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Author Topic: Lt 70 lubimizer  (Read 1181 times)

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Offline Carpenter

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Lt 70 lubimizer
« on: July 30, 2018, 10:37:36 PM »
Hi guys,  I haven't posted in quite a while.

Things have changed for me quite a lot since I joined the forum and re-built my old circle mill.  It's a super long story, but now I am working for a timber frame company and one of my duties is to run their saw mill.  It is an LT 70 super wide with the diesel engine.  After running my EZ Boardwalk it was pretty easy for me to pick up on the LT 70.  I still need to think my way through the hydraulics, but it wasn't too steep of a learning curve.  Of course I've still got a lot to learn with the LT 70. I've got a pretty mediocre handle on the accuset 2.  I've watched Bibbimans video several times and I am gaining, I think when I have a good handle on that, it will be a very powerful tool.  

My question to you guys has to deal with the lubimizer.  Its not lubing.  This mill is fairly new, (around 450 hrs)  I don't know the history of it, but I've been here about 2 months and I've been the only one running the mill.  They had a full time sawyer before that.  He was laid up with an injury when I started.  I am the shop manager by the way, but as I do have some sawmill experience I also run the mill.  The first time I ran the mill, I noticed that I didn't see any lube coming out.  So, I called the sawyer to find out what I was doing wrong.  He told me that it probably was lubing, that I just couldn't see it, and that he normally ran it on pulse 3.  So, I put it on pulse 3.  Cut just fine, I still couldn't see any lube coming out.  We mill a lot of white oaks by the way, and most of what I was using the mill for was to re-saw white oak cants.  So, well, I thought that maybe he was right and the blade was really getting some lube.  But,l milled some Ash logs, and they turned out ok, as well, we had some logs delivered that were mostly oak with a few ash logs mixed in.  I milled most of them, missed a few, but I found them today and put the first one on the mill, and I just wasn't happy with the cut at all.  The blade was pretty new, maybe not perfectly sharp.  But, I looked over some pictures last night of when I first started and I noticed that the blade lube tank was just as full as it is now.  So, it has not used any lube in the last two months.  I have not been running the mill regularly, but I would have expected some lube usage.  

     So, I got out the manual and checked the wiring.  Frankly, I don't know that it ever worked right.  Our full time sawyer is now our ex full time sawyer, so I hesitate to call him.  And like I said the mill has a little over 400 hours on it.  So, I took a test light and tried to track down the problem.  From what I could tell, there is no power going to the pump, in fact, I could not get a reading to tell that there was any power going to the switch either.  Is there a fuse that I should check?  
     For today, I took the cover off of the battery box, everything looks hooked up in there.  I took the cover off of the lube switch box, everything looks hooked up there, but there is one connection that is missing on the switch, I don't know if it should be there or not, but it is the lower one on the left hand side of the back of the switch, and I could not get a power reading with the test light to indicate that there is even power going to the switch.  I also took the cover off of the pump, I never could get a power reading to the pump.  
     I am used to a gravity flow system, so this is all new to me.  However, I have been around pumps, on my spray rig for example, they do need electricity to run.  I just have no idea what to expect out of this system.  Does the pump only run when the saw head is moving forward?  The de-barker only runs when the sawhead is moving forward.  If that is the case, then I have not fully tested the system.  Will the lubamizer work with the key on acc, or only when the machine is running?  How much lube should I expect?   I've got so many questions.  I'll call Woodmizer in the morning, it was 4:30 this afternoon when I noticed the problem and had the machine torn apart.  But, I thought I'd post a question here to see if anybody could point me in the right direction.

Thanks,  Jeff Carpenter

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Re: Lt 70 lubimizer
« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2018, 10:58:17 PM »
I have an LT40, but I can put my power feed in forward and with the rheostat fully CCW, walk around and watch it pulse.  My lamp on the LubeMizer also blinks when it pulses.  Are the nozzles clear?

Oh, and Welcome home.   :)
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Offline Carpenter

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Re: Lt 70 lubimizer
« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2018, 11:20:18 PM »
Yes, the nozzels are clear, and that is another question I had about this thing.  There is a green thing on the control panel, looks like it should be a light, never lights up.  It certainly is not a button.  

Thanks for the welcome back home!  I've been checking in fairly regularly,  I just haven't had much to post.  With this new job, I'm in the same industry that I've been in for 10 years just on a much larger scale.  It's as bit challenging, so I may be posting a lot, I hope you guys can give me some support.

