,than click yes and you are done. Preview to make sure you like it.You can fix it if it don't look quite right.Posting more than one picture together,hit the enter key for some white space.
Nice gazebo by the way.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on April 09, 2011, 10:20:47 AM
Ok I am going to try this.


 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/2883/IMG_2356.JPG)

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/2883/IMG_0004.JPG)



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/2883/IMG_3591.JPG)

A couple more of my lube tube mod and the finished gazebo.

Thanks for the help and thanks for the compliment on the gazebo but that has to go to my wife for the gazebo idea. I built it but she made made it fit the yard from more than a size stand point. I could not have built it with out my saw mill. I would hate to see what the price of some of the timbers I made would have cost even if I could get them at the lumber yard.



Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: thecfarm on April 10, 2011, 08:32:08 AM
Nice job on the pictures. You are right about saving money with your own mill.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 19, 2011, 10:20:58 AM
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/888/wsdragback20110419.JPG)

I've had this project on the back burner for a couple of years.  I had the guide build by a local metal fabrication shop.  He made a couple of major mistakes and over did a lot of it - taking upon himself to substitute heavier material than I asked for.

Anyway,  I got it mounted and it works ok except the fingers are too long.  And I'd like to make a way to quick detach it or hinge it up out of the way.

I need a distance from the blade to the end of the guide fingers so I only have to measure twice and cut once.  

Would an LT70 ower please measure the distance from the blade to the bottom of the aluminum fingers for me?  

I figure set the blade at 12" and then move the guide fingers over a bed and then measure from the bottom of the fingers to the bed.





Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: AvT on April 19, 2011, 11:02:36 AM
On mine the fingers are 3 inches closer to the bed.  But looking at the setup I think design may have been 2 1/2" as horizontal bar looks like it slopes down a wee bit
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 19, 2011, 01:35:29 PM
Thanks. 

We sawed 6x8 with the guide in place yesterday so there was no problem with the guide fingers being too long.  This morning I've been sawing some cedar 6x6 and again no real test.  But I've sawn a couple of small logs down to 1" of the deck and it seems to be working fine - even if they're a couple of inches longer than they should be.

It’ll probably end up like most of my projects – if it works I won’t mess with it.   ::)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: beenthere on April 19, 2011, 01:52:13 PM
Guide fingers? I thought maybe they were for dragback.  What do they guide?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Larry on April 19, 2011, 02:49:15 PM
bt, they steer the board.

On my TK I hate looking through the fingers to see the grade on a cant.  My console is on the right, so sometimes I only use the left side fingers to keep the board from veering to the left.  It it veers to the right I can correct course with my hand without moving.  It works out better than two out of three boards behave.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 19, 2011, 03:43:25 PM
Guide fingers? I thought maybe they were for dragback.  What do they guide?

The LT40 Super comes standard with a dragback arm.  I think it’s an option on the LT40 Standard.  It works well as designed if you've got a walk-along mill and can place a hand on the board being drug back.  But if you have a Command Control model,  the boards tend to shoot off this way and that depending on how the end of the log is cut or any number of other issues.  

The LT70 series solved this problem with the dangly down guide fingers that keep the board in line.  So far,  Wood-Mizer has not saw fit to design a guide system for the LT40 series.  There are a couple of others that have built their own guide system and have shown them here on this topic.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsTomHeidlage2008041202.JPG)

Here is a home-made model done by Tom Heidlege.  He used Wood-Mizer guide fingers and a bracket of his own design.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 21, 2011, 09:29:02 PM
They predicted rain all day today.  The wind was up high.  And Mary didn't want to saw.  She wanted to go to town to get "stuff".  So I spent most of the day hacking and welding on the dragback.  A little fine tuning may be required but I think I'm close.   I got it installed and pictures taken just as the storm came in.



(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/888/wsdragback20110421b.JPG)

I installed a hinge about midway.  I used a 1/2" bolt with a wing-nut I'd found so it can be taken off with little effort.   I also looked at the unit Tom handmade and noted that the cross bar holding the fingers was turned 90° from the unit I had built.  So when I cut the mounting bar off to install the hinge,  I turned the mounting angle to be like the same as Tom's model.  That brought the fingers up to what looks to be the right length.

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/888/wsdragback20110421a.JPG)

I got hinge geometry just right so the dragback clears the motor about 1/2" when folded up.  Problem is,  the weight of the fingers out front make it want to fall back down.  I figure to drill another set of holes above the hinge to install a pin to keep it from falling back down.  Wouldn’t do to let it fall on Mary's head!

 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/888/wsdragback20110421c.JPG)

Another view of it folded up.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on April 21, 2011, 09:40:59 PM
This is unrelated to your project, but do you have to blow those electric motors out regularly to clear the sawdust from the cooling fins?  I know that I have issues with the radiator air filter on the Diesel.  I guess that I'm surprised that you don't have a filter on that electric motor.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: logwalker on April 22, 2011, 12:36:29 AM
Those motors are fully enclosed with the fan on the outside of the housing.
They are referred to as TEFC motors.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 22, 2011, 01:57:46 AM
Almost 5,000 hours on the motor over the past 9 years.  Only a single squirt of grease in the bearing on each end yearly.   8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on April 22, 2011, 06:49:29 AM
Bibby,   couldn't you use double roller chain for the guide arms?  It's seams a lot less mechanical engineering would be required and it would work just as well.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 22, 2011, 02:11:03 PM
Bibby,   couldn't you use double roller chain for the guide arms?  It's seams a lot less mechanical engineering would be required and it would work just as well.

Yes.  Would work great.  If you have the chain or can get some cheap without buying new.  Else even old flat link chain like used on old farm equipment??  Anything that bends one way but not side to side.  It don't take much.

I was trying to work something out by using fiberglass/nylon bars instead of aluminum.  Maybe from hammer handles?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: paul case on April 22, 2011, 08:07:56 PM
use wood on a sawmill?  sounds like a good idea to me and maybe the cheapest option! pc
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on April 24, 2011, 07:05:27 PM
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/15/wsbarrelsawing20110422c.JPG)

Now I'm sorry I left this project go for so long.  It really works well.  We've sawn maybe 1mbf of 8' logs and it's not missed bringing the board back to the outfeed table. 

We’ve had to change our procedure a little to use the dragback guide.  For example, when we cut a slab,  the guide is in the way of removing it.  So we either have to run the head further forward or raise the head and return.  But overall it's an asset.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: AvT on April 25, 2011, 12:25:00 AM
Guide fingers? I thought maybe they were for dragback.  What do they guide?

here is a detailed description... haha

http://www.sumobrain.com/patents/wipo/Saw-mill-apparatus-with-board/WO2003066293A2.pdf
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Brucer on April 25, 2011, 01:59:33 AM
There you go ... complete design details. Ain't the patent office wonderful?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: zopi on September 17, 2011, 07:51:06 PM
The best yet...electric lights in the sawshed! Next up, a toolshed for all the crap the mill collects...with acorner for my forge and anvil....but that must wait until
mama's storage shed is built...
The best yet...electric lights in the sawshed! Next up, a toolshed for all the crap the mill collects...with acorner for my forge and anvil....but that must wait until
mama's storage shed is built...

For the record...none of this has been accomplished.. lol
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: bandmiller2 on September 18, 2011, 07:04:45 AM
My bandmill is set up in a nice building with a smooth cement floor came in the outher day and it was spotless not a speck of sawdust. Seems one of the lads that was cleaning up used a backpack leaf blower,did a real nice cleanup job. Frank C.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Slingshot on November 19, 2011, 09:23:45 PM
 Had to go back to page seven to find this thread.

Just want to show a little mod I did to my LT40 toeboards. Older type hydraulic.

They are usually OK as they are but sit a little too far away from the dogs for small logs.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18700/3705/DSC03591.JPG)

And can't be moved any closer because of the inner brace beam.
But by installing on the opposite side of the bunk they can be moved closer to the dog.

I drilled one hole- bolt spacing over -and re-positioned the toeboard about 6 inches
closer for the front one and left the rear as is.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18700/3705/DSC03592.JPG)

 Small and medium logs can be loaded small end to the front and larger logs that need to be raised to center the
 pith can be loaded small end to the rear.



________________________
 sling_shot


Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Woodchuck53 on November 21, 2011, 05:25:31 AM
You guys are always talking about a place for spare blades. This might be to bulky.

When I cut open some plastic drums to make my culvert collars I noticed that the base of the drum on each end tapers quit a bit. Would a drum cut down to about 12 or 14"  to make a lower bowl and then the other end cut about 2" to form a top slide in? I'm not home to try this but I will as soon as I get back.

My sawing partner has a LT40 and could probably use something like that. For now he just lays them in the back of his truck on the mat after sharpening. I think it will work with a little experimenting with the depth of each.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on November 21, 2011, 06:53:03 AM
Yes, that should work very well.  It sounds like what I did with a garbage Magic Can.
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0272.JPG)
 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0271.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: zopi on November 21, 2011, 08:11:20 AM
Rubbermaid, I think makes a short round can about that size...seen em a lowes, etc...
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pnyberg on November 21, 2011, 10:04:59 PM
Yes, that should work very well.  It sounds like what I did with a garbage Magic Can.

Since I now stock 3 blade profiles, and the blade cabinet that lives in the back of my pickup truck only has 3 drawers, I needed another solution for storing my dulled blades.  I remembered Magicman's Magic Can, and found it in the archives.  It seems simple, but first I have to figure out how to saw my garbage can in half.  Eventually I remembered that I own a sawmill.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/19920/2553/Blade_Bucket_1.JPG)

So that was pretty easy.  But then I couldn't figure out how to take the two halves of a tall garbage can and turn them into one short garbage can.  Just laying the lower section inside the upper section left a gap of about 1" all around, which I clearly couldn't fix using pop-rivets.  But then it occurred to me to fill the gap with spray foam, which seemed to work OK.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/19920/2553/Blade_Bucket_2.JPG)

Crude but effective.  To finish the job I'll need to buy another can of foam, and fill the lower part of the gap.  It seems pretty solid.

Rubbermaid, I think makes a short round can about that size...seen em a lowes, etc...

Now you tell me  :)

--Peter
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on November 21, 2011, 10:24:58 PM
I removed a section of the top (larger) part and then fitted it inside of the bottom.  You can see where I cut slots for the handle, and then riveted it together.  Of course, then the top no longer fitted, hence the black top from a smaller can.   ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on December 03, 2011, 06:29:58 PM
Another mod/addition under way.



 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/DSCF3155.JPG)

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/DSCF3154.JPG)

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/DSCF3153.JPG)

As you can see no welding done yet as i am still in design stage. Want to make it so that it goes off and on in about 5 seconds or less.

Thinking drilling right through the clamp where I now have the 3/8ths by 3/4 inch bolts holding the little tabs in place so I can use a pin to told it in place that will slide in and out easily.

Any comments or Ideas?
That stuff is a hard drill but good bits and lot of water worked well to get the 2 holes drilled about and inch deep on each side in about 15 minutes.   
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on December 04, 2011, 03:28:01 AM
Looks like it may be a tad aggressive for clamping a cant.  Might "bite off" a chunk.  Have you tried it yet?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on December 04, 2011, 08:26:38 AM
I have never seen/had the need for such, but if you do it certainly should work.   ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: LeeB on December 04, 2011, 10:54:49 AM
Looks like it wood be good for clamping small diameter stuff. I need to do some small cedars and it looks good for that.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on December 04, 2011, 12:29:40 PM
Looks like it may be a tad aggressive for clamping a cant.  Might "bite off" a chunk.  Have you tried it yet?

Hey Bibbyman

Thanks for the response. No I havent tried it yet as it is in the design process. I have only bolted the 2 tabs to the clamp and have a piece of 3/16 flat stock stuck in between the 2 pieces that I intend weld in the there.

The question I am contemplating is whether or not to increase the thickness of that piece.

This one will be for use on fresh log with bark still on so I want it to be quite agressive.

I am thinking of making it reversible with 2 or 3 smaller saw type teeth about 1/4 in deep.

Its a work in progress at this point and I want it to be as practical as possible and easy to swap.

May end up with 2 separate pieces as that piece across between the 2 tabs is a fairly important piece to ensure that the clamping pressure remains on the face of the clamp and not on the bolts. The bolts may be a temporary fastening method as I want to be able to make it so I can pull a pin to remove and reinstall quickly.

My ultimate goal is to end up with 3 clamping surfaces and have them very easily and quick to inter change so that it INCREASES out put not decreases it.

I am thinking of drilling the hole all the way through the clamp so that  pin will slide through to hold the clamp pieces in place.

Any additional ideas and comments are welcome.     
   
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pineywoods on December 04, 2011, 04:37:16 PM
Looks a lot like my home-made turner/clamp. Yes, you can in fact poke holes in the side of a cant, but that's an operator problem  ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on December 05, 2011, 05:14:47 PM
I put two fangs on my clamp by using the wirefeed then file them down. works good I can even pull the cant down a little if I have to, but be careful not to rip two lines down the side of the cant. just have pull away first :D :D :D(http://)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: customsawyer on December 05, 2011, 05:19:42 PM
I have the same question as some of the others. I am not sure I understand the need for this mod. Can you please explain what you plan to gain from this.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on December 05, 2011, 05:37:54 PM
Customsawyer , sometimes if the bark is loose and the log will want to turn on me the fangs will hold it. or pull off the bark and clamp it , I would show you a pic but my file is to big :D :D im in error :D I can;t seem to post a pic, it;s in my gallery, ill keep trying :D :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: beenthere on December 05, 2011, 05:45:42 PM
Pete
Just copy the info in the box below your pic in the gallery and paste in your post like this

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/mill_clamp_061.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: customsawyer on December 05, 2011, 06:25:37 PM
Peter I am not trying to question you just trying to understand.
What size logs are you milling that you need this mod on and what kind of log is it.
I cut some pine logs that have thicker bark that when it has dried a bit the bark will slip very bad but I haven't had on try to turn on me unless it was 8" dia. or less. I try not to mill this small of a log for several but this is one of them. If I do have to mill logs this small I usually cut 2 or more logs at a time so your mod would not help to hold the inside log.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: POSTON WIDEHEAD on December 05, 2011, 07:06:12 PM
Saturday night I sat down on my couch and read every post in this thread. It took me a little over 3 hours and  45 minutes.
I am very impressed with the ideas you fellows and gals came up with! The pictures were great when needed. If anyone hasn't read 'em all.....DO IT!

I wish they were all in a book...but now we have a computer.

Thanks for the ideas. smiley_applause
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on December 05, 2011, 07:21:30 PM
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/mill_clamp_062%7E1.JPG) thanks for info customsawer. not somuch small logs old w pine the 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/mill_clamp_062%7E0.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/mill_clamp_062%7E0.JPG) canbium layer is slippery like ice and the clamp fills up with the slime and slips. all so when im cutting hemlock and hit a knot the cant will lift sometimes if the back stops are to low. I have hit them with the blade :D :D so I keep them on the low side :D. sometimes cutting r oak and I get down to the last cuple of cuts I reposition the clamp the thing will pop up  :o the fangs will pull it back down ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on December 05, 2011, 08:05:06 PM
Is there such thing as a "picture echo"  ???    :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on December 05, 2011, 09:05:28 PM
Yes Peter

Exactly the reason for my mod in process. Small poplar and western birch and a few others that like to pop/slip up before/while you are opening the log. That the reason I want to be able to remove quickly. As a rule only need it on the first 2 some times 3 cuts depending on the log and how you open the it.

I have had Poplar and Birch pop up during a cut and that is very annoying.


Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on December 05, 2011, 09:55:47 PM
 :D :D :D ya MM sometimes I don;t do so good with the computer  :D :D I saw logs better :D :D

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/stans_lumber_010.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/stan_2_004.JPG)  :D :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on December 05, 2011, 10:01:51 PM
 :D  Indeed you do.   smiley_thumbsup
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on December 13, 2011, 08:06:03 AM
In 08 when I gut this mill, It gut a seat with it  :D. but the seat is black and boy is hot on your but in the sun :o :o. so with some junk I had around I made this.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/sawmill_building_004.JPG) and it slids in to a pice of 2" chanel welded to the bottom of the seat ,

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/sawmill_building_008.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/sawmill_building_006.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/sawmill_building_007.JPG) I use it when im on a job and the sun is out , and keeps my but cool :D :D :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on December 13, 2011, 08:18:58 AM
Yup, the only thing better than a seat is a seat with an umbrella on it.   smiley_thumbsup
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0875.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: paul case on December 13, 2011, 11:56:40 AM
I am guessing ya don't use the umberella under the building?  PC
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on December 13, 2011, 05:18:37 PM
 :D :D :D :D No It;s that I had the camera with me the outher day , so I thought you all  would like to see how I did it  :D :D maybe it will help :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Brucer on December 14, 2011, 12:28:11 AM
I tried something like that once. Big windstorm blew up and next thing I new the umbrella was floating on the breeze -- out over the highway that ran through a cut below my milling site.

I didn't hear any squealing brakes, but I didn't find the umbrella either ???.

Some things weren't meant to be :(
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: PC-Urban-Sawyer on December 14, 2011, 11:50:39 AM
I tried something like that once. Big windstorm blew up and next thing I new the umbrella was floating on the breeze -- out over the highway that ran through a cut below my milling site.

I didn't hear any squealing brakes, but I didn't find the umbrella either ???.

Some things weren't meant to be :(

Seems like a pin through the mounting bracket and umbrella shaft would have prevented that problem...

Herb
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Brucer on December 15, 2011, 01:16:06 AM
That was plan B.

Just so's you know, when the wind pops the umbrella upside down, it's just never the same again :(.

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on December 15, 2011, 07:30:10 AM
Mine is a tractor umbrella that has a clamp on the bracket and is securely fastened.
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0866.JPG)
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0849.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: YellowHammer on November 25, 2012, 09:47:18 PM
I used the info from this topic and fabricated dragback/fingers for my LT-40 as well as an outfeed table to make sawing much more efficient.  This combination sure makes sawing easier, especially if working alone.  I thought folks might want to see it in action.  One of these days, I might finish painting the table.  The sawdust is being sucked into my shop duct collecter, the same one I use for my planer and table saw, and being discharged into a dump trailer

http://youtu.be/4UGD0LNGUIM

At first I left the last bed rail extended which works best for longer boards, but then I folded it back and like this better for shorter 8 footers because the board drops from the cant and the end closest to me raises up to make it easier to grab. 
Now I need to add power rollers so I don't have to slide the boards on the stack by hand.
YH
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on November 27, 2012, 09:44:55 AM
Great job!  Somehow it all looks very familiar to me.   ::)

We have a big roller on the back end of the table that makes off loading long and heavy stuff easier.  We’ve also found that all we really need most of the time is the one dangly guide on the far left.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: bedway on November 27, 2012, 11:31:30 AM
Nice set up YellowHammer, sure helps the back.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: YellowHammer on November 27, 2012, 10:26:46 PM
Bibbyman,
It should look familiar, I wore out UTube watching your videos 8) and a whole bunch of others.  I decided to build the guide fingers after having a few dragback boards get out of control and come at me like missiles.  Then I built the table after a few boards hit the ground.  I'm really pleased how the addtion of these two simple mods makes a world of difference in the ease and efficiency of sawing.  Very little wasted motion or effort.  I see how using only a minimum of fingers would beneficial, as they obstruct the view.  Now if I could build a live deck and reduce the edging slowdown I might even feel like I'm getting the hang of this.
YH
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Jemclimber on November 28, 2012, 07:43:34 AM
Here is just a small change I made to the clamps on my lt15. The 15 clamps are angled back slightly, about 80ish degrees, so when a cant is clamped it lifts it up off the bed and the cant then gets cut into a tapered piece. It is very frustrating. I wanted the vertical bar of the clamp to be at a 90 degree angle to the bed and to apply a slightly down pressure to prevent it from lifting the cant.

 I put the clamp chassis in a vice and put a very slight bend in the top and bottom (the horizontal part that slides on the bed) to angle it forward. Next, I welded a small tab on the bottom front to remove the slop that the vertical bar slides in on the lower part. This keeps it at a 90 and then the cam action forces it slightly down when clamping.
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26094/2012-11-27_22-21-21_359.jpg)
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26094/2012-11-27_22-28-34_42.jpg) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/26094/2012-11-27_22-29-15_811.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: tgalbraith on November 29, 2012, 04:48:28 PM
I've been trying to think of a nice waterproof container to store spare blades in that can be attached to the mill, anyone have slick solutions?

I don't have a bandmill, but I would think that if you cut about 4" off the bottom of a plastic drum, made a seperator from plywood that would slip inside and a plywood cover that was attached with a hinge and some sort of clasp; it should hold two spare blades nicely.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on November 29, 2012, 07:57:37 PM
Mine does not attach to the sawmill, but it is waterproof.
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0271.JPG)
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0272.JPG)
A sawed off and shortened garbage can.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: terrifictimbersllc on November 29, 2012, 08:00:48 PM
In the back of your new truck does too attach to your sawmill.  :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on November 29, 2012, 09:34:33 PM
Yup, in a way I guess that everything is hooked up.   :) 

I filled that Magiccan today.  We crank up early Saturday morning.  Next week will be busy also.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: WDH on November 29, 2012, 10:02:11 PM
Jemclimber, that is slick!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Woodchuck53 on November 30, 2012, 08:27:40 PM
I like it Yellowhammer. I plan on building one for my partner's LT 40 when I get home. That will save him a few steps in a days work. Thanks for the thread guys. Chuck
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: YellowHammer on December 01, 2012, 12:14:36 AM
It's a very simple addition but sure makes the dragback 100% more useful and a lot safer with the command station.  Without the fingers sometimes a board would veer off uncontrollably from the dragback and get way out of shape, either fall off the right side of the mill or come at me on the left side.  Either way, I didn't like the unpredictability.  I haven't had an uncontrolled board since I built the fingers, and the whole system is much safer and less effort. Course it's not an original idea, you can easily reverse engineer them from the information on this site as well as the WM videos.  I tried to just buy one from WM for my LT-40 but they are not specifically offered, so I figured I'd just build one.  Since I figured WM knew what they were doing (they did) I just tried to duplicate their design for the LT-70, except mine doesn't have a folding arm, my fingers are mounted so they just flip back up and over the bar out of the way. 

Woodchuck, I used to play a little basketball at Lousiana College, in your home town, many years ago.  Pineville is also where I developed an addiction to real Cajun red beans and rice 8). 
YH
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Woodchuck53 on December 01, 2012, 12:58:06 AM
Played in that old gym myself all those years ago. We still make red beans and rice so come on down.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on December 01, 2012, 06:54:58 AM
Did someone say "red beans and rice"  ???   food6
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: barbender on December 01, 2012, 12:24:42 PM
I'm way north of red bean and rice country, but I like them ;) Here we are on food again ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Woodchuck53 on December 01, 2012, 08:10:52 PM
I ate a few red beans and rice while running around MN, and both Dakota's. Ya'll just need a little more seasoning. Great people.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: swampbuggy on December 02, 2012, 10:35:43 PM
The log loader on the Norwood has to be removed so the head will go by it. I took the mount and had it extended so now I only need to turn it around to mill. I also added the electric winch because now it can stay hooked up all the time. Sure saves on the back aches and to date, with the increased leverage, I haven't had any issues with the mill staying level and in place. 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/27914/IMAG0354.jpg) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/27914/IMAG0353.jpg) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/27914/IMAG0352.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: learner on December 17, 2012, 09:41:55 PM
Hope this helps.  We have a problem with the sawdust building up under our belts.  So we came up with this little tool.  Everytime we change blades we clean the belts and run this around the pulleys to clean out any build-up.
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/30097/1213122030%7E1.jpg)
We used molding clay to get the shape of the pulley then just cut a piece of 1/8" steel to match it.  Be sure to de-burr and clean it up so it doesn't scracth the inside of your wheels.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: stamper on December 18, 2012, 08:46:50 PM
I replaced the blade lube tube [copper] with stainless steel, also put a bushing in the end to regulate the water, This was on a Norwood lumbermate. I have mounted strap winches [log truck size] on my loader bucket [on the back] so I can pick & carry a log or beam where I can see it. I hook the straps on the cutting edge of the bucket, So I can set it down, tilt the bucket to unhook
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: petefrom bearswamp on December 19, 2012, 02:21:45 PM
Poston got me to thinking. I just read thru the entire thread, wow made my eyes glaze over in some parts but what a wealth of info.
Here are some things i have done.
Just like Bibbyman, I removed the hydraulic lever decal plate after the first day of sawing.
Then I removed the factory levers on the toe board pair and replaced them with bolts about 1-1/2" shorter so i don't hit them by accident.
Being a lazy sort, I sit on a stool behind the CC center and quickly got tired of craning my neck to view the log or cant.
I then rotated the center in about 10 degrees and now look straight down the mill.
To prevent the boards that are returning from hitting me, I put a deflector board on the left side of my homemade outfeed table.
Another mod I did at the suggestion of my neighbor Tim Roberson, was to weld a 3/8 drive socket on the tensioner in place of the short lever.
This allows me to use a 3/8 drive ratchet handle to tension and de tension the blade very quickly.
I will now make my first attempt a posting pics

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18633/IMG_0032.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18633/IMG_0033.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/18633/IMG_0034.JPG)

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: POSTON WIDEHEAD on December 19, 2012, 02:48:02 PM

To prevent the boards that are returning from hitting me, I put a deflector board on the left side of my homemade outfeed table.


 

Good idea Pete. That's a whole lot better than a Hockey Mask.  ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: WDH on December 19, 2012, 09:59:30 PM
Great mods, Pete, and congrats on the pics.  They showed up nice  8).
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: learner on December 26, 2012, 06:50:58 PM
Hope everyone had a Merry Christmas.  Thought i'd share this little mod with you folks.  We sometimes get logs with knobs that just aren't worth the time with the chainsaw.  Well sometimes they are just big enough that the de-barker will jam up on them and stop the forward movement.
So I came up with this.  If you look in the black circle you can barely make it out.  It's hard to see because it's clear.
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/30097/de-barker.jpg)
That is a piece of 1/8" thick clear vinyl.  It's the same thickness as the original flap but you can see through it.  This lets me see when I'm about to hit a knob and move the de-barker out and around it.  No more jamming.
Global Industries in Buford, GA sells 12" x 7' replacement cooler flaps for $17.50.  Plus shipping of course.  This makes 8 flaps when cut in 10" segments.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: petefrom bearswamp on December 27, 2012, 04:07:01 PM
Are they heavy enough to prevent debris from flying back at you?
Pete
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: learner on December 27, 2012, 06:53:56 PM
Pete it actually seems to work better than the original flap.  It's a bit stiffer so it really hugs the log. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: petefrom bearswamp on December 28, 2012, 03:03:38 PM
Thanks learner
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: drobertson on December 28, 2012, 05:27:55 PM
Nice mods! like the clear deflector,  and the board deflector too!  nice stuff,   david
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on January 06, 2013, 10:22:08 AM
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wslubemizerfilter20130106.jpg)

If you have the Lube-Mixer option on an LT40 series mill, you probably curse each time you take the side shield off and put it back on.  We’ll,  I thought about it and didn’t see why it had to be where it was.  If it were up on the turned up edge of the water tray it would be out of the way. 

