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Author Topic: What's this one.  (Read 1675 times)

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Offline LeeB

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What's this one.
« on: September 20, 2009, 08:34:15 PM »
 It ain't local for sure. First time I ever saw one. They're planted in orchards every where here.






I can guarantee you they taste awful. Never ate an unprocessed one before and won't do it again. Don't taste nay better green or black.
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Offline Radar67

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Re: What's this one.
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2009, 09:05:01 PM »
Olive
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Offline LeeB

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Re: What's this one.
« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2009, 10:30:25 PM »
Pretty easy with the fruit right in front of you. I don't know what cooking and brining them does to change the taste, but I do know they are horrible raw.
'98 LT40HDD/Lombardini, Case 580L, Cat D4C, JD 3032 tractor, JD 5410 tractor, Husky 346, 372 and 562XP's. Stihl MS180 and MS361, 1998 and 2006 3/4 Ton 5.9 Cummins 4x4's, 1989 Dodge D100 w/ 318, and a 1966 Chevy C60 w/ dump bed.

Offline bandmiller2

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Re: What's this one.
« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2009, 06:09:31 AM »
I think its whats called russian olive its planted all along our highways up in the northeast don't believe the fruit is edible I've never heard of anyone eating it.Frank C.
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Offline Weekend_Sawyer

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Re: What's this one.
« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2009, 06:36:44 AM »
When I was out in Colorado last year there was a very noticable aroma in the air that made me think of Eucalyptus trees. I was told it was the Russian Olive trees.
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Offline Dodgy Loner

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Re: What's this one.
« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2009, 11:03:01 AM »
Those look like true olives to me. Russian-olive usually has a more bluish appearance from far away due to to the silvery undersides of the leaves. Also, the fruits (which are, indeed, edible) are usually borne in clusters rather than individually.

From Wikipedia, this would explain why the fruits aren't tasty raw :):
Quote
Olives are a naturally bitter fruit that is typically subjected to fermentation or cured with lye or brine to make it more palatable.
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