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Re: Lt 70 lubimizer
« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2018, 11:52:52 PM »
My LT70 is as old as dirt compared to yours so this is just a guess. There are breakers all over the place on my mill so Id look around for one that may be tripped. When my mill was new, I had to replace the "brain" that runs the lubemizer intermittent interval adjustment. It went stupid and didnt do what it was supposed to. Warranty easy fix...Good luck
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Re: Lt 70 lubimizer
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2018, 08:00:21 AM »


 
Yes, that green lamp should flash when the LubeMizer pulses.  I have had to replace my "module" too.
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Re: Lt 70 lubimizer
« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2018, 05:56:48 PM »
Call woodmizer they will help you track the problem down.
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Offline MartyParsons

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Re: Lt 70 lubimizer
« Reply #6 on: July 31, 2018, 10:13:11 PM »
Hello,
 I am guessing you have a LT70 Wide not the Super LT70 Wide.

If you have the green light then you have the Walk with LT70 Wide. The Lube Mizer box will be in front of the Power Feed Drum switch. First thing, Check the fuses behind the switch and green light. There are four Philips head screws. There are two fuses. One is 2 amp  light grey and 4 amp Pink  ATO is the fuse type. 4 amp is to the switch. 2 amp is the timer.
Not many issues with timer, but you never know.
You also want to check the power feed drum switch term 2 if you have no power to the 4 amp fuse. I have seen one of the fingers of the drum switch break off. This would also effect the debarker.

Most common is the fuse is blown. 4 amp. Pump motor may have frozen in the winter , pump motor was not used for a time and the magnets rusted to the armature. ( new pump needed)
There is a wiring diagram in your manuals.

Hope this helps.
Marty

Super Wide Lube system is different, same pump system but the pulse is done through the ECU.

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Offline Carpenter

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Re: Lt 70 lubimizer
« Reply #7 on: July 31, 2018, 11:43:20 PM »
     Ok, I called Woodmizer this morning, I believe I talked to Doug.  Very helpful.  Within about 15 minutes on the phone he coached me through the process.  It was a blown 4 amp fuse.  Fortunately, we had spares, and I was sawing again in about a half an hour.  Now the light comes on and I can see lube coming out!  It's all good.

     Obviously I've been running the mill dry this whole time.  I suspected that from the first day I ran the mill.  Oh, well, it still made nice cuts.  I was mostly re-sawing air dried white oak, and sawed a few oak logs.  I don't run the mill every day, but I have been the only one running it since I started here.  

   

Offline bandmiller2

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Re: Lt 70 lubimizer
« Reply #8 on: August 01, 2018, 07:16:11 AM »
Carpy, maybe you don't really need the lube at all or at a greatly reduced rate. When I ran the 70 we never used lube and had zero problems. Frank C. 
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Re: Lt 70 lubimizer
« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2018, 10:49:50 PM »
     So, now that I've got everyone's attention, I've thought of several more questions.  I probably should start a new thread.  
  
     As some of you know, I re-built an old circle mill, and then bought an EZ Boardwalk 40.  I've logged hundreds of hours on the EZ boardwalk.  It's an all manual mill, which for me was easy to learn on.  I developed a feel for when I was pushing the head at the right rate, when the blade was sharp, etc.  Also, the log turning and clamping was done by hand.  I had support equipment and a manual log turner to turn the bigger logs.  Also, I have the extension, so I was milling 28' logs.  No small task on an all manual mill.  Sometimes I had to get creative with the support equipment just to turn the big logs.  The mill itself did just fine.

     Ok, now I have the LT 70 to run, with full hydraulics.  It's nice.  I did find there is a limit to what can be done with the hydraulics though, and with a few of these big oak logs, I have reverted to turning them with the forklift, which is what I did on my all manual mill.  I have been having trouble getting my second cut square.  Is there a trick to that.  On my EZ boardwalk, that was probably the most difficult thing to learn, however, I did develop a feel for it to not over clamp, or under clamp.  I tried to teach that to several people, and it is a difficult thing to teach.  With the Woodmizer, I've been using the hydraulic stops with the rollers on top of them.  And, I've been clamping so that I can't see any light between the opening cut of the log and the back stops.  I've also been trying to not over clamp, or under clamp.  Most of the time, this produces a square cant, but not always.  I aligned the bed recently, so I know that it is within a 32nd of an inch.  Do you guys use the hydraulic log turner stops as the stops, or should I be using the ones that you flip up by hand as the stops?  So far, I've just been using the ones that you flip up by hand when I roll a log onto the mill, so that it doesn't roll off the other side.  Frankly, with the clamping system being all hydraulic, and with this mill, you can only use the hydraulics when the head is in the fully returned position.  It's a bit more challenging.  I used to be able to just walk up to the log or cant, make a small adjustment and clamp again, and I had a feel for it, which obviously I just don't have with the hydraulics.  

