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Author Topic: which of these 60-75cc saws would you buy?  (Read 2548 times)

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Offline Pulphook

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Re: which of these 60-75cc saws would you buy?
« Reply #20 on: September 12, 2018, 06:33:21 AM »
In all honesty, in our part of the world we run as small a bar as gets the job done, one never sees bars like the op mentions on the saws he mentions.


What part of the world would that be?

I agree - I typically run 16" bars on my saws, but then 80% or more of what I'm cutting is 16" diameter or less, and 95% is 20" or less. The 16" bar does not come off unless I know I'm going to be doing a significant amount of cutting over 16". I'd rather carry a smaller, lighter saw all day even if it means I occasionally have to do some extra cutting here and there.
Nailed it. My best tool is the brain and body with that "smaller, lighter saw...all day."
Fatigue, decreased capacity for work in any weather with time leads to errors. I don't want it harvesting for hours.
Besides, with a lighter pro saw ( now down to a MS261 ) and a shorter 16" bar I can do up to +/- 24" DBH trees safely and efficiently.
The 16" bar makes it easy to touch up with a stump vise in the woodlot when touching rot, dirt, barbed wire, or the usual round in the trunk.
I'm no pro, but do take 6-8 cords out each year plus blowdowns and trail work for local groups. The 261 fits nicely in a backpack.
The "world" is Downeast Maine.

Offline OlJarhead

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Re: which of these 60-75cc saws would you buy?
« Reply #21 on: September 12, 2018, 09:11:13 AM »
I have a 576XP and sadly had to have it completely rebuilt under warranty.  It was running lean and no amount of adjusting (by the local Husky repair folks) would stop it from burning up.  Sent it off and got it back running nicely.  It's still going well but I'm not too keen on pushing it.
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Offline Greenerpastures

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Re: which of these 60-75cc saws would you buy?
« Reply #22 on: September 12, 2018, 09:44:39 AM »
In all honesty, in our part of the world we run as small a bar as gets the job done, one never sees bars like the op mentions on the saws he mentions.
Hi John Mc
Am in Ireland

Forestry wise there are no real big trees here, old oak and larch is getting hard 
to find, but when you do the larger bar is the way to go,
though it is always safer to only go for what the body can handle,
age soon creeps in and has its impact on what weight we can handle,
I think it is is more important to haul only what feels comfortable with regardless of tree size,
a young fit person will obviously handle more power and weight safely, all else being equal.

Regarding the 575, read elswhere they are not selling, they are a pound heavier than a 372
Husqvarna, and that 372 cuts better, they will only sell in numbers when the 372 is out of production,
as it will not meet the emissions criteria, I would avoid adding weight to my day, thats just me.

What part of the world would that be?

I agree - I typically run 16" bars on my saws, but then 80% or more of what I'm cutting is 16" diameter or less, and 95% is 20" or less. The 16" bar does not come off unless I know I'm going to be doing a significant amount of cutting over 16". I'd rather carry a smaller, lighter saw all day even if it means I occasionally have to do some extra cutting here and there.

Offline Greenerpastures

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Re: which of these 60-75cc saws would you buy?
« Reply #23 on: September 12, 2018, 09:57:36 AM »
I have a 576XP and sadly had to have it completely rebuilt under warranty.  It was running lean and no amount of adjusting (by the local Husky repair folks) would stop it from burning up.  Sent it off and got it back running nicely.  It's still going well but I'm not too keen on pushing it.
Sorry to hear that, very disappointing to spend ones cash and have to go through
such a repair, I know a lot of people who had melt downs and they were messed
about something chronic, shop blaming them and refusing to sort the saws, pleased
you at least got sorted, I am stumped though that this sort of thing is still happening
with the time they have had to fine tune this system, will it ever be fixed or are they
nursing it along until the come out with fuel injection systems, hard to beat an ordinary
carb, they could have been smart enough to enable the fitting of a normal carb and just
let the auto-tune handle the spark timing, I for one would be swapping in a carb if this was
the case, wonder who is really to blame for lumbering us with this epa rubbish, did the epa
push the manufacturers, did the manufacturers push the epa, or are they in together so we
have to keep replacing our machines thus making someone else rich.

Offline HolmenTree

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Re: which of these 60-75cc saws would you buy?
« Reply #24 on: September 12, 2018, 10:34:03 AM »
In all honesty, in our part of the world we run as small a bar as gets the job done, one never sees bars like the op mentions on the saws he mentions.


