The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:

iDRY Vacuum Kilns


Forestry Forum
Sponsored by:


TimberKing Sawmills



Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Norwood Industries Inc.




Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

Michigan Firewood, your BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

FARMA


Baker Products

ECHO-Bearcat

iDRY Wood Lumber Vacuum Drying for everyon

Nyle Kiln Dry Systems




Author Topic: Emergency heat  (Read 7688 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline york

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 849
  • Location: Newfield,ny
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Emergency heat
« Reply #40 on: December 16, 2008, 02:22:33 PM »
Hi all,

I have friends that live on Blue hill,above Sunbury,pa-they have the same heater that Jeff talks about-they have a small cabin type house,with wood heater as main-but they like the wall hung propane heaters so much,they are becoming the main source of heat....Bert
Albert

Offline beenthere

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 26932
  • Location: Southern Wisconsin, USA
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Emergency heat
« Reply #41 on: December 16, 2008, 02:31:07 PM »
.................
One thing is for sure;  If they get into a situation where any of these measures are necessary, I or one of my Siblings will be moving in with them for the duration of the problem. ;) :) :)


DanG
Isn't that threat enough for them to decide in favor of the wall-hanging heater, considering the aesthetics and all......

 ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D
south central Wisconsin
 It may be that my sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others

Offline Larry

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5903
  • Age: 70
  • Location: NW Arkansas
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Emergency heat
« Reply #42 on: December 16, 2008, 02:41:03 PM »
I also have a heater similar to what Jeff linked to.  I think it would be ideal as backup heat.  They have a thermostat so iffen ya got the pilot lit the heater will come on when the house temperature drops.  Would be quite nice if power goes out bout bedtime...your folks will still wake up to a somewhat warm house in the morning. 

Use the generator to keep the beer cool in the fridge and the TV on football games.  I just don't have a lot of confidence in generators for supplying heat.  Having said that my generator kept my folks in there home during the Kansas City ice storm of 02.  Power out 10 days and mom was on kidney dialysis.
Larry, making useful and beautiful things out of the most environmental friendly material on the planet.

We need to insure our customers understand the importance of our craft.

Offline isawlogs

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 8188
  • Age: 59
  • Location: Chelsea Québec
  • Gender: Male
  • A smile is contagious ... Start an epidemic
    • Share Post
Re: Emergency heat
« Reply #43 on: December 16, 2008, 03:45:36 PM »
 Seeing as every body else has given his 2¢ here , might as well jump in two .  ;D
I have a generator set up outside in its own little cabane , its a 5500 watts and it powers the house here when power goes out .. yes I wrote when .... We live at the end of the road , and the end of the line 14 poles from the neighbour , when power goes out in a storm , ya can bet we are not on the first to be serviced list .
  The generator powers the fridge, the 2 freezers, the water pump, a light in each room , a few plugs and the furnace fan .
  The furnace is a wood/electric/heat pump combo , when out of power we only use the wood once the generator is going . the generator has its own panel wich is run off the main panel , one must shut the incoming power from hydro breaker and connect the generator breaker.
   
    I would get the propane heater that Jeff has in the cabine , and keep the generator for the lights and radio/tv , fridge /freezer and a few fans ... Well ya never know , it aint always cold out when power goes ... I would not touch the fire place , it can always be used to make a fire and cook on . one needs to eat at one point . Well I know I would be using it to make me some food ...  ;D
A man does not always grow wise as he grows old , but he always grows old as he grows wise .

   Marcel

Offline dolittle

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 57
  • Location: Rangeley, Maine
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Emergency heat
« Reply #44 on: December 16, 2008, 04:58:58 PM »
Instead of installing a few outlets around to plug some items in why not install a small transfer switch or a Gen-Tran (brand name).  This connects to the generator and is wired into the breaker box and powers up predetermined circuits like the ceiling paddle fans to bring down heat, microwave for food or instant coffee.  The small systems have 6 circuits and all you do is move the toggle switch and it connected.  They are very easy to connect up.

Offline old joe

  • In Memoriam
  • *
  • Posts: 197
  • Age: 77
  • Location: ashland al
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Emergency heat
« Reply #45 on: December 16, 2008, 05:09:27 PM »
DanG   My gas logs sit in an existing fireplace.
It doesn't have glass doors but I would guess you could leave them open.
Your folks will like the way they look.
You will like the ease of install.
Good luck.
Joe
THE NEW YANKEE TIL A NEWER ONE ARRIVES THEN I\'LL BE THE OLD YANKEE

Offline beenthere

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 26932
  • Location: Southern Wisconsin, USA
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Emergency heat
« Reply #46 on: December 16, 2008, 05:28:20 PM »
Just follow the safety procedures, and you should be fine.

Propane Heaters: Carbon Monoxide Deaths
When a propane heater is lit, it consumes oxygen and produces carbon monoxide as a by-product. Carbon monoxide is an odorless tasteless gas that competes with oxygen binding molecules in our blood. Early symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include headache and nausea. On prolonged exposure, it can cause cardiovascular collapse, coma and eventually death.
Deaths related to carbon monoxide are normally seen when people go out camping with indoor propane heaters. Inside the closed tents, there is no outlet for carbon monoxide and no inlet for oxygen. Further, campers, having spent the entire day hiking fall asleep immediately unaware of what is happening and some unfortunately never wake up.
It is always advisable to get a carbon monoxide detector fitted in the room like the garage or the green house where the propane heater will be used extensively. These days propane heaters fitted with oxygen detectors are also available. These detectors sound an alarm when the oxygen level falls under a pre-determined value. This will indicate that the carbon monoxide level is rising in the room.
south central Wisconsin
 It may be that my sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others

Offline Raider Bill

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 7250
  • Location: S.E. Tenn & Floridas Gulf Coast
  • Gender: Male
  • Who will pull the wagon when everyone rides?
    • Share Post
Re: Emergency heat
« Reply #47 on: December 16, 2008, 05:35:45 PM »
I like my gas log set up too course I don't need it for heat but it does put out a considerable amount.
Mine has a remote control, push of a button and you have fire, can adjust it and it even has a timer which will turn on shut off at a predetermined time. Ebay $300, 3 years ago.

