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Author Topic: What kind of leaf is this?  (Read 8124 times)

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Offline fishpharmer

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Re: What kind of leaf is this?
« Reply #20 on: October 22, 2009, 09:28:23 PM »
Too bad about the shumard.  Did Dodgy saw it up? ;D

And thanks for the education.  I might try to get some
started on the sight I told you about.  It already has water oak.  Do they like same type site?
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Re: What kind of leaf is this?
« Reply #21 on: October 23, 2009, 09:35:52 AM »
Yes, swamp chestnut should do fine on your site.

Here is the champion shumard after the storm.  It was 141 feet tall, and being so dominant in the canopy, the crown acted like a sail.  Unfortunately, there was no way we could get this log out of the bottom without a really big skidder.

 

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Offline fishpharmer

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Re: What kind of leaf is this?
« Reply #22 on: October 23, 2009, 10:10:25 AM »
That is a shurnuff whopper.

Makes a fella want a Lucas or Peterson.
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Offline Tom

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Re: What kind of leaf is this?
« Reply #23 on: October 27, 2009, 08:05:29 PM »
Quote
Unfortunately, there was no way we could get this log out of the bottom without a really big skidder.

Think Portable Sawmills, Danny.  :D

An Alaskan would go in there and so would a Peterson or Lucas, if someone want the lumber bad enough. :)
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Re: What kind of leaf is this?
« Reply #24 on: October 27, 2009, 08:15:38 PM »
And if somebody wanted to tote boards a quarter of a mile thru that swamp  :D.  I guess that you just have to want it real bad, right ??? ;D
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Offline Tom

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Re: What kind of leaf is this?
« Reply #25 on: October 27, 2009, 11:21:08 PM »
That's how Fla_Deadheader does it, down there on that Costa Rica Island.  :-\

Hmmmm    Jim King in Peru too.  ;D
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Offline fishpharmer

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Re: What kind of leaf is this?
« Reply #26 on: October 27, 2009, 11:24:00 PM »
Sounds like a good excuse for an FF getogether. 8)
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Re: What kind of leaf is this?
« Reply #27 on: October 28, 2009, 09:28:08 AM »
One reason that shumard got so big is that it is inaccessable.   If it was easy, somebody would have gotten it years before, probably.  Also, it is in a Wildlife Management Area.  My Company used to own this area and lease it to the State of Georgia, and while the Company owned the land, I could have salvaged the log.  Alas, the property was sold to some speculators/investors in 2004 before the big shumard blew over.  They would not take too kindly to a human chain of board toters conveying boards through the swamp  :D.

But, all that aside, it was a magnificant tree.  There is another one about 100 yards down the bottom that is almost as big, but it falls a few points short of being a champion  :).  Hardwood trees that are 140 feet tall are rare and special.  Yellow poplar in the mountain coves can attain that height, but to see it in an oak is awesome.
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Offline ncsuclell

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Re: What kind of leaf is this?
« Reply #28 on: October 28, 2009, 01:15:54 PM »
Given your location in Meridian, MS, it is swamp chestnut oak like Mr. Tom said  ;D.  Nice shadow, by the way  :D.

Since the photo looks as if it's on a hill, it could possiblly be Chestnut oak (Quercus montana).  I remeber from my studies that it looks very similar to its Swamp cousin.
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Re: What kind of leaf is this?
« Reply #29 on: October 28, 2009, 07:43:27 PM »
Those big golf ball sized acorns give it away.  Chestnut oak does not have an acorn that will put a knot on your head :D.
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Offline fishpharmer

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Re: What kind of leaf is this?
« Reply #30 on: October 28, 2009, 09:23:12 PM »
ncsu, although it may look like its on a hill.  It is growing on floodplain land.  Every time we get a good rain its feet stay soaked for a day or so.  Actually the roadway behind it is on an elevated levee.
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Offline climbncut

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Re: What kind of leaf is this?
« Reply #31 on: October 29, 2009, 12:19:51 AM »
Maybe 80 years old.

If that tree is only 80yrs old, then the growth rings would be 2-3 inches wide. It would surprise me if the tree was only 100yrs old. I've never seen a tree with that large of rings...not even pin oak.
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Online SwampDonkey

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Re: What kind of leaf is this?
« Reply #32 on: October 29, 2009, 04:47:02 AM »
When we talk cows and tree in the same sentence it usually refers to "cow shade spruce tree" and not the acorns. But, alas, white spruce don't have acorns. :D
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Re: What kind of leaf is this?
« Reply #33 on: October 29, 2009, 09:37:21 AM »
Maybe 80 years old.

If that tree is only 80yrs old, then the growth rings would be 2-3 inches wide. It would surprise me if the tree was only 100yrs old. I've never seen a tree with that large of rings...not even pin oak.

The diameter of the Champion was 69", a shade less than 6 feet.  It was 131 feet tall.  If the tree is 80 years old, then the average diameter growth would be .86" per year.  That would equate to growth rings that averaged .43" per year on each side, a little less than 1/2" of radial growth per year.  That is within the realm of reason. 

However, we don't know the actual age, but I have seen oaks on pampered sites that had growth rings of 1/2" per year.   But to your point, it could be older.  On that site, I could not imagine it being over 100 years old, though.

Just think that if it was in Texas it would be even bigger since everything is bigger in Texas  ;D  ;D.
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Offline Tom

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Re: What kind of leaf is this?
« Reply #34 on: October 29, 2009, 01:18:02 PM »
Contrary to trees that grow in New Brunswick, the South has some prime opportunities for trees to reach great heights, as well as large diameters.  Swamps and Hammocks, already inhabited with species of trees that reach great heights, like Cypress and Pine, will have saplings of their offspring reaching for sunlight through their already mature parents.

We have long growing seasons, plenty of sunlight, rich ground, plenty of water and, until recently, areas of undisturbed acreage.

Also, contrary to the general consensus that we rape forests, the south is full of agricultural people who appreciate the size and health of their trees.

I've seen Loblolly pine with growth rings greater than one inch.  That's two inches of diameter a year, or more.
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Re: What kind of leaf is this?
« Reply #35 on: October 29, 2009, 05:07:50 PM »
Contrary to trees that grow in New Brunswick Central Kentucky, the South has some prime opportunities for trees to reach great heights, as well as large diameters.

Tom Tom. Far be it for me to doubt anyone with experience in the south. I think you was referring to someone else in the thread. :D

Now getting down to diameter growth, our fastest grown native tree is large tooth aspen. I seen it grow in groves following a cut and reached 8" dbh in 13 years and 45-50 feet tall. Should grow more of it, it's worth as much as hardwood, sometimes more. It never grows in pure stands here, just little pockets or mixed in trembling aspen, but usually on the best sites. Trembling will grow on swamps as well as dry high ground.
Move'n on.

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Re: What kind of leaf is this?
« Reply #36 on: October 30, 2009, 03:47:02 PM »
Oops!  Yer right!  :D   Here's your chain back.  :D :D :D
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