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Author Topic: serious chainsaw accidents  (Read 4953 times)

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Offline knuckledragger

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Re: serious chainsaw accidents
« Reply #20 on: March 30, 2018, 05:39:49 PM »
That's the thing that gets most folk. "Some other unexpected cause"

Offline John Mc

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Re: serious chainsaw accidents
« Reply #21 on: March 30, 2018, 07:11:14 PM »
10 years of hand falling the only accident has been a widow Maker to the left shoulder and a full brim hard hat a lucky day. Another thing make dang sure the plastic hard hats or helmet are up to the task of taking a hit from a limb most aren't.
In all my time in in the Vermont/NY/New Hampshire woods, I've only seen one person wearing an aluminum hard hat. No one seems to use them out here. In that time, I've seen plastic helmets that have taken solid hits and protected the wearer appropriately.

They do need to be replaced after a good hit, and periodically whether they've been hit or not: the plastic can get brittle with age and UV exposure. I believe OSHA requires replacing every 5 years. The average landowner probably does not do this - and probably has no idea of the need for it (on the other hand, the average landowner probably doesn't have their helmet out in the sun and elements 40+ hours per week either).
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline Tin Horse

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Re: serious chainsaw accidents
« Reply #22 on: March 30, 2018, 07:34:18 PM »
I've bought or tried different helmets over the years. Last year I bought a Phanner Protos helmet. They're expensive but unlike anything I've used before. The design and function is ahead of anything else I could find. My wife even thought it was worth the money.  ;D
Bell 1000 Wood Processor. Enercraft 30HTL, Case 580SL. Kioti 7320.

Offline HolmenTree

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Re: serious chainsaw accidents
« Reply #23 on: March 30, 2018, 11:31:57 PM »
The Aluminum Macdonald T helmets popular in the PNW have had a history of punctures  from falling debris. But over the last decade or so have been reinforced with a double layer of aluminum riveted into the crown.
They have upgraded to a ratchet adjuster on the suspension recently but still only have 4 point suspension.

Best helmet I own is  New Zealand made called a Pacific Kevlar with 6 point suspension and a full 4 webbing chin strap.
The shell is claimed to be 5 times stronger then steel of equal weight.
The helmet I'm wearing in my avatar pic is a Petzl climbing helmet not near as rugged as my Pacific but being brimless the Petzl offers me better visual of my surroundings while up in the canopy.

But the key for safety is the chin strap harness. It keeps the helmet on your head after getting hit by a struck- by, mostly a broken tree limb or top.
Fatality and serious injury reports have shown many forestry workers have had their non- chinstrap helmets knocked off by the first part of the outer twigs of the tree struck by .
Then the solid part hits the unprotected head.
Making a living with a saw since age 16.

Offline MAF143

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Re: serious chainsaw accidents
« Reply #24 on: March 31, 2018, 01:52:35 AM »
From the head down to the toes.

Our woods is full of Honey Locust trees and I will be cutting a lot of them.  Along with the standard PPE, I got some steel lined insoles for all my workboots that I wear out in the woods.  Much less expensive than the dedicated steel lined boots.  They give me peice of mind when I'm tromping around a big locust I just dropped.  My wife still has a scar on her one foot where a locust thorn went through her foot 45 years ago.  I do watch where I walk, but out in the woods, especially when alone, safety, safety, SAFETY.

The steel lined insoles tend to be a little thicker than the standard insole so if your boots are nice and tight, they may be a little more snug.  I have replaced the insoles in some of my older boots that seem to have streched and were loose and it has given them new life again.
Always having a great day!
MS 391, MS 250, HM-126, Ferguson TO-35, '97 Ram 1500 wood cuttin' truck, splitter, Woodland Mills Grindlux 4000 sharpener, Vogelzang Ponderosa keeping us warm

Offline Skeans1

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Re: serious chainsaw accidents
« Reply #25 on: March 31, 2018, 11:27:15 AM »
The Aluminum Macdonald T helmets popular in the PNW have had a history of punctures  from falling debris. But over the last decade or so have been reinforced with a double layer of aluminum riveted into the crown.
They have upgraded to a ratchet adjuster on the suspension recently but still only have 4 point suspension.
Have you ever seen a limb go through 1" AR2 lexan? A limb flying out at 200' is a rocket no matter what you're in or wear is going to feel the abuse plastic, aluminum, or steel. To New Zealand have you been around their tethering stuff any? I have and have seen a few of the failures because their standards are up to the same as the USA they've had cables snap and shackles fail both the helmet and the tethering you're putting your life on the line.

