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Author Topic: flannel lined pants  (Read 5040 times)

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Offline momark

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flannel lined pants
« on: December 05, 2013, 02:36:45 PM »
Has anyone ever used the flannel-lined pants made by Arborwear(sold by Bailey's)? Are they plenty warm enough to wear without long underwear, etc/ And do they hold up well? Looks like a good product if they can be worn alone at 20 degrees and above. Thanks for any reviews.

Offline beenthere

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2013, 03:50:40 PM »
momark
Don't know where you are located. But everyone is a bit different to what is comfortable in cold weather.

I have a flannel-lined pair and have never worn them. Have been in the drawer now for at least 20 years.
Friend gave them to me as he ordered them too small (36 - 32). 

If I go out to deer hunt, I put on long underwear because I will be sitting all the time.

If I'm working, then I will have the chainsaw chaps over my Levi jeans and that is plenty warm down to below zero F. Don't go very often if the temps are below zero F. 

I bought some of the BadAss jeans from Bailey's but have not worn them either.. going on a couple years. Stick to my Levi's. 
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Offline submarinesailor

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2013, 05:22:33 PM »
I like mine.  But, I like the fleece lined one better.  Much warmer.

Bruce

Offline chucker

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2013, 06:42:30 PM »
with the recent cold snap were having here in the upper Midwest,i am wearing mine as the temp was only 4 above all day.... wont go with out them or my gaiters to keep out the wet snow! dry feet, warm lined pants and gaiters are a combo that's hard to beat! as far as wear ability time will tell as there only 2 weeks old ! wash easy and stays about the same as when new! out of 5 stars ===== I will go all 5*****!
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Offline John Mc

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2013, 06:43:47 PM »
Is the flannel cotton, or some other material?  If it's cotton, it's going to be pretty worthless for adding warmth if you sweat at all.  Once cotton gets damp, it doesn't insulate worth a darn, and it holds the moisture right against your skin, which suck the heat right out of you. (There's a reason that there's a saying among winter campers: "Cotton kills")

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Online celliott

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2013, 07:22:45 PM »
+1 to what John Mc said. If you're working outdoors and get it wet, it won't do you much good.
When cruising timber this late fall\early winter (October through November) I wore lightweight wool pants. Polypropylene longjohn baselayer. Kept me warm, and I would get wet, whether rain, or snow, or sweat.
I have flannel lined jeans, and don't often wear them. I'd rather wear a polypro baselayer under something else.
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Offline Oliver1655

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2013, 08:16:32 AM »
While I agree in wet/moist conditions wool is hard to beat, I have fleece lined jeans I wear a lot for temperatures 30 - 50 degrees.  When I sweat it is generally the upper body which is layered so that is not a concern for me.
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Offline plt

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #7 on: December 06, 2013, 09:49:57 AM »
  Layers are always warmer than bulk one piece.
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Offline DeerMeadowFarm

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #8 on: December 06, 2013, 09:55:41 AM »
I have 2 pairs of fleece lined Cabela's jeans. I wear then to work at the plant when it's wicked cold. The windows/walls in my office are'nt very well insulated. Long johns are better for true cold outdoor work IMHO. Being able to tuck the long johns into my socks eliminates drafts that you still get with flannel/fleece lined jeans.

Offline thecfarm

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #9 on: December 06, 2013, 10:04:01 AM »
I wear a pair of the green so called wool pants,I think some wool and a bunch of man made stuff. Than a pair of long johns and I am warm. I don't have to be out in the weather,so I head for the house when it gets down to 10-12°. My upper body gets a bunch of layers.
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Offline AdkStihl

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #10 on: December 06, 2013, 11:02:38 AM »
Flannel lined pants are a PITA to break in. Theyre just like a pair of work boots.
I'd much rather throw on my UnderArmor base layer and wear loose top layers.
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Offline webgal

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #11 on: December 06, 2013, 12:55:46 PM »
I have a pair of Berne's flannel lined pants that I drag out when I want to do some work in the shop. I'm pretty happy about them and they don't wick away any heat especially at the knees. My shop is uninsulated and the woodstove does take its time bringing things up to the low 60s in there while I'm working. I plan on dragging those lined ones out for some woodworking I need to do tomorrow in fact. We've had about 10 degree mornings of late.
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Offline John Mc

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #12 on: December 06, 2013, 01:26:52 PM »
Your body is always giving off moisture, even if you don't notice that your skin is wet (even during periods of inactivity, such as when sleeping). If your legs are staying dry, that just means that the moisture is evaporating faster than it is being produced.