Well, yesterday was the day.  I soon found out that if you just raised it up and tried to install it on the edge of the tray,  you couldn’t unscrew the bowl.  So just to try something,  I turned the bowl assembly so the top was flat against the edge.  We sawed a couple of hours yesterday and everything worked so it just may be fine there.

Just for good measure, we removed the bunji cord from under the try.  As our mill is stationary, it was never used.

In any case,  the side shield went back on MUCH easier.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on January 06, 2013, 11:03:36 AM
Good one, Bib!

I usually use a nut driver to remove the side shield (except for the one that's towards the engine) and the top-front bolt is right in line with the clamp (pita) that holds the gas hose.

Mine has been adjusted too.

Thanks for posting.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: terrifictimbersllc on January 06, 2013, 04:41:42 PM
I put these 12V trailer clearance lights on the front of my hydraulic box.  They're wired to the motor lead side of the hydraulic solenoids.  Why?
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21495/DSC_0418.jpg)
Those are my wife's toes, she's pushing down on the loader lever.  When hydraulics are working normally, both lights are on.  Originally, I mounted these to be able to see when one of the solenoids fails, rather than waiting to find hydraulic fluid running out of the box.  These lights have already proved useful in another way.  Several weeks ago I saw that the lights were dim even though the hydraulics were working.  I checked voltages and found the alternator wasn't charging the battery.  I called WM,  and very quickly was led to discovering that the green wire from the alternator had a bad connection at the 16 pin connector, which was easy to fix.  If I hadn't seen this I might have run down the battery and been unable to start the sawmill.  It is reassuring to see these lights on bright,  whenever I use the hydraulics.
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21495/DSC_0419.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on January 06, 2013, 04:49:36 PM
I like them.  They would also be dim if/when the button was not making good contact with the strip.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: terrifictimbersllc on January 06, 2013, 04:59:20 PM
I like them.  They would also be dim if/when the button was not making good contact with the strip.
Thanks. Or when the hydraulic microswitch fails, when my battery is going bad, or anything else affecting battery voltage. I don't have to worry about that button anymore though,   with help from Bibbyman and PNyberg (posts earlier in this thread), last summer I did the 1/0 gauge welding cable replacement of the hydraulic strip.  What a difference!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on January 07, 2013, 12:47:37 PM
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wslubemizerfilter20130106.jpg)

If you have the Lube-Mixer option on an LT40 series mill, you probably curse each time you take the side shield off and put it back on.  ................In any case,  the side shield went back on MUCH easier.

I'm going to have to look close at my mill tonight.  My mill came with the factory installed lubmizer.   I don't ever recall having an issue with the lubmizer bowl  when taking the side shield off and on.     smiley_headscratch
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on January 07, 2013, 02:03:03 PM
I had that shield off of my sawmill this morning.  On my sawmill, I loosen and remove the 5 bolts and then the shield pivots out from the bottom and passes by the wiring terminals on the up/down motor and then lifts downward and out.  The top edge of the shield is the last to come out when removing and the first to be reinserted when installing.  I also have a retrofitted Lube-Mizer.

Other LT40 versions may be different.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on January 07, 2013, 05:33:48 PM
  On my sawmill, I loosen and remove the 5 bolts and then the shield pivots out from the bottom and passes by the wiring terminals on the up/down motor and then lifts downward and out.  The top edge of the shield is the last to come out when removing and the first to be reinserted when installing.   




thats what I do :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: YellowHammer on January 21, 2013, 11:09:16 PM
This a followup to a previous post (702 on this thread) where I've been working on my board return system to make it more controllable, and fixing it so that it would release the board where I wanted, not just where it wanted.  I also desired to return shorter boards all the way to the end of my loading table, and virtually drop it on my lumber stack, as opposed to just dropping to the mill bed about halfway back, which kind of defeats the purpose of a board return.  Normally, I have to reach forward to grab the dropped board to drag it to the loading table with one hand and this got old real fast, especially with lots of heavy, boards. 

So I welded a small lip to the bottom of the board return arm and now I can return most boards all the way across the table and release them at any point by just reversing direction on the mill head.  Much easier and more controlled.  I'm still experimenting with the shape of the lip, but here's a picture and also a video on it returning a board with me stopping at a few locations on my table, then finally dropping it where I want it.  I put a few thousand bdft through it in the last couple weekends and it seems to work pretty well. I only had to reach for a few boards, and was also able to push the ones I wanted right to my stack with no real handling.  This was one of the first configurations, now I am experimenting with a slightly larger, more tapered flange.  A very simple mod, but pretty effective.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21488/image%7E9.jpg)

http://youtu.be/E5upimQu1YU



Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on January 22, 2013, 08:19:17 AM
This a followup to a previous post (702 on this thread) where I've been working on my board return system to make it more controllable, and fixing it so that it would release the board where I wanted, not just where it wanted.  I also desired to return shorter boards all the way to the end of my loading table, and virtually drop it on my lumber stack, as opposed to just dropping to the mill bed about halfway back, which kind of defeats the purpose of a board return.  Normally, I have to reach forward to grab the dropped board to drag it to the loading table with one hand and this got old real fast, especially with lots of heavy, boards. 

So I welded a small lip to the bottom of the board return arm and now I can return most boards all the way across the table and release them at any point by just reversing direction on the mill head.  Much easier and more controlled.  I'm still experimenting with the shape of the lip, but here's a picture and also a video on it returning a board with me stopping at a few locations on my table, then finally dropping it where I want it.  I put a few thousand bdft through it in the last couple weekend and it seems to work pretty well for such a sImple mod, I only had to reach for a few boards, and was also able to push the ones I wanted right to my stack with no real handling.  This was one of the first configurations, now I am experimenting with a slightly larger, more tapered flange.  A very simple mod, but pretty effective.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21488/image%7E9.jpg)

http://youtu.be/E5upimQu1YU

Nice mod.   Keep us informed of any improvemnets you come up with.   I might have to do the same on my mill.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Larry on January 22, 2013, 12:59:40 PM
YH, I like your mod. :)  Think I'll do something similar for my TK.

Let us know if ya make improvements.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: rmack on January 22, 2013, 01:08:19 PM
This a followup to a previous post (702 on this thread) where I've been working on my board return system to make it more controllable, and fixing it so that it would release the board where I wanted, not just where it wanted.  I also desired to return shorter boards all the way to the end of my loading table, and virtually drop it on my lumber stack, as opposed to just dropping to the mill bed about halfway back, which kind of defeats the purpose of a board return.  Normally, I have to reach forward to grab the dropped board to drag it to the loading table with one hand and this got old real fast, especially with lots of heavy, boards. 

So I welded a small lip to the bottom of the board return arm and now I can return most boards all the way across the table and release them at any point by just reversing direction on the mill head.  Much easier and more controlled.  I'm still experimenting with the shape of the lip, but here's a picture and also a video on it returning a board with me stopping at a few locations on my table, then finally dropping it where I want it.  I put a few thousand bdft through it in the last couple weekends and it seems to work pretty well. I only had to reach for a few boards, and was also able to push the ones I wanted right to my stack with no real handling.  This was one of the first configurations, now I am experimenting with a slightly larger, more tapered flange.  A very simple mod, but pretty effective.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21488/image%7E9.jpg)

http://youtu.be/E5upimQu1YU

it's simple, and it works... pretty tough combination to beat.  8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ElectricAl on January 22, 2013, 08:24:10 PM
Pretty nice mod YellowHammer.



In a quest to keep from plugging up the LubeMizer upper jet, I made a plastic guard.

The prototype was a piece of Milk Jug. Worked good enough to pass the "Proof of Concept" stage.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10103/LubeMizerProtector.jpg)

Next was the bottom corner of a one quart oil bottle. I just let it rub on the blade until it had self adjusted to a slight gap. That took about 2 weeks.
With the gap set we enter Long Term Testing.
Which may only be a couple weeks until I dream up a slight modification.
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10103/LubeMizer1.jpg)

Nothing like Modifying a Modification.   ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: LeeB on January 22, 2013, 11:15:35 PM
What blades are you using Al? I don't recognize the profile.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pineywoods on January 23, 2013, 10:56:28 AM
What blades are you using Al? I don't recognize the profile.

Me neither, that is sure some wicked gullet..
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ElectricAl on January 23, 2013, 06:34:00 PM
Lee & Pineywoods.

That is actually a WM 9 degree that I pushed the set out to 34. We had just sawn a bunch of frozen Pine.

The Gullet looks funny because there is Sap build up on the back of the tooth. Plus the bottom of the Gullet is hogged out a little extra.

Good Eye
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: LeeB on January 23, 2013, 08:20:20 PM
Do you do your own sharpening and have you sharpened them? I use WM 9° also and still the configuration looks different to me. It seems that the transition from the tooth face to gullet is very acute. Did you modify the cam?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Brucer on January 23, 2013, 11:48:00 PM
... The Gullet looks funny because there is Sap build up on the back of the tooth....

The tooth on the very left shows up the buildup on the back of the other teeth.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ElectricAl on January 24, 2013, 05:48:12 PM
Lee,

We grind our own blades with a WM Drag Sharpener.  The Face to Gullet transition is pretty tight and could use some extra radius. 

We normally saw with 7 degree and 10 degree blades, so the sharpener has a 10/32 cam on it.
Only had to saw 2700' of Pine so I never changed the cam when I put the 9 on. There are 3 other cams in the draw to choose from, but I chose to ignore them.

We are going to use up all the 9 degree as soon as possible then switch to CBN  .

The CBN wheel is the same for 7 degree and 10 degree.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Larry on February 06, 2013, 07:09:40 PM
This a followup to a previous post (702 on this thread) where I've been working on my board return system to make it more controllable, and fixing it so that it would release the board where I wanted, not just where it wanted.  I also desired to return shorter boards all the way to the end of my loading table, and virtually drop it on my lumber stack, as opposed to just dropping to the mill bed about halfway back, which kind of defeats the purpose of a board return.  Normally, I have to reach forward to grab the dropped board to drag it to the loading table with one hand and this got old real fast, especially with lots of heavy, boards. 

So I welded a small lip to the bottom of the board return arm and now I can return most boards all the way across the table and release them at any point by just reversing direction on the mill head.  Much easier and more controlled.  I'm still experimenting with the shape of the lip, but here's a picture and also a video on it returning a board with me stopping at a few locations on my table, then finally dropping it where I want it.  I put a few thousand bdft through it in the last couple weekends and it seems to work pretty well. I only had to reach for a few boards, and was also able to push the ones I wanted right to my stack with no real handling.  This was one of the first configurations, now I am experimenting with a slightly larger, more tapered flange.  A very simple mod, but pretty effective.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21488/image%7E9.jpg)

http://youtu.be/E5upimQu1YU

It sure is nice to drag the board back and drop it right where I want it.  I welded up my rendition for a TK 2000 last week and tested for proper operation.  Worked great so I painted it and got it installed permanent today.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10125/DSCF7233.JPG)

Thanks for the idea...every step saved makes for faster/easier production.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: YellowHammer on February 08, 2013, 11:14:30 PM
I glad to hear that it also works on TK's.  I've already gotten so used to mine that I don't think I could go back
YH
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: papow22 on February 09, 2013, 05:05:55 PM
Are other mill so complete that they don't need these updates?
To some other sawmill owners this site only "Woodmizer".......But it pays to go and snoop around to snag some ideas also Lm2000 owner operator. :snowball:  :D 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on February 09, 2013, 07:25:02 PM
KOHLER Service bulletin 267


Just a quick note to let all Kohler EFI Engine owners know about a  service bulletin that was issued in may of 03. It is service bulletin 267 and affects engine models CH26, CV26, CH745 & CV745.

https://www.google.ca/#hl=en&tbo=d&sclient=psy-ab&q=%22Kohler+service+bulletin+267%22&oq=%22Kohler+service+bulletin+267%22&gs_l=hp.3...3172.3172.3.4220.1.1.0.0.0.0.64.64.1.1.0.les%3B..0.0...1c.1.2.hp.BfkDO711YzQ&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&bvm=bv.42080656,d.cGE&fp=2d7d641e9b546947&biw=1430&bih=708

For those of you that know about just ignore my post.

For the rest of you, check the integrity of your grounding on your mill.

The LT40HDG28 has 2 5/16 bolts that hold the ECU module box to the mill. The ground wires attach to the bolt towards the cooling intake grill/ front of the motor. The braket is powder coated and has a star washer BEHIND the the ground wires to enhance grounding.

Symtoms include premature O2 sensor failure, rich fuel mixture, premature plug fouling, difficult cold starting, rough idle and a few others.

I removed the bolt and saw that there was some corrosion around the ground wire tabs and on the bolt.
I took my dremel tool and sanded the powder coating to bare metal and then wire brushed the bolt real good as well.
Local Kohler service shop told me to use some copper based anti sieze compound on the bolt threads and on the wire tabs and bolt head when I put it back together.

It is back together and the improvement was immediately noticeable and significant on my engine in starting, smooth idle again, lower idle speed, smooth throttle response. I expect I will notice improved fuel consumption as well. As in back to what it was.
     
The picture shows where the grounding bolt is located on my mill.
 

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_0465.jpg)

There is a update grounding kit that is identified in the service bulletin but the local service guy told me that is more for lawn mowers etc. Most farm implements and forestry related machines just need the powder coating on the bracket removed and reassembled with a corrosion inhibitor that is conductive as well.

Hope this helps any of you that are having similar issues with you Kohler engines.

Generally shows up between 300 and 700 hours. 

just thought i would post this here as well since it does require some minor mod work.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: fred in montana on February 09, 2013, 08:23:41 PM
Here is a simple one for the LT 15 clamps.

I removed the nuts from the long bolts that are used to fasten the clamp to the log bunk. So now the bolts are really acting as pins. When I want to move the clamp from one bunk to another, I just pull the bolt out, move the clamp and drop the bolt back in. Gravity keeps it down. Sure beats getting out the wrenches to un bolt and re bolt.

No problems with this mod after more than 2 years of doing it that way.

Hey Yellohammer- I went to Buckhorn HS. Class of 88.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: YellowHammer on February 09, 2013, 11:09:15 PM
Fred,
It sure is a small world.  How in the world did a good ol boy end up all the way in Montana?  If you ever get this way, drop in and we'll grab some BBQ downtown New Market.
YH
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: york on February 10, 2013, 04:50:35 AM
Scroll down to Larry...
OOPS,this was to go into Roghairs thread,oh well it`s worth looking at again...
http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg247857.html#msg247857
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on February 15, 2013, 05:22:18 PM
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsshieldweld20130216.jpg)

Don't try this at home.

The dust chute scoop on the drive wheel cover was loose.  Sawdust from millions of board feet of sawing has cut the heads off the pop rivets several times. 

As I had bought a Hobart Handler 125 EZ and was just itching to use it.  I found a final fix. Or so I thought.

 I over did the welding. Welding it inside and out.  I was reasonably pleased with some of my last welds.  I cleaned up the ugly with the angle grinder and went to put it on the mill.  Well it went on with a struggle.  The welding heat had warped the cover.

I'd probably gotten by with just some short stitch welds.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on February 15, 2013, 06:46:16 PM
Looks like it'll hold!  ;)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on February 15, 2013, 07:16:43 PM
Thats the first thing I did with mine, A blade broke and pop off some rivets that hold the thing on :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: drobertson on February 15, 2013, 07:34:50 PM
bibby, I bought the 140 some years ago, love the machine as well,  I just keep a pop riv gun handy,  Let us know how it works out,  I have had a few knarly messes there, and needed to pop it loose, 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on February 15, 2013, 07:54:09 PM
A better fix would have been to use old fashion steel rivets that are peened over.    Or else small stove bolts and peen the thread ends so they never work loose.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: drobertson on February 15, 2013, 08:19:50 PM
I hear ya, I usually run with a few missing all the time,  even with the extra rivets handy,  still yet you have the welder now,  I got the gas tank for mine, man it is sweet, up to 1/4" anyway, 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on February 25, 2013, 06:19:11 PM
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10034/wsdragbackmod20130225.jpg)

Here is my copy of Yellowhammer's excellent idea. 

I tack welded a piece of barstock 5/8 wide by 1/10" thick on the bottom edge of the dragback plate.  I installed it Sunday morning while Mary was off getting milk and eggs. After a short learning curve,   it worked great.

When Mary got back, she came out to help.   We sawed a couple of logs and the mod worked as advertised.   I calculated it saved Mary 150 steps just on one small 8' log.

I turned to Mary and asked her assessment.   She gave it a thumb up. I asked if I should take it off and weld it up solid.   She replied "Saw!".   Saw we did and about two logs latter the tack weld broke.  We continued to saw.

We sawed again today until mid-afternoon.  I had enough time left to weld the barstock back on.  No tack this time.  It's on to stay.

I made one small change from my first try,   I angled the barstock down just a wee bit.   The test model tended to hold the board too good.  I often had to pull it off.

It may be a couple of days before we can try it out.  The snow forecast ranges from 2-7" to as much as 12-18' possible in some places.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Ga Mtn Man on February 25, 2013, 06:33:07 PM
I have to admit, I'm struggling to understand how this works. :-[  How does the added lip on the board return find its way into the saw kerf? 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on February 25, 2013, 06:42:17 PM
As the board starts back, it reaches a tipping point on the front edge of the cant.  The end of the board against the dragback hand raises to hit the top plate.   It's at that point the lower ledge slips under the board.

Yellowhammer's video is linked a few posts back.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E5upimQu1YU&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Here it is again.  The video does not clearly show the board tipping action but that's what happens.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Ga Mtn Man on February 26, 2013, 10:55:42 AM
Thanks for the explanation, Bibby.  Did you (and you too, Larry) understand how it worked before you did the mod or did you just take it on faith that it worked?  It bugs me that I gave this a lot of thought and couldn't come up with how it worked, even after watching the video over and over.  I fear I may be slipping fast. smiley_old_guy
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on February 26, 2013, 11:23:09 AM
I too feel like the Scarecrow - "I should of thought of that.".

It's not a hard mod to to test out.  Just tack weld a strip on the bottom of the hand and try it out.  If you don't like it, just knock it off.  If you like it weld it up solid before it breaks off.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Ga Mtn Man on February 26, 2013, 11:34:54 AM
Of course, you actually need to have a board drag-back on your mill before you can do the  mod.  I don't.  Not yet, anyway. :(
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Larry on February 26, 2013, 11:35:39 AM
I’ve been running my dragback since I got my mill and could see the short comings along with the benefits.  I had been thinking of a design improvement and when Yellowhammer posted his mod it just clicked.  I wouldn’t think a sawyer without dragback would quite understand the mechanics so you’re still ok Paul.  Wait until you hit the big SIX 0.

The TK never had the top lip either, which I added at the same time as the bottom lip.  In Yellowhammer’s pic you can also see the dragback angled, I guess to guide the board along with a couple of additional blocks.  In my case I want boards and slabs coming straight back.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Ga Mtn Man on February 26, 2013, 11:38:36 AM
Thanks for  bailing me out, Larry.  I feel a little better.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on February 26, 2013, 07:31:15 PM
Mine Is next to fix the drag back :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: WDH on February 26, 2013, 08:19:41 PM
I have drag back on my LT15, but it is manual  :D.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Ga Mtn Man on February 26, 2013, 08:32:32 PM
Yeah... manually drag your butt back to the house. :D

Sorry, Danny.  I just couldn't help myself ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on February 26, 2013, 08:38:26 PM
Bib I went  back to your first post about puting all the mods in one place, I think thats a good Idea

Here are some of mine

some time when the bark is loose or have ice on the log,I can't hold the log, so I made some fangs for my clamp
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/mill_clamp_061.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/mill_clamp_062%7E2.JPG)
sometimes  the cant will pop up when I move the clamp down so not hit it with the blade, I can pull the cant down a little,

One time when I set the mill up on ice I loaded a big log and me mill andlog went for a ride, so I welded nuts on the bottom of the legs
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/2948/004%7E0.JPG)
now I don't slide around no more

ON my mill I have fine adjustable legs, and they would loosen on me so I made some locks
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/2948/001%7E0.JPG) 

 
all like this one


Then one day Im cutting wood and got off my seat to move some boards then I got back on my seat and burn my butt [sunny day]
so I made this

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/sawmill_building_004.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/sawmill_building_005.JPG)
gos in the back of the chair to hold my umbrealla
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/sawmill_building_008.JPG)
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/DSCN2414.JPG)
the umbrealla holder comes out to put all of it in the truck




Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on February 27, 2013, 07:12:52 AM
I had an umbrella, framework and everything given to me last summer, really nice on those super-hot days! ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on February 27, 2013, 12:31:54 PM
the outher thing I did was to put on a back stop on the end of the mill
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/DSCN2448.JPG)

so this wont happen with long beams, some times the cant will hit the short stops
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/DSCN2452.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on February 27, 2013, 08:33:22 PM
this might not be considered a mod on the mill but it helps, I hope it's ok
 the log shifter

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/DSCN2410.JPG)
to line up the log to the mill
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/DSCN2412.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/DSCN2413.JPG)
saves my back a lot of times
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: VictorH on February 28, 2013, 03:05:14 AM
So peter, does your log roller just lay between the loader arms or is it attached to the loader arm ground supports?  I like it!!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on February 28, 2013, 06:24:03 AM
So peter, does your log roller just lay between the loader arms or is it attached to the loader arm ground supports?  I like it!!

It just lays there :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: rmack on February 28, 2013, 09:45:18 AM
I bought a horn and button for my mill, not sure exactly where to put it yet, will have to wait till I get the mill out of storage.

May come in handy preventing somebody from getting hurt.

will post pics when I get it all together.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on March 08, 2013, 09:08:43 PM
heres mine
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/DSCN2801.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: learner on March 08, 2013, 09:22:12 PM
Peter, your log shifter mod is very nice!  I'm allready working on one for us.  Should save a LOT of time not having to move the log with the FEL.  Thanks Man.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Barney II on March 09, 2013, 10:32:06 PM
I don't know if this is in the 39 pages or not---I didn't see anything --I got tired of my rails looking all rusty after sitting for a few day so---   I took and sanded, brushed and got the rails looking nice and shiny.  Then heated just a bit and then applied that liquid gun bluing---walaa no more rust and when a nice bright streaks appear from using it I just go over the whole rail with the bluing----no sticky stuff or whatever.   I also did a few other parts but this was the main item
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on March 10, 2013, 07:15:44 AM
I just spray the rails (don't forget the bottom rail on a WM) with WD-40 and use steel wool, takes about 15 minutes and both rails are done.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: octam1 on March 10, 2013, 02:59:45 PM
This one is for the guy's that have the older WoodMizers... if you have an older LT40 you know that your last cut is not about one inch from the bedrails, it's 3" from the bedrails... that will always leave you with a 3" leftover piece...

What I did is make a set of rails that mount ontop of the bedrails out of 2"x2" heavy wall square tubing, added some tabs on to index them to the bedrails and put one pin in each of them... I stamped numbers on the ends of the bedrails and on the top of the addon rails, so that if taken off they can all be put back on the same rail it was made to fit on... These came in very handy and made it so we no longer had to plan around the 3" last cut...

we also added an electric winch to operate the turner we added on and also used it to load logs... we just used it with an extra battery and it worked out pretty good... just had to push a button to load or turn our logs... we never even had a problem turning max size logs...

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/27246/IMG_5056.JPG)
I even put some cant stops on the addon rails to be able to clamp the cants down...

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/27246/IMG_5058.JPG)
i made one for each bedrail

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/27246/IMG_5063.JPG)
here you can see the pins that hold them on the bedrails

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/27246/IMG_5060.JPG)
my LT40 didnt have a hand winch on the front, so this is where I chose to put the electric winch... Just a small 2k pound winch we had laying around...

