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Author Topic: Piecemeal post and beam frame assembly  (Read 2488 times)

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Offline Don P

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Re: Piecemeal post and beam frame assembly
« Reply #20 on: December 09, 2018, 07:09:52 PM »
We've gotten 18" of snow today I ought to cut a couple of 1' squares out and weigh it.

That isn't really a good connection. Even a strap over the ridge, down the backside and under the rafter to a timberlock there would have better strength. I'd personally rather have something supporting the rafter from the bottom.

Nails and timberlocks, the timberlocks are going to hook up right now under load, the nails being smaller and more ductile steel are going to slip some amount before hooking up. Mixing fasteners and assuming they are helping one another can be tricky.

Beveling a 2x to sit on the top of the ridge at the roof angle, a cant strip, is another way to get that bearing under the rafters if you set them on top of the ridge. Doug fir has a bearing capacity in edge grain of around 500-600 psi.

The strap requirement is really to hold the planes of the roof together down to the connection to each wall then down to the foundation connection. The rafters could be offset from side to side enough for them to lap over the ridge and then connected to each other at the lap.  Think of the building inflating, that is what the strap or lap connection over the top is about. In hurricane Andrew you might remember seeing roof planes blowing around. The toenailed connections of rafter to ridge let go, the strap or lap holds them together. Doesn't hurt to catch the ridge on the way over. The other thing was entire trussed roofs coming off, that is the tie between roof and walls.

A laborer works with his hands
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An artist uses his brain, his hands, and his heart

Offline evjim

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Re: Piecemeal post and beam frame assembly
« Reply #21 on: November 19, 2019, 08:42:54 PM »
Been awhile since I updated this thread. Still not done with the project; but it is roofed, insulated, and heated for this winter.


I insulated with 4inches of rigid EPS foam screwed to the OSB. About 1 screw per sqft. This added some rigidity to the expansive walls. And once the mesh reinforced EIFS basecoat was applied the wall became very rigid. It seems to be acting as a site built SIP. Inbetween the foam and OSB is a wrinkled building wrap that supposedly allows for drainage.

This flashing is for a porch I will be building over the french doors. A simple shed roof supported by heavy timbers.

All of the yellow on the foam had to be rasped off. It seems like an environmental nightmare but this is standard practice for EIFS.




Another coat is needed. The finish coat will be consistently colored. It seems like little changes in the amount of water added to the base coat and how windy/sunny it was at the time would change what shade of gray it dried. Solo tuccoing this house from a ladder took over a month off and on of work. Winter came very early this year and has delayed a lot of outside work days.






Pretty happy with how the 2x6 car decking turned out as a ceiling and floor. I primed the bottom side before installing. Not looking forward to adding a second coat of white paint up against all that rough sawn board edge.

In the background you can see I started drywalling. On the inside of the OSB I cut off the ends of the foam screws and screwed the drywall directly to the OSB. It is very hard to get the drywall to be the perfect size/shape to fit in there. Its going to need some touch up mudding around all the edges or lots of trim. Not sure how people normally deal with drywall abutting rough sawn?





Offline evjim

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Re: Piecemeal post and beam frame assembly
« Reply #22 on: November 19, 2019, 08:58:44 PM »
The basecoat is 99% done now except around windows. Here are a few more pictures of the process.






All of the gaps between EPS foam was filled with sprayfoam. And then a fiberglass mesh is embedded in the wet stucco material.









I haven't figured out for sure I am going to insulate the slab at the doors. The slab is heated so insulating is important. But I can only fit about 1inch of thickness under the door lip. And then I need to protect the foam somehow. And fasten it all up. I am thinking 1in of polyiso adhesived to the slab and then a piece of aluminum adhesived to the foam?







Offline Don P

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Re: Piecemeal post and beam frame assembly
« Reply #23 on: November 19, 2019, 10:12:33 PM »
Good progress, you can work in the warm this winter 8).

2" foam, bevel the top, form with a piece of removable plastic ~1/2-3/4" thickx1" or so down to the foam. Pull that strip out after the pour, insert a rope of backer rod foam and cover that at the surface with polybutyl caulk tooled with a masons striker or similar, dipped in mineral spirits. Look down at the floor seams, at the wall joints and wall to floor joints in a Walmart or Lowes. You'll need to keep out of it till it cures, they use a catalyzed 2 part version that kicks off quicker.
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Offline evjim

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Re: Piecemeal post and beam frame assembly
« Reply #24 on: November 21, 2019, 12:10:12 AM »
Thanks Don! Also, the slab has already been poured. It is insulated around most of the perimeter because the slab came out flush to the sheathing. And then the same 4in wall foam drops down below grade. Its only under the doors where I need to add some extra perimeter insulation.





Two inches of foam under the slab with electric resistance wire embedded. (Electricity is only ~5cents per kwh here do to being on co-op power and near a hydrodamn). A pex system with boiler would have cost $1500+ where as the wire in the slab cost $300 plus a contactor with a gfci breaker connected to the thermostat.

Used the pex staples about every 4ft. More often at corners.





Put rebar on top of that at 2ft centers. Did not use chairs to hold the rebar up because after testing that they just compress into the foam. I was very vigilant about lifting up the rebar as we poured.




Blocked out for this shower p-trap




Conduit for floor temp sensor so that it can be replaced later.




Poured through this door. Would have been much easier to pour a slab up front but the plumbing and heating planning were not ready when I wanted to start framing. And the funding was much easier to just pay for piers up front. I now see on this forum that piers are often not recommended.




Here was the pier foundation 7 months earlier. The trench was backfilled with drainage gravel and a foundation drain is buried alongside all the piers that empties out to daylight.




I hired a concrete finisher (so far only hired out 16man hours, besides my friend and I). But he had a hard time finishing up to the edges. Not sure if this is normal because the slab was poured inside or I just didn't pay enough for quality work. The slab will end up needing to be ground down or a very thick epoxy finish over acid etch.







Here is the edge of the slab, form partially removed.




Slightly worried about the frost heave effecting the slab independently of the piers. I may burry a 4ft skirting of sloped poly around the perimeter of the building to keep the soil dry. My understanding is only wet soil heaves. Have also considered burying a skirting of foam to keep the soil under the slab from freezing.

Also, just want to make sure this is an acceptable forum to be posting this build on as its not timber frame?

Offline Don P

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Re: Piecemeal post and beam frame assembly
« Reply #25 on: November 21, 2019, 07:54:09 AM »
A rose by any other name, if a 2x4 starts as a log, call it log construction and we're good.

My objections to piers are mainly twofold, first is overturning, you have what are called constrained piers now, the slab is locking them from overturning. Second is independent settlement, each one finding a different depth to settle to depending on soil and differing loads. Hope its not an issue.

Read up on frost protected shallow foundations, that is the foam skirting you are talking about. I think it'll be in chapter 4 here, some climate data may be in chapter 3, can't remember for sure;
https://codes.iccsafe.org/content/VRC2015
that's my state, yours will read the same.

The biggie for frost heave is it requires moisture. We build to frost depth as a worst case preventative but in reality if you can keep the moisture down or if the soil is free draining it can't heave
A laborer works with his hands
A craftsman uses his brain and his hands
An artist uses his brain, his hands, and his heart


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