If you are mostly stationary, or working in a shop, you may not have a problem with cotton.  If you are out hiking/hunting/cutting trees, odds are you are losing a lot more body heat than you need to if you are wearing cotton, especially if it's the layer closest to your skin.  You'll also notice it a lot more if you are engaged in stop-and-go activities (huffing in to your favorite hunting spot through tough brush or deep snow, then sitting motionless, takig a long hard ski run, then sitting on the chairlift back up the mountain).  It may not be an issue in many cases, but if you are out in a remote area or for a prolonged time in cold weather, it's something to be aware of.

As a kid, I used to go downhill skiing with just my blue jeans over a pair of the old cotton/wool blend duofold long underwear in -10 or -15˚F weather  (I coming in for a break and finding that even my thighs were just about completely numb). I don't know how I did it, but I know I sure can't get away with that now (even with the ski lodge conveniently near by for a quick warmup).
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Offline Windy_Acres

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #13 on: December 06, 2013, 04:06:02 PM »
I spend most of the winter outside in FLEECE lined jeans, although I have probably 10 pairs of FLANNEL lined, the fleece is much warmer. I cant stand to wear them inside, and it needs to be at least freezing or colder to wear outside and work. Its pretty windy here, daily, so our 32 feels more like 20. If the wind didnt blow, I would probably not wear them until it got down to 20.

If it gets REALLY cold, like below zero F, I put on my insulated carhartt bibs over my fleece lined jeans.

As far a brands, I wear several different.

Offline momark

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #14 on: December 07, 2013, 01:41:23 AM »
After reading some of the responses I thought the fleece-lined pants did sound better. After a little research I found some from Duluth(out of Wis.) called fleece-lined fire hose pants which sounded warm and quite rugged. Is anyone familiar with these are any of Duluth's other products?

Offline luvmexfood

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #15 on: December 07, 2013, 06:09:26 AM »
I have also wondered about the lined jeans. I once bought a pair of 100% military surplus pants from I think it was sportsman guide or something like that. They were military surplus from an eastern europe country. Gave a little of nothing for them. They were warm and if it was raining water would bead up on them. Now have to remember what I did with them. They may be in a rubbermaid tote in an out building.
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Offline Stinny

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #16 on: December 07, 2013, 07:42:09 AM »
My wife bought me a pair of lined pants years ago, and I had never worn them until about a month ago. It was about 15 degrees and windy, and I was just wandering down in the woods. They were very comfortable and warm. If I was working however, I can tell they'd be too warm and would get ruined quickly. Chaps and jeans with a Carhart coat are what I'll wear when stirring up a mess to roll around in. (My wife is convinced I've got a lot of dog & hog in me, with the blitz of dirt and debris I carry into the house sometimes.)
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Offline thecfarm

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #17 on: December 07, 2013, 09:20:35 AM »
That reminds me,My wife wanted to wash my chaps when they got dirty.  ::)  Than I have certain sweat shirts I only wear outside.I can wear a sweat shirt for a month and it will look like it's a couple years old from being so dirty. And,yes,see does get her hands on them and they get washed quite often. She will let them soak over night and put in her homemade soap and try her darnest to get them things clean. Than she complains she can't get them clean. It's only ground in sawdust and ground in dirt from me picking up rocks and wood. I can't under stand why it don't come out.  ::)
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Offline Stinny

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #18 on: December 07, 2013, 10:02:05 AM »
Now that you mention it, after my stuff is "magically" cleaned up, there's nothing like getting my head down into those ole rotten stumps and mounds of sawdust/dirt... rolling on my back. Takes about 5 minutes to get those ole "clean" clothes just the way I like em again.  Guess I might have a bit of dog in me after all...
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Offline beenthere

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #19 on: December 07, 2013, 10:58:04 AM »
Stinny, good one..  :D

I prefer to double layer, putting on a second un-lined layer of coveralls for outside and be able to shed it easy when coming back inside.
With the wood fire going and not wanting to change clothes, I'll stick to the un-lined jeans and add something outside. As mentioned, often it is just adding the chaps over the jeans.

If I am going out to a deer stand, then I go to the trouble of adding the long underwear first, then the jeans, and then likely the heavy wool pants. But takes forever to strip down when I come back in to the warmth inside.