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/27246/IMG_5062.JPG)

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/27246/IMG_5059.JPG)
we never had any problems with the turner/electric winch... even with logs that maxed out the mill...
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: POSTON WIDEHEAD on March 10, 2013, 04:29:59 PM
Very nice Mod, Octam1. More work for the mill.....less work for you. Good job!  smiley_thumbsup
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: octam1 on March 10, 2013, 05:27:55 PM
yah, those add on rails worked out good for us as did the electric winch... but we have since been able to upgrade to the LT40 super and now with hydro's we are loving it! lol... I'd like to say we are able to work smarter not harder.... but sometimes that is still not the case...  :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on October 30, 2013, 10:06:51 PM
I have tried all kinds of things to stop this
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/DSCN2430.JPG)
The back of the blade would cut in the wheel and mess it up  :D
so I had a bondo spreder and cut a piece off and put it on , just drill a hole . Works great

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/DSCF0070.JPG)

the blade is lose it will go up to it and when you turn on the lube it;s ok
the lube will cleen the blade,
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on November 11, 2013, 08:04:30 PM
The other day the mill would not start. No juice to the starter. The day before it was good. I called WM and we check the wires.  The cat has a lot of vibration.
And this is what I found .  :o

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/DSCF0078.JPG)

I removed the wire from the nut but look at the wires where they rub on each outher . the vibration broke off the brass pice that goes up in where the relay is. I have a new one comeing .
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/DSCF0079.JPG)
when I put it back together Ill tape up the wires and zip tie the so they wont move. can you imagine what would happing if the wires came together  :o
I did tape up some they all had the rub going on
so you guys best go look and see what you have  :D :D
the wires are in the black box on the loader side of the cat .
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: drobertson on November 11, 2013, 11:17:10 PM
Portable mills and vibration,  now there's a new one!  How long will it take to remedy this issue?  Lots of ideas rolling around here,    david
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on November 12, 2013, 06:24:22 AM
You have a cat David you should look to see what you have going on in there.
You won't like the fire in there.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: dboyt on November 14, 2013, 08:38:03 AM
Norwood mills shoot the sawdust straight out.  It seems that no matter how the mill is turned, the wind blows it back in my face.  The sawdust deflector is a piece of a 12" tire from an Geo Metro, cut with an angle grinder.  It works great, and the rubber with steel belting should deflect anything that hits it.  Takes about 30 seconds to remove, but I haven't had to yet.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/12837/DustChute_04m.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on November 14, 2013, 06:01:11 PM
Now that's ingenuity, not only directs the sawdust, but should easily stop a broken blade! smiley_thumbsup smiley_thumbsup
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on December 23, 2013, 06:39:42 PM
Has anyone added a battery to the hydraulic pumps on an LT40? I get really tired of not having hydraulics when the head is at the other end of the mill. Usually, I just want to unclamp the last board. I have a new heavy duty battery that I'm thinking of putting under the hydraulic box and hooking up to the cables coming from the contact strip. I know WM says that there shouldn't be power to the hydraulics when you are sawing, but with the strip you have about 5' of travel with active hydraulics (and 5' on the other end with the LT70) and full time hydraulics with an external power pack.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on December 23, 2013, 10:24:44 PM
I'll bet that you could leave one of these hooked up:  LINK (http://www.autozone.com/autozone/accessories/Duralast-900-Amp-jump-starter-with-inflator/_/N-2629?itemIdentifier=389252_0_0_)

I actually do not leave mine hooked up, but it is available.   :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: stavebuyer on December 24, 2013, 04:29:28 AM
Has anyone added a battery to the hydraulic pumps on an LT40? I get really tired of not having hydraulics when the head is at the other end of the mill. Usually, I just want to unclamp the last board. I have a new heavy duty battery that I'm thinking of putting under the hydraulic box and hooking up to the cables coming from the contact strip. I know WM says that there shouldn't be power to the hydraulics when you are sawing, but with the strip you have about 5' of travel with active hydraulics (and 5' on the other end with the LT70) and full time hydraulics with an external power pack.
I went with an external hydraulic power pack but another alternative would be a length heavy gauge wire that bypasses the contact strip altogether.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Mapleman on December 24, 2013, 07:36:41 AM
Yes, I did just what you're describing a few years ago to my 1999 LT40 super and I haven't had any negative issues with it so far.  If I'm not going to use the mill for a while, I disconnect the extra battery. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on December 24, 2013, 09:02:28 AM
Has anyone added a battery to the hydraulic pumps on an LT40? 
That added battery might have to be charged at night because when the sawmill leaves the strip, the strip also looses the alternator.   A permanent setup would allow for a battery charger.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on December 24, 2013, 09:06:05 AM
Has anyone added a battery to the hydraulic pumps on an LT40? I get really tired of not having hydraulics when the head is at the other end of the mill. Usually, I just want to unclamp the last board. I have a new heavy duty battery that I'm thinking of putting under the hydraulic box and hooking up to the cables coming from the contact strip. I know WM says that there shouldn't be power to the hydraulics when you are sawing, but with the strip you have about 5' of travel with active hydraulics (and 5' on the other end with the LT70) and full time hydraulics with an external power pack.

This is covered earlier in this thread.  A number of people have added a 2nd power power bar to the far end of the mill.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Mapleman on December 24, 2013, 09:41:31 AM
Its true that the extra battery isn't charging when the saw head is off the strip, but it seems to get enough during the times when the head is back and I'm setting up for another cut.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on December 24, 2013, 09:46:00 AM
 smiley_thumbsup  That's good to hear.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on December 24, 2013, 09:47:54 AM
Has anyone added a battery to the hydraulic pumps on an LT40? I get really tired of not having hydraulics when the head is at the other end of the mill. Usually, I just want to unclamp the last board. I have a new heavy duty battery that I'm thinking of putting under the hydraulic box and hooking up to the cables coming from the contact strip. I know WM says that there shouldn't be power to the hydraulics when you are sawing, but with the strip you have about 5' of travel with active hydraulics (and 5' on the other end with the LT70) and full time hydraulics with an external power pack.


Yup!

I added a battery and run a generator I built out of a 5.5HP Honda and a 105 amp Delco alternator. I wouldn't run my mill with out them now.
I will go find the posts and put the links here too.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_0496.jpg)
This picture shows the battery connected to the mill in the shop.

I disconnect battery at the end of the day/milling job.

FYI Adding the generator reduced the operating temp of the alternator on the mill from around 200 - 225 degrees Fahrenheit to around the 130 - 160 degree mark.  Alternators don't last long once you get into the 200 range and above. Also the gallon of fuel my little generator uses in a day is off set by about a gallon and a half to 2 gallons less fuel burned in the mill.

On my mill the alternator puts out about 70 to 80 amps at idle which is an extremely inefficient range for that alternator. My mill idles around 800 rpm which has the alternator turning at around 1600 rpm which is about 40 % of the ideal 4200 to 4400 Recommended RPM. that basically translates to Hugh heat build up because air flow with the fan on those alternators is about 25 to 30 percent of what it needs to be to keep them cool. The best performance range on the fan is 3600 to 4600 rpm.

When my head hits the strip it has a 1200 amp deep cycle battery on the ground that is getting a constant 14.48 volts at 104 amps out of an alternator that is always running at 4200 to 4400 RPM that maxes at 128 amps basically leaving the alternator on the mill as a booster that cut time required to get all the batteries back to max charge  about 50%. The difference it has made in my milling performance is nothing short of amazing. Also increased wire gauge to feed an lift motors as well. Haven't done a load test to date but  I can tell you t hat EVERYTHING  is so positive in response, operation and control at a level that did not exist prior to these mods and additions. I wouldn't be without it and would make the exact mods to new mill with the exception of possibly getting a 150 ish plus alternator to run on the generator and that probably will happen wheat he current one quits.

FYI all the external cables are 2-00 and the quik connectors are 225 amp fork lift connectors and all connections are silver soldered.
   
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on December 24, 2013, 10:11:24 AM
Thanks everyone. I think the head will be at the contact strip enough to recharge the extra battery. I don't plan to use the hydraulics a lot, just to unclamp after the last cut, or maybe drop the loading arms if they got left in the way. ::)

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on February 19, 2014, 07:00:24 PM
 Ga Mtn Man sent me a personal message asking what I use for protectant/lubricant on my electrical connections. I had to really scratch my head to come up with the name cause the gallon pail has no label any more as it is about 30 ish years old.

I had to ask my Son as I know he uses that same stuff in the computer control systems shop when he builds systems.

It is called NO-OX-ID A special by Sanchem Inc  www.sanchem.com.

It is a sticky greasy hard to clean up product and you don't need a lot to do the job And i have never found another product that works as well. its been around for at least 60 70 ish years and I know all the Fortis service trucks around here have a bucket on all of them.

I would think you could pick it up a local electrical supply store. I have had mine so long I don't even remember where i bought it but it would probably have been Westburne Electrical supply here in Canada.   
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: manoverboard on February 20, 2014, 02:38:50 PM
No Ox grease is what we use on our batteries at work, also used on our breakers and grounds throughout the power plant. It is readily available and a little goes along way...
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: terrifictimbersllc on February 20, 2014, 06:00:09 PM
Thanks everyone. I think the head will be at the contact strip enough to recharge the extra battery. I don't plan to use the hydraulics a lot, just to unclamp after the last cut, or maybe drop the loading arms if they got left in the way. ::)
I and others removed the contact strip and hard wired the head to the hydraulic pumps with 1/0 welding wire.  2 positive lines, 1 ground and leave the grounding strip in place. This is hands down a good solution, no looking back.  Being able to run the hydraulics anytime anywhere has many advantages not the least of which are to be able to load a log, or unclamp a board with the head at the other end of the mill.  I don't feel that there is any risk of running the hydraulics when sawing.  On the contrary I have been glad a number of times to have been able to pull the log over a bit to be able to finish a wide cut which would otherwise have bound up.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on February 20, 2014, 06:31:41 PM
How does that work? I'm not going to have 50 feet of cable laying beside the mill to drag back and forth. ;)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on February 20, 2014, 07:31:11 PM
How does that work? I'm not going to have 50 feet of cable laying beside the mill to drag back and forth. ;)

It works if you have Command Control with cable track.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on February 20, 2014, 07:40:19 PM
That was what I was thinking. No command control here, just a little yellow wireless remote. You would think a piece of wire would be cheaper to install from the factory than the track and all the rest of it for the Command Control mills.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: YellowHammer on February 20, 2014, 07:42:32 PM
How does that work? I'm not going to have 50 feet of cable laying beside the mill to drag back and forth. ;)

It works if you have Command Control with cable track.
This is a hands down top notch mod.  8)

I re-rigged my mill like this for some time now, as per Bibbyman's instructions except I never removed the contact strip.

Not only is it useful, but it is a great safety mod as well.  Now I can traverse the head to the far end of the mill, clearing it and the debarker far out of the way of any off bearers or while edging, and it also allows unrestricted visibility when manipulating and clamping logs.
It's also handy for quickly leveling logs because as I pull the head back from the far side of the log, back to the command station, I brush the dragback fingers down the length if the log, as a reference, adjusting the toe rollers as I go.  If the finger tips just touch the top of the log its entire length, its dead level, and I can commence to sawing hi grade lumber parallel to the bark.
YH
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: woodyone.john on February 20, 2014, 11:32:30 PM
My comprehension is reading low ATM. a picture would be really handy. Or is this mod only for those with remote operating stations[i.e not on the head rig] cheers john
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on February 21, 2014, 11:21:54 AM
It is only for the Command Control mills, where the wiring runs through the cat track at the side of the mill. Command Control has the controls mounted at the hitch end of the mill, and the operator stays with the control box.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on February 21, 2014, 12:01:22 PM
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_0496.jpg)

If look close you will see the battery sitting on the floor connected to a pair of 1 O cable with an electric fork lift quick connector.  That battery sits on the ground beside my little generator when I am in operation. I took a pair of 2 O 25 foot NAPA industrial booster cables and cut the ends off and then put the fork lift connectors on both the clamp ends that I cut off and on the remaining cable. The cable piece runs from the big deep cycle battery to the short cable that connects directly to the hot connectors in the Hydraulic box. Another set of the quick connectors on 18 inch 2 O cable hook it up to a garden tractor battery that is mounted on the little Genset. AND I can still clip the clamp ends back on and use as booster cables. 25 foot cables sure are handy. As is the little Genset for a lot of other applications.

I will take a pic of the complete set up next time I set up to cut mid next week and post it here as well.

This keeps arrangement keeps the genset back out of the way but close enough that I can still hear when it runs out of gas but provide lots of power to the mill. No cables dragging around. 

Contact strip still in place.

The improvement in mill performance was was very substantial.

Dave; FYI the head isn't  at the front of the mill enough to keep that extra Battery charged with 2 hydraulic pumps UNLESS you convert to the 140 amp alternator. Hence the extra generator build for me because I had ALL the components to build it. Think I spent 10 bucks on connectors.   
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on March 31, 2014, 06:39:31 PM
I bought a pair of 25' hydraulic hoses today. I'm going to take my closest roller toe board off and put it on my BX24, and take that bed rail and put it on my mill. I always load butt first, so I don't typically need a toe board closest to my end of the mill. I do, however, need a toe board somewhere down on the bed extension to level up logs over about 26'. My cost on the hoses was $225, retail was over $330. :o
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: delvis on March 31, 2014, 08:47:42 PM
*NOTE* I posted this before reading the rest of the posts but it is the best thing we have seen to do so far.

We've only made one real mod to our LT40HD but it is something that I appreciate every single time I saw.  We got the idea from a fellow local Wood Mizer owner who had done the same thing.  Our mill has the command station so we saw all from one end without walking.  We put about 50 feet of welding cable in the caterpillar tray and wired it to the mill in order to bypass WM's copper strip on the side of the main beam.  This lets us run all the hydraulics with the head anywhere in its travel and not just the first few feet.  This allows for a few things.

1. We can move the log posts out of the way on a flat sided cant after starting a cut if the sawyer (me) forgets to get them low enough before starting the cut.

2.  I can turn logs and cants with no obstruction to my view with the saw head all the way down at the end of the mill.  This is as useful to me as anything.  I only need to pick the head up as high as I need to and I don't have to try and see around it to turn a big log or cant.  I also don't need to walk around it. 

3. When sawing alone, I can unclamp the last board, raise the log posts, and lower the loader arms to the ground for the next log without having to bring the head back to where I am standing.  Considering that the boards all come off the end to be placed on our stand it is especially helpful to have the head out of the way without having to bring it back to release the log clamp and then have to move it forward to get to the boards.  This alone saves a ton of time.

I realize that WM has that strip there most likely for liability purposes but it would be nice to offer it both ways and let the customer decide.     
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: delvis on March 31, 2014, 09:13:08 PM
On the back of the loader of a Woodmizer, the hoses enter the Ram.  The fitting is solid tube and is next to the ground where it will break if it comes into contact with a scrap of wood, or the loader digs a hole.  When mine broke, I replaced it with two end fittings stuck into a piece of hydraulic hose that was as short as I could get it.  There is about 1.5 to 3 inches of hose between the fittings.  It gives the fittings just enough movement that they don't break if something gets under them.

I found out the other day the hard way how important it is to make sure those fittings and the hoses are freed up before running the arms up or down.  My hoses were frozen in the ground and when I brought the arms all the way down and the feet tried to come up it sheared both velocity fittings off the bottom of the rams.  That was fun to fix.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on March 31, 2014, 09:26:04 PM
delvis,
You should build a mill shed and keep the mill under a roof, And that won't happen.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: delvis on March 31, 2014, 09:47:47 PM
delvis,
You should build a mill shed and keep the mill under a roof, And that won't happen.

Peter, After talking to my father who is in Florida for the winter I think this year will be the year we finally get a post and beam affair we can drive in and out of.  I have access to paper machine dryer screen fabric so we'll be able to have sides that we can roll out of the way when it is nice out and put down when the weather is not so good.  This will give us enough ventilation for fumes as well.  I would like to have a cement slab but I just don't have the cash for that right now. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on April 12, 2014, 07:58:02 PM
I bought a pair of 25' hydraulic hoses today. I'm going to take my closest roller toe board off and put it on my BX24, and take that bed rail and put it on my mill. I always load butt first, so I don't typically need a toe board closest to my end of the mill. I do, however, need a toe board somewhere down on the bed extension to level up logs over about 26'. My cost on the hoses was $225, retail was over $330. :o


I'm putting the BX back on the mill, so I moved the first bed section with the hydraulic toeboard down to the BX and hooked the hoses up. Now I won't have to lift the end of long logs with the forklift and shim them. It will save a lot of time. Next, I'm going to figure out how to link up a side support on the BX so it goes up with the ones on the mill.
'
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14240/20140412_192137.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on April 12, 2014, 08:37:52 PM
Nice job , That will help a lot 8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on April 13, 2014, 09:09:13 AM
I hope so. It's the best I could do for now. I want to buy a hydraulic BX24 to go between the mill and this BX, but it was going to be something like $16k, so that will have to wait. :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: LeeB on April 13, 2014, 11:43:58 AM
Look back through the early posts in this thread. Bibby made some links for his mill to activate the manual posts.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on April 13, 2014, 12:46:47 PM
I hope so. It's the best I could do for now. I want to buy a hydraulic BX24 to go between the mill and this BX, but it was going to be something like $16k, so that will have to wait. :D


How long do you want to cut? :o
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pineywoods on April 13, 2014, 01:44:15 PM
Here's how I did the backstop on the bed extension. Toe roller would be a bit more complicated..
http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,24757.msg353671.html#msg353671
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: customsawyer on April 13, 2014, 05:07:32 PM
When you get it up and running you will ask yourself "why didn't I do this sooner".
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on April 13, 2014, 05:59:07 PM
Peter, I want to cut the longest timbers around. ;) I have orders for 50', which really means 51' or 52' with trim. I might also want to cut some 60' someday for my own shop.

Pineywoods, that is pretty much what I had in mind, that or a 12v linear actuator.

customsawyer, I'm already anticipating how much nicer this will be with that powered toeboard. 8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on April 13, 2014, 07:57:23 PM
60'+  ::) That's over the top. If I get a call for 60' wood I'll send them to you :D 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on April 13, 2014, 08:26:04 PM
Just be sure you send the 60' log with them :D

It will take time, but I want to be known as the person who can deal with the odd stuff. Long, wide, crooked etc. I'd like to upgrade to a 70 Wide Head at some point, that would really make sawing the big butts on those long logs easier. Then, way down the road, a WM1000 or a big slabber of some sort.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on April 13, 2014, 09:59:06 PM
That's the thing Dave, cutting is easy finding the tree is the hard part and have a logger know how to drop them and not crack the log :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on April 13, 2014, 10:08:59 PM
The stuff is out there. I seem to have to be involved right from selecting the tree in the woods. I'd rather be able to make a phone call and go to the header with my orange paint can. Some people really have no clue what it is that I am looking for, even when I give exact specifications. I told one guy that I was looking for logs that were 46' long, 18"+ on the small end and straight. I told him they would be at least 28" DBH. He said he had forest full of them. (On 2 acres. ::) ) When I got there, the trees were maybe 70' tall and 18" at the stump. I told him that was what I left in the woods, and that he needed to raise his trees up 46' and put the rest of the log under them. :D Another time I drove up to VT to look at 12 acres with 120,000 feet of 3' pine on it. Again, looking for 46' logs. When I got there, I found six trees in the 28" to 34" DBH range, but none of them straight. He argued that "every tree has three sixteens in it!". Yes, I said, but they aren't all in a straight line. :-\
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on April 15, 2014, 08:28:44 PM
I scrounged the materials for the BX Backstop Mod. I got a category 0 top link that I will cut in half and about 20 feet of gun barrel stock that was supposed to have come from Savage Arms. It looks like about 12 gauge. :D I have a long 7/8" bolt that I'm going to drill and tap the head end for 1/2" coarse. I'll screw that on the bolt for the last backstop on the mill in place of the nut. The other end I will turn down to 5/8" for the heim joint. I hope to have it all together later this week. I'll have to look around for some plate to make the bracket for the backstop on the BX, but it's around here somewhere.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on April 16, 2014, 10:17:57 PM
I dropped off the parts at my machinest friend this evening. I've attached a drawing of the adapter that I am going to have made to add the linkage to the mill. The bolt on the last backstop is 1/2-13, and I will take the nut off and screw this on instead. The end is turned down to 5/8" to accept the ball from a Category "0" top link, which I have cut in half. The top link is going to be put in the lathe, and the threaded portions are going to be turned down about .020" so they fit in the ends of the tube. Then the threaded portions will be cut off and welded in the ends of the tube. The adapter gets the linkage far enough out to clear the stationary legs on the BX, but not the adjustable ones on the mill. The bracket that holds the adjustment pin sticks out too far, so I will have to put one of the stationary legs on the mill to clear the linkage.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14240/bxlinkage.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on April 17, 2014, 08:22:46 PM
We got the adapter machined today. We made a slight change in that we threaded the end that the top link goes on instead of a cotter pin. That will capture the ball better. We put the top link in the lathe and turned the ends down about .020" to clean them up so they would fit in the ends of the tube, then cut them off the body of the top link. I did a test fit on the mill tonight, and it looks like it is going to work great. You can see the shiny ends on the top link to the left. I still have to weld on a piece of plate to the manual backstop on the BX. Then, I will have to measure the tubing and cut to length and weld the top link parts into it. If I had the time and money, I would just order a hydraulic backstop, but I have little of either, so it's off to the scrap pile with the torch. :D The adapter replaces the 1/2" Nylock nut on the factory linkage. The new connecting rod will clear the legs on the BX, and the rear most leg on the mill. The leg you can see has a lower locking pin mechanism, so I will have to take it off and put a stationary leg on in it's place, which I already have.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14240/20140417_191808.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on April 20, 2014, 08:09:31 PM
Got the mod finished tonight. Phone battery was too far gone to film it, but I'll do that tomorrow. The thin tubing has a bit of sag to it, but I expected that. It doesn't seem to affect the operation at all. My big concerns at this point are the welds. I think where I welded the tube to the threaded portion of the toplink is OK, I didn't shrink it noticeably, but the spot where I welded the two tubes together isn't too nice. We machined a piece of round stock to fit inside the tubes about 5" long. I then butted and welded the tubes together, leaving about an 1/8" between them. I had a lot of slag inclusions, so it may not hold up. If it fails, I'll drill and pin each half of the tube to the round stock in the middle.

This is going to save a ton of time. I'd still be out there running the stops up and down if it hadn't gotten dark. :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on April 21, 2014, 09:56:15 PM
Warning, this may be the most boring video on the internet! :D

http://youtu.be/GZhCkH0vW1s
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: POSTON WIDEHEAD on April 21, 2014, 09:59:06 PM
 :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o

What just happened?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: thecfarm on April 21, 2014, 10:00:25 PM
Happy now, ain't ya??
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on April 21, 2014, 10:21:45 PM
Nope, not boring at all.  Looks like  smiley_thumbsup to me.   ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: WmFritz on April 21, 2014, 11:42:30 PM
Success! Good job Dave.  smiley_thumbsup
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ljohnsaw on April 22, 2014, 12:32:14 AM
<<snip>>
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/27246/IMG_5059.JPG)
we never had any problems with the turner/electric winch... even with logs that maxed out the mill...

Octam1,

Can you post another picture or make a little drawing of how this winch turner operates? I can't see the whole setup in this picture.

Thanks!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on April 22, 2014, 09:55:05 AM
:o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o

What just happened?

The manual backstop on the bed extension is now linked to the powered backstops on the mill. No more walking down there to flip it up and down every turn of the log.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on May 04, 2014, 08:33:47 PM
Sawed my first log long enough to reach the bed extension today. It was really nice not having to shim the end of the log or fiddle with a manual backstop. 8) Saved quite a bit of time. Sawed one 9"x12"x31' timber, and 495 feet of 5/4 lumber. 765 feet of product in 1:05. 8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on May 04, 2014, 09:37:16 PM
Sounds like success.   :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: drobertson on May 04, 2014, 09:46:14 PM
Some folks kinda hate the sound of the solenoids,  ;D  That there sounded like music to me!  nice work Dave!
I need to pick your brain some day, you mentioned in another post about the roller track on CC models, just wondering how the extensions work on these.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: WmFritz on May 04, 2014, 09:47:25 PM
Sawed one 9"x12"x31' timber, and 495 feet of 5/4 lumber. 765 feet of product in 1:05. 8)
Uhmm... I would be all day sawing that.  :-\    :D :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on May 05, 2014, 09:28:11 AM
I don't know much about the Cat track, but you can only run a 6' extension with the CC mills. I don't think you have to do anything to the track, just bolt the extension on.

WmFritz, I had help. Telescopic boom forklifts are very handy. :) Once I have the slabs off, all turning is done with the forklift, the two plane clamp can dig into the face of the timber, then I can't sell it.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on May 05, 2014, 10:49:42 PM
In my opinion, there is no better suited forklift for around a mill than a Lull:

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14240/20140505_09375528129.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: YellowHammer on May 09, 2014, 10:16:56 PM
This a follow up of my previous post, Reply 737, (link below) of a dragback modification in which a board can be held and carried completely back across an out feed table.

 http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg942542.html#msg942542

So I shot a video of the drag back as I was sawing a cant today.  The video shows how the board levers up and gets held by the bottom plate and carried off the mill deck.  Also, near the end of the video, it shows how I drag the last two boards off the mill by raising the nearside roller so that I can get the two boards to tip and engage the drag back lip.  I've been sawing with it for awhile now, and I wouldn't saw without it.  Its a safety feature also, I don't have to worry about my off bearers getting near the head of the mill anymore, they just stand by the table for the next board to drop in their hands.
YH
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YpO3njUNe4g
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on May 10, 2014, 07:06:16 AM
Nice YH, But you should tighten your blade when you cut wood  :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on May 10, 2014, 02:31:58 PM
Looks like it works pretty nice!

Pete; looks like the pressure gauge is about maxed out!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on May 10, 2014, 05:06:01 PM
Looks like it works pretty nice!

Pete; looks like the pressure gauge is about maxed out!




 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/DSCF0386.JPG)
No Chuck this is. When I was in VT Friday All the mills were like this.
I run like this all the time.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on May 10, 2014, 08:32:02 PM
I would never operate my mill with the pressure maxed out like that!  :o

I think it would be hard on bearings, B57 belts & blades!  ;)

I usually run mine on the line between yellow and orange or slightly above and have had no issues!  8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on May 10, 2014, 08:53:02 PM
Mine settles in quite nicely at about 2800. :) If it drops below 2500, then a blade has heated up and gets changed.  I have no concern about blowing anything.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Larry on May 10, 2014, 09:11:21 PM
That ain't nuthin....I wound up my TK so tight the needle fell off. :-[  Works better that way anyhow. ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on May 10, 2014, 09:39:35 PM
There is absolutely no harm in running a WM with the needle buried. It is totally psychological. When my '08 was delivered, I was told to bury the needle, and that WM had done a lot of research on blade tension and what was really going on, that they had completely changed their advice. I think the only reason that there is any color ranges on the gauge now is because they must have bought about a 100,000 gauges years ago and haven't run out of them yet. :D People are worrying that it is too much tension, and they are going to wear something out sooner, but they aren't taking into consideration that for years people have been running too little tension. Or think of it this way. It's like Arnold Schwarzenegger bench pressing 10 pounds for years, then one day he starts benching 12 pounds. Not going to strain the system. ;)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: drobertson on May 10, 2014, 09:49:43 PM
After a few years of running, an ole timer told me to max it out, I did have reservations, but started to tweek it, now it is a norm, re-sharpes I run a lil less though,  just me. every log is different, and conditions change.  I trust the gauge, and blade performance.   If a blade is going to fail, might as well get it over with, 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on May 10, 2014, 10:08:34 PM
That ain't nuthin....I wound up my TK so tight the needle fell off. :-[  Works better that way anyhow. ;D


 :D :D :D :D :D smiley_thumbsup
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: YellowHammer on May 11, 2014, 08:41:44 AM
Mine settles in quite nicely at about 2800. :) If it drops below 2500, then a blade has heated up and gets changed.  I have no concern about blowing anything.

Having the blade "settle" is a good description of how I tension blades, too.  I'll initially tension it up near 2,800 to 3,000 and let it warm up, make a readjustment, and then seems like each blade like to run where it likes to run.  As long as it's cutting good and fast with no waves or vibration, I'll just keep sawing. This blade was a Mesharp on the last log of a an easy 600 bdft maple run, and was still behaving nicely when I took it off. 
YH
 
Title: LT35 Lube-mizer
Post by: thechknhwk on May 23, 2014, 09:29:31 PM
Replaced leaky hard to control plastic valve at the jug with a nice positive shut off ball valve, and an inline needle valve to control the flow.  It's my LT35 lube-mizer, patent pending..

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/25990/10356344_564980980290012_240161474721236469_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Brucer on May 24, 2014, 12:42:49 AM
My "poor-man's" lubemizer consists of a solenoid valve (WM spare part) that opens whenever the drum switch is set to the forward position, plus a simple on-off switch on the control panel (where the laser switch would normaly go) that over-rides the solenoid and keeps it off.