Offline HolmenTree

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Re: serious chainsaw accidents
« Reply #26 on: March 31, 2018, 12:28:12 PM »
Limb falling 200 feet your neck will probably be busted anyways.
From what Sam Madsen out of Centralia told me years ago the aluminum T's were taking a lot of punctures, plastics weren't.
Tethering stuff? Explain better
Making a living with a saw since age 16.

Offline chet

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Re: serious chainsaw accidents
« Reply #27 on: March 31, 2018, 02:18:23 PM »
For obvious reasons aluminum hardhats were never an option for me, working in close proximity to high voltage lines.  electricuted-smiley
I am a true TREE HUGGER, if I didnt I would fall out!  chet the RETIRED arborist

Offline Skeans1

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Re: serious chainsaw accidents
« Reply #28 on: March 31, 2018, 04:27:15 PM »
Limb falling 200 feet your neck will probably be busted anyways.
From what Sam Madsen out of Centralia told me years ago the aluminum T's were taking a lot of punctures, plastics weren't.
Tethering stuff? Explain better
Sam is a very nice guy we've done business with them for a lot of years. Tethering is what has killed the hand falling industry it's a cable assist system for cutting as well as yarding it's interesting to see a big leveler on a steep slope that it can't be level on.

Offline dgdrls

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Re: serious chainsaw accidents
« Reply #29 on: March 31, 2018, 06:11:20 PM »
Former B.I.L responded as an EMT to a logging C.S incident.  Ugly, and it took years
for him to reconcile what he saw and the result of it.

C.S wins........always.

D

Offline HolmenTree

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Re: serious chainsaw accidents
« Reply #30 on: March 31, 2018, 06:31:11 PM »
Limb falling 200 feet your neck will probably be busted anyways.
From what Sam Madsen out of Centralia told me years ago the aluminum T's were taking a lot of punctures, plastics weren't.
Tethering stuff? Explain better
Sam is a very nice guy we've done business with them for a lot of years. Tethering is what has killed the hand falling industry it's a cable assist system for cutting as well as yarding it's interesting to see a big leveler on a steep slope that it can't be level on.
Feller bunches, processors killed the hand falling industry here. And we got flat ground, no looking back. 
Making a living with a saw since age 16.

Offline knuckledragger

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Re: serious chainsaw accidents
« Reply #31 on: April 01, 2018, 01:46:49 AM »
Chainsaws always win against flesh, for that matter any moving steel or metal does. This topics purpose is to remind anyone that safety equipment is crucial. The helmet post are good enough that I've read them several times. One point that I believe should be touched on is this. Frequently I work alone. At times I need another set of eyes or help in some form I go get some. 

Offline John Mc

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Re: serious chainsaw accidents
« Reply #32 on: April 01, 2018, 08:36:15 AM »
Frequently I work alone. At times I need another set of eyes or help in some form I go get some.
 

That's a good point. It relates to why a cell phone is part of my safety equipment- and why I carry it on my body when working alone with a chainsaw. Even when working with a friend, the difference between having one with you and not can make a big difference in getting First Responders there in an emergency.
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline Stoneyacrefarm

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Re: serious chainsaw accidents
« Reply #33 on: April 02, 2018, 02:44:45 PM »
Good point John. 
Cell phones donít do us any good if they are out of reach. 
Even without cell reception in our area 911 still works. 
Work hard. Be rewarded.

Offline thecfarm

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Re: serious chainsaw accidents
« Reply #34 on: April 02, 2018, 02:48:14 PM »
My wife insists I have my cell phone on me in the woods, I said on me,not on the tractor, Yes,it's only a cheap tracphone,but it could save my life.
Model 6020-20hp Manual Thomas bandsaw,TC40A 4wd 40 hp New Holland tractor, 450 Norse Winch, Heatmor 400 OWB,YCC 1978-79

Offline Skeans1

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Re: serious chainsaw accidents
« Reply #35 on: April 03, 2018, 05:07:48 AM »
On some of the companies lands one of us is always required to have service of some sort in case of injury. There's a tracker you can get kind of like that life alert but for timber fallers out here to get help if you push the button. Best cheapest advise that was given to me about falling is never do it alone always fall in pairs and walk out what both of you are doing that day.


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