     I love having the Accuset 2.  I used to do all of these calculations on the fly in my head.  I still don't have the accuset mastered.  But, thanks to Bibbymans youtube videos I do have a pretty good handle on the auto up and auto down and the "go to" button.  I have yet to master the pattern mode, which is the one that I am most interested in.  As I work for a timber frame company, most of what I am sawing is to produce timbers.  8x8s, 10x10s, etc.  So, I am basically trying to box the heart for a perfect timber, and getting what useful side lumber I can off of it in the mean time.  And, part of the time I am re-sawing.  I really think pattern mode is what i need to know.  So far, I can set the head to where I want to end up, then use the auto up, raise the saw head to where I want to make my opening cut, switch it to auto down and make the rest of the cuts to finish sawing the side lumber. It works ok.  I think there is a better way with pattern mode, I just don't have a good handle on it yet.

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Re: Lt 70 lubimizer
« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2018, 11:25:45 PM »
I always found it's alot easier to get a log into a square cant by flipping 180 from first cut.  Make sure it's sitting flat on the bed and no bark underneath it obviously...after flipping 180 and you have 2 faces opened up, stand the cant up with the clamp or chain turner and push it into the stops (have the stops almost all the way up makes it more easier).  Now you can gently pick up or push down on the cant into the stops with the clamp and watch for daylight.  If theres daylight on the bottom of the stops, pull the clamp down, or pick the stops up.  And vicey versey for the vicey versey.  If you're turning the cant/log with a forklift you're doing it wrong lol!!!  Use the chain turner or the clamp or both.  


Here's a video of me cutting with my 70 super.  Watch the clamp how I use it to get the log/cant square.  You can't see from this camera position, but sometimes all it takes to get it square is to lower or raise the stops/squaring arms/knees/whatever you wanna call them.

Boy, back in my day..

Offline bandmiller2

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Re: Lt 70 lubimizer
« Reply #11 on: August 02, 2018, 07:58:12 PM »
Backstops have a habit of getting out of square due to large logs rolling agents' them and overzealous use of hydraulic clamps. My band mill bed is level all ways and if I want something real square I put a 2' bubble level on it to be sure. Have you adjusted the back stops to square?? As stated sometimes bark gets under the cant or flat face and cocks it slightly. The problem with fancy mills remotely controlled is sometimes you don't see what you did with a manual mill. Frank C.
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Offline JB Griffin

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Re: Lt 70 lubimizer
« Reply #12 on: August 02, 2018, 08:57:29 PM »
I differ from 4x4 as I almost never open one face and flip 180, while it's slightly easier to square up a cant that way it wastes soooooo much time to do so. 4 180 turns vs 4 90 turns.

The chain turner runs both directions for a reason, if you over turn a little reverse the chain and push the bottom back square.  Also you can use the dog to adjust by dogging it and raising up or pulling down.
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Re: Lt 70 lubimizer
« Reply #13 on: August 02, 2018, 10:45:25 PM »
I did not know that you can adjust the backstops.  I'll look at that tomorrow.  A few weeks ago I did do a bed alignment to the blade.  It was pretty far out of wack.  The main bed was just fine, but whoever set up the extension didn't do a very good job.  Which I think is part of the reason that I am finding cants in our log yard that are out of square, and 1/4" over or under.  I do understand how wood shrinks and moves as it dries, (and I do understand that it moves on the mill during the cut) but a lot of what I've been finding and having to re-saw seems excessive.  On my EZ Boardwalk that was the rule of thumb as well, no light showing between the backstops and the cant.
     As far as using the forklift instead of the hydraulics.  The only times I have done this are for long big oak logs.  Since I do work for a timber frame company, the main focus of this mill is to produce timbers and the longer and the bigger the better.  So far, the longest log I have milled was a 28' 18" diameter white oak.  I milled it into a timber that went to a covered bridge restoration project.  I was having trouble getting it turned, I think a lot of that is that both the log turner and the clamp are on the main section of the bed instead of near where the center of the log was.  I'm sure there are some things I could have done differently, but having turned logs with the forklift before, I just got on it and got the job done.  The turner works great for 12' logs.  I still have to think my way through the process of turning and clamping a log, but I am getting better at it.  