I usually leave the plastic valve on the tank set to where-ever it was at the last time I used it. If I want lube, a flick of the on-off switch will activate the system. The solenoid valve turns off the flow when the carriage is stopped or returning.

No reaching anymore except to change the flowrate.

I like the idea of a needle valve to get finer control over the flow.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on May 24, 2014, 07:51:10 AM
I've added the fine adjustment lube flow valve to mine, about 2 years ago.

I have the main valve on the lube jug, then about 2-3 inches out into the line I installed the fine adjust valve.

I open the main valve (on the jug), then adjust the fine adj valve to the desired flow, I just turn the lube on and off with the main valve!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: backwoods sawyer on May 25, 2014, 01:13:51 PM
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17725/IMG_4458.jpg)
When I replumbed the lube system I didn't add a needle valve but did add a "T" and a 1/4 turn valve for breeding the system. No more waiting for the water to make it back thru the system and as a bonus I have found it use full for washing hands as well ;)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: LeeB on May 25, 2014, 01:31:45 PM
So, did it throw blue jugs or white ones?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Shotgun on May 25, 2014, 05:15:49 PM

When I replumbed the lube system I didn't add a needle valve but did add a "T" and a 1/4 turn valve for breeding the system.

This may need additional explanation.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: backwoods sawyer on May 26, 2014, 01:52:01 AM
Others have mentioned they added a needle valve to control the flow I did not do that but I did make a change by adding a "T" just before the pump so when I toss a fresh jug up there I hook up the hose open the main quarter turn valve and the valve to the bleeder hose that runs down and away from everything and lets the air out of the system so the pump has water to pump. I also use medical "oxegen hose" to run from the pump to the other side of the sawhead where I use the slip connect end so I can seperate it and purge the pump reconect and insure spayers are clear. I have spent considerble time bleeding the old system, and this works much faster big time saver and as a bonus open the bleeder hose and wash your hands as needed.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on September 12, 2014, 12:37:31 PM
Well, My Bearing Support Kit came in for the mill today.
I will put it on next week. Looks easy , Maybe  :D :D :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on September 12, 2014, 12:42:50 PM
I was going to ask you if you got yours yet. I haven't ordered mine yet. You get to be the Guinea Pig. :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on September 12, 2014, 12:49:30 PM
I have to see If I have a new drive belt. To change the belt later you have to take the whole thing apart :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on September 12, 2014, 05:19:17 PM
Does on old man proud to see new mods added to this topic now over 10 years old. 

I'm not making many mods these days.  It's enough work to keep fixing up my old equipment.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: petefrom bearswamp on September 12, 2014, 05:59:21 PM
Way to go Bibby.
I have done quite a few from this thread.
Lately the nozzles on my lube mizer have been clogging so I just took them out and let the stuff gurgle out of the orifices under pressure .
Actually get more on the blade this way as the nozzles sprayed way past the blade and this method doesn't seem to use any more lube/coolant.
A jug lasts most all day
Pete
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on September 12, 2014, 07:39:12 PM
This is what I got from Wood Mizer.
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/motor_brace_001.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/motor_brace_002.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/motor_brace_003.JPG)
Will see how it goes  :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on September 12, 2014, 07:58:18 PM
That looks very similar to the bearing setup on the bottom of the Debarker which is also designed to remove the side loading from the motor bearing.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on September 12, 2014, 08:02:45 PM
Bibby
This is the best and probably the most usefull thread on the site IMO.

That not to say there are not a lot of good threads on here but if we put it to a vote I think this one would come in as the overall top thread.

cept maybe for the food one? ;D

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: WDH on September 12, 2014, 08:18:43 PM
I will put it on next week. Looks easy , Maybe  :D :D :D

At least it is not a grease gun  ;D.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on September 12, 2014, 08:33:23 PM
I have added several items to this thread, and I have also gleaned several ideas that I have adapted for my own use.  :P
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on September 12, 2014, 08:35:58 PM
I will put it on next week. Looks easy , Maybe  :D :D :D

At least it is not a grease gun  ;D.




My grease gun has a battery  :D :D :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: customsawyer on September 12, 2014, 08:43:30 PM
Next time I am at Danny's I will have to look at his grease gun. I think he is worrying about it to much.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on September 12, 2014, 08:52:50 PM
Next time I am at Danny's I will have to look at his grease gun. I think he is worrying about it to much.


 :D :D Maybe it's low on grease and he doesn't want to open it up :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Ga Mtn Man on September 12, 2014, 08:59:44 PM
This thread has gotten so huge it needs an INDEX!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on September 12, 2014, 11:22:20 PM
Next time I am at Danny's I will have to look at his grease gun. I think he is worrying about it to much.

Isn't Danny's grease gun solar powered?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: POSTON WIDEHEAD on September 13, 2014, 08:36:57 AM
So…we are back to the grease gun.  :D :D :D :D :D
Thats good, I'm running out of material.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: barbender on September 13, 2014, 03:24:23 PM
Peter, I may have to fab one of those since the kit isn't available for my Lombardini engine. I've never been able to crank the drive belt tension as high as I would like. It seems like the recommended tension is in the area of "just barely enough". I want the working limit to be my engine horsepower, not how much the belt will transmit.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on September 15, 2014, 12:16:28 PM
All morning to get all apart and not break something :D
And I mean all apart. Have lunch and go out and put it together.
I'll have pics later.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on September 15, 2014, 06:49:40 PM
Got the new thing on. I did it alone, but to have  someone to hold things would help :D
Looking at the ring I did not know how it came off so I called WM.
The small bolts come out and you put them in the other holes and it pushes the pulley back so the split ring will come off the shaft.
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/sawmill_brace_install_002.JPG)
And set screw.
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/sawmill_brace_install_003.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/sawmill_brace_install_004.JPG)
But with rust on the shaft I had to use the puller some.
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/sawmill_brace_install_005.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/sawmill_brace_install_006.JPG)
I had to put heat to get the 3 flat heads out, then It was easy till when I had to line up the pulleys to the drive pulley and the alternator up. No way, you line up one or the other. I lined up with the drive wheel and I was ¼" away from the alternator :o
Called WM and what to do , Go with the alternator they said,
I put in all new belts. I think I was an hr on that, see when you tighten the pulley moves. I'm sure the guys at WM can do it with their eyes close  :D
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/sawmill_brace_install_007.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/sawmill_brace_install_008.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/sawmill_brace_install_009.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/sawmill_brace_install_010.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/sawmill_brace_install_011.JPG)
When you put the big plate on leave all the bolts loose, just start them, or you fight it  :D
The other thing , With a new drive belt make sure you back off on the auto clutch  :D
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/sawmill_brace_install_012.JPG)
And you have to play with the brake band too :D
And when the time comes to change the belts It won't be bad
 not a bad job I had 6 hrs in it, And thats with customers stoping in too.
Now that I know how 2 hrs more or less to do the job. I'm glad I did it. 8) 8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ElectricAl on September 15, 2014, 08:29:42 PM
Nice Mod ! 
The photos help show the steps it takes to get the job done.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: POSTON WIDEHEAD on September 15, 2014, 08:36:46 PM
 smiley_beertoast

If you ever get on the service loop, you can come do mine.  :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on September 15, 2014, 09:20:02 PM
smiley_beertoast

If you ever get on the service loop, you can come do mine.  :)


300 and lunch :D :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on September 15, 2014, 09:22:26 PM
No wait, you will have grits  :o  :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on September 15, 2014, 09:23:34 PM
You might want to specify what "lunch" is. Goats have been known to eat some rough chow.
 :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: POSTON WIDEHEAD on September 15, 2014, 09:23:40 PM
No wait, you will have grits  :o  :D

 :D :D :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on September 15, 2014, 09:24:38 PM
You beat me to it.  :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: POSTON WIDEHEAD on September 15, 2014, 09:27:03 PM
You might want to specify what "lunch" is. Goats have been known to eat some rough chow.
 :D

Today I had 2 V-Belts, 6 bearings from an old guide roller, a broken spring from a KOHLER 29G and washed it down with a cool glass of ATF.  :D :D :D
I need a Rolaid.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Nomad on September 16, 2014, 06:17:25 AM
     Nice pictorial and write-up, Peter.
     David, I don't think a Rolaid will help what's wrong with you... :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: backwoods sawyer on September 16, 2014, 11:43:22 AM
Nice job on getting it changed out and documenting the steps ;)

You will want to make sure those bolts don't loosen up like the alternator bolts do from the vibration as a little side movement at the bolts will translate into movment at the bearing making the whole contraption useless :o :o :o
Just not the level of engineering I was hoping to see. As a much more robust unit that would solve the side load issue is realy needed, or at the least a better braced unit for long term stability of the out put shaft :-\


sorry just not impressed with the fix for the side load issue.
 :( :( :(

Over time watch for signs of rust dust at all ends of the bolts that will let you know the bearing is moving and not doing it's job.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on September 16, 2014, 11:52:51 AM
I agree with backwoods. There is a lot of leverage on those hexagonal studs, and with the sideloading issue, you are worried about misalignment in the hundred thousandths of an inch. It's got to help some, I suppose, and if they CAT is good to go with proper belt tension, I guess a little bit of help is enough for a little peace of mind.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on September 16, 2014, 12:20:28 PM
WM told me not to tighten the belt more than what I had before.
I'm sawing w oak today and I will keep an eye on all of it.
Will see if it was money well spent.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on September 16, 2014, 06:52:39 PM
When I had all the covers off I put in a new brake on the up and down motor. To stop the head drift.
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/003.JPG)
See the old one was starting to hog out. And the pin has wear on it. 450 hrs on it.
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/001%7E1.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/002%7E1.JPG)

And one of the roller guard had to be replaced too. Sometimes the sawdust stops it from turning and the blade makes a groove in it.
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/005%7E0.JPG)
I put them on a lathe and dress them up.
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/004%7E0.JPG)
And don't forget to grease the auto clutch .
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/007.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/008.JPG)
My GUN  :D :D :D :D :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on September 16, 2014, 08:44:58 PM
Fine adjust out rigger Mod in progress!
 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_0869.jpg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_0870.jpg)

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_0872.jpg)

There will be more Pics and Possibly a Vid of the Jack in use. planing on doing at least 4.

Jacks cost me 5 Bucks each. The rest of the material is coming out of my scrap pile.

The jack crank will be either cordless drill driven or manual hand crank if you don't have a cordless drill handy. Jacks are 10 ton jacks out of GMC SUVs.

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: drobertson on September 16, 2014, 09:16:43 PM
Nice show there Peter!  I hope it works for you!  pretty sure it will, you've been successful to this point for sure.  Just have to ask, not you but myself, if the belt tension is the same? then what is then advantage?   I have an idea on making it more of a rotary stress than a side load. but then weight and room to fit might become an issue.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on September 16, 2014, 09:29:07 PM
The advantage Is knowing I did all I can for my mill to last a long time.
Or when I can get a wide head 70. ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on September 17, 2014, 08:28:18 PM
The Proof of concept and checking a couple of ideas.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_0875.jpg)

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_0876.jpg)

Well from test results on just one modified jack ready to test I am calling it a great success! 8)  3 more to go at this point and then a milling test run. The 2 middle ones under the head rail will be a bit more of a challenge. I am hoping I wont need to do those, but I am sure I will not be happy till I do.

Travel on the jacks is 12 inches but I set them to use about  max 3 inches when milling.

The idea I am contemplating is on the jack mounting pin. Do i cut em to fit and spot weld them in or make em as pins so the jacks can be removed easily? (would sure keep the jack tubes easy to keep clean)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on September 18, 2014, 12:47:56 PM
I like it, smiley_thumbsup
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on September 18, 2014, 02:55:56 PM
Just had a breakthrough moment on the mod that saves about an hour ish worth of mod time.

will do pictures in series to show how to it
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Remle on September 18, 2014, 04:19:06 PM
Bandmill Bandit

Absolutely an out standing mod for the jacks. Can't wait to see the new pictures. I see a trip to the local salvage yard in the near future.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ronwood on September 18, 2014, 05:43:52 PM
I would make it so that the pin is removable so that if you have an issue with the  jack or it  needs lubercation it could be removed.

Ron
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Ga Mtn Man on September 18, 2014, 05:56:08 PM
I think I like yours even better than the the jacks I did (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,71391.msg1074133.html) and yours cost a lot less!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on September 18, 2014, 11:44:54 PM
Yup Ron that was my thinking too and that is what I did.

Will be pics tomorrow but I think I just cut mill set up time in half if not more and I can jack that thing off the ground about 4 inches in about 2 minutes and it is stable. Have a concept in mind for the 2 middle ones on the head side too if I need em.

 I wouldn't cut lumber with wheels off the ground but for tire change or brake service it is wonderful. First jack took about 4 hours total. the next 2 took 3 ish hours wit ha whole bunch of interruptions with all the pieces cut for the fourth one.

May fit a 1/2 bolt to the jack drive so i can use a 3/4 inch socket to operate the jacks instead of the rod. Saw dust packing in those holes would be a pain.

WOODMIZER take NOTE! You saw it here first! 8) Just kidding Marty but I have a real good idea for a factory option that would use the same idea.

It takes longer to cut the old stands apart for modification then any thing.

.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: scsmith42 on September 19, 2014, 03:55:53 AM
That's a neat idea.  I've been thinking about something similar for my Baker.  One challenge is that two of the jacks are right in-between the axle's and access is a real challenge, especially at the end of the day when the supports are buried under a foot or two of bark and sawdust.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on September 19, 2014, 10:48:58 AM
OK here goes step by step. If I missed a picture or 2 I will come back put them in.

I have one of the 4 straight left to assemble and the 2 with the offset still to do. I have them figured out too.

Stab tube Mod!

#1 Cut the bottom plate off and clean it up to weld to the bottom of the jack.
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_0883.jpg) 

#2 Cut 2.75 ish inches off the tube
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_0884.jpg)

#3 Drill 3/4 inch jack pin hole 1/4 turn from the holes in the jack. I used a 3/8 pilot hole.
 
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_0885.JPG)

#4 Drilling the 3/4 pin hole which finishes the stab tube prep.



 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_0886.jpg)

Jack Prep!
Couple of things to Note on the jacks.
The jacks come in 10, 20 and 30 Ton models. All 3 have the same lift stroke which is about 12 ish inches. Of course I wanted to use the 30 ton jacks just cause I am too german to use anything less than the biggest and bestest. The first one I did was in fact a 30 ton. My Son came by to grab the RV and took a 10 ton and shoved it inside the 2 inch square tube. Decent fit but just a bit loose. but a lot easier to deal with than the cutting that I did on the first one.

The difference in the jacks is that the 10 ton has a barrel size of 1.9 inches and the 20/30 have barrel size of 2.1 inch.

Ok heres the pics.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_0890.jpg)   


1) Jack parts ready to assemble!  I had them all cut ready to go.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_0894.jpg)

Assembled jack.
Note the notch in the top tube 1"x 1" to allow for welding to the top of the stationary tube of the jack.


 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_0887.jpg)



Setting up a jack on the mill.

completed parts ready to install.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_0877.jpg)


Stab tube in place ready for jack.
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_0878.jpg)

Jack in place ready to set stab tube height.
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_0879.jpg)

Setting stab tube height.


 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_0880.jpg)

Fine adjustment.
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_0881.jpg)

Done.

The transport position is pretty cool and you will never have tubes filled with rotting saw dust again. 





Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: beenthere on September 19, 2014, 01:41:02 PM
Clever mod. And looks like it will be good reason to have some Bluecreeper handy. ;)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on September 23, 2014, 11:16:25 PM
Did some cutting and trimming this evening on a couple of pieces of aspen that are going to be kitchen benches for my DIL. 4 FAOs in place! 1 Of the 2 center jacks on the bench in the shop.

I thought I was on a different saw mill. I cant believe how much more stable the fine adjust out riggers make my saw mill and how much easier and quicker it is to get set up. No doubt at all now about doing the 2 middle ones.

IMNSHO. I don't think the mills should be offered for sale with out the FAOs.   
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: drobertson on September 24, 2014, 08:39:35 AM
Heck of a good idea!  thanks for sharing, 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: FarmingSawyer on October 04, 2014, 02:53:19 PM
Finally got sick of dropping the band shield keeper bolts in the sawdust or forgetting to grab them before I put the shield down after a blade change. So I made them permanent. Now if I drop something on the sawdust and loose it I can replace it cheaper/easier or with a nail temporarily.....

Before:  (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/37458/image%7E0.jpg)

After:  (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/37458/image.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: thecfarm on October 04, 2014, 06:55:26 PM
Thomas must of changed them I see. My keeper bolts holds up the shields on mine.
Have you added inch marks to the log stops?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: FarmingSawyer on October 05, 2014, 05:59:35 AM
Thomas must of changed them I see. My keeper bolts holds up the shields on mine.
Have you added inch marks to the log stops?

I have added inch marks. Best tip yet. I've also switched the lube tube to the other side and upgraded the valves when I changed the tank.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on October 08, 2014, 09:23:57 AM
Those FAO's are terrific Wes, and to my mind, the two center ones are the most important because the log's weight tends to cause them to sink into the ground and they occasionally need tweaking.  Of course, my ground is soft and has no rocks.
Quote
I don't think the mills should be offered for sale with out the FAOs.
  I agree.   :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on October 08, 2014, 10:39:56 AM
Hey Magicman thanks for the compliment on those FAOs.

Yes I am doing the 2 centre ones as well. BUT a friend of mine changed a couple 5000lb crank jacks on trailers he bought to 7500lb electric jacks. The one he took off look like the exact same jacks that WM uses for the FAOs. The only difference is the landing pad on the jack. It is about and 8 inch square piece of 1/4 in plate so I don't think it will be much trouble to modify.

Are you back home already or still driving around the rockies?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: backwoods sawyer on October 08, 2014, 11:10:20 AM
I should be unloading the camper, but I am sipping on a cup of coffee instead.
http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,76518.140.html#lastPost
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on October 08, 2014, 12:17:47 PM
As Harvey noted, I am home but the phone keeps ringing about sawing jobs.  I looked at a fairly large Oak job this morning.  It will all be live edge slabbed, so hourly rate.

The camper will have to come off this afternoon because I have to saw some Sassafras tomorrow.  1X5 for flooring.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: mesquite buckeye on October 14, 2014, 11:14:09 PM
Sorry if someone has already done this, but I don't remember seeing it anywhere. Pretty obvious really.

Super Dave et al have complained for years about having to bend up the lock bar when at the lowest position on a manual clamping wood mizer. He suggested cutting a second notch further down the bar to hook the chain, but I was worried that it would weaken the bar. Here is my alternative solution. ;D

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/31219/IMG_0866.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/31219/IMG_0868.JPG)

Just a piece of a lintel similar in thickness to the original bar. Sorry about the ugly weld. Had to nurse the acetylene to the last gasp to get it done. :-\

As you can see, now the bar can easily be hooked at the bottom position anywhere along the arc of travel w/o lifting/bending to hook the chain. ;D 8) 8) 8) :snowball:

While I was at it, I fixed another problem from when I first got my saw. Boy genius Martin "helped" me load the mill with a forklift by dropping a thousand pound log from about 2 feet above the deck onto the clamp. Bent it down about a quarter inch. Also had to pound on the holder thingy below. Anyway the hammering left little bumps along the edge of the cam. Grrr. While I had it home to modify it, I cleaned up the burs and also added a small groove down the edge of the cam parallel to the edge to reduce those lovely cant popped out moments. seems to have more grab, but yet to test it. Sorry, I forgot to get a picture of it. I can take one if anyone is interested. ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Brucer on October 14, 2014, 11:30:49 PM
That's a useful mod. You're right about notching the bar directly. I could have used that idea 9 years ago. I don't think I'd have come up with it myself because I was trying to figure a good way to operate the clamp from the other side of the mill.

In the end I solved the problem by buying a hydraulic mill instead ;D.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: mesquite buckeye on October 14, 2014, 11:41:36 PM
 ;D

Can't afford a new one. This one will have to do so I will make it work as well as I can.

I think this will save at least 15-20 minutes every day of operation at least. That really adds up over time. 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8) 8)

Cha Ching!!!!! ;D 8) 8) 8) :snowball:

Or at least it will make it easier to break even. ;D

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: slider on November 04, 2014, 06:39:10 AM
I don't think this has been covered but I would like to share it with some of you.Those that have a drag  back with the guide fingers.I saw from the rear most of the time because I can see the clamp and dogs much better.My mill has a remote console.My problem was loosing the board off the side while dragging back to the roller table.I can't tell you how many trips I have made picking that board up.I moved the second finger in by swapping the spacer to the outside.That put the finger about 1/2 inch from where the dogs are.I can't tell you what a difference this makes.I wish I had thought of this long ago.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14302/002~25.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: customsawyer on November 04, 2014, 07:11:24 PM
Took you long enough.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: tule peak timber on November 04, 2014, 07:18:04 PM
Yup ! 8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: POSTON WIDEHEAD on November 04, 2014, 08:36:30 PM
Took you long enough.

 :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Larry on November 04, 2014, 10:13:11 PM
My problem was loosing the board off the side while dragging back to the roller table.I can't tell you how many trips I have made picking that board up

On my TK if the loose board is small enough, it drops through a hole in the table and wedges itself, making it DanG near impossible to get back out.  Took me a long time to figure out I needed to plug the hole and adjust the fingers. :D :D  I'm sloooow. ::)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: backwoods sawyer on November 04, 2014, 11:40:37 PM
When I picked up my mill the previous owner had removed the whole assembly and mumbled about what a pain it was to use.

Guess he never did figure out how to get it to function correctly.

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on April 07, 2015, 08:22:35 PM
I broke my LubeMizer hose on the corner of a big cant about 4 years ago. I got a PTC union and cut fresh ends on it and went back to work. I caught it again not long after, and had to replace the one section of hose. I had to modify the PTC connector for the new hose, as it wouldn't fit, so it was just loose on that side. It would pull out if it got caught on a cant, so that was ok, as at least it wasn't breaking. The original polyethylene tubing got brittle, and cracked under the engine, so I found a package of 1/4" O.D. poly hose at Home Depot last night. 25' for $3. Now I have a new hose and two spares. I know some other people have caught their hoses, so I took a photo of how I rerouted mine. It is sort of in the way of the tensioner handle, but not really an issue. The way it loops when the guide arm is all the way out, it won't snag on a cant, just rub the side of the log.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14240/20150407_194714.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on April 07, 2015, 08:49:54 PM
Nice job, 8) 8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on April 07, 2015, 08:53:04 PM
Next I have to take my triangle debarker belt off and rotate it. :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on April 07, 2015, 09:17:28 PM
Yes you do. :D :D :D :D :D :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on April 08, 2015, 08:56:31 PM
Rain today. It can stay triangulated for now. :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on April 09, 2015, 06:53:03 AM
Next I have to take my triangle debarker belt off and rotate it. :)

I don't understand.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on April 09, 2015, 01:54:30 PM
Sounds completely worn out.   ???
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on April 09, 2015, 05:39:50 PM
Peter broke his debarker shifter shaft, and Marty Parsons suggested checking that the belt hadn't become rusted to the sheave.

Read about it here. (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,82626.0.html)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on April 09, 2015, 06:10:21 PM
I am familiar with the thread but I was in Oklahoma for a couple of days and missed the triangle.   :-\
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on April 09, 2015, 07:41:18 PM
I am familiar with the thread but I was in Oklahoma for a couple of days and missed the triangle.   :-\


 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/DSCF1038.JPG)
 :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on April 10, 2015, 07:44:05 AM
Now I see it after looking at the pic, thanks Peter.

I think you should run that debarker a little more, either that or maybe the belt is hardened because of age!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on April 10, 2015, 07:55:31 AM
either that or maybe the belt is hardened because of age!
Does that include backs and knees??   smiley_old_guy
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on April 10, 2015, 02:53:43 PM
Yup, seems to be that way, Lynn.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on April 10, 2015, 10:35:02 PM
I change that belt every spring now. Cheap preventative maintenance. i have changed that little shaft twice. now I just put a new belt on ever spring after an over night soak in a pan of ATF or dextron
 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: scully on April 12, 2015, 08:00:06 AM
I dug the mill out from winter storage and before anything else I did my live hydraulics mod . I have an LT 40 SUPER with remote command . I found that haveing to move the head back and work my hydraulics was a total pain in the butt ! so I ran 1 OT welding cable through my cat track and back to the pump box and then into the connection for the contact shoe . . No more power strip ! I can now use the hydraulics at any time ,saveing steps and time for last board off bearing and for the occasional oops my backstops are to high.....
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: YellowHammer on April 12, 2015, 08:47:05 AM
Scully,
That mod is an amazing time saver.  My sawing output jumped significantly.  If you are going to use the board return, then don't forget to weld the board carrying strip to the bottom of the paddle.  It will really save steps, too.
YH
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on April 12, 2015, 10:00:41 AM
 

 (http://[quote author=Dave Shepard link=topic=7789.msg1260855#msg1260855 date=1428452555]
I broke my LubeMizer hose on the corner of a big cant about 4 years ago. I got a PTC union and cut fresh ends on it and went back to work. I caught it again not long after, and had to replace the one section of hose. I had to modify the PTC connector for the new hose, as it wouldn't fit, so it was just loose on that side. It would pull out if it got caught on a cant, so that was ok, as at least it wasn't breaking. The original polyethylene tubing got brittle, and cracked under the engine, so I found a package of 1/4" O.D. poly hose at Home Depot last night. 25' for $3. Now I have a new hose and two spares. I know some other people have caught their hoses, so I took a photo of how I rerouted mine. It is sort of in the way of the tensioner handle, but not really an issue. The way it loops when the guide arm is all the way out, it won't snag on a cant, just rub the side of the log.

