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Author Topic: EAB invasion  (Read 2392 times)

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Offline 9shooter

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EAB invasion
« on: March 02, 2009, 08:06:59 PM »
Well, the dang bug has made it into the woods I am currently working in. This is also where I hunt so it's going to change the look of the woodlot. It's not a big wood and I just cut firewood.  I'm not transporting it out of a quarentine area and it is all around where I live. It got me thinking though. I wonder if there is any information out there on how the bug finds and identifies ash trees? I figure it must rely on chemical markers that we know as smells. It got me to thinking that if you could change the way ash trees smell that the bug might not be able to find them? It would seem cost prohibitive to do much. I understand that you can deliver insecticides systemically to kill the bugs but the cost is rather high. I just hate to give up. I hate the loss of so many species of trees caused by indifferent importers. Another cost of globalization.
Earth First! We'll log the other planet's later!

Offline Ed

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Re: EAB invasion
« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2009, 07:54:44 AM »
If you have found signs of infestation (exit holes?), IMO, it's to late. The damage has been done.
EAB treatments need to be done as a preventative measure to kill the pest after the eggs hatch & before they do damage.

I've spent the last 2 months cutting nothing but Ash, up to 24" dbh and 80' tall. If you peel a section of bark off, you'll find the larva will have completely destroyed the trees ability to move nutrients.

Ed

Offline 9shooter

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Re: EAB invasion
« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2009, 08:54:44 AM »
Yah, I knew that. I was just wondering about the efforts to halt the invasion. I did e-mail the MSU  Phd who is working on the issues. My dad was an entomologist who was consulted a few times on invasive species. I know that any ideas are sometimes helpful. I expect to be cutting a lot of ash these next few years. BE safe and wear a hat.
Earth First! We'll log the other planet's later!

Offline Ed

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Re: EAB invasion
« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2009, 09:17:44 AM »
BE safe and wear a hat.

Yes!
You will find when felling EAB Ash they are in much worse shape than you realize. The tops will literally explode on impact. Look up often, watch for widowmakers. Hinges need to be left thicker than normal or you will lose directional control when felling.
Take extra time with these trees, think everything through.
When the tree starts to go.........run like hell.

Ed

Offline beenthere

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Re: EAB invasion
« Reply #4 on: March 03, 2009, 11:02:42 AM »
Ed
After how much time does this loss of wood strength happen?

south central Wisconsin
 It may be that my sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others

Offline Ed

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Re: EAB invasion
« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2009, 12:13:47 PM »
I would say 2-3 years from the first signs of infection. EAB kills the tree from the top down, this is evident by the trunk of the tree starting to "sucker out", nutrients can't reach the crown, the tree tries to save itself by sprouting branches from the once limbless trunk. This process allows the crown to die off & start to get brittle before the tree is completely dead.

Ed


Offline beenthere

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Re: EAB invasion
« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2009, 01:56:22 PM »
Thanks.
I can see where the crown branches would become dry and brittle, but am concerned that the hinge wood would be affected, and become brittle.

If so, that would be an indication that any wood recovered from the dead ash would have less strength in tension.
And that would impair its potential value and end use...especially regards the NDS design specs for ash (from another thread).  Anyone know of any strength testing with EAB killed ash?

I'll sniff around.  :)
south central Wisconsin
 It may be that my sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others

Offline 9shooter

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Re: EAB invasion
« Reply #7 on: March 03, 2009, 03:55:57 PM »
I know that some loggers will not fell an ash, alive or dead, with out chaining the trunk. If you are not familiar with the concept, it means you wrap a chain around the trunk a foot or 2 above your felling cuts and hook it off. I usually go around twice before hooking the chain on itself. This will control a barber chair split when it happens. I think ash is right near the top when it comes to that . I know the firewood blocks split like a dream. I can't think of the felling notch name many guys also use. This is the method of notching the felling direction, side cutting, and then plunge cutting from the side leaving some meat at the back opposite the notch to establish a hinge. The last thing you do is cut that last bit of uncut back cut and then run like hell. I use this type of felling cut on almost every leaner tree I run into.
Earth First! We'll log the other planet's later!

Offline stonebroke

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Re: EAB invasion
« Reply #8 on: March 03, 2009, 07:32:40 PM »
bore cut

Stonebroke

Offline 9shooter

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Re: EAB invasion
« Reply #9 on: March 04, 2009, 01:29:17 PM »
Bore cut, Right, thanks
Earth First! We'll log the other planet's later!

Offline letemgrow

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Re: EAB invasion
« Reply #10 on: March 05, 2009, 03:36:14 PM »
It sounds like the American Chestnut all over again...hopefully a few trees will be the type that the EAB does not touch and they can be used to replant ash.  I know I have a few growing in the fertile bottomland soils that I have.  It's only a matter of time before they make it, along with the gypsy moth.  Gotta love imports.


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