     

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Re: Lt 70 lubimizer
« Reply #14 on: August 02, 2018, 10:59:01 PM »
@JB Griffin  I waste more time trying to get it square with a 90 degree turn that I find it quicker to do a 180 then a 90 then a 180.  So thats actually two 180 degree turns and one 90 degree.  Multiple times per day I do 4-90 turns.  There are cases where if I do a 180 flip the sawhead wont fit through or I cant clamp the cant flat to the bed.  The pilot controls dont give you the feel that a manual valve does.  My backhoe has pilot controls as well and I dislike them.  On the sawmill they do make it easier for setting up on one end or the other and I have 4 different joystick patterns that I can switch with the touch of a button.  So that part is nice but the problem I have with pilot controls is you dont have the finesse you have with regular direct action hydraulic controls.  Different strokes for different folks I reckon.  
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Re: Lt 70 lubimizer
« Reply #15 on: August 03, 2018, 05:55:30 AM »

  The only time I don't turn 180 is for clearance reasons, so much easier to keep square turning 180 plus I'm cutting less bark turning 180.  It sure doesn't take long to turn 180 with a chain turner.  Steve  
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Offline Jim_Rogers

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Re: Lt 70 lubimizer
« Reply #16 on: August 03, 2018, 07:51:20 AM »
To verify the back stops are 90 to the table put some square metal tubing on the rails and a framing square on the tubes up against the back stops. If it's out of square then adjust the back stops until they are right. Read the manual or call the company for instructions of how to adjust your back stops.
To verify that a cut face is 90 to the blade put a framing square against the cut face and lower the blade down to the other part of the square. If it isn't 90 then you'll see it before your first second face cut. Adjust log until faces and blade are 90.
Or check the second face first cut with a framing square against the first face cut.
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Re: Lt 70 lubimizer
« Reply #17 on: August 03, 2018, 10:23:58 AM »
I did not know that you can adjust the backstops.  I'll look at that tomorrow.  A few weeks ago I did do a bed alignment to the blade.  It was pretty far out of wack.  The main bed was just fine, but whoever set up the extension didn't do a very good job.  Which I think is part of the reason that I am finding cants in our log yard that are out of square, and 1/4" over or under.  I do understand how wood shrinks and moves as it dries, (and I do understand that it moves on the mill during the cut) but a lot of what I've been finding and having to re-saw seems excessive.  On my EZ Boardwalk that was the rule of thumb as well, no light showing between the backstops and the cant.
     As far as using the forklift instead of the hydraulics.  The only times I have done this are for long big oak logs.  Since I do work for a timber frame company, the main focus of this mill is to produce timbers and the longer and the bigger the better.  So far, the longest log I have milled was a 28' 18" diameter white oak.  I milled it into a timber that went to a covered bridge restoration project.  I was having trouble getting it turned, I think a lot of that is that both the log turner and the clamp are on the main section of the bed instead of near where the center of the log was.  I'm sure there are some things I could have done differently, but having turned logs with the forklift before, I just got on it and got the job done.  The turner works great for 12' logs.  I still have to think my way through the process of turning and clamping a log, but I am getting better at it.  

    
Your backstops could be out of alignment...but my old 11,000 hour plus LT70 has never needed an adjustment...and Ive done some stupid things to them  over the years...heh ;D ;D
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Re: Lt 70 lubimizer
« Reply #18 on: August 07, 2018, 10:54:24 PM »
     Ok, I did check my backstops today, and they were out.  I found two pieces of tubing like Band Miller suggested and checked them with a square.  They were out about 1/8" at 10" which was about the same amount that my cant's were out of square.  That's really not a huge deal if you are sawing boards, but for timbers that can be a huge deal.  I don't know how long it's been out of square, for all I know now I've sent timbers out to job sites that are out of square.  I was not checking every one.  But, after making that little adjustment the timbers that I did make for the rest of the day were square.  I hope I don't have to go through that regularly. It wasn't hard to do, I just don't want to have to make it a part of my morning routine.  Towards the end of the day, I had to do a partial bed alignment because my helper had apparently got the forks of the fork lift in the wrong place and lifted two of the log bunks.  But, I got it done, so hopefully we are ready to saw at "full steam" tomorrow.  I put full steam in quotes because I'm still working on layout of work flow, training my off bearer, and frankly, I'm still learning the mill.  So, it may be more like 3/4 steam, but we will be running tomorrow and we won't be slacking.

     

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Re: Lt 70 lubimizer
« Reply #19 on: August 08, 2018, 07:34:21 AM »
When I lifted timbers off the mill, I would raise them up with the roller toe board system to get them up enough for the fork lift to get them without hitting the mill bed.
Jim Rogers
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