One very comfortable outdoor outfit is my old army WWII thin wool jacket and pant set. A hand-me down and I find it very comfortable in the cold.
Reminds me, probably going to put those on shortly as a friend is having more trouble getting his old Ford 600 running and it is 6° outside where the tractor sits.
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Offline cheeves

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #20 on: December 12, 2013, 03:34:10 PM »
Have a pair of L.L. Bean ones on right now!! Bought them at Saver's, a discount store here, for like $4!!
Was just out in the woodpile splitting wood, and believe me you need them up here on this hill this afternoon!!!   :laugh:

Offline thecfarm

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #21 on: December 12, 2013, 08:33:27 PM »
Those same pants would be about $15-20 around here at a store like that.  Good deal.  :)
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #22 on: December 12, 2013, 08:52:38 PM »
I wear Stanfields under my work pants/shirt most of the time. But in the extreme stuff I dig out the wool pants. I've never warn out none of the wool items. Wool is warmer and tougher than cotton.  I could survive a night in a snow bank. 8) :D :D

I liked the little outpost up at Hyder, Alaska. Heavy wool pants for $20 bucks. 8)
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Offline Dusty Rhodes

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #23 on: December 12, 2013, 09:02:27 PM »
Guess I am the only one who likes his flannel Jeans. IMO they have there place.  Have two pair, one pair are denim and the other canvas.   I wear Gaiters when in the snow with them so getting them wet trudging through snow doesn't happen.  Mind you I am probably not spending the day outside in them, maybe running the tractor for a few hours or moving some wood. If I am spending the day out there then I am in my long johns and quilted bibs. I also wear the flannel jeans when I am in the pole building puttering around,  no heat out there but its dry inside the building. Maybe I am just lazy, its easier to throw the flannel jeans on than to get into the long johns and put the bibs on.  Wearing long johns under regular jeans would not work for me.  My regular jeans are snug enough as it is. Trying to squeeze myself into them with long johns on wouldn't be pretty.   

Offline Dusty Rhodes

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #24 on: December 12, 2013, 09:11:28 PM »
Wool pants for $20.  Around here they would cost well over $100.  Wool is a luxury for me.  I love wool, but it usually is not in the budget for bigger clothing items.  Couple of my children chipped in a few Christmas's ago and bought me a wool vest. That sucker ran them about $120.  I have some wool sweaters and lots of wool socks but wool pants that have any heft too them would set me back a bit I would think. Tell me how I can order heavy wool pants for $20.  I will gladly pay for the shipping!:) 

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #25 on: December 12, 2013, 09:26:17 PM »
Back in the mid 90's I lived on the north coast of B.C. and in the department store there (Zellers) there was shelves of heavy long johns by Stanfields and rag wool pants by Big Bill. I still have those items and wear'm every winter. Never wore them out. I also ordered direct from Stanfield's in NS a couple years ago for a couple suits of wool underwear. I'll never need a new set of woolies for the rest of my time. :D But a suit of that stuff is around $85 I think. But if you want good stuff you have to pay. I don't want Asian junk. I like wool and don't mind paying if it's made on our own shores.  :) Work pants I have to buy Big Bills (Poly/cotton), as that Asian stuff is too small, crotch is all wrong and everything about them is wrong. That includes Dickies.
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Online celliott

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #26 on: December 13, 2013, 06:18:20 AM »
Tell me how I can order heavy wool pants for $20.  I will gladly pay for the shipping!:) 


Dusty, keep your eye out at yard sales in the summer-Not the "time" to buy wool clothing, but sometimes you get lucky and find stuff in your size, typically at much less than retail.
Also, search on craigslist, there is typically deals to be had on wool jackets, pants, etc. for much less than retail, just have to get lucky with your size.
There is multiple Johnson woolen mills jackets on VT CL for less than 50 bucks.
I think the only wool item I own that was purchased new was a woolrich shirt- christmas gift.
Wool clothes just happen to find us I guess. All the pants I have were given to me  :)
It's spoiled me so I won't buy new stuff! But I still love anything wool, it is great.
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Offline Dusty Rhodes

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #27 on: December 15, 2013, 09:58:10 PM »
CElliott, Thats good info.  I will indeed, though I don't get around to the yards sales much but I know someone who does and I will have them looking.  I used to have a heavy pair of Wool pants that were my father in-laws.  When he quit hunting he gave them to me.  Though they were pretty worn out they were still warm.  Finally bit the dust a few years ago and have missed them.  Got lucky and have found some good wool sweaters over the years. I'll keep my eyes out for a good pair of pants. 