What part of the world would that be?

I agree - I typically run 16" bars on my saws, but then 80% or more of what I'm cutting is 16" diameter or less, and 95% is 20" or less. The 16" bar does not come off unless I know I'm going to be doing a significant amount of cutting over 16". I'd rather carry a smaller, lighter saw all day even if it means I occasionally have to do some extra cutting here and there.
Nailed it. My best tool is the brain and body with that "smaller, lighter saw...all day."
Fatigue, decreased capacity for work in any weather with time leads to errors. I don't want it harvesting for hours.
Besides, with a lighter pro saw ( now down to a MS261 ) and a shorter 16" bar I can do up to +/- 24" DBH trees safely and efficiently.
The 16" bar makes it easy to touch up with a stump vise in the woodlot when touching rot, dirt, barbed wire, or the usual round in the trunk.
I'm no pro, but do take 6-8 cords out each year plus blowdowns and trail work for local groups. The 261 fits nicely in a backpack.
The "world" is Downeast Maine.

Actually with a 90 open face cut (humbolt on bottom cut) you can cut a much larger diameter tree then 32" with a 16" bar.
Here my 1986 Stihl 064 owner manual explains it quite well.

Also a video of Soren Ericcson using a early 064 with a 18" or 20" b/c making a good presentation.
I got a pile of  Soren's 1980's safety instruction VCR tapes.
This one I put on YouTube (thanks to my 11 year old daughter :D) by my phone recording off the TV screen.
Good thing I kept my old VCR :)



 

 
https:/youtu.be/pLAvjw7lb9A
Making a living with a saw since age 16.

Offline pdbrandt

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Re: which of these 60-75cc saws would you buy?
« Reply #25 on: September 12, 2018, 12:00:24 PM »
Thank you for all the advice, guys.  Especially useful was the advice about using the smallest bar feasible.  When I went out yesterday to check out the saws the 562 was already sold.  The 365 special was having trouble getting started and had clearly seen a lot of use.  The 575 was a beast with a 28" bar.  It ran well and would have worked well for me, but I ended up buying a saw from the guy that I didn't know about when I posted the original message.  I got a never-before-used 2009 Redmax GZ7000 for $475. It is the identical twin to the Husqvarna 570.  I used it this morning to cut up a 28" diameter maple trunk and I'm very happy with it.  Thanks again.


Offline John Mc

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Re: which of these 60-75cc saws would you buy?
« Reply #26 on: September 12, 2018, 12:20:39 PM »
The "world" is Downeast Maine.
 

You might want to edit your profile to include that. It's often helpful in discussions on here knowing where someone is from, since that gives you at least some idea of what conditions are like in their area.
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline John Mc

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Re: which of these 60-75cc saws would you buy?
« Reply #27 on: September 12, 2018, 12:29:32 PM »
Actually with a 90 open face cut (humbolt on bottom cut) you can cut a much larger diameter tree then 32" with a 16" bar.
Here my 1986 Stihl 064 owner manual explains it quite well.

Also a video of Soren Ericcson using a early 064 with a 18" or 20" b/c making a good presentation.
I got a pile of  Soren's 1980's safety instruction VCR tapes.
This one I put on YouTube (thanks to my 11 year old daughter :D) by my phone recording off the TV screen.
Good thing I kept my old VCR :)


(Image hidden from quote, click to view.)
 
(Image hidden from quote, click to view.)
 
https:/youtu.be/pLAvjw7lb9A
I have used that a few times, though it's very seldom needed for the size trees I typically run into around here. For the most part, if I need that technique, it's an old "wolf pine" that grew up in a pasture years ago, and has now had a forest grow up around it.
BTW, that's a nice diagram. Since I'm artistically challenged, my attempts at tree felling drawings generally aren't very recognizable. (Some years ago, my daughter looked at one of my stump sketches and said, "no, Daddy, that's not how you draw a horsey!")
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline DelawhereJoe

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Re: which of these 60-75cc saws would you buy?
« Reply #28 on: September 12, 2018, 01:03:32 PM »
I think those RedMax are re-labeled / rebranded Jonsered saws. So basically you have a Husqvarna 372xp thats red & black with a Jonsered sticker covered up by a RedMax sticker. It should do everything you need it to do and if it does there are tons of parts out there to fix it. It will definitely save you time and money over the small saws, just be careful with all that extra power.
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Offline Pulphook

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Re: which of these 60-75cc saws would you buy?
« Reply #29 on: September 12, 2018, 07:40:04 PM »
Soren E. is the originator of GOL. It is competitive sport as method teaching.

