The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:

iDRY Vacuum Kilns


Forestry Forum
Sponsored by:


TimberKing Sawmills



Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Norwood Industries Inc.




Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

Michigan Firewood, your BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

FARMA


Baker Products

ECHO-Bearcat

iDRY Wood Lumber Vacuum Drying for everyon

Baltic Abrasives Technologies Nyle Kiln Dry Systems




Author Topic: Antique planer  (Read 6947 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Al_Smith

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 9696
  • Location: Northwestern Ohio in the center of a giant corn field
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Antique planer
« Reply #20 on: November 22, 2012, 08:00:47 AM »
Some where in my deceased fathers pile of junk are the wicking ,ropage or what ever they call the stuff they use to pour babbit including some babbit ingots .

He was was a machinest/tool maker early on and often remarked in the 30's and early 40's of repairing shafts ,bearings  etc. for sawmills in the local area which once were plentifull .

Offline Ironwood

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4552
  • Age: 52
  • Location: Near Pittsburgh,Pa
  • Gender: Male
  • I need to edit my profile!
    • Share Post
    • http://www.branchandburl.com
Re: Antique planer
« Reply #21 on: November 25, 2012, 06:44:44 PM »
I had a couple early units early on. One single sided Cresent. The challenge is IF it has the HEAVY slotted square head knives. It is NOT so much the square head as it is blade availability. On jointers the square head is DANGEROUS, but "captive" in a planer less of an issue. More of issue is the metal fatigue on the bolts holding the blades and the knives. It is nearly impossible to get knives made for anything under a fortune (been there, tried that, no good) due to heat treating to harden, they will then tend to "move" on you out of plane....

 On the Forum here there is an old thread that we talked about a "negitive bevel" or "back bevel" on the old knives to get a better finish. I had found this in an old book that gave some insight. Here it is:

 

  

  

 

 I personally like babbit. Quietest jointer I ever had was a babitt 16" Cresent. Just need to "touch" the housing on occasion to see if she needs shimmed out or oiled. I too have some babitt rods here "just in case I need some". It basically entails melting, damming, cooling, "scraping" and chalking (to see rub points) then more scraping, and shimming.

 Ironwood
There is no scarcity of opportunity to make a living at what you love to do, there is only scarcity of resolve to make it happen.- Wayne Dyer

Offline Al_Smith

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 9696
  • Location: Northwestern Ohio in the center of a giant corn field
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Antique planer
« Reply #22 on: November 25, 2012, 07:28:18 PM »
 The gent I had mention who had that 24" Oliver single side planer also had a monster of a Cresent jointer .

My heavens 10 HP and 20 inch jointer with a table 12 feet long and no power feed .I cautioned him to never try and run it by hand with no feed because that thing had enough power to impale a person if it kicked back .Thank heavens he heeded my advice because quite frankly he was kind of slow in the thinking department and I worried he might do himself in which he didn't .A few stiches every so often but he still had all his fingers .

All that old stuff came from an old pattern shop that made patterns for both the Sherman tank plus patterns for Lima Ohio built steam locomotives during WW2 .BTW that old Oliver  had a knife dresser built into it .

Offline Dave Shepard

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 11068
  • Age: 2014
  • Location: Alford Massachusetts
  • Gender: Male
  • Geometrically proportional
    • Share Post
    • My homepage
Re: Antique planer
« Reply #23 on: November 25, 2012, 07:35:27 PM »
I like those big old machines. Babbitt bearings are nice when they are set up right. I have friends that do a lot of babbitt work on different types of machines. I'd like to find a big jointer. Found a 24" not far away, but the person who has it is fixing it up, and that might take a little while. :D
Wood-Mizer LT40HDD51-WR Wireless, Kubota L48, Honda Rincon 650, TJ208 G-S, and a 60"Logrite!

Offline Ironwood

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4552
  • Age: 52
  • Location: Near Pittsburgh,Pa
  • Gender: Male
  • I need to edit my profile!
    • Share Post
    • http://www.branchandburl.com
Re: Antique planer
« Reply #24 on: November 25, 2012, 08:59:00 PM »
I have had three 30" jointers here. One American, and early Porter and a later CM300 Porter. Just down to one now which is the CM300 Porter, lets just say that you gotta have a pair to flatten a BIG board on that puppy. It is BIG.

 I have three 30" Oliver 361's here, two need restoration/cleaning, the other is "plug and play"  they weigh just under 10k. They are the wedge bed version of the 261 Oliver.


 I love old ARN.....

Ironwood
There is no scarcity of opportunity to make a living at what you love to do, there is only scarcity of resolve to make it happen.- Wayne Dyer

Offline Dave Shepard

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 11068
  • Age: 2014
  • Location: Alford Massachusetts
  • Gender: Male
  • Geometrically proportional
    • Share Post
    • My homepage
Re: Antique planer
« Reply #25 on: November 25, 2012, 09:02:22 PM »
At some point I need to joint some planking up to 24" wide. Some 3.5" and some 2.5". About 5,000 square feet worth. I think some sort of power feeder would be in order.
Wood-Mizer LT40HDD51-WR Wireless, Kubota L48, Honda Rincon 650, TJ208 G-S, and a 60"Logrite!