Offline trapper

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #28 on: December 16, 2013, 10:58:53 PM »
Target stores sell merino wool sweaters.  I go in the spring when they have them at 75% off and buy all they have in my size. Keep them in plastic bags in the summer.  Best underwear tops you can find.
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Offline Dusty Rhodes

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #29 on: December 17, 2013, 10:44:50 PM »
Wore my flannel lined denim last night to move some snow for my Amish neighbor.  Wasn't a big job so used the 4 wheeler with the plow.  My pants get tucked into my Muck boots and all stayed dry and warm.  Guess for our climate the flannel lined pants work well if you can keep them dry.  Low 20's when I was plowing.  Just an FYI, if you have a SAMS club nearby. I bought the denim flannels 2 years ago at SAMS for $14.  Usually cost more than that for regular denim jeans so they were a great buy in my book. I did not look for them this year but was told SAMS got another stack of them in this fall and they sold out within the week.  Not sure what they were asking for them this year.   

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #30 on: December 18, 2013, 05:50:56 AM »
Back in the day when my grandfather was younger and working like a yarding horse, men of the woods wore wool checkered coats, usually red or green. Then for some reason they stopped making them available around here and made them flannel coats lined with polyester and fill. Unless your in dry 20 degree weather I'd freeze to death in those type of coats. No warmth much if they get wet from snow and the ice starts forming. :D I had one last fall when thinning, I was warmer with a work shirt over wool t-shirt. I hung the flannel up on a tree branch. :D
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Offline coxy

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #31 on: December 18, 2013, 06:56:33 AM »
ya the old wool rich coats and pants were the best  I still have my black and red hunting coat that I got when I was17  it still fits if I don't have any shirts on or don't try to bend my arms or button it up :D my kid uses it to hunt with now   best 120bucks I ever spent  have 4 pair of the fleece pants would not have any thing else in the cold

Offline JohnG28

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #32 on: December 18, 2013, 08:50:07 AM »
I like my flannel lined Carhartt pants for working outside in fall/winter weather until they get wet. If they stay dry they're great, and they last a long time. I don't work outside daily so they work well for me for what I do.
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Offline beenthere

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #33 on: December 18, 2013, 10:46:29 AM »
Just sent my Woolrich red plaid coat to Goodwill. Couldn't use it to hunt any more as it wasn't blaze orange.

My good wool pants, vest, and coat are from Johnson Woolen mills in northern VT. 
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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #34 on: December 18, 2013, 11:09:30 AM »
I too like my flannel jeans, mine are Carhartt. Think I'm on the 5th pair over the years. We had minus 0 temps about 10 days ago, they worked great. Many people like myself cannot wear any poly or neo materials due to allergic reaction, so all the "new" materials are left to others. Cotton or wool and sweating comes with the territory!

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #35 on: December 18, 2013, 11:55:34 AM »

My good wool pants, vest, and coat are from Johnson Woolen mills in northern VT.

I have a nice red wool coat from there. Very nice coat, well made. This was my uncle's, he passed away last fall. It will last a heck of a long time, even though we have long winters. I feel like a Mounty wearing it. :D :)
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Offline Dieselsteve

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #36 on: December 18, 2013, 10:19:41 PM »
I like mine I only have one pair there no special brand, Ive had them for a few years now they hold up pretty well I still like my wrangler leather tabs though.

Offline John Mc

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #37 on: December 25, 2013, 11:57:55 AM »
I too like my flannel jeans, mine are Carhartt. Think I'm on the 5th pair over the years. We had minus 0 temps about 10 days ago, they worked great. Many people like myself cannot wear any poly or neo materials due to allergic reaction, so all the "new" materials are left to others. Cotton or wool and sweating comes with the territory!
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline John Mc

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #38 on: December 25, 2013, 12:00:52 PM »
... Many people like myself cannot wear any poly or neo materials due to allergic reaction, so all the "new" materials are left to others. Cotton or wool and sweating comes with the territory!

If you can't wear the synthetic materials, you may want to try silk long underwear. They wick water away from your skin (not quite as well as the synthetics, but a whole lot better than cotton, which holds the water near your skin). Wool can get a bit itchy as an inner layer.
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline beenthere

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #39 on: December 25, 2013, 12:55:07 PM »
I find silk is better than any synthetics I've used.
south central Wisconsin
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #40 on: December 25, 2013, 03:50:06 PM »
I can wear wool and get wet, and never feel anything but warm. ;D
Move'n on.