That infrared that Jeff mentioned looks to be the ticket for straight heat.
The First 60 years of childhood is always the hardest.

Offline Radar67

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 3912
  • Age: 153
  • Location: Collins/Seminary, MS
  • Gender: Male
  • Cuttin Wood Now For My House Later.
    • Share Post
    • Stewart Photography
Re: Emergency heat
« Reply #48 on: December 16, 2008, 07:28:37 PM »
BT, I understand exactly where you are coming from, but the ventless heaters were designed to use indoors without the problems. My Mom has used them exclusively for a couple of years and never had a problem with Carbon Monoxide. Her heater does have a sensor and if oxygen levels get too low, the heater shuts off until levels are normal again. Her heater has never shut down. I think the sensors are required on the ventless heaters.

I've noticed that the only flame produced by her heaters are the pilot and an initial flame when the heater first comes on. After that, the flame is not apparent, just the glow of the heating grates.

The detector is good advice though.
"A man's time is the most valuable gift he can give another." TOM

If he can cling to his Blackberry, I can cling to my guns... Me

This will kill you, that will kill you, heck...life will kill you, but you got to live it!

"The man who can comprehend the why, can create the how." SFC J

Offline StorminN

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 816
  • Location: Sequim, WA USA
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Emergency heat
« Reply #49 on: December 16, 2008, 07:51:27 PM »
It has four outlets on it but I'm not sure if they are 15 or 20 amp capacity.  The longest run would be about 40 feet.  What size wire should I use?  I have a roll of 14ga on hand.  Would that be big enough?

DanG,

If it's a 5,500W generator, it's probably two 20A circuits... if the outlets have a "T" shaped spade on the left side, they're 20A. If they're just two parallel blades that look the same, they are 15A. The generator might even have a little push-button circuit breaker above each outlet pair that is labeled... my Generac is like that.

-N.
Happiness... is a sharp saw.

Offline Slabs

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 809
  • Age: 76
  • Location: Mossy Head, Florida
  • Gender: Male
  • It don't get no better than flyin' sawdust
    • Share Post
Re: Emergency heat
« Reply #50 on: December 17, 2008, 08:18:48 PM »
Hey DanG.

This probably isn't a solution for an easy generator connection for you but it worked for me since I had a surface-mount breaker box.  Uses heavy-duty three-way switches and beats having to run special circuits for emergency/standby power or buying an expensive changeover switch.  You can just see the generator cable coming in the top of the box.

 



The little pink thingy on the back side of the door is a piece of flagging tape that I stick on a switch if I use it to isolate a circuit for maintenance.  Reminds me to switch back when finished.
Slabs  : Offloader, slab and sawdust Mexican, mill mechanic and electrician, general flunky.  Woodshop, metal woorking shop and electronics shop.

Offline DanG

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 13491
  • Age: 72
  • Location: Chattahoochee, Florida USA
  • Gender: Male
  • DanG, The Official ForestryForum Cussword
    • Share Post
Re: Emergency heat
« Reply #51 on: December 17, 2008, 10:46:20 PM »
That would be pretty cool Slabs, but we got a little problem here.  My Dad know's just enough about electricity to get it from here to yonder, in other words, enough to make him dangerous! :o  When we got the generator, his idea was to rig an extension cord with two male plugs and just run it from the genset to an outlet in the house.  He hadn't even thought about feeding juice back into the grid that way. ::)  That is a good part of my decision to go with an entirely seperate wiring scheme.  I don't want any chance that he is gonna try to use any sort of shortcut.
"I don't feel like an old man.  I feel like a young man who has something wrong with him."  Dick Cavett
"Beat not thy sword into a plowshare, rather beat the sword of thine enemy into a plowshare."

Offline rowerwet

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 70
  • Age: 45
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Emergency heat
« Reply #52 on: February 01, 2009, 05:42:04 PM »
My dad has a cabin (tiny three bedroom house) in Maine, He lives two states away, and the bank wouldn't sign on the loan without a central heat source. The cabin is on york beach and is realy only for the summer.
He put in a propane "floor furnace" it is a vented gas heater that sits under the floor, it requires no power as the thermostat is powered by a thermocouple that sticks into the pilot light.
You would never have to worry about power or generators with this as a backup, he has heated the cabin with this since '95. When I got married we lived in the cabin for the first year and a half, we made it through two Maine winters with it as the heat source. We just had to put a fan blowing the cold air back from rooms we wanted warmer (much like a pellet stove), the heat comes out by convection. There is a grating that covers the heater and you can walk on it with no problems.
It also has an ignitor on it like a gas grill to light the pilot. I have thought of putting one in my house here as we get power outages every time a deer farts in the woods.
Husky 460, Fiskars x27, X7


Share via delicious Share via digg Share via facebook Share via linkedin Share via pinterest Share via reddit Share via stumble Share via tumblr Share via twitter

 


Powered by EzPortal