Offline Al_Smith

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 9696
  • Location: Northwestern Ohio in the center of a giant corn field
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Antique planer
« Reply #26 on: November 25, 2012, 09:37:47 PM »
It scares me to death on a little jointer hand feeding it I can't imagine a big one .I haven't been around any jointer for years and frankly don't care if I ever am again .

In a life time of working around all kinds of machinery that's one item  I'm just not comfortable around .

Offline Ironwood

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4552
  • Age: 52
  • Location: Near Pittsburgh,Pa
  • Gender: Male
  • I need to edit my profile!
    • Share Post
    • http://www.branchandburl.com
Re: Antique planer
« Reply #27 on: November 25, 2012, 09:54:26 PM »
Winston Church had designed a HUGE spring loaded feeder that was over top two of my 30" jointers. The assembly over it was 2000# and the cast base plate was another 1000#, then add the jointer 3-4K, made for a heavy unit. I scrapped all the components as I only wanted the jointer. I will see if i can find a picture.

 Ironwood
There is no scarcity of opportunity to make a living at what you love to do, there is only scarcity of resolve to make it happen.- Wayne Dyer

Offline TW

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 441
  • Location: ÷sterbotten Finland
  • Gender: Male
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Antique planer
« Reply #28 on: December 12, 2012, 01:18:34 PM »
I know this is an old thread but I just want to add that professional woodworkers hand feed big jointers all the time and with proper guards and care it is no more dangerous than hand feeding a small one. Maybe less.

Mine is 24" and I feel safer hand feeding it than I do hand feeding hobby sized ones. It has a proper European style bridge guard and a home made wooden guard that covers the portion of the cutter that is behind the fence. It feels safer mostly because the tablea are long and everything becomes more controlled when the workpiece is supported along the greater part of it's lenght.

Just my thoughts

Offline Ironwood

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4552
  • Age: 52
  • Location: Near Pittsburgh,Pa
  • Gender: Male
  • I need to edit my profile!
    • Share Post
    • http://www.branchandburl.com
Re: Antique planer
« Reply #29 on: December 14, 2012, 11:22:15 PM »
I am a "professional" and it aint no picnic, that 30" knife is chopping some serious air (and alot of wood with each rotation), I would love a "insert head" but ouch that would be some $$$$


Ironwood
There is no scarcity of opportunity to make a living at what you love to do, there is only scarcity of resolve to make it happen.- Wayne Dyer

Offline dhilbert

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 5
  • Age: 59
  • Location: near Green Bay Wi
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Antique planer
« Reply #30 on: February 02, 2013, 03:12:34 PM »
Hi guys, I work for a company that rebuilds electric motors, generators, hydroelectric generators,and such.  I am a machinist, 30 years, anyhow for rebuilding babbit brgs. we use a company in Milwaukee, Wi. called Fuison Babbiting, they can rebuild or make a new brgs. for just about any size or style of brg. the biggest one I have worked on were about 8.500 dia. ID. and 18" long. Don't know how pricey they are, but it is a source, just thought you guys would like to know. The oldest hydro I worked on was built in 1903, rebuilt in the 40's, then we rebuilt it in 2007. That is reliability.
Thanks,   Dan

Offline brb

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 40
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Gillett, WI
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Antique planer
« Reply #31 on: March 28, 2013, 08:16:09 PM »
I ended up not getting a good look at the planer, thought it was too much money. Did go look at a old belt driven 24" planer with an edging head. Cast and babbit, I sure love the old iron.   Brian

Offline Al_Smith

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 9696
  • Location: Northwestern Ohio in the center of a giant corn field
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Antique planer
« Reply #32 on: March 29, 2013, 12:00:24 PM »
Quite frankly that old iron  was designed to last forever .For all intents it has .

Things have changed in heavy industry .Because the manufacturing process methods change so fast it's not that heavy cast iron any more .It might at best have a usefull life expectency of 10-15 years .

After such time it becomes obsolete ,cut up for scrap and replaced with the newest methods and that's the way that story goes .

What is small enough for low production methods might be salvaged and the others end up as a bumper for a Toyota or a beer can depending on the material .

Offline Finn1903

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 151
  • Age: 43
  • Location: Hillsborough, NC
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Sunrise Oak Farm
Re: Antique planer
« Reply #33 on: April 02, 2013, 01:36:18 PM »
 

After such time it becomes obsolete ,cut up for scrap and replaced with the newest methods and that's the way that story goes .

What is small enough for low production methods might be salvaged and the others end up as a bumper for a Toyota or a beer can depending on the material .