Offline John Mc

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #41 on: December 25, 2013, 08:42:51 PM »
I find silk is better than any synthetics I've used.

Silk feels better to me as an inner liner, but there are a number of synthetics that will wick more moisture faster.  The synthetics I've used tend not to hold up as well as silk, however. Washing or drying at the wrong temperature (or hanging them too close to the camp fire to dry) can destroy their wicking ability, for example. If you are working around fire, silk also has the advantage of not melting and sticking to your skin.
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline beenthere

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #42 on: December 25, 2013, 10:34:35 PM »
John Mc
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south central Wisconsin
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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #43 on: December 26, 2013, 12:15:24 AM »
Now the only question is, where do you get silk long underwear these days.  I haven't really looked for it, but the last time I saw it was when I was working as seasonal help at an Eastern Mountain Sports store 20+ years ago (a fun gig, and the store had much more of an "outdoor enthusiast" atmosphere and clientele than most of those I've visited more recently.  I probably spent about double what I earned - that employee discount was hard to pass up.)
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #44 on: December 26, 2013, 05:46:58 AM »
John it's like trying to find heavy wool long John's, I had to call the company. No stores stock it here.

You know, they do sell silk yarn and many weave with it. But weaving is not the same as a knit fabric, it is not elastic or stretchy when woven, but is if knit.
Move'n on.

Offline labdad

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #45 on: December 29, 2013, 10:37:39 AM »
I like my flannel lined pants. I have Carharts and they are warm. If I am out splitting wood I'm not sweating much and they keep the wind out, if its too cold I will wear my long johns and then I don't have to wear bibs. Wool is nice and I have wool pants but they are too warm most of the time for the weather we have here.
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Offline Arborwear

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #46 on: March 06, 2018, 09:12:22 AM »
Dress Like an Onion!

As cold weather approaches people often ask us “How should I dress?” the simplest answer is:  Dress Like an Onion.  What we mean by that is to think in terms of layers.  An onion has many layers, so should anyone working outdoors in cold temperatures.

We like to steer people towards three layers; a base layer, a mid-layer and an outer layer.  Sometimes one layer can perform multiple duties but for the most part during cold weather months it is best to have these three addressed before you head out for work.

The base layer is the next-to-skin-layer.  This is the layer that keeps your skin warm but also should transfer moisture to other layers as you sweat.  Therefore, base layers that wick are the best.  These can be thin long underwear or simple performance Tees but if they move moisture away from the body, they will keep the body dry and warm. These layers are often made of thin merino wool, poly propylene or unique blends that perform well together.  

The next layer, or mid-layer, should be your insulation layer.  This is where the heat resides.  Think of an R-value on insulation for your home. You want something with an R-value that measures up to the coldest weather you may face that time of year.  For some, this layer might be a fleece pullover, a sweatshirt or even a wool sweater.  Again, if this layer wicks moisture, then your sweat keeps getting carried further away from your body which is a good thing.  There are many great insulating textiles.  Some are light and thin and easy to move and some are heavy and bulky but provide serious warmth.

Lastly everyone needs a protective shell or outer layer.  The main purpose is to keep the elements out.  This means wind, rain and snow.  Outer layers can be jackets, parkas, rain gear, snow suits, etc.  Anything that keeps the inner layers dry and something that breaks the wind.  

Another important piece of the puzzle we like to suggest is the ability to easily modify your layering in the field.  By this I mean wearing layers that can unzip or unsnap partially or fully to regulate your temperature quickly.  If it is hard to modify your layering on the spot, then most people will just keep working and “suck it up” for the rest of the day.  

By wearing a sufficient layering system, workers in the field remain more comfortable, more level-headed and less susceptible to injury and temperature-related hazards.  
 
So, the next time you are gearing up for a cold weather day, think of the onion!
Arborwear
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Offline moodnacreek

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Re: flannel lined pants
« Reply #47 on: March 06, 2018, 11:17:48 PM »
Have a few pair of flannel lined jeans for when it's cold indoors. For outdoors I wear fancy Pantagonia long under ware bottoms with carhart  logger double knee blue jeans with heavy button suspenders.  In the woods and away from grease, battery acid etc. it's Johnson wool pants. Just bought a pair in a junk store, green, my size, like new, $12.00 !  My 3rd. pair. My first pair was $28.00. Know they are about $190.00.


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