 <br><br> [img width=640 height=480]http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14240/20150407_194714.jpg)
[/quote]

i did a re work of the hose connection that works very well. Have not ripped a hose off since.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/2883/IMG_2356.JPG)

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/2883/IMG_0003.JPG)

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/2883/IMG_0005.jpg)

There are more pics of this mod in the gallery

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Kbeitz on April 29, 2015, 06:24:03 AM
Wow.... Right in the middle of building my mill I found this 48 pages of stuff to do....
I thought I was almost done building... I guess it will be another couple weeks doing mods.
 This was a long read... Great ideas...
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: flatrock58 on June 21, 2015, 08:47:31 AM
Decided to change out the 2" hitch with a lunette ring for a pintle hitch.  Made it so I can remove the lunette ring to make the mill harder to steal.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/37117/IMG_2135.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: mesquite buckeye on June 21, 2015, 11:44:29 AM
cool ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: petefrom bearswamp on June 23, 2015, 06:33:53 PM
Scully My neighbor did this.I have toyed with the idea but am too cheap to buy cable
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on June 23, 2015, 06:46:28 PM
I put a hose clamp on top of the rubber to stop it from splitting apart.
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/deer_001~0.JPG)
And put in one of these.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/deer_004.JPG)
Title: But if I patten it how can i share with Friends
Post by: addysdaddy on July 25, 2015, 11:56:27 AM
 8) 8) 8) So I think I have finally cured the clamp problem with my LT-10...  :snowball:It was always an issue trying to get the clamp to stay tight and when just trying to keep it snug as some folks recommended it would vibrate loose which was even less fun.  >:( There was also the issue of it pushing the CANT up and out of square... also a tad aggravating. So as I sat with my Coffee this morning I thought that if there were teeth on the end of the clamp screw and they didn't spin with the clamp screw and if it was as large as the clamp housing (Yeah I know that's a lot of ands but bear with me)... All those things being correct then it would hold straight and allow me to lower the clamp and get a better grip on the log or cant. OKAY so here goes.

First I measured the screw to see what size adapter I would need... turns out 3/8 is the perfect and convenient size for the project. The clamp screw housing is 1 1/2 inch threaded pipe. So I droped in to the local hardware store and picked up a new 3/8 steel drill bit. also a FORSTNER style bit with a 3/8 shank and a 1 1/2 inch head with teeth. I took both of these out to my handy dandy gunsmith since he has the nice drill press and had him drill me a nice straight 3/8 hole in the end of the screw.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/38253/drillbit2.jpg)

Then I just replaced the screw post in the clamp. inserted the FORSTNER bit and WEE HAW 8) 8) 8)I can clamp the cants or logs without them riding up or having the clamp shake loose... I can also now cut within 1 1/8 inch of the bed so my last board is 1 1/8 thick...

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/38253/clamp.jpg)

This may not be earth shattering for some folks but it's sure gonna make my days easier... And as the topic states... It may be my idea but I'm not patenting it so everybody feel free to copy as you wish...    ;D
Title: Re: But if I patten it how can i share with Friends
Post by: East ky logging on July 25, 2015, 12:22:24 PM
Looks like a good idea. I'm going to try that on one of my clamps.Does the forstener bit just slide in and out of the clamp?
Title: Re: But if I patten it how can i share with Friends
Post by: mesquite buckeye on July 25, 2015, 12:25:27 PM
You should link this to the useful sawmill modifications thread.

Looks good. ;D
Title: Re: But if I patten it how can i share with Friends
Post by: addysdaddy on July 25, 2015, 01:33:00 PM
Yes. The Forstner bit just slides into the end of the screw. That way it sits in place while you tighten the screw and the screw shaft will spin around it and tighten.  I would have liked to get the end of the bit closer to the screw but the larger section of the shaft of the bit is between 30 and 31/64 of an inch and no drillbit that size... you could probably machine the shaft down but for my purposes it works so i'm not messing with it.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on August 06, 2015, 08:11:58 PM
Think I have to do something.
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/deer_002.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/deer_003.JPG)
Adding or subtracting steel here will ajust the arm 90°to the cant I think.
The arm is less than 90° now and will wedge into the cant sometimes on a return.

Has anyone had to fix this before.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on August 06, 2015, 08:57:28 PM
No, but I did fix my bumper splitting issue several years ago.  Reply #561 on this thread:  LINK (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg635376.html#msg635376)

This was over 5 years ago and I have never split a bumper since.  ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on August 06, 2015, 09:04:45 PM
I haven't had any issues with mine. I have had it jam into the cant if you get the height just right, err I mean wrong.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bibbyman on August 07, 2015, 06:49:54 AM
Makes me glad to see this old topic come to the top again and again.   I've not come up with anything that's  needed changed on our mill in years.  Right now it just needs a good cleaning out from under.
Title: Re: But if I patten it how can i share with Friends
Post by: WDH on August 07, 2015, 07:24:46 AM
8) 8) 8) So I think I have finally cured the clamp problem with my LT-10...  :snowball:It was always an issue trying to get the clamp to stay tight and when just trying to keep it snug as some folks recommended it would vibrate loose which was even less fun.  >:( There was also the issue of it pushing the CANT up and out of square... also a tad aggravating. So as I sat with my Coffee this morning I thought that if there were teeth on the end of the clamp screw and they didn't spin with the clamp screw and if it was as large as the clamp housing (Yeah I know that's a lot of ands but bear with me)... All those things being correct then it would hold straight and allow me to lower the clamp and get a better grip on the log or cant. OKAY so here goes.

First I measured the screw to see what size adapter I would need... turns out 3/8 is the perfect and convenient size for the project. The clamp screw housing is 1 1/2 inch threaded pipe. So I droped in to the local hardware store and picked up a new 3/8 steel drill bit. also a FORSTNER style bit with a 3/8 shank and a 1 1/2 inch head with teeth. I took both of these out to my handy dandy gunsmith since he has the nice drill press and had him drill me a nice straight 3/8 hole in the end of the screw.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/38253/drillbit2.jpg)

Then I just replaced the screw post in the clamp. inserted the FORSTNER bit and WEE HAW 8) 8) 8)I can clamp the cants or logs without them riding up or having the clamp shake loose... I can also now cut within 1 1/8 inch of the bed so my last board is 1 1/8 thick...

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/38253/clamp.jpg)

This may not be earth shattering for some folks but it's sure gonna make my days easier... And as the topic states... It may be my idea but I'm not patenting it so everybody feel free to copy as you wish...    ;D

Check out reply #948 from addysdaddy.  It was merged in, but since it was first posted on July 25, it did not merge as the most recent post.  It is a great idea for manual mills with screw clamps, so check it out.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on September 03, 2015, 09:47:50 PM
Good day to all

I have been so busy that I haven't even had a chance to sit down long enough to sign in to the forum.

This will be short.

Here is my latest mod to resolve the annual $35  PIA with a $120 solution that will likely last about 10 or 15 years or more.

The new water tank holds 7 gallons CAD.  You will notice that the Gas tank is not the Woodmizer version either. That tank is already about 25 years old and its been on the mill now for 4 seasons and its still as good as the day I put it on and it was around 20 years old then. Holds 6 Gallons CND and has the vented gas cap.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_1125.JPG)


New tank!

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_1124.JPG)

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_1123.JPG)

The tank cap is from a plastic boat gas tank that has a vent that you can adjust in the gas cap.

Tank walls are about a 1/4 in thick and has lots of UV inhibitors. Cost me $120 CND so would be about $95 USD right now.

Tank is made locally and is a standard model for a pickup camper and includes all the fittings and the handle.
 

Will get a new base plate made this winter when I have more time. Needs to be 1.25 inches wider and 3.5 inches longer.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on September 03, 2015, 09:54:04 PM
Welcome back BB.   :)

I am assuming that the new tank is filled in place rather than removed for filling?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on September 03, 2015, 10:07:16 PM
I have done both ways.

I have a little 3 step ladder that goes where I go with the mill. The tank is heavy with 7 gallons but with little step ladder it isn't bad to get up there. I think I may see if the can change the handle to go the the long way on the tank. Have to get a few hours on it to figure out what will work the best. I am not 100% happy with the handle arrangement yet. May also put the filler hole on the corner if I did another one.

I am finding that I am a bit more liberal with the blade lube with the larger tank and i still only fill once a day.


Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on September 03, 2015, 10:14:37 PM
I once tried one sorta like this (http://www.amazon.com/Flojet-04406-143A-Multi-Fixture-Water-Pump/dp/B0000AXDOY/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1441332533&sr=8-3&keywords=flojet+water+pump) to pump the tank full from the ground, but is was too slow for me.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: drobertson on September 04, 2015, 03:57:49 PM
No help here for now, but a thanks to you guys for sharing your tips and tricks to mods'  I'm pretty certain now we have all seen just about the same issues from head to toe, I enjoy seeing how you guys approach these issues,  and I still ram my bumpers! :D :D
and they do split :D :D :D I reckon a dog would learn quicker than me ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on September 04, 2015, 06:20:44 PM
Scully,
That mod is an amazing time saver.  My sawing output jumped significantly.  If you are going to use the board return, then don't forget to weld the board carrying strip to the bottom of the paddle.  It will really save steps, too.
YH

Will you enlighten me as to what a board carrying strip is please?  :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Ga Mtn Man on September 04, 2015, 09:14:54 PM
4x4, look at reply #845 of this thread.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on September 05, 2015, 07:26:36 AM
Thanks Paul.

YH smart mod, I like the fingers you put on, did you make em up yourself or order lt70 fingers and mod them to fit?  Have you come up with any recent advances to your dragback lip or pretty happy how it is? 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on September 05, 2015, 07:28:42 AM
For doing the hydraulics anywhere mod, running a welding cable through the cat track in a remote mill, what is the smallest gauge wire I could run without restricting amperage?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: YellowHammer on September 05, 2015, 08:44:34 PM
For doing the hydraulics anywhere mod, running a welding cable through the cat track in a remote mill, what is the smallest gauge wire I could run without restricting amperage?
I used a 1/0 welding cable, and its really a good idea to both a hot and a ground wire.  Its important to use welding cable because it is designed to be flexed a lot.  Also I had the weld shop professionally crimp the connectors because I didn't want them working loose or heating up.  I did not remove the contact strip, I left it on the mill.  The mod is very useful, and allows the operator to do lots of movements when they want, not just when the head is on the strip.  I had an opportunity recently to run a new, stock LT50, and I felt handicapped and frustrated because it used a contact strip only.

Thanks Paul.

YH smart mod, I like the fingers you put on, did you make em up yourself or order lt70 fingers and mod them to fit?  Have you come up with any recent advances to your dragback lip or pretty happy how it is? 

I bought one finger from WM and fabbed up the rest using it as a template.  Its necessary to have the fingers to guide the board with the dragback mod.  Although I've tried several different configuration for the bottom strip on metal n the dragback, the original design still works fine. 

I have done some interesting things with the welded on drag back strip, just experimenting around.  For example, I spent a little effort to level the bottom of the dragback strip to lay perfectly flat on the cant (there are 3 bolts that allow its height and angle to be adjusted) so that as the next board is being sawn, the dragback strip is being dragged forward across the top of the board, and it acts as a wiper and scrapes the sawdust off the top of the board being sawn.

Also, for a while, I mounted a push broom, bristles up, to the end of the offload table, so as the dragback plate held and pushed the board down the table, it would drag it over the top of the broom and knock or sweep the sawdust off the bottom of the board.  It worked very well, but since then, I mounted a roller to the end of the table and the dragback will push the board off the table onto a pallet with very little effort on my part.     


     
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on September 05, 2015, 09:14:19 PM
Great info thanks!


One more q- does the ground wire have to be done out of welding cable?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on September 05, 2015, 09:37:02 PM
Hey 4X4
On cable type and size I wouldn't go smaller than 1/0 and welding cable is durable and has great flex life. its designed for the type of applications where flex life is a factor.
 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: boscojmb on September 05, 2015, 10:17:01 PM
One more q- does the ground wire have to be done out of welding cable?

Same size and just as flexible. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on September 05, 2015, 10:19:26 PM
Thanks
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: YellowHammer on September 07, 2015, 10:32:24 PM
These mods really shine if you can build or install a dragback table for the wood to be offloaded on so you can be sawing while someone else handles the lumber.  Or just use it to do a full return and drop the lumber off the table pretty much onto the board stack or pallet with minimum handling.

In the video you can see me take advantage of the power everywhere feature several times. In the last cut, with the saw head at the far side of the mill, way off the power strip where the hydros would normally be dead, if you look close, you see where I released and dropped the clamp, used the metal strip on the dragback to grab and pull the last two boards back at once, and while doing so, raise the toe board roller so the board angles up a little, clears the bunks and lands in the table.  Also, on one of the cuts, you can see where the loader arms and edging boards were getting too close the guide arm, so I was able to drop them a few inches on the fly. 
Another thing I did was cut a taper on the left most finger and it can be seen on the video.  Sometimes when edging on the mill, the  left edging wants to bow out and not stay in line with the fingers so will drop inside on the cat track.  The taper allows part of the finger to drop down the side of the edging or cant and get foothold on the edging to prevent it from falling off to the inside into the track.  Normally, also, as soon as the head passes the last side support, I will raise all the side supports to also help trap the edging from falling, something I couldn't do with a power strip. 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YpO3njUNe4g

If I would have had another log on the arms, I would have started raising them as soon as I started traversing back and would have had the log rolling onto the saw about the time the head cleared and dropped the last two boards on the table. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on September 07, 2015, 10:47:58 PM
Very interesting.  Is your dragback arm still at the angle or did you make it so that it pulls back flat?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: YellowHammer on September 07, 2015, 11:09:24 PM
Very interesting.  Is your dragback arm still at the angle or did you make it so that it pulls back flat?
It's still at an angle to the board but it doesn't matter as the fingers will keep the board straight.  Also, on the dragback there are a couple of little 1/4 inch square bar stocks welded to the sides of the back plate, with their corners facing forward.  These function as little teeth that dig into the end of the board to keep it from sliding.  As long as they engage the end of the board anywhere, then the board is trapped and stuck and isn't going anywhere.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on September 08, 2015, 07:44:17 AM
My dragback has one bar and its welded the whole width of the dragback.  I don't think I'd fuss around with the angle too much anyways, haven't had any issues with it anyhow.  So for the board to catch that piece of square stock I'd need to weld the carry arm a bit lower, eh?  I like where I have it set now, so I only have to pick up the head 1/8" to clear and dragback.  If I remember correctly, that's about all I can bring it up with the adjustments.



Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on October 04, 2015, 06:22:55 PM
I feel a mod coming on.

My son just sent me a link for some real quality components that will allow me to completely convert my mill to wireless remote for what appears to be a decent price (about $2500cdn) at this point. I need him to do the design which he said he pretty much has done in his head.

 I will have full control of ALL functions including hydraulic from a single lite panel I can "wear" or clip to a stand. And I'll have a range of about 60 metres with out signal boost. Will have swappable 14 volt battery on the  remote panel.

The most expensive part not Included in the above price will be changing over my hydraulic control valve assembly to an electric solinoid activated assembly. The wire less control system for this valve assembly is included in the above 2500.

I wonder if Woodmizer could/would supply me a valve body out of the the LT70 remote mill?  Pretty sure Bucher will if they don't.

The Valve assembly may be as much by it self. We will see! I will post again when this project hits the shop floor.

Son said he could make it so it would work off my IPhone or IPad if I want.

How cool would that be?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on October 04, 2015, 06:55:06 PM
That would be really cool if you could figure it all out!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on October 04, 2015, 07:09:48 PM
That would be really cool if you could figure it all out!

Son said it is actually pretty simple. He took my mill manual and used that to get electrical spec as well as doing reading on the mill well I been sawing just to confirm.

 He is actually doing a remote mod to a couple of oil field transport systems that allows the operators to be about 100 metres away. Said doing the mill is a cake walk by comparison.

If I can find a assembly number that applies to the Bucher valve assembly he figures he an get it direct from the manufacturer.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on October 04, 2015, 07:27:55 PM
Not to derail your project, but how much would the parts cost from WM? I know they say it's not a retrofit option, but I bet you could buy the parts if you asked nicely. :D I know for the WM wireless you would need Accuset2 and autoclutch, with the right version of the Accuset software. You would not have remote hydraulics, but I don't seem to need them with my wireless.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: UpInATree on October 04, 2015, 10:14:34 PM
When I got my wireless setup I was disappointed that the hydraulics were not part of it, but after using it, since it is attached to me with a shoulder strap, I simply have myself in position at the hydraulic controls when I need to access them.  It might be interesting, but a lot of extra work and expense to pull it off.  Keep us updated.

I had asked Woodmizer about adding a channel to the remote to activate lights, but the control board would have required reflashing the software or new chipset, etc. aside of high cost.  A nice switch works fine. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on October 04, 2015, 10:42:08 PM
Not to derail your project, but how much would the parts cost from WM? I know they say it's not a retrofit option, but I bet you could buy the parts if you asked nicely. :D I know for the WM wireless you would need Accuset2 and autoclutch, with the right version of the Accuset software. You would not have remote hydraulics, but I don't seem to need them with my wireless.

We are checking on that BUT it seems that the control system is quite different from the non remote ones. Lots of research to do BEFORE this hits the shop floor.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on October 04, 2015, 10:57:54 PM
I do and will appreciate ALL input on this project.

Just so every one knows where my son and I come from as a team

First we are both lazy BUT hate in-efficiency with a passion. When we work we work as hard as we play and rest.  So we demand maximum performance from all equipment and systems we utilize in our work.

I am farmer at heart and a mechanic by trade. My son is a kid at heart and a electronics/computer engineer by trade with a robotics certificate. 

We are of pure German decent And this started out as an idea and then hmm this just might be feasible? To ok this is not only feasible and desirable to ok if we don't d o this we are not living up to our reputation in the family!

I hope you now understand the challenge that this has become for us and the height of the "imposed bar" that has been set (by us). Not because it is needed or wanted but because we can we must!

I know it silly but it is a project in which father and son will mentally spar and colaberate to make something work that is both useful and unique.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pineywoods on October 04, 2015, 11:23:30 PM
Bandit, I understand completely. I have already done most of what you are contemplating, only on an old lt40 manual. I elected to not hook the hydraulics (all home-made) to the remote, It looked to be of limited usefulness. I used an infra-red link with a hand-held remote, looks like a tv remote with 12 channels. The 12 outputs are small spdt relays which made the interfacing fairly easy. No auto clutch on my mill, so cobbled up one using a wheel chair motor driving a jackshaft. It all works reasonably well, but without some kind of setworks, it's of limited value. That project (setworks) is still in the engineering analysis stage (sitting around thinking about it). There's posts with pics in the sawmill and milling section...Working with a son on joint projects is priceless. Wish I could do that, but mine lives 150 miles away....
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on October 05, 2015, 10:22:39 AM
Thanks piney!

Now I know that I am not the only nuts guy on here. Lol

I guess a brief discription of my mill Is in order.

2007 LT40HDG28 is how it started its life

It now has a high power green laser sight,
The LT40 Super feed motor up grade along with the second hydraulic pump and 3/8 hydraulic hose through out.

Simple Set installed.

The hydraulic system is live full time when I am running the mill. Manual board return and I run an extra 108 amp delco alternator connected to a 160 minute @ 20 amp draw crown marine battery when I am milling. When the mill head is on the cooper strip it has 220 ish amps alternator capacity available.

All the electric motor cables have been upgraded to #6 cooper cable and the cables that connect to the pumps, extra battery and alternator to the mill are 1/0 high grade welding cable.

I have also made fine adjust outrigger jacks and I have addded lights.

All those mods are previously described in this thread with pictures.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on October 05, 2015, 06:46:02 PM
ya know, I'd like to see what'd happen to an lt70 if you got your hands on it! lol
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on October 05, 2015, 08:35:44 PM
ya know, I'd like to see what'd happen to an lt70 if you got your hands on it! lol


Think I'd have to figure out a way to make that thing cut both directions.  ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on October 05, 2015, 09:05:44 PM
 :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: deadfall on October 05, 2015, 09:30:41 PM
ya know, I'd like to see what'd happen to an lt70 if you got your hands on it! lol


Think I'd have to figure out a way to make that thing cut both directions.  ;D

I think a good mod would be to cut one direction forever.  The band would be a Möbius strip, and the logs would have to be from specially genetically modified trees.  The boards would not stack worth a darn and older carpenters would not like them.  But hey, you can't argue with progress.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on October 05, 2015, 09:57:43 PM
Unless it's progress in the wrong direction...and I like to argue everything!  Just my nature. lol
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: deadfall on October 05, 2015, 10:31:38 PM
...and I like to argue everything!

My mom would say that my dad "would argue with a signpost."  That's kinda the way I remember it too.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on October 05, 2015, 11:27:10 PM
haha that's a good one
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on October 06, 2015, 10:10:58 AM
Me & my son are bit like that but in different dimension sort of.

Don't ever tell either of us something can't be done cause then we will for sure figure out a way to do it.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: deadfall on October 06, 2015, 10:17:10 AM
Don't tell me not to tell you something can't be done! 

You see how these things get started?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on October 06, 2015, 11:09:26 AM
Don't tell me not to tell you something can't be done! 

You see how these things get started?

 ;D TOO true! But most often it just fun anyway!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on October 07, 2015, 09:14:59 AM
 :D :D :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: flatrock58 on October 17, 2015, 10:59:04 PM
I made a notch to lock the compressed outrigger pin spring while I raise and lower the leg.  I might add another pin like Dangerous Dan and this would allow me to lock both or just one pin.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/37117/IMG_2690.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on October 18, 2015, 09:12:12 AM
Now, that's clever!   smiley_thumbsup
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on October 18, 2015, 10:46:48 AM
I made a notch to lock the compressed outrigger pin spring while I raise and lower the leg.  I might add another pin like Dangerous Dan and this would allow me to lock both or just one pin.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/37117/IMG_2690.JPG)

That is one that I have said a 100 times i need to do but never remember when i have the mill near or in the shop. you have motivated me to do it now.

Where dangerous Dan put the extra pin?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: flatrock58 on October 18, 2015, 01:29:30 PM
I need to file it flat on bottom since I just used a grinder.  Dangerous Dan added a pin  see: http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,45914.40.html

Here is a picture of his mod.  It gives you more stops for the outriggers.  You need three hands to hold both pins and move the outrigger up and down.   He fabricated a solution to hold the pins out, but I decided to just cut out a notch.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/37117/outrigger.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on October 18, 2015, 09:34:57 PM
I need to file it flat on bottom since I just used a grinder.  Dangerous Dan added a pin  see: http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,45914.40.html

Here is a picture of his mod.  It gives you more stops for the outriggers.  You need three hands to hold both pins and move the outrigger up and down.   He fabricated a solution to hold the pins out, but I decided to just cut out a notch.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/37117/outrigger.jpg)

Thats a good one too but I just made me some fine adjust out rigger jacks using GMC spare tire jacks. I like em alot.   
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: jimdad07 on October 18, 2015, 10:08:51 PM
I am brand new to a bandmill but found on my Hudson HFE30 that on a windy day it rolls easily enough to take my mill head down all 28' of track and almost take it over the carriage stops.  At first I wedged a piece of wood under the rollers and it worked fine but I didn't trust it.  Made a trip to my work van and grabbed two beam clamps that go on I beams to hang pipe and duct work with threaded rod from the clamps.  Put them on the angle iron track and now she's secure.  As soon as the barn is built I'm turning all 28' into a mobile mill complete with hydraulics for lifting logs and turning them.  Been watching too many threads of hydraulic mills on here.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on October 19, 2015, 04:55:58 PM
Bandit those GMC jacks'll never stand the test of time, needa use Ford jacks, Ford knows their customer will use the jacks alot so they spend extra money on an extra heavy duty design jack.  loo
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on October 19, 2015, 07:21:48 PM
I hear you 4X4 but the Ford jacks are too big to fit inside the mill jacks and at 5 bucks a jack at the wreaker I got about 8 spares right now the last 4 I found are out of 1 ton dually trucks and are 30 ton rated. Got another idea that I am going to try too. Just working on one now and will post when i see how it works out.
 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: larrydown60 on October 19, 2015, 09:14:35 PM
I made a notch to lock the compressed outrigger pin spring while I raise and lower the leg.  I might add another pin like Dangerous Dan and this would allow me to lock both or just one pin.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/37117/IMG_2690.JPG)

I just saw your pic of locking pin and my fisher snow plow has similar pins and I saw some replacement pins at auto store that have the spring included might be worth a look.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: larrydown60 on October 19, 2015, 09:51:20 PM
I found a pic of the locking pin

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/40619/locking_pin.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: flatrock58 on October 19, 2015, 10:09:38 PM
larrydown60  Do you have a web site where you found the pins?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: larrydown60 on October 19, 2015, 10:19:36 PM
Yes they are on fisher plow.com or Ebay under fisher plow parts and locking pins
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Seaman on October 31, 2015, 08:25:30 PM
I started the extra battery mod for the HD pump. I have been cutting a good bit of short stuff and do not like to move the engine back so often.
I plan to go to the flat seven pin plug in, and plan to use the hot wire to charge the deep cell batt while towing.
Will the alternative charge both batteries while on the power strip at idle, or do I need to idle it up?



 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/31118/20151031_145533.jpg) 



 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/31118/20151031_145516.jpg)

Batt in pic is a temp, I plan to get a deep cell from Cat, I think it will be a good investment.
A friend gave me a bent alum diamond plate toolbox to close in the box. I might make new fenders out of diamond plate also. A little BLING might help if I have to go into da hood and saw !
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: WV Sawmiller on October 31, 2015, 08:43:38 PM
Seaman,

   Does this give you the hydraulics anywhere functionality? When you park the head does the alternator recharge your extra battery too?

   If so please take plenty of good pictures and measurements and bring them with you next week as I need to talk with you. I need to do something with my hydraulics as keep having to move too much to find a spot that works. I've sanded dead spots where I arced and coated everything in dielectic grease and it is still a pain and too time consuming finding a sweet spot that works.

   Thanks. see you Friday.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: LeeB on October 31, 2015, 09:14:55 PM
WV,
Check the contactor on the bottom rail. The rail may need a good sanding too or the contactor may need adjusting.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on October 31, 2015, 09:59:09 PM
Will the alternative charge both batteries while on the power strip at idle, or do I need to idle it up?
Put a voltmeter across the battery and watch the voltage as you increase the idle speed.  My engine has to idle at 1500 in order for the alternator to put out max volts. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: WV Sawmiller on November 01, 2015, 08:09:13 AM
Lee,

   Thx. I may try sanding the rail. I already adjusted the shoe to fit a little tighter. Looks to me like it should be tight enough. The shoe looks to be about 3" long so I can't understand why a small burnt spot would prevent contact but something surely is.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Seaman on November 01, 2015, 08:11:42 AM
WM, PM sent
MM, Thanks sent!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on November 01, 2015, 02:07:00 PM
Will the alternative charge both batteries while on the power strip at idle, or do I need to idle it up?
Put a voltmeter across the battery and watch the voltage as you increase the idle speed.  My engine has to idle at 1500 in order for the alternator to put out max volts.

I went to a half inch smaller pully on the alternator and a high HP alternator belt to turn the alternator. I get max out put at 8-900 engine RPM. Also installed a Kohler Tiny Tac so i know actual RPM.

It is all on the forum some where.

FIP
Top view of my genset so you can all see the lay out. Right now is it on a piece of 3'X18" glue lam beam about 2 feet long. The steel frame base is under construction but I need to pick a few rubber mounts be for I continue. The inverter will mount above the alternator in the steal frame and will be made to remove with an over centre lock leaver and a 100amp forklift type quick disconnect.