I was teaching a fiber optics class at a GM engine plant in Definace OH. I got a tour of the place and got to see where the scrap metal is bring fed into the foundry to make Dura-max engine blocks.  The feed system and melter has a feedback sensor to pull in different types of scrap depending on the mix down stream.  I am sure some antiques have been melted down in that plant. 
Another sad fact is as time goes on we will have less trademen available who actually know how to work on the old equipment and align all the pieces and parts. 
WM LT40HDD47, bunch of saws, tractor, backhoe, and a loving wife.

Offline Framerguru

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 4
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Antique planer
« Reply #34 on: March 23, 2019, 09:05:59 PM »
Greetings all.  New to forum, had a couple of questions.  2 years ago I bought an old 24" planer.  Old guy I got it from bought it over 40 years ago, used it a lot.  When I got it from him he had installed a 5hp 220v electric motor to drive it.  I didn't have that kind of power in my garage, so I took it off and installed an 8hp gas engine.  Runs it nicely.  My questions are, can anyone help me identify my planer?  I have the original blades for it, as well as new ones that I use.  The original blades are stamped E.C. Atkins & Co., Lancaster, NY, 1926.  Unfortunately, these are the only markings I've found on this thing.  I am also looking to replace or upgrade the bearings on it, so if anyone could point me in the right direction, it would be greatly appreciated.  I am trying to figure out how to post pictures of it right now, so you can't see it just yet.  Thanks in advance for the help!

Jimmy

Offline Framerguru

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 4
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Antique planer
« Reply #35 on: March 23, 2019, 09:28:56 PM »
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Offline Al_Smith

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 9696
  • Location: Northwestern Ohio in the center of a giant corn field
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Antique planer
« Reply #36 on: March 24, 2019, 04:58:01 AM »
Wow ,that looks like an old line shaft driven machine .It's got some age alright .If I'm right on that many of them were converted to run from electric motors instead of shafts .I've got two line shaft  pieces,a heavy old Bowe and Emmes lathe and a Fosdick spotting drill with an x-y table that are both over 100 years old .These aren't babbitt but rather brass bearings with  gravity oilers .If you keep oil on them I'm not sure you could wear them out.Like I said before they made them  to last 100 years and I've got the proof .
    After that paragraph I really don't know what brand that thing is other than old ,nice paint job though  ;)

Offline Quebecnewf

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1085
  • Location: Harrington Harbour Quebec Canada
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Antique planer
« Reply #37 on: March 24, 2019, 08:18:17 PM »
Check over on the OWWM.com forum. 

Anything you need to find out about old woodworking machines can be found there.

Post back here what you discover 

Quebecnewf 

Offline Framerguru

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 4
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Antique planer
« Reply #38 on: March 26, 2019, 05:14:10 PM »
Thanks guys!  Like I said, I wasn't able to find any kind of manufacturers markings on it whatsoever.  The man I bought it from never said, and I think he's the one who painted it.  I do like that name Monster Mouth, so I kept it.  When I use it I tend to give all the pulleys and gears a wide berth, so I don't get grabbed and drawn into that mouth!  I will check up on the link you specified, and let you know what I found.  Thanks again.

JImmy

Offline Framerguru

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 4
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Antique planer
« Reply #39 on: March 26, 2019, 05:20:10 PM »
Oh yeah, I forgot.  I recently took the blades off and had them sharpened.  The ones that are usable were custom made by the previous owner, and they still have a lot of meat on them. So I can guarantee that I'm going to be using this thing for many years to come.  It has 2 blades, 24" long, and let me tell you, they will CUT!  Aside form a couple of my fingers while reattaching them, they can go through slabs of lumber without even bogging down!  I sawed up a few trees that were knocked down during a hurricane a couple of years ago.  I milled them up and sent them through, the Monster didn't even slow down.  And the sawdust!!!  Hahahahahaha!  It was snowing in my garage.


Share via delicious Share via digg Share via facebook Share via linkedin Share via pinterest Share via reddit Share via stumble Share via tumblr Share via twitter

xx
Grizzly Planer: G0544 20" Pro Spiral Cutterhead Planer

Started by Dan_Shade on General Woodworking

46 Replies
15198 Views
Last post January 11, 2009, 07:20:18 PM
by Dan_Shade
xx
New toy! A bit of an antique but it looks like it will do.

Started by Kipper on Sawmills and Milling

16 Replies
1906 Views
Last post January 02, 2016, 09:11:34 PM
by Corley5
xx
Antique new to me jointer

Started by Don K on General Woodworking

18 Replies
3967 Views
Last post December 25, 2007, 10:04:41 PM
by WDH
xx
My new Antique Saws!

Started by Kirk_Allen on Chainsaws

11 Replies
7232 Views
Last post May 01, 2005, 08:40:47 AM
by sawguy21
 


Powered by EzPortal