Offline John Mc

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Re: which of these 60-75cc saws would you buy?
« Reply #30 on: September 12, 2018, 08:07:05 PM »
Soren E. is the originator of GOL. It is competitive sport as method teaching.
They do make a bit of a "just for fun" competition out of their classes, but I wouldn't call it competitive sport, unless you choose to enter in the regional and national events, which involve some serious competition. Those regional competitions are not about teaching, they are a competition plain and simple - but they are not really a part of the courses they offer (other than making use of the techniques taught in those courses)
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Online Skeans1

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Re: which of these 60-75cc saws would you buy?
« Reply #31 on: September 12, 2018, 09:52:21 PM »
In all honesty, in our part of the world we run as small a bar as gets the job done, one never sees bars like the op mentions on the saws he mentions.


What part of the world would that be?

I agree - I typically run 16" bars on my saws, but then 80% or more of what I'm cutting is 16" diameter or less, and 95% is 20" or less. The 16" bar does not come off unless I know I'm going to be doing a significant amount of cutting over 16". I'd rather carry a smaller, lighter saw all day even if it means I occasionally have to do some extra cutting here and there.
Nailed it. My best tool is the brain and body with that "smaller, lighter saw...all day."
Fatigue, decreased capacity for work in any weather with time leads to errors. I don't want it harvesting for hours.
Besides, with a lighter pro saw ( now down to a MS261 ) and a shorter 16" bar I can do up to +/- 24" DBH trees safely and efficiently.
The 16" bar makes it easy to touch up with a stump vise in the woodlot when touching rot, dirt, barbed wire, or the usual round in the trunk.
I'm no pro, but do take 6-8 cords out each year plus blowdowns and trail work for local groups. The 261 fits nicely in a backpack.
The "world" is Downeast Maine.

Actually with a 90 open face cut (humbolt on bottom cut) you can cut a much larger diameter tree then 32" with a 16" bar.
Here my 1986 Stihl 064 owner manual explains it quite well.

Also a video of Soren Ericcson using a early 064 with a 18" or 20" b/c making a good presentation.
I got a pile of  Soren's 1980's safety instruction VCR tapes.
This one I put on YouTube (thanks to my 11 year old daughter :D) by my phone recording off the TV screen.
Good thing I kept my old VCR :)


(Image hidden from quote, click to view.)
 
(Image hidden from quote, click to view.)
 
https:/youtu.be/pLAvjw7lb9A
What no block face or windows?

Offline HolmenTree

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Re: which of these 60-75cc saws would you buy?
« Reply #32 on: September 12, 2018, 10:13:41 PM »
Soren is just doing a one on one  tree demonstration. He's not working off a face on a logging strip. :D
Making a living with a saw since age 16.

Offline Pulphook

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Re: which of these 60-75cc saws would you buy?
« Reply #33 on: September 13, 2018, 04:43:04 AM »
They do make a bit of a "just for fun" competition out of their classes, but I wouldn't call it competitive sport, unless you choose to enter in the regional and national events, which involve some serious competition. Those regional competitions are not about teaching, they are a competition plain and simple - but they are not really a part of the courses they offer (other than making use of the techniques taught in those courses)
Our GOL 4 part course was run by MEMIC in Maine. The method of instruction for cuts was a very competitive sport, and fun.
Example: dropping a tree to a target stake when the lean was 90 degrees opposite to the fall. Or, in a 20" DBH trunk making the 2 bore cuts meet without cutting through the hinge. Tough at first...humbling.
If we didn't use the brake when moving around a tree, the instructor would tap us on the shoulder, stop the cut and de-brief the errors. It was like a benevolent D.I. :'(

Offline HolmenTree

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Re: which of these 60-75cc saws would you buy?
« Reply #34 on: September 13, 2018, 07:15:49 AM »
I had the same issue about 8 years ago when I took a "train the trainer course" for a arborist training company.
We were all having turns in 2 man teams measuring the tree height with a stick and felling it .
While making my face and backcuts I walked more then 2 steps without putting the brake on, I got my hand swatted twice by a stick  :D
My whole game plan was a mess and I was running that saw like a beginner :)
Making a living with a saw since age 16.

Offline John Mc

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Re: which of these 60-75cc saws would you buy?
« Reply #35 on: September