The grey weather proof box with the amp meter, light and on/off switch in it will be expanded to contain ALL connections, gauges switches and various other plug ins. It will be raised to the top of the protective frame/cover and be mounted on a slight upward facing angle to allow for easy read of the gauges. The finished steel frame will be 2 inches wider just to give a bit more space for wiring to be run inside of conduit AND still fit inside my little red wagon. I know its over kill but over kill has never come back to bite me so far. Well not until I have to do a repair anyway. 

Larger fuel tank mod is rolling around in my head but at this point it seems unnecessary.         
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_1189.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Seaman on November 01, 2015, 07:20:13 PM
Thanks BB, that is quite a settup!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on November 01, 2015, 10:02:39 PM
Thanks BB, that is quite a settup!

Meh! what can I say but;
I am German. some days that is a blessing and some days it is a curse.

Thanks for the compliment.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DGK on November 02, 2015, 10:10:53 AM
BB, what size of engine are you using? I have a GX160 4.9 hp driving a 60 amp alternator. I doubt that I could have driven a larger alternator with 4.9 hp based on the load that the engine is experiencing when using the hydraulics. Max torque on the GX160 occurs at 2500 rpm. I have my alternator spinning at 4166 which is near the top of the alternator power output curve.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on November 02, 2015, 11:05:52 AM
GX160 5.5HP pulling a 108 amp alternator. Not having any issues with power. Think I am running a 4.5 inch to a 2.25 inch on alternator. have a to check for sure though.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on November 27, 2015, 05:44:46 PM
Had time today to fix the mill.
Pulled out the pin, undo the auto clutch, unbolt the mount from the cat and leave it hanging. :D :D :D
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/SAM_0324.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/SAM_0320.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/SAM_0323.JPG)

All new bushing,
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/SAM_0322.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/SAM_0325.JPG)

All in, will have to spend some time on alignment . With the new bushing I want to be sure the drive pulley and the engine pulley align.
The auto clutch, and brake band.
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/SAM_0327.JPG)


You can see how bad it was  :D :D
But even with that The super cuts like a champ.  ;D
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/SAM_0326.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/SAM_0328.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/SAM_0329.JPG)

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: POSTON WIDEHEAD on November 27, 2015, 06:50:30 PM
Feels good to get a job like this done before the REAL cold sets in. Way to go Peter.  :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: YellowHammer on November 27, 2015, 11:15:55 PM
Good job on the fix.  Seems like there should be a way to get a grease fitting to that wear surface somehow.  Every time I look at mine I get the feeling it's not being lubricted adequately. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on November 28, 2015, 06:29:58 AM
Good job on the fix.  Seems like there should be a way to get a grease fitting to that wear surface somehow.  Every time I look at mine I get the feeling it's not being lubricted adequately. 








I did put ATF on it over the years.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: SawyerBrown on November 28, 2015, 10:36:49 AM
Speaking of grease fittings, I sure have had trouble with the ones in my claw turner.  Not sure whether they got whacked at some point, but both have popped out when I had to use just moderate pressure to get some grease in.   

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/31067/IMG_1068.JPG) 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/31067/IMG_1067.JPG) 

 
I don't really like the press-in type.  In the process of tapping the holes and replacing with "good" ones.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/31067/IMG_1069.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on December 03, 2015, 08:32:56 PM
Been fabric making a roller dragback table unit for my mill.  Idea came from Peter Drouin of New Hampshire


Here it is upside down:
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/34510/IMG_3717.JPG)


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/34510/IMG_3718.JPG)


Right side up:
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/34510/IMG_3719.JPG)
Here's the idea:
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/34510/IMG_3721.JPG)


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/34510/IMG_3722.JPG)






Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on December 03, 2015, 09:18:32 PM
Coming along. 8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on December 03, 2015, 09:31:28 PM
If it doesn't work too well there I'll remove the stock unit and pull mine ahead a bit.  We'll see how it goes..
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on December 04, 2015, 08:09:21 PM
Made some more progress today:


New dragback, just took a piece of 3" channel and drilled/tapped some holes
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/34510/IMG_3730.JPG)


Added a third roller.  For some reason when I was doing it I got a wild ambition to hug it to the other side thinking better support for wide slabs.  If I had enough pipe laying around I would have just done them all full length.  The long one is two pieces of 1-1/2" pipe that I welded together.  If I were to do it over I'd use 2" pipe or even bigger, but this is what I had.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/34510/IMG_3733.JPG)


Top view
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/34510/IMG_3734.JPG)


Here it is mounted
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/34510/IMG_3735.JPG)


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/34510/IMG_3736.JPG)


The front is supported fine, very sturdy, the back I am need to put a couple legs, or maybe one more leg and a jack that will go to the ground.  The 1/4" plate I used moved alot while welding and cutting so it's all sorts of wrinkled.  I got it as straight as I could.  My mig welder run out of gas so I used a new to me stick welder and I think 135amps with 1/8" rod was a little too hot, but sure did penetrate well.  Haven't stick welded in awhile so it was fun practice.  This was the first project I've done with that welder.  Glad I picked up some AC rod for it.  The one thing I'm trying to decide now is do I hack off the piece from the OEM drag back support that's sticking out.  It sticks out and looks like it's going to be in the way.  I think I'm going to keep it for awhile and make sure I like it before I cut off what's sticking out.  Or the other option is to unbolt it and make a new one to suit my current setup so that I can put it back to stock if need be.  Most likely I will do that but I'd have to buy steel to do that, and this whole project was based off of using what I had laying around (except for the 1/4" plate I bought).  I might also put a little fence on the rail side so that boards don't fly off, but undecided on it yet.  Next project when I have some time is to make some dragback fingers.  Hoping to get the plate done tomorrow.  Excited to try it out.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on December 04, 2015, 08:16:25 PM
If any of you have made a dragback table I'd love to see some pictures!  Also any of you who've made dragback fingers I'd like to see your design too if you don't mind sharing!  I know @YellowHammer (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=profile;u=11488) you made some for your 40, no?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: YellowHammer on December 04, 2015, 09:56:16 PM
You will love the new dragback table.  I wouldn't saw without mine.  You'll also love the new drag back board holder "shoe" (I never came up with a catchy name for it) and between the two items, will make your board handling a whole new world.  One thing you might add to your board holder shoe is a couple sharp edges, or cleats, on the open sides of the channel.  If you ever buck a log at a slight angle, when it is being dragged back, it will have a tendency to slide off the side of the shoe, depending on which way it is slanted.  If you weld on a small piece of square stock, so they are like a diamond with the apex of one corner facing the edge of the board, they will keep the board from sliding in the shoe.  This way, when you hit he board return, and the board holder hits the end of the board, the little cleats will dig in and keep the edge of the board secure and prevent it from sliding sideways.
I'll take some picture of the dragback fingers tomorrow.  They are very easy to make, main thing is just finding the aluminum and steel bar stock for the fingers. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on December 04, 2015, 10:12:25 PM
Thanks YH, good idea on the cleats.  The OEM one has that what you speak of, with the square stock welded on in a diamond like fashion, must be for a reason!  I played around with the dragback today, and it was  8) .  I hope that the rollers are protruding enough, about 1/4" is all I could get.  I am thinking of ways to build them up a bit if necessary.  If the table was flat they'd prolly be fine, but it's so bent outta whack from too much heat moving it all over the place.  If I had enough thick flat stock lying around I would have tacked it on all over the place to keep it flat but I really didn't have enough to do that.  Oh well, heat n beat tomorrow!  I'll figure it out.  Do you think that it's necessary to use aluminum for the fingers?  Also, what thickness did you use for the aluminum and for the steel flat stock?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: YellowHammer on December 06, 2015, 08:50:01 AM
Here's some pics of the drag back fingers and holder.  The metal for the fingers is 1/2" solid bar stock.  It took a little trial and error to get the spacing right, since I saw mostly to standard widths, I used the spacers between the fingers to optimize their position.  Also, setting the left most finger is critical, in order to make sure the boards don't slant toward the left on the return stroke.

My drag back deck is made of wood, the fame is welded steel, and comes in at the end of the stock WM outfeed plate.  A couple (three) tips, make sure there are no places on the table that can hang the board on the powered return stoke, or it will get real ugly real fast.  The saw head isn't going to stop, and the table isn't going to move, so about the only thing left to happen is not good.  Also, I spaced my table boards apart so that sawdust will fall through and not just build up on the table, its a pain when it does.  I put a roller on the end, but submerged the mounts.  Also, if you have anywhere hydraulics, get the hang of raising the powered toe board roller a little on the return stroke, that will help it feed onto the table and make a smooth transition.

Not sure if you edge on the mill, (I do) but you can also return the whole pack of edged board to the outfeed table, no need to pull them from the mill by hand anymore.  Really speed things up.   
     

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21488/image.jpeg) 

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21488/image~0.jpeg)
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21488/image~1.jpeg)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21488/image~3.jpeg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on December 06, 2015, 10:09:14 AM
Thanks for the pics!  Did you weld or bolt it to the headrig?  Two half inch bolts be enough?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: slider on December 06, 2015, 10:38:30 AM
As Yellowhammer stated that left finger or the one next to it is critical .
Mine kept loosing the board to the left on the return until i moved that one finger.It made things much easier for me.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ljohnsaw on December 06, 2015, 01:30:22 PM
Thanks for the pics!  Did you weld or bolt it to the headrig?  Two half inch bolts be enough?

Casual observation.  Based on what YH said about what would happen if a board hangs up:  I'd bolt it on with low grade bolts so they would snap in the event of a crash!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: YellowHammer on December 06, 2015, 11:34:18 PM
Thanks for the pics!  Did you weld or bolt it to the headrig?  Two half inch bolts be enough?

Casual observation.  Based on what YH said about what would happen if a board hangs up:  I'd bolt it on with low grade bolts so they would snap in the event of a crash!

That is exactly correct.  There is a need for the drag back arm to "release" and raise up in some circumstances.  It's a safety feature and will save some headaches.  If you'll notice, the OEM dragback arm has a joint in it, about halfway along its length.  This is for folding the arm up and out of the way, as well as a providing a way to release the arm if things get haywire.  I didn't want to put a joint in my arm, but rigged a simple solution where it can do the same thing.  In essence, I mounted a piece of angle iron along the main crossmember, with two relatively weak grade 0, 5/16" bolts holding it on the saw.  I keep the bolts loose, about a turn or so, and gravity on the long lever arm keeps everything in place and the arm tight against the head of the bolts.  Since it's installed loose along the vertical axis, this allows the whole arm to rise up several inches, and fall back down if there is ever a need, which does happen occasionally.  Things that happen are returning mid stroke and a dragback finger jams, or lowering the head to the bed and the fingers hit a crossmember and can't fold up, etc.  If the arm can raise up and take the pressure off the saw head, no harm, no foul.  Of course, the arm must be mounted so that there is zero side to side movement, just a little up and down.  Using this mounting method, I've never broken a bolt, bent the arm or otherwise caused any damage.

If I ever need to get the fingers out of the way, I have mounted the cross rod a little forward, (you can see it in the picture) and this allows me to simply flip the fingers up, back over, and gravity will hold them in place, out of the way.

I don't know many boards I've sawn with this rig and these mods, but it's a few (you can see the wear marks on the WM return ramp) and these all compliment each other, greatly increase production and significantly reduce effort:
Board return table
Board return shoe
Dragback fingers
Anywhere hydraulics




Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on December 07, 2015, 06:50:13 AM
I need to do the anywhere hydraulics mod for sure.  I don't see it being too difficult just need to get down and do it.  I never liked that contact strip idea anyhow.  On my mill there is two small plugs in the frame about where I think the dragback fingers arm would mount.  Did you find that you had to adjust anything after adding the weight of the dragback fingers?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Larry on December 07, 2015, 01:14:31 PM
There is a need for the drag back arm to "release" and raise up in some circumstances.  It's a safety feature and will save some headaches.  If you'll notice, the OEM dragback arm has a joint in it, about halfway along its length.  This is for folding the arm up and out of the way, as well as a providing a way to release the arm if things get haywire.

The TK comes without a joint in the arm or any kind of safety release.  Took me all of a day to realize the folly, as one mistake could twist the whole carriage out of alignment. 

I added a hinge for peace of mind.  It was a simple process.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on December 07, 2015, 06:16:58 PM
Pretty much finished tbe table today, I added a jack and another bolt spot.  Played around with it a bit, and it most definitely needs fingers, good grief!!!  But already 100x better.  Not sure why they don't come with a roller table stock, it's way better!  I believe Cook's and Baker mills do have roller outfeed tables stock.  I had a question, I see that there is already drilled and tapped holes in the angle iron piece that supports the engine's hinge/pivot point, what are they for?  Can I use them to bolt the arm for the fingers to?  How is yours bolted, yh?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: YellowHammer on December 07, 2015, 10:25:01 PM
Heres a picture

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/21488/image~170.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on December 08, 2015, 05:55:37 PM
YH you have a nice clean mill, Must be from not cutting Pine. I have Pine pitch all over mine. :D :D :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on December 08, 2015, 11:03:59 PM
Thanks YH, preciate it.  Did you drill and tap or drill all the way and through bolt?  I looks awful tight in there to fit a drill.  Definitely need to do fingers here soon.  Will start sourcing steel now that I have an idea in my head.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: YellowHammer on December 08, 2015, 11:52:37 PM
YH you have a nice clean mill, Must be from not cutting Pine. I have Pine pitch all over mine. :D :D :D

Heck no, I don't cut wet, messy gooey logs on my mill, I got to keep it looking good, never know when someone might want to look under the skirt.   :D

Thanks YH, preciate it.  Did you drill and tap or drill all the way and through bolt?  I looks awful tight in there to fit a drill.  Definitely need to do fingers here soon.  Will start sourcing steel now that I have an idea in my head.

Yep, it's tight, but I drilled and tapped the holes, didn't want a nut vibrating off and causing issues.  I drilled the holes into the angle iron, then clamped the angle to the mill, matched drilled and tapped the holes into the mill.  Only after all that was done did I take everything down and weld the long arm to the angle iron and reinstall the assembly to the mill.   



Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Kbeitz on December 20, 2015, 06:13:51 PM
I have been wanting to buy a good edger. I started to build one but other
projects just kept getting in way. Using the log dogs on the mill was just
way to slow. So I came up with this idea. Just two bolts hooks it to my mill,
Tommorow I will test it out and report back on how it works out.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/39553/Edger_attachment_1~0.JPG)

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/39553/Edger_attachment_2.JPG)

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/39553/Edger_attachment_3.JPG)

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/39553/Edger_attachment_4.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: drobertson on December 20, 2015, 08:16:13 PM
clever, low voltage on the drill motor aye?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Kbeitz on December 20, 2015, 08:27:30 PM
clever, low voltage on the drill motor aye?
Yea.... Batterys are getting old....

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on January 11, 2016, 10:44:14 PM
Not really a sawmill mod, but figured this might be the place to put it.  I runned over my broom with the sawmill the other day and snapped it off.  I like to keep the broom handy to brush off sawdust or clean dirt from logs.  Well I needed a place to put it.  This is where it ended up. 


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/34510/IMG_4045.JPG)


Turns out it works great to sweep the sawdust from the boards as it passes over it.  8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on January 11, 2016, 10:49:19 PM
Oh, and when you're wrenching on your mill, the claw is a handy tool holder lol


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/34510/IMG_4049.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: LeeB on January 11, 2016, 11:08:01 PM
much better than the tool holder I usually use, which is the sawdust pile under the mill. I bet there has to be many a wayward tool living in there.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: fishfighter on January 12, 2016, 05:06:28 AM
much better than the tool holder I usually use, which is the sawdust pile under the mill. I bet there has to be many a wayward tool living in there.

Get a big speaker magnet and pass it over the saw dust. That saved me once already. :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on February 07, 2016, 10:25:06 AM
Not really a mod, but something to make life easier.  Whenever I'm greasing the drum switches I always fight with the lubemizer control I set it on top of the accuset and it never seems to stay put.  So yesterday a light bulb come on.  I reckon that the older mizers aren't a prob when they had the lubemizer control on the h-bridge box. 


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/34510/IMG_4237.JPG)


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/34510/IMG_4236.JPG)


Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on February 07, 2016, 12:03:23 PM
What are you trying to do??????? :o :o :o :o
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on February 07, 2016, 03:27:09 PM
Man, I wish my drum switches were that easy to get out!   :o

It's sort of a hit and miss with lubing mine!   :-\
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on February 07, 2016, 03:54:48 PM
I lube mine through the front panel.  I have never removed a switch to do it.   :o
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: petefrom bearswamp on February 07, 2016, 04:08:41 PM
Never tried that I use Lynns  method.
How about the other switch?
Boy your mill is clean.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: terrifictimbersllc on February 07, 2016, 04:14:37 PM
Me either, front panel off, long middle size screwdriver with grease on the tip, stick it in there rolling the switches back and forth. 

I wish my Lubemizer were on the front remote, it were  I'd just leave it there.  Be worried a bird would fly in there at lunch :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on February 07, 2016, 06:01:52 PM
I've never lubed my drum switches. I don't use them. :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on February 07, 2016, 06:08:35 PM
I lube mine through the front panel.  I have never removed a switch to do it.   :o



x2
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on February 07, 2016, 06:37:57 PM
Personally I don't see how you can do a thorough job without taking them out.  The amount of metal flakes that I remove...  Another advantage to taking them out is you can twist them all the way around to clean them better. 

Thanks Pete from bear swamp, I polish it every three months lol oh and the other switch is easy peasy I take off the panel and pull it out also. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Ga Mtn Man on February 07, 2016, 06:58:27 PM
The newer Super mills that have the 2-axis h-bridge don't have the 10AWG wires connected to the drum switch so it's apparently much easier to pull the drum switch out.  I would not want to try that on my mill.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on February 07, 2016, 08:26:49 PM
When I said I wish my drum switches were that easy to get out, I was referring to the access hole on the side of the control panel box!  ;)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on February 07, 2016, 09:23:39 PM
I didn't realize they didn't have access panels on the older mills.  I also didn't realize they had 12awg wires connecting to it.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on February 07, 2016, 09:25:05 PM
I grease mine when I think of it . Last time was a 1000HR ago. :D :D :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on February 07, 2016, 09:37:46 PM
lol I've been doing it every 50 hrs
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on February 08, 2016, 06:42:44 AM
I usually grease my drum switches every 50 hours, but sometimes I'll go a little over if I'm in the middle of a sawjob.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Ga Mtn Man on February 08, 2016, 07:00:51 AM
There are 4 10 AWG wires and some others on the feed drum switch of my LT40.  Those concentric slots that the drum switch mounting screws go through allow the switch to be rotated for easier access to the back contacts.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: richard boyd on February 17, 2016, 11:41:28 AM
Can someone show me how to add another hyd.pump to my 93 lt40 to make my hyd. faster. Or an up close picture.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on February 18, 2016, 08:31:10 PM
Dose it have a flip clamp? I think that will be a lot of work, Better call Wood Mizer and ask them.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: richard boyd on February 19, 2016, 12:21:01 PM
Yes it has the flip up clamp on it. I was hoping to maybe put bigger pump on it or some how hook 2 pumps up. It would be great if I could find a bigger  pump that would bolt up like the one on it now. Have no idle if there is such a thing or not.
Title: 3rd Toe-board added
Post by: DGK on February 26, 2016, 08:34:26 PM
Here are a few pics of my latest mods. The mill started out life as a LT40G28 manual but has since grown a bit. The latest mods are 3rd hydraulic toe board, dual hydraulic pumps, 2nd battery, 2nd contact strip, and external DC power.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17833/FullSizeRender.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17833/IMG_0488.JPG)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17833/IMG_0489.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on February 26, 2016, 09:00:33 PM
Are those WM parts?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DGK on February 26, 2016, 09:47:10 PM
Hi Dave, yes they are. I cut down the bed pieces from the original ones that were removed to install the hydraulic toe-board kit on the mill 2 years ago. The leg is also an original that was removed when I installed front & rear fine-adjust outriggers. The second battery box is the original hydraulic box that came with the log loader kit. The only non-woodmizer parts are the battery selector switch, external generator connector and the fuse block wired in with the second battery.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on February 26, 2016, 09:54:49 PM
Nice, 8) 8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on February 27, 2016, 10:28:42 AM
I was thinking back to the bed extensions and drilling a hole in the rail, looks like WMz drills the rail at the factory at least on mine they did, eh.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chromazome on February 27, 2016, 12:03:26 PM
I welded my 10' bed extension on then moved the axle back to balance the mill for towing had to widen the log lift extend hoses etc .
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on February 27, 2016, 12:29:52 PM
There ya go, Chromazome...as usual, welcome and
please add your location and equipment to sig line to make posts more relevant
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chromazome on February 27, 2016, 12:47:38 PM
added a bit of info is that better
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on February 27, 2016, 01:22:59 PM
That's a much a more better!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: landscraper on February 28, 2016, 07:24:36 PM
I usually grease my drum switches every 50 hours, but sometimes I'll go a little over if I'm in the middle of a sawjob.

I read this thread a few weeks back and checked the maintenance schedule for my LT35 and lo and behold there is no mention that I could find for drum switch maintenance.  I put it on my list of things I should do on my next service interval, just in case.

Then today, out of the blue, she got all herky-jerky in forward, but not reverse.  Chain and rails clean and ATF'ed, check.  No bark in in the drive sprocket, check.  Not hung up on a log, check.  Brand new hot battery, check.  Wires to the feed motor tight, check.  Drive belt and pulleys tight, check.  Follower bearings rolling smooth, check.

Opened the control panel figuring it was going to be electrical, and it was ................... kind of.

I don't know if you all have stink bugs up north, but they are like a plague of locusts around here.  They get into everything, and I mean everything.  I have gotten them out of everything from carburetors to carpet knives.  It's gotten warm for the last few days and there must have been a hatch,because they were inside the control panel by the hundreds, and some guts and gizzards were in the drum switch contacts causing intermittent contact in forward.  I blew them out with air, cleaned and lubed the switch, checked the indicator lights on the circuit board and I was back in business.  No metal shavings btw, just bug intestines.  I'm guessing they crawled up through the wire loom.

I was going to take a picture of the bug-pocalypse but the volume button was on the wrong side.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on February 28, 2016, 10:06:49 PM
stink bugs stink!  We have em in ny..
did you check the maintainence calendar?
Title: Re: 3rd Toe-board added
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on February 28, 2016, 10:13:34 PM
Here are a few pics of my latest mods. The mill started out life as a LT40G28 manual but has since grown a bit. The latest mods are 3rd hydraulic toe board, dual hydraulic pumps, 2nd battery, 2nd contact strip, and external DC power.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17833/FullSizeRender.jpg)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17833/IMG_0488.JPG)
(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17833/IMG_0489.JPG)

Hi Doug

What are the chances you'd have the WM part numbers for that battery box and related parts?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DGK on February 29, 2016, 12:25:37 AM
Hi BB, the box that is holding the battery is the hydraulic pump box that came with the bolt-on log loader kit. Sorry, but I don't have a part-number for it. I am sure Gary in Salmon Arm would be able to find it. I have a class 31 size battery in there with room to spare.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on February 29, 2016, 08:16:24 AM
Welcome to the Forestry Forum, Chromazome.   :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on March 13, 2016, 02:18:03 PM
My micro switch wasn't working this morning, so I wired in a toggle switch I had around. I didn't want to just leave it dangling, and was considering poking a hole in the hydraulic box somewhere, when I noticed a plastic plug on the front of the box. I think it might be for the log deck option. Anyway, it made a great place to put the switch temporarily. I'm working on a battery to run the hydraulics when I need to unclamp at the other end. It's wired in directly now, but I have a master switch that will fit a hole discretely on the box that is under the rail. You would have to get down on the ground to see it. It's really handy to be able to unclamp and bring the last two boards back with the dragback. Pics when I get it done.



 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14240/IMG_20160313_105953141_TOP.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on March 26, 2016, 12:56:18 PM
My sprocket on the blade guide motor has gotten to the point where I can push the roll pin in by hand. They don't stay in long. I was going to wrap the sprocket with electrical tape, but I found a piece of fine welding wire and ran it through the middle of the pin.. That should hold it until I can get an updated sprocket.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14240/IMG_20160326_114216252_HDR.jpg)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Kbeitz on March 26, 2016, 06:22:49 PM
My sprocket on the blade guide motor has gotten to the point where I can push the roll pin in by hand. They don't stay in long. I was going to wrap the sprocket with electrical tape, but I found a piece of fine welding wire and ran it through the middle of the pin.. That should hold it until I can get an updated sprocket.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/14240/IMG_20160326_114216252_HDR.jpg)

You can drive a thin screw driver in the roll pins slot. That spreads it open and makes it a little fatter.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pineywoods on March 26, 2016, 07:19:19 PM
Use the next size larger  roll pin.. they come in a variety of sizes.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on March 26, 2016, 08:34:41 PM
I went with the new stile works good so far.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on March 26, 2016, 08:43:18 PM
I'll order one next time I get parts. I just had to come up with a solution that lasted longer than 15 minutes. :) I try to order as much as I can in one shot to spread the shipping around.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Ga Mtn Man on March 26, 2016, 09:33:53 PM
Moved to new thread by OP
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: flatrock58 on March 28, 2016, 12:47:42 PM
Got the gauge Magicman suggested and put in on the glow plug cover.  It goes through the switch so it isn't always on..

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/37117/IMG_3052.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on March 28, 2016, 02:25:54 PM
Your voltmeter looks good and 4.6 is a good number.  ;)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: flatrock58 on March 28, 2016, 02:47:34 PM
Thanks Magicman.  I thought you had a good idea, but wanted to have it where it would go through the switch.  I just tied into the 12v line going to the glow plug relay.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on March 28, 2016, 03:43:59 PM
Any of you put a tachometer on your mill?  I'm thinking it might be a handy gauge to have, as I can find what rpm the saw likes to be run at, which could be helpful when you can't hear the engine.  Sometimes someone is running a powersaw, or the tractor is running next to the mill and I can't hear the sawmill running too well.  I've never installed a tach before so not quite sure how that all works and if there's already exisiting sensors for it on the yanmar or whatnot.  Anyone?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ronwood on March 28, 2016, 04:01:03 PM
I have been running a tach for years  I set my feed rate by the engine rpms.

Ron
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Kbeitz on March 28, 2016, 05:02:02 PM
Yep... You can get them cheap on E-bay. Two wires for 12v and one wire to the spark plug wire on my setup.

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on March 28, 2016, 05:05:08 PM
Not quite so simple with a Diesel. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Kbeitz on March 28, 2016, 05:12:24 PM
Not quite so simple with a Diesel.

Yea that would be an whole another beast. You would need something like a proximity switch.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on March 28, 2016, 05:58:07 PM
Tiny Tach makes sensors that go on an injector line. Different sensors for different diameter lines. Then tell the tach how many cylinders.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on March 28, 2016, 09:43:54 PM
I've had a Tiny Tach on my mill for the last 800 ish hours. Wouldn't want to be with out it.

You can program oil changes and other maintenance things as well as time jobs.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on March 28, 2016, 09:59:58 PM
Thanks for the tip.  I'm going to have to look into the tiny tach.  I don't see why a tach isn't standard!  Or at least an option. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on March 28, 2016, 10:22:06 PM
Thanks for the tip.  I'm going to have to look into the tiny tach.  I don't see why a tach isn't standard!  Or at least an option.

I actually ordered mine from Kohler at the suggestion of my local Kohler service guy. Think it cost me 30 ish bucks. I'll get pic of it in the morning and post it here.

I am going to do the volt meter and a amp meter as well.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on March 28, 2016, 10:23:39 PM
I agree, but I would know instantly by the engine sound if mine was off.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on March 28, 2016, 10:26:39 PM
I agree, but I would know instantly by the engine sound if mine was off.

Yea MM I go by the sound too but of idle adjustments and the service tracking it is good to have. Also the accuracy does allow you to run closer to the margins I find. 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on March 28, 2016, 10:35:23 PM
I have a manual tach that I hold to the output shaft to measure the rpm's for idle and run.  The Lombardini has no exposed fuel lines so I do not see how a transducer tach could be installed.  There would have to be a magnet, etc and pickup arrangement used on either the fan or output end.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on March 28, 2016, 11:01:40 PM
MM I think they have one that is designed for that engine. not a 100 percent sure but if you interested it worth a check.

Heres a picture of my little guy.

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_1287.jpg)

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on March 29, 2016, 08:47:14 AM
LINK (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=11364.0) to an older thread.  When the fuel leaves the primer pump it goes inside the engine to the injector pump, fuel lines, and injectors.  Nothing is exposed.

This seems to further indicate that a sending unit would have to be attached or a photo pickup be used.  This would only be a "gee wizz" thing because I have never seen a change in the rpm's.  I use an old military manual tach. for setting and adjusting the rpm's.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on March 29, 2016, 09:03:24 AM
I don't see the need to check rpms during normal operation. If you are having problems, or have to make an adjustment, then a contact tach is sufficient. If you want the hour meter and have a gas engine, then it's just a bonus.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on March 29, 2016, 10:38:33 AM
Yea Dave you are right. I like the other features it has more than the RPM reading but I do find my self watching it more as get to the blade change time.

Probably more because its there than because I need it. Its pretty sensitive and you can see rpm drops of 5 or 10 rpm from cut to cut and when your blade are dulling it counts.

I cant state unequivocally that the tach has drastically reduced blade breakage for me BUT I do know that it is a factor because as soon as I notice a 20 to 30 RPM change in average cut RPM I change blades.

I know my sharpening skills are much improved as well which also helps.

MM: Could you post a pic of the the method you use for hooking your short chain and hook to the side support arms to move logs. i have chain and hook made. now just need to  see how you hook it up.
Thankyou   
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on March 29, 2016, 06:03:49 PM
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0248.JPG)
I do not recall having another picture and it will be Friday before I saw again.  As the above picture shows, when the side support is raised the log will be rolled toward the front of the sawmill.  Move the end tong to the other end and raise the side supports.  Now when the side supports are lowered the log will be pulled toward the back of the sawmill. 

Care must be taken because one wrong move and you know where the log will be.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ozarkgem on March 29, 2016, 06:26:46 PM


 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/2410/DSCN0248.JPG)
I do not recall having another picture and it will be Friday before I saw again.  As the above picture shows, when the side support is raised the log will be rolled toward the front of the sawmill.  Move the end tong to the other end and raise the side supports.  Now when the side supports are lowered the log will be pulled toward the back of the sawmill. 

Care must be taken because one wrong move and you know where the log will be.
good idea. How do you like the Lombardini engine?  How many hrs do you have on it?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on March 29, 2016, 07:32:58 PM
I turned 700 hours last week so it is a few over now.  The other option that I had was $3K more so I opted for this one.  I probably would do the same thing now.  This engine is OK, but there is a noticeable difference between it and the old turbo engine.  I can load this one down but I never ever loaded the old turbo down.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on March 29, 2016, 08:18:17 PM
yes MM I can see how that works and i can understand how you can drop if off the wrong side.

What I am wondering is how you attach the chain to the side support?

Don't need to know today. I just started the annual in the shop maintenance session and will do any minor mods while it in the shop.

Material handling on out feed is the upgrade project for this year.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on March 29, 2016, 09:46:32 PM
It's not actually attached.  Just looped around and hooked tight.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ScottCC on April 12, 2016, 08:34:35 PM
I have contacted woodmizer for metal mizer parts that I hope will rotate the blade on a wm lt15 wide 90deg.  Why?  So that I can convert the band mill to a band mill cut off saw.  WM has the best platform  in the mp100 lt15 wide tracks.  Can't wait to put together to have serious value added cabin logs for spec houses.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on April 12, 2016, 08:37:16 PM
That sounds neat, I hope you keep us updated with pictures!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ljohnsaw on April 12, 2016, 08:39:20 PM
I have contacted woodmizer for metal mizer parts that I hope will rotate the blade on a wm lt15 wide 90deg.  Why?  So that I can convert the band mill to a band mill cut off saw.  WM has the best platform  in the mp100 lt15 wide tracks.  Can't wait to put together to have serious value added cabin logs for spec houses.

How wide and heavy of a blade will you be using?  Twisting it 90° will put a lot of stress on it. :o  Can't you do just 45° like a metal band saw does?  The head is at 45° and the 45° blade twist and gets you to 90°.  Or are you planning on just leaving the head alone and using the normal up/down function to make the cuts?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on April 12, 2016, 08:41:08 PM
This will be interesting. :o   :P
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on April 12, 2016, 08:54:17 PM
So if I'm following correctly, you're gonna be crosscutting to square up cabin logs to spec? 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: ozarkgem on April 13, 2016, 08:09:15 AM
I would think a Beam saw or a Beam cutter attachment for your Skilsaw would be faster.
Just my thinking.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Kbeitz on April 13, 2016, 08:11:51 AM
Or a Electreic chain saw with a lond blade mounted on the side of your mill.

http://morganchopsaw.com/electric-chain-bar-cut-off-saw/
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on April 19, 2016, 09:21:10 AM
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_1302.JPG)

Made hook to connect the MM chain to when I need to adjust a log on the mill.

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on April 19, 2016, 09:27:33 AM
Looks good, Bandit, just have to be careful not to overdo it and break something!   smiley_thumbsup
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on April 19, 2016, 09:31:46 AM
Hey, that is a good idea.   smiley_idea
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on April 19, 2016, 09:51:25 AM
Looks good, Bandit, just have to be careful not to overdo it and break something!   smiley_thumbsup

Thanks Smiley

I used a 3/8ths mild steel eye bolt that is not welded closed so it will give.

I picked up 2 and tried the first 1 to see how hard it would pull before it bends.

If something catches it will bend open.

Also I drilled the little hole just below the roller out to 5/16 and threaded it to 3/8 NC so that eye bolt screws right into the side support and that is a 3/8ths beaner that I use to hook the chain to.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on April 19, 2016, 09:56:05 AM
That should keep you safe, Bandit!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on April 25, 2016, 10:00:23 PM
As per a tip I took delivery of in GA, on the Yanmars, the exhaust isn't far enough above the intake and will clog the filter.  The exhaust need to be approximately 6" above the intake.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/34510/IMG_4946.JPG)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on April 26, 2016, 07:55:24 AM
Nice, just have to watch you overhead clearance when moving the mill.

Second option would be to put a 45° or 90° elbow on the exhaust pipe in order to get the exhaust away from the intake!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on April 26, 2016, 09:53:36 PM
It's well below the mast when the headrig is at 1".  The stainless steel bandclamp I used I've found likes to blind me when the sun is behind me lol


Ya try to be fancy and that's what happens...I might just take a crayola crayon to it, that oughta fix it
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: DR_Buck on April 27, 2016, 06:20:20 AM


 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_1302.JPG)

Made hook to connect the MM chain to when I need to adjust a log on the mill.


OK  I'm confuised.   smiley_headscratch    What is this all about?    What's MM chain?
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on April 27, 2016, 06:24:43 AM
Magicman chain, he has a cant hook or half a log tong at the end of the chain and uses the side supports to move the cant fore or aft
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: OneWithWood on April 27, 2016, 03:12:47 PM
C'mon, David, do try and keep up  :D :D ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: petefrom bearswamp on April 27, 2016, 05:10:40 PM
I use my roller toe boards and my tail man.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on April 27, 2016, 10:53:38 PM
I use my roller toe boards and my tail man.

My tail man is in his 70s and he is good. But moving heavy logs is just a PITA. This just make life so much easier. 

I still have some finishing touches to put on my chain and I am re doing my FAO's.

The spare tire change jacks work good but they are not designed for every day use. And i have had to replace 2 of them already.

I found a manufacturer that builds custom jacks and the owner of the company hooked me up with his Alberta distributor.  I got em for same price as OEMs pay for them and about 20 minutes per jack of modification work and they are installed in about 5 more minutes.

The 2 middle ones will take a bit more work. Gross combined jack weight capacity will be 15 tons. I think that should be sufficient   
 
YES I will get pics up but may be the week end before they show up.


   
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on April 30, 2016, 10:01:51 AM
New jack out of the box


 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_1333.JPG)


Disassembled wit hthe 2 holes driled ready to instal on the mill
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_1340.JPG)

More pics tomorrow.
Can I upload a short video of my junior apprentice? I did try and it wouldn't load.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on April 30, 2016, 10:08:53 AM
Oooooo, nice.   ;)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: PC-Urban-Sawyer on April 30, 2016, 11:26:44 AM
New jack out of the box


 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_1333.JPG)


Disassembled wit hthe 2 holes driled ready to instal on the mill
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22409/IMG_1340.JPG)

More pics tomorrow.
Can I upload a short video of my junior apprentice? I did try and it wouldn't load.

You can't upload videos directly to the Forestry Forum.

You have to upload them to YouTube and then post a link to the video on the forum page.

Perhaps someone can provide more info about how to do the link so the video will show on the Forum page instead of just looking like a link.

Herb
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on May 17, 2016, 09:14:41 PM
This is not an actual modification but an addition.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/IMG_0649.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1463533612)
See it?  It's the little blue thing on the lid.
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/IMG_0650.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1463533588)
Yup a stick-on moisture resistant analog "clock".  Clock (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B014D1D8KA/ref=sxr_rr_xsim1?pf_rd_t=301&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_p=2286650982&pf_rd_i=stick+on+clock&pf_rd_r=0TQBE27N394QMASHQ4E2&pf_rd_s=desktop-rhs-carousels&ie=UTF8&qid=1463533758&sr=1)  This should be handy when sawing hourly rate, plus I could even check it to know when to eat lunch.   ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: grouch on May 26, 2016, 11:29:24 PM
I’m really pleased to see so many useful mods posted on this thread.  Some I never thought of.   (where’s that wacky guy that put sled runners under his LT15?)

But I never intended this thread to be mods exclusively for and on Wood-Mizer mills.  Surely some of you Timber-King,  Baker, Peterson, Double Cut, etc. owners have made some mods to your mills also. Tell us about them..

The above is quoted from page 4 of this thread. (Check the date). A bit later on someone suggested that maybe other mills were perfect when they came from the factory. This may come as a shock to some people, but my Harbor Freight mill came from the factory in a state just a tad shy of perfection.

The clamp screw is too long when you get near the capacity of the mill.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/38564/hfmill-i4187.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1463420502)

Laying it down low enough to stop interfering with the carriage leaves you with not much holding an 18 -20 in. diameter log.

So...

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/38564/hfmill-i4193.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1463420504)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/38564/hfmill-i4194.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1463420505)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/38564/hfmill-i4195.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1463420508)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/38564/hfmill-i4198.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1463420507)

Same log. Same clamp position. No more interference.

Bibbyman also suggested that if anyone posted mods elsewhere to try to recreate the posts in this thread. The above info was mixed in with a bunch of other non-mod stuff in this thread  (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,90230.0.html). Will distill some more out of that for here tomorrow.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: barbender on May 26, 2016, 11:51:22 PM
You guys with lathes at your disposal are cheating ;)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on May 27, 2016, 06:35:45 AM
You guys with lathes at your disposal are cheating ;)

Yup, it sure does.

Nice job there Grouch, thanks for posting.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: grouch on May 27, 2016, 12:23:07 PM
Thanks for the kind comments, guys.

Hey, the only thing I did with that lathe was put a point on the rod. The threading was done by die and elbow grease.

Czech_Made, need more photos of that setup!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Czech_Made on May 27, 2016, 02:04:42 PM
1" shafting from garage door opener was used to slide dogs on, 1" apart 1/4" holes allow to pin the dog in place.  The idea was to have more dog sets - that i did not make yet - and use what fits the log/cut better.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/43116/DSCN3221.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1464188380)

The 1-5  ACME threaded rod moves the log up and down:

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/43116/DSCN3220.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1464188378)

The right dog on this picture is right angle, but I have to make a long bracket for cants, the dog is too short to hold it well.

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/43116/DSCN3226.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1464188384)

There is suprisingly strong force pushing the log to the side when cutting.


Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Czech_Made on May 27, 2016, 02:15:34 PM
Oh, and the dogs are piece of 1" DOM tubing - that was for my sidecar :( -  with a tube or square tube welded to it at right angle with 1/2"-13 nut welded to the end.


I also thought about using lag screws to hold the log to the cross beam - from the bottom, two at each end.  With some vedges, it could work.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: grouch on May 27, 2016, 11:53:02 PM
That log lifting mechanism is what really caught my eye. Thanks for the info!

I'm still puzzling over a good all-around clamping system. Obviously the old dogs that you hammer into the log and into wooden bunks are not the best or they'd still be used a lot. All non-hydraulic clamping means that I've seen are variations on screws or cams.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: grouch on May 28, 2016, 12:12:08 AM
The HF mill comes with enough track to cut a 9 ft 2 inch log. There are rumors that owners of other sawmills can call up the manufacturer or dealer and just order extra track. Might just be internet myth, though.

I acquired some W beams some years ago in anticipation of making a bandsaw sawmill from scratch. They weren't my first choice for a track, but they were cheap.

Have to join a pair together, so... brackets!

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/38564/hfmill-i4264.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1464114027)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/38564/hfmill-i4266.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1464114027)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/38564/hfmill-i4267.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1464114030)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/38564/hfmill-i4268.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1464114031)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/38564/hfmill-i4270.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1464114033)

Original track spacing, outside to outside
Extension to match:

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/38564/hfmill-i4271.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1464114032)

Bolt it together

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/38564/hfmill-i4272.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1464114034)

Fiddle with strings and blocks and levels and a grinder for a while

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/38564/hfmill-i4274.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1464114037)

Then roll beyond the green tracks (don't forget to reposition the carriage stops!)

(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/38564/hfmill-i4275.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1464114038)

Since the 9'-2" maximum includes space for the carriage before and after the cut, anything added to the existing tracks is all usable cutting distance.

I added 13'-6" so my length of cut is now 22'-8". Now I just have to find and move some logs that long.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Czech_Made on May 28, 2016, 07:44:37 PM
We are of one blood, you and I, grouch  ;D

I can just see myself coming up with similar solutions to your needs. ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on May 31, 2016, 10:06:16 PM
The drivers side cover busted off the handle and the dust shield collector unit mabobber..I welded the chute thingy, nothing special, but I wasn't sure if the handles were weldable with my wire feeder and solid wire and argon/c02...so I tried it, and it worked...really noting special but I figured that if someone had same problem it might be good to know u can weld it.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/34510/IMG_5236.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1464746563)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on June 01, 2016, 06:26:09 AM
Had to fix mine too. :D :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on June 01, 2016, 06:55:05 AM
Obviously something happened that was not supposed to happen ??   ???
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Ga Mtn Man on June 01, 2016, 08:36:00 AM
I can't see why you would need to do this.  Please explain. ???
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: mesquite buckeye on June 01, 2016, 10:31:06 AM
I'm guessing the small bolt broke off inside the handle.

Mine just used to vibrate out. now they are properly rusted and stay put. ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 69bronco on June 01, 2016, 07:54:14 PM
Good looking bead there 4x!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on June 01, 2016, 07:55:05 PM
Mine kept falling off until I lost the thing. So I grab an allen wrench, Fix now. :D :D :D :D

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/22511/SAM_0641.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1464824285)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on June 01, 2016, 08:01:16 PM
I had to weld it because the blade bit off the head of the bolt.  It's right in the line of fire.  The other one taint far from being bit off.  Look at the dowel that plugs into the top hole for the cover, that things been gnawed on a time or two I'd say...


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/34510/IMG_5310.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1464825565)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on June 01, 2016, 08:24:42 PM
 :o  In two years??   ???
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on June 01, 2016, 08:31:52 PM
He's hard on things MM. :D :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on June 01, 2016, 08:49:26 PM
 :o  I am wondering how many thrown/broken blades it took to caused that many tooth marks.   ???
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Peter Drouin on June 01, 2016, 09:51:37 PM
:o  I am wondering how many thrown/broken blades it took to caused that many tooth marks.   ???


4 :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on June 01, 2016, 10:02:11 PM
 :D :D :D


MM don't ever sell your mill! 
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on June 01, 2016, 10:17:28 PM
I wanna see what the inside of Jake's covers look like on his Hazelhurst 70...they are prolly a lot lighter than they were new
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on June 02, 2016, 06:54:05 AM
Mine is 18 years old.  You don't wanna see the claw marks on it.   :o
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Czech_Made on June 02, 2016, 07:01:52 AM
Nothing wrong with blue flame fix  ;D

The drivers side cover busted off the handle and the dust shield collector unit mabobber..I welded the chute thingy, nothing special, but I wasn't sure if the handles were weldable with my wire feeder and solid wire and argon/c02...so I tried it, and it worked...really noting special but I figured that if someone had same problem it might be good to know u can weld it.


(http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/34510/IMG_5236.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1464746563)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: reswire on June 02, 2016, 08:47:58 AM
Hey Bibby,
Do you know of a way to increase the lift head motor on a LT 40 HD?  I love my mill, but the head life is painfully slow sometimes, and I'd like to make it faster without buying the super!!   ;D ;D  Is it simply a matter of changing a motor, or is it more to it than that?   Any ideas?

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: grouch on June 02, 2016, 10:00:43 AM
This thread has gotten so huge it needs an INDEX!

Here 'tis. Rough and in chronological order as they appeared in the thread. Not sorted by type of mod or whether brand-specific or generic. Just chrono index. Dunno if Bibbyman can edit the first post to include this (or even if he'd want to), but here 'tis anyway.

Needs work, but I need a break.

reverse bolts on Wood-Mizer cover plate (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg105960.html#msg105960)

two sacrificial boards for sawing shorts (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106124.html#msg106124)

12V fuel pump for priming diesel engine (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106133.html#msg106133)
12V fuel pump for priming diesel engine (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106310.html#msg106310)

hydrostatic carriage drive and chain hoist for log turning (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106169.html#msg106169)
hydrostatic carriage drive and chain hoist for log turning (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106285.html#msg106285)

R.V. level on mill (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106175.html#msg106175)

platform for WM walkers (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106320.html#msg106320)

carriage return switch (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106404.html#msg106404)

changing Wood-Mizer from mobile to stationary (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106413.html#msg106413)

2nd battery, oil pressure, tach, micro switches on clutch handle for lube and engine, marker lights, spot lights (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106432.html#msg106432)

lights to tires, head, posts (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106436.html#msg106436)

spring to LubeMizer tube (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106437.html#msg106437)

hydraulic solenoid valve indicator light (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106438.html#msg106438)

glass sediment bowl (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106439.html#msg106439)

garden hose to cover leg hazards (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106440.html#msg106440)

hydraulic hose to protect loader ram fittings from breakage (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106441.html#msg106441)

sleeve to hang fenders, wrenches, ammo box (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106442.html#msg106442)

block of oak to replace bearing (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106444.html#msg106444)

movable scale becomes special scale (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106445.html#msg106445)

file for blade (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106446.html#msg106446)

Moon hubcap as skid (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106447.html#msg106447)

buddy bearings and spare tire (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106448.html#msg106448)

scale and log lights (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg107023.html#msg107023)

light for night sawing (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg107371.html#msg107371)

brush for bark fuzz, rounded power strip, fenders filled for billboards (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg109357.html#msg109357)

manual to power back supports (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg111923.html#msg111923)

guard as belt cleaner (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg112416.html#msg112416)

forward battery box, keyed switch, oil pressure, tach, 3 inch backstops (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg112506.html#msg112506)

stainless steel bolts with Nylock nuts (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg112586.html#msg112586)

double head chain, lights, line levels, jack (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg112615.html#msg112615)

water tube relocate, deflector protector (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg112758.html#msg112758)
water tube relocate, deflector protector (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg112984.html#msg112984)

sawdust drag with overhead return, table spacing (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg112863.html#msg112863)

throttle activated windshield washer blade sprayer (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg113020.html#msg113020)

other manual back support converted to powered (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg118309.html#msg118309)

lever mod, switch for 2nd loader arms, no tongue (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg128348.html#msg128348)

chain turner idler (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg128552.html#msg128552)

solid square for chain turner rollers (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg128745.html#msg128745)

dragback deck extension (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg131606.html#msg131606)

tape measure magnet (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg153733.html#msg153733)

board guide (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg155469.html#msg155469)

replace blade tensioning lever with nut (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg170017.html#msg170017)

loader mod for short logs (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg171993.html#msg171993)

wrench hanger (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg172431.html#msg172431)

hook and bar for earmuffs and gloves (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg172555.html#msg172555)

DC fan for sawdust (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg172640.html#msg172640)
DC fan for sawdust (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg172652.html#msg172652)

closet basket (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg175818.html#msg175818)

umbrella (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg176241.html#msg176241)

handle bars and throttle (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg183406.html#msg183406)

traction for step (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg184118.html#msg184118)

sawdust chute cover plate (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg184122.html#msg184122)

ramps and extensions for offloading timbers (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg184374.html#msg184374)

handle for shifting side stops (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg184599.html#msg184599)

sawdust exhaust chute (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg185153.html#msg185153)
sawdust exhaust chute (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg185619.html#msg185619)

fork to clean sawdust chute blade stoppers (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg185265.html#msg185265)

chain substitute for dragback cable (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg190274.html#msg190274)

dragback motor prop (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg205403.html#msg205403)

castors for outriggers (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg209241.html#msg209241)

bicycle tach on idle wheel (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg215173.html#msg215173)

gearmotor for head height (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg216186.html#msg216186)
gearmotor for head height (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg216255.html#msg216255)

toe boards via ratchet binders (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg216234.html#msg216234)

load lock as log dog (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg218636.html#msg218636)

gearmotor replaces winch for head height (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg232450.html#msg232450)

blade guide motor rubber knuckle saver (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg233405.html#msg233405)

convex mirror (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg233488.html#msg233488)

balanced guide crank, ice tea bottle hand grip, oil filler sleeve, battery outlet/plug, cutout in mainsaw guard (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg238551.html#msg238551)

air quick connect (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg238903.html#msg238903)

oil fill extension, dust chute (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg239156.html#msg239156)

contact strip bypass with welding leads cable (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg242177.html#msg242177)
contact strip bypass with welding leads cable (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg265729.html#msg265729)

DC to AC hydraulic pump (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg244794.html#msg244794)
DC to AC hydraulic pump (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg270013.html#msg270013)

manual log turner handle (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg244853.html#msg244853)

roller toeboard (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg247857.html#msg247857)

accuset buttons for gloves (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg250785.html#msg250785)
accuset buttons for gloves (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg251388.html#msg251388)

squaring arms (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg267745.html#msg267745)

6 gpm AC hydraulic pump (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg269802.html#msg269802)

log dogs (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg273432.html#msg273432)

battery box (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg273549.html#msg273549)
battery box (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg273627.html#msg273627)
battery box (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg273747.html#msg273747)

rail guard and battery box dust sucker (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg278675.html#msg278675)

scale and magnets (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg290658.html#msg290658)

splatter shield (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg294900.html#msg294900)

hydraulic tank heater (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg320194.html#msg320194)

log stop scales (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg320476.html#msg320476)

LED tail lights (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg320679.html#msg320679)

roller chain board guide (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg320689.html#msg320689)

tubing light protector (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg321165.html#msg321165)

mechanical remote controls (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg332271.html#msg332271)

gear oil drain plug (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg344424.html#msg344424)

dragback arm pivot joint pin (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg366229.html#msg366229)

water drum, hose, tap, pump, switch (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg366640.html#msg366640)

tape measures and magnets for scales (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg378178.html#msg378178)

umbrella on accuset (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg381311.html#msg381311)

LubeMizer retrofit (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg412525.html#msg412525)

water tank with air hose quick coupling (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg413921.html#msg413921)

offbearer table with roller (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg440580.html#msg440580)

roller chain board guide details (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg442828.html#msg442828)

sawdust chute clean-out fork (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg445565.html#msg445565)

water lube to drive side, 2nd valve on lube tube (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg493075.html#msg493075)

home made autoclutch for LT40 (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg532520.html#msg532520)

custom tool boxes (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg566526.html#msg566526)

custom aluminum fuel tank (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg566542.html#msg566542)

dishwashing detergent jugs for lube (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg566653.html#msg566653)

ratchet strap for head during travel (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg566938.html#msg566938)

washer with hairpin clip for head during travel (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg567026.html#msg567026)

remove hydraulic decal plate (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg567188.html#msg567188)

tripod and electric winch for log turning (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg575080.html#msg575080)

battery hold-down, battery isolator (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg575874.html#msg575874)

heavy sawhorses for mobile dead deck (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg575949.html#msg575949)

battery terminal short prevention (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg576011.html#msg576011)

bucket for sawdust discharge (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg576787.html#msg576787)

forkliftable toolshed (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg576819.html#msg576819)

blade cover and log dog mods for Oscar (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg581021.html#msg581021)

hydraulic cover traction mod (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg582568.html#msg582568)

dragback removed for larger cant (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg582724.html#msg582724)

7 ft bed extension for LT15 (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg582965.html#msg582965)

hour meter, exhaust re-route, cold air intake restrictor, choke cable removed (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg586928.html#msg586928)

truck mudflap sawdust deflector, Norwood (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg586929.html#msg586929)

duck tape Honda fan intake (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg587292.html#msg587292)

trailer jacks (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg615573.html#msg615573)

blocks for stabilizers (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg615821.html#msg615821)

wedges for stabilizers (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg615929.html#msg615929)

Log Arch Mill Deck, Mark I. (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg617292.html#msg617292)

12VDC gearmotor speed control (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg617457.html#msg617457)

trailer axle front (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg627165.html#msg627165)

rubber bumper protectors (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg635376.html#msg635376)

boat winch to worm gear winch (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg635645.html#msg635645)

nuts as loading arm teeth (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg635741.html#msg635741)

cam cleat and rope control for dragback arm (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg636402.html#msg636402)

calculator and cyclocomputer (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg636434.html#msg636434)

umbrella mount using nut rivets to seat (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg637469.html#msg637469)

Ambidexter Thermostropter (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg638945.html#msg638945)

removable log stop extensions (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg643056.html#msg643056)

sawdust discharge chute (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg660904.html#msg660904)

hinged unloading ramps (for timber), bed extension with removable bunks (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg664964.html#msg664964)

broken blade for log clamp teeth (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg671407.html#msg671407)

blade storage (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg685384.html#msg685384)

half-pipe sawdust collection trough (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg690942.html#msg690942)

12VDC winch log turner (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg696864.html#msg696864)

saw lube solenoid switched by engine rpm (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg697857.html#msg697857)

lube tubing extension and re-route (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg724816.html#msg724816)

lube tube extension and re-route (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg725219.html#msg725219)

dragback guide fingers (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg728790.html#msg728790)

hydraulic toeboard reposition (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg782946.html#msg782946)

plastic drum blade storage (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg783285.html#msg783285)

Magic Can (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg783293.html#msg783293)

cut-down garbage can with expanding foam, blade storage (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg783485.html#msg783485)

clamp fangs (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg788106.html#msg788106)
clamp fangs (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg788166.html#msg788166)

seat umbrella (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg790802.html#msg790802)

LT15 clamp mod (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg916094.html#msg916094)

Norwood log loader extension plus winch (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg918458.html#msg918458)

belt cleaner tool (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg925176.html#msg925176)

stainless steel lube tube with bushing (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg925656.html#msg925656)

hydraulic control center mods, 3/8 drive socket tensioner, deflector board (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg925997.html#msg925997)

see-through debarker flap (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg929239.html#msg929239)

lube mixer side shield relocate (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg934032.html#msg934032)

marker lights as hydraulic solenoid trouble lights (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg934188.html#msg934188)

board return arm lower lip added - Wood-Mizer (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg942542.html#msg942542)

modified plastic jug guard mod for LubeMizer upper jet (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg943093.html#msg943093)

board return (dragback) arm lower lip added - TK 2000 (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg951543.html#msg951543)

LT15 clamp bolts as pins (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg953267.html#msg953267)

dust chute scoop welding and cover warpage (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg956456.html#msg956456)

modified (angled) board return arm lower lip (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg962749.html#msg962749)

clamp fangs, traction nuts, nut locks, umbrella holder (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg963546.html#msg963546)

end of mill backstop (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg963850.html#msg963850)

log shifter for loader (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg964130.html#msg964130)

clanger (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg968833.html#msg968833)

gun bluing rails (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg969293.html#msg969293)

removable bed rail risers with cant stops, electric winch turner / loader, extra battery (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg969550.html#msg969550)

bondo spreader as blade cleaner (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1050848.html#msg1050848)

Norwood sawdust chute deflector from tire (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1057146.html#msg1057146)

external battery and 5.5HP engine with 105A alternator (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1075256.html#msg1075256)

NO-OX-ID "A-special" for electrical connections (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1104818.html#msg1104818)

BX backstop mod (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1129234.html#msg1129234)

ball valve and needle valve for lube control (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1144260.html#msg1144260)

carriage activated lube valve (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1144306.html#msg1144306)

valve and tee for "breeding the system" and washing hands (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1144711.html#msg1144711)

request for explanation of "breeding the system" (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1144772.html#msg1144772)

suggestion for "INDEX" (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1179884.html#msg1179884)

fine adjust outrigger from jacks (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1181289.html#msg1181289)

fine adjust outrigger from jacks - step by step (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1182352.html#msg1182352)

permanent band shield keeper bolts (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1187141.html#msg1187141)

clamp lock bar mod (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1190485.html#msg1190485)

lube tube reroute (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1260855.html#msg1260855)

forstner bit for clamp teeth (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1295526.html#msg1295526)

water tank (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1307467.html#msg1307467)

lock for compressed outrigger pin spring (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1320617.html#msg1320617)

smaller alternator pulley (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1324996.html#msg1324996)

replace drive-in grease fittings with threaded (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1333020.html#msg1333020)

steel dragback roller table (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1334863.html#msg1334863)

dragback fingers and holder, dragback deck (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1335442.html#msg1335442)

TK hinge in dragback (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1335810.html#msg1335810)

mill as edger with vises (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1340502.html#msg1340502)

upside down broom on offloader (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1348583.html#msg1348583)

3rd toeboard (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1367402.html#msg1367402)

voltmeter (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1377525.html#msg1377525)

exhaust extension (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1385849.html#msg1385849)

HF log dog shortening (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1394891.html#msg1394891)

allthread plus coupling nut log dog, acme thread log height adjusters (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1394943.html#msg1394943)

HF track extension (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1395091.html#msg1395091)

welded dust shield handle (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1395961.html#msg1395961)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: OneWithWood on June 02, 2016, 10:12:35 AM
Nice work, Grouch.  Appreciate it  8)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Savannahdan on June 02, 2016, 10:39:28 AM
Grouch:  Thank you for the index. I've spent almost an hour looking at some of the modifications.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: pineywoods on June 02, 2016, 10:50:54 AM
Hey Bibby,
Do you know of a way to increase the lift head motor on a LT 40 HD?  I love my mill, but the head life is painfully slow sometimes, and I'd like to make it faster without buying the super!!   ;D ;D  Is it simply a matter of changing a motor, or is it more to it than that?   Any ideas?

There's more to it...The bigger motors need more electrons ie bigger alternator, then the drum switch contacts aren't husky enough. Search for "faster up for older woodmizers"  I didn't post it in the sawmill mods thread. There's an update which I haven't posted yet, but will do so asap..
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: mesquite buckeye on June 02, 2016, 11:53:26 AM
Grouch:  Thank you for the index. I've spent almost an hour looking at some of the modifications.

 ;D ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: stihltoomany on June 02, 2016, 12:48:23 PM
This thread needs to be a book on sawmilling. Thanks for the index. I never have managed to read this entire thread. This will really help.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Ga Mtn Man on June 02, 2016, 02:11:24 PM
Hey Bibby,
Do you know of a way to increase the lift head motor on a LT 40 HD?  I love my mill, but the head life is painfully slow sometimes, and I'd like to make it faster without buying the super!!   ;D ;D  Is it simply a matter of changing a motor, or is it more to it than that?   Any ideas?

I share your opinion on the speed of the head.  When I first got my mill the slow speed drove me nuts compared to that of my previous mill, which was hydraulically driven.  As an experiment, I changed the lift motor pulley on my LT40HD Standard to the same size pulley as is used on the Super mills.  I reckoned that there must be some excess lifting capacity since the mill can be ordered with much heavier engine options than my mill has(G29).  The motor had no problem lifting the head and, as expected, was about 50% faster but... the SimpleSet was no longer accurate at that speed, as much as a ¼" off.  After playing around with all of the hidden settings on the SS without any success,  I spoke with Rick at WM and was told that it can't be made to work without a firmware change, which is not available.  Changed the pulley back and just got used to the slower speed. :-\   
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Bandmill Bandit on June 02, 2016, 03:57:04 PM
Hey Bibby,
Do you know of a way to increase the lift head motor on a LT 40 HD?  I love my mill, but the head life is painfully slow sometimes, and I'd like to make it faster without buying the super!!   ;D ;D  Is it simply a matter of changing a motor, or is it more to it than that?   Any ideas?


I have tried a few thing but ultimately have not found any thing that really makes a lot of difference short of changing out the lift motor to the same one that is on the super with the wood mizer upgrade for that purpose.

It is the ONLY upgrade I have NOT done on mine to date and probably wont be doing. All the other upgrades combined made a very significant production improvements and in running the mill since all the upgrades I find the head lift speed is not as much of a noticeable issue any more.

There is a spring assist mod somewhere in the usfull mods but I found it made the head a bit to "lite in the cut" as you approached the lower cuts in the log.

I some times wish i had done the super lift motor upgrade BUT only because I could have added the full set works II instead of just the simple set.

With I all said and done i am very happy with my mill and head lift speed is a very minimal productivity factor if at all as my mill is now operates. The hydraulics, feed motor and simple set, board return with the out feed table and laser site, in that order will give you the most productivity increase you can get.

With all that done the lift motor becomes a matter of milling experience to get the head where you need it BEFORE you are ready for the next cut.     
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Chuck White on June 02, 2016, 04:12:21 PM
Hey Bibby,
Do you know of a way to increase the lift head motor on a LT 40 HD?  I love my mill, but the head life is painfully slow sometimes, and I'd like to make it faster without buying the super!!   ;D ;D  Is it simply a matter of changing a motor, or is it more to it than that?   Any ideas?


I have tried a few thing but ultimately have not found any thing that really makes a lot of difference short of changing out the lift motor to the same one that is on the super with the wood mizer upgrade for that purpose.

There is a spring assist mod somewhere in the useful mods but I found it made the head a bit to "lite in the cut" as you approached the lower cuts in the log.

It's called the Piney Wood's lift assist.

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17517/2013-03-31_17_35_18.jpg?
easyrotate_cache=1365813131)

 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/17517/2013-03-31_17_35_46.jpg?easyrotate_cache=1365813151)

I found that this system helped increase the speed a lot, but a year later I upgraded the motor and the gear box.

The lift assist is cheap and easy to do.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Ga Mtn Man on June 02, 2016, 07:02:49 PM
I have tried a few thing but ultimately have not found any thing that really makes a lot of difference...

It seems like you didn't read my post.   :-\

You absolutely can increase the speed (by about 50%) just by changing the pulley but, the SimpleSet won't work correctly.

Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on June 02, 2016, 07:29:12 PM
  MM don't ever sell your mill! 
OK, you pictured yours so I'll let you off of the hook and post up mine.
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/IMG_0729.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1464910046)
There are plenty of claw marks, but none are freshly done......yet.   ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on June 02, 2016, 07:34:08 PM
Self modified sawdust chute.  Kinda like the monkey said when he got his tail caught...it won't be long now.   :-\
 

 (http://www.forestryforum.com/gallery/albums/userpics/20011/IMG_0724.JPG?easyrotate_cache=1464910060)
It's only 17" long now.  A broken blade tore a hole through it which was constantly catching sawdust, especially ERC, so I whacked it off.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on June 02, 2016, 08:38:33 PM
Looks like you've changed a bolt there before!  Me, if I have to change it once and it can be welded then it will be welded! lol


Any particular reason your feed motor assy cover is off? 


I hacked my sawdust chute in half once I got the mill, the thing makes sawdust so fast you have to shovel too soon with the full length they give you.   It's the motion of the ocean..
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Magicman on June 02, 2016, 08:49:13 PM
Yup, the screws have vibrated loose.  Matter of fact, I tightened the one on the right today, but it wasn't going to shake out.  BTW, my handles are brass. 

That power feed cover was off (and lost) when I bought the sawmill.  I could build one if I knew what it was supposed to look like, or better, just leave it like it is.  It will slip when it is wet, but I don't work in the rain anyway.   ;D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on June 02, 2016, 08:55:24 PM
I was figgering that it had something to do with watching that belt if it twists around in the groove, or to keep cool hauling that operator chair back and forth all day  :D


Brass handles on your mill?  Boy WM really used to be fancy!
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on June 02, 2016, 09:00:16 PM
4x4, just flip the chute up. You can get 25 feet if you're pushing the feed.

http://youtu.be/TlMTxUwF-YY
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Kbeitz on June 02, 2016, 09:15:02 PM
I have tried a few thing but ultimately have not found any thing that really makes a lot of difference...
It seems like you didn't read my post.   :-\

You absolutely can increase the speed (by about 50%) just by changing the pulley but, the SimpleSet won't work correctly.
If you could change the speed of the encoder to match your
Speed increase then the simple set should work
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on June 02, 2016, 09:20:13 PM
Dave, I have been doing that recently, which I find helps me talk with the blade in a more spiritual fashion. 


But when I cut the chute, I was portable sawing, and I like to be as neat as I can, and often times there's things nearby that won't do to be covered in sawdust, such as flowers, firewood, ant farms, long-legged suntanning women, ya know..stuff
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on June 02, 2016, 09:20:50 PM
If I pushed the feed like that on my mill I would be saying surfs up dude
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods, faster up-down
Post by: pineywoods on June 02, 2016, 09:45:25 PM
Faster up-down speed for older mizers. Two methods. click here

http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,27272.0.html
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Ga Mtn Man on June 02, 2016, 10:10:20 PM
I have tried a few thing but ultimately have not found any thing that really makes a lot of difference...
It seems like you didn't read my post.   :-\

You absolutely can increase the speed (by about 50%) just by changing the pulley but, the SimpleSet won't work correctly.
If you could change the speed of the encoder to match your
Speed increase then the simple set should work

Kbeitz,

Do you have some inside knowledge of the proprietary code that runs the Wood-Mizer SimpleSet?  It isn't as simple as you think.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: grouch on June 03, 2016, 12:22:06 AM
Nice work, Grouch.  Appreciate it  8)

Grouch:  Thank you for the index. I've spent almost an hour looking at some of the modifications.

This thread needs to be a book on sawmilling. Thanks for the index. I never have managed to read this entire thread. This will really help.


Welcome. Glad it helped; wasn't sure if I was wasting time or not. When my eyes uncross I'll try to organize that better. Sure appreciate Jeff making it easy to use stock-standard html for links. That made it easy once the posts were cataloged.

Of course, now the index is out of date. :)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Dave Shepard on June 03, 2016, 09:52:06 AM
If I pushed the feed like that on my mill I would be saying surfs up dude

That was a 10° in 16 inch pine. You should see what it will do with a Turbo! :D
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Kbeitz on June 03, 2016, 11:11:17 AM
I have tried a few thing but ultimately have not found any thing that really makes a lot of difference...
It seems like you didn't read my post.   :-\

You absolutely can increase the speed (by about 50%) just by changing the pulley but, the SimpleSet won't work correctly.
If you could change the speed of the encoder to match your
Speed increase then the simple set should work

Kbeitz,

Do you have some inside knowledge of the proprietary code that runs the Wood-Mizer SimpleSet?  It isn't as simple as you think.
I have no knowledge of your machine. But if it has an encoder somewhere it´s reading so many 0´s and 1´s per movement.
So if that could be geared up or down to match the speed change of the carrage that should work.
I work with PLC´s and encoders and if you dont have a way to change the programing then you change the ratio of the encoder
or buy a different encoder.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: fishfighter on June 03, 2016, 12:50:50 PM
Need y'alls help. Looking for some ideas as to how to rig up a lock, to lock the saw head in place now that I have my mill on a trailer. Pictures would be great.

thanks.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: Kbeitz on June 03, 2016, 01:12:11 PM
I just welded a tab with an 1/2¨hole in it and welded it to the carrage.
When moveing I bolt it down to the track.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: fishfighter on June 03, 2016, 02:10:42 PM
Thanks, but I would have to do all 4 post. I wouldn't feel comfortable if I didn't.
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: thecfarm on June 05, 2016, 06:58:47 AM
I wonder if Jeff could move that index up to the top of this thread.  ;)
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: 4x4American on June 05, 2016, 12:35:26 PM
Grouch, heck of a job on the index.. smiley_clapping
Title: Re: Useful sawmill mods
Post by: grouch on June 06, 2016, 10:39:36 AM
Grouch, heck of a job on the index.. smiley_clapping

Thanks. Trying for version 0.2 now. If I get shot for this, it's all your fault.

Corrections, etc. appreciated.

Baker

   battery hold-down, battery isolator (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg575874.html#msg575874)

Circular saw

 
hydrostatic carriage drive and chain hoist for log turning (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106285.html#msg106285)
 
sawdust drag with overhead return, table spacing (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg112863.html#msg112863)

DIY saw

 
allthread plus coupling nut log dog, acme thread log height adjusters (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1394943.html#msg1394943)
 
gearmotor for head height, pt.1 (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg216186.html#msg216186)
 
gearmotor for head height, pt.2 (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg216255.html#msg216255)
 
gearmotor replaces winch for head height (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg232450.html#msg232450)
 
handle bars and throttle (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg183406.html#msg183406)

Diesel engine

 
priming pt.1 (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106133.html#msg106133) Use 12V electric fuel pump for priming diesel engine.
 
priming pt.2 (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106310.html#msg106310) Use 12V electric fuel pump for priming diesel engine.

Engine

 
air quick connect for fuel (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg238903.html#msg238903)
 
duck tape Honda fan intake (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg587292.html#msg587292)
 
exhaust extension (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1385849.html#msg1385849)
 
glass sediment bowl (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106439.html#msg106439)
 
smaller alternator pulley (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1324996.html#msg1324996)
 
voltmeter (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1377525.html#msg1377525)

Harbor Freight

 
HF log dog shortening (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1394891.html#msg1394891)

Level

 
R.V. level on mill (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106175.html#msg106175)
 
blocks for stabilizers (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg615821.html#msg615821)
 
fine adjust outrigger from jacks - step by step (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1182352.html#msg1182352)
 
fine adjust outrigger from jacks (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1181289.html#msg1181289)
 
trailer jacks (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg615573.html#msg615573)
 
wedges for stabilizers (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg615929.html#msg615929)

Lights

 
lights to tires, head, posts (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106436.html#msg106436)

Lube

 
ball valve and needle valve for lube control (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1144260.html#msg1144260)
 
carriage activated lube valve (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1144306.html#msg1144306)
 
dishwashing detergent jugs for lube (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg566653.html#msg566653)
 
lube tube extension and re-route (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg725219.html#msg725219)
 
lube tube reroute (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1260855.html#msg1260855)
 
lube tubing extension and re-route (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg724816.html#msg724816)
 
request for explanation of "breeding the system" (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1144772.html#msg1144772)
 
saw lube solenoid switched by engine rpm (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg697857.html#msg697857)
 
spring to LubeMizer tube (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106437.html#msg106437)
 
stainless steel lube tube with bushing (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg925656.html#msg925656)
 
throttle activated windshield washer blade sprayer (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg113020.html#msg113020)
 
valve and tee for "breeding the system" [needs further explanation] and washing hands (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1144711.html#msg1144711)
 
water drum, hose, tap, pump, switch (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg366640.html#msg366640)
 
water lube to drive side, 2nd valve on lube tube (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg493075.html#msg493075)
 
water tank with air hose quick coupling (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg413921.html#msg413921)
 
water tank (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1307467.html#msg1307467)
 
water tube relocate, deflector protector, pt.1 (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg112758.html#msg112758)
 
water tube relocate, deflector protector, pt.2 (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg112984.html#msg112984)

Misc.

 
NO-OX-ID "A-special" for electrical connections (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1104818.html#msg1104818)
 
boat winch to worm gear winch (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg635645.html#msg635645)
 
buddy bearings and spare tire (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106448.html#msg106448)
 
carriage return switch (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106404.html#msg106404)
 
castors for outriggers (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg209241.html#msg209241)
 
custom aluminum fuel tank (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg566542.html#msg566542)
 
guard as belt cleaner (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg112416.html#msg112416)
 
gun bluing rails (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg969293.html#msg969293)
 
replace drive-in grease fittings with threaded (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1333020.html#msg1333020)
 
stainless steel bolts with Nylock nuts (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg112586.html#msg112586)
 
suggestion for "INDEX" (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1179884.html#msg1179884)
 
trailer axle front (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg627165.html#msg627165)

Multi

 
2nd battery, oil pressure, tach, micro switches on clutch handle for lube and engine, marker lights, spot lights (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106432.html#msg106432)
 
balanced guide crank, ice tea bottle hand grip, oil filler sleeve, battery outlet/plug, cutout in mainsaw guard (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg238551.html#msg238551)
 
brush for bark fuzz, rounded power strip, fenders filled for billboards (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg109357.html#msg109357)
 
clamp fangs, traction nuts, nut locks, umbrella holder (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg963546.html#msg963546)
 
double head chain, lights, line levels, jack (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg112615.html#msg112615)
 
oil fill extension, dust chute (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg239156.html#msg239156)
 
removable bed rail risers with cant stops, electric winch turner / loader, extra battery (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg969550.html#msg969550)

Norwood

 
Norwood log loader extension plus winch (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg918458.html#msg918458)
 
hour meter, exhaust re-route, cold air intake restrictor, choke cable removed (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg586928.html#msg586928)
 
squaring arms (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg267745.html#msg267745)
 
truck mudflap sawdust deflector, Norwood (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg586929.html#msg586929)

Oscar

 
blade cover and log dog mods for Oscar (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg581021.html#msg581021)

Safety

 
LED tail lights (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg320679.html#msg320679)
 
battery terminal short prevention (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg576011.html#msg576011)
 
clanger (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg968833.html#msg968833)
 
garden hose to cover leg hazards (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106440.html#msg106440)
 
hydraulic cover traction mod (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg582568.html#msg582568)
 
ratchet strap for head during travel (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg566938.html#msg566938)
 
traction for step (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg184118.html#msg184118)
 
tubing light protector (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg321165.html#msg321165)
 
washer with hairpin clip for head during travel (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg567026.html#msg567026)

Sawing

 
12VDC gearmotor speed control (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg617457.html#msg617457)
 
12VDC winch log turner (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg696864.html#msg696864)
 
6 gpm AC hydraulic pump (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg269802.html#msg269802)
 
DC fan for sawdust, pt.1 (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg172640.html#msg172640)
 
DC fan for sawdust, pt.2 (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg172652.html#msg172652)
 
DC to AC hydraulic pump, pt.1 (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg244794.html#msg244794)
 
DC to AC hydraulic pump, pt.2 (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg270013.html#msg270013)
 
HF track extension (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1395091.html#msg1395091)
 
Norwood sawdust chute deflector from tire (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1057146.html#msg1057146)
 
bondo spreader as blade cleaner (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1050848.html#msg1050848)
 
broken blade for log clamp teeth (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg671407.html#msg671407)
 
bucket for sawdust discharge (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg576787.html#msg576787)
 
clamp fangs, pt.1 (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg788106.html#msg788106)
 
clamp fangs, pt.2 (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg788166.html#msg788166)
 
convex mirror (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg233488.html#msg233488)
 
dragback fingers and holder, dragback deck (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1335442.html#msg1335442)
 
dragback guide fingers (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg728790.html#msg728790)
 
external battery and 5.5HP engine with 105A alternator (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1075256.html#msg1075256)
 
forstner bit for clamp teeth (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1295526.html#msg1295526)
 
half-pipe sawdust collection trough (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg690942.html#msg690942)
 
heavy sawhorses for mobile dead deck (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg575949.html#msg575949)
 
hinged unloading ramps (for timber), bed extension with removable bunks (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg664964.html#msg664964)
 
hydraulic tank heater (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg320194.html#msg320194)
 
light for night sawing (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg107371.html#msg107371)
 
load lock as log dog (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg218636.html#msg218636)
 
loader mod for short logs (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg171993.html#msg171993)
 
log dogs (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg273432.html#msg273432)
 
log shifter for loader (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg964130.html#msg964130)
 
log stop scales (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg320476.html#msg320476)
 
mechanical remote controls (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg332271.html#msg332271)
 
mill as edger with vises (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1340502.html#msg1340502)
 
movable scale becomes special scale (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106445.html#msg106445)
 
nuts as loading arm teeth (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg635741.html#msg635741)
 
offbearer table with roller (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg440580.html#msg440580)
 
ramps and extensions for offloading timbers (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg184374.html#msg184374)
 
removable log stop extensions (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg643056.html#msg643056)
 
roller chain board guide details (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg442828.html#msg442828)
 
roller chain board guide (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg320689.html#msg320689)
 
roller toeboard (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg247857.html#msg247857)
 
sawdust chute cover plate (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg184122.html#msg184122)
 
sawdust discharge chute (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg660904.html#msg660904)
 
sawdust exhaust chute, pt.1 (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg185153.html#msg185153)
 
sawdust exhaust chute, pt.2 (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg185619.html#msg185619)
 
scale and log lights (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg107023.html#msg107023)
 
scale and magnets (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg290658.html#msg290658)
 
seat umbrella (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg790802.html#msg790802)
 
shorts (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106124.html#msg106124) Use 2 sacrificial boards to hold short logs.
 
steel dragback roller table (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1334863.html#msg1334863)
 
tape measures and magnets for scales (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg378178.html#msg378178)
 
toe boards via ratchet binders (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg216234.html#msg216234)
 
tripod and electric winch for log turning (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg575080.html#msg575080)
 
umbrella mount using nut rivets to seat (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg637469.html#msg637469)
 
umbrella (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg176241.html#msg176241)
 
upside down broom on offloader (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1348583.html#msg1348583)

Storage

 
Magic Can (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg783293.html#msg783293)
 
blade storage (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg685384.html#msg685384)
 
closet basket (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg175818.html#msg175818)
 
custom tool boxes (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg566526.html#msg566526)
 
cut-down garbage can with expanding foam, blade storage (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg783485.html#msg783485)
 
forkliftable toolshed (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg576819.html#msg576819)
 
plastic drum blade storage (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg783285.html#msg783285)
 
sleeve to hang fenders, wrenches, ammo box (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106442.html#msg106442)

Thomas

 
permanent band shield keeper bolts (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1187141.html#msg1187141)

Timber King

 
TK hinge in dragback (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg1335810.html#msg1335810)
 
board return (dragback) arm lower lip added - TK 2000 (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg951543.html#msg951543)
 
chain turner idler (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg128552.html#msg128552)
 
solid square for chain turner rollers (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg128745.html#msg128745)

Tools

 
Log Arch Mill Deck, Mark I. (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg617292.html#msg617292)
 
Moon hubcap as skid (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106447.html#msg106447)
 
belt cleaner tool (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg925176.html#msg925176)
 
bicycle tach on idle wheel (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg215173.html#msg215173)
 
calculator and cyclocomputer (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg636434.html#msg636434)
 
file for blade (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg106446.html#msg106446)
 
fork to clean sawdust chute blade stoppers (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg185265.html#msg185265)
 
hook and bar for earmuffs and gloves (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg172555.html#msg172555)
 
sawdust chute clean-out fork (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg445565.html#msg445565)
 
tape measure magnet (http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,7789.msg153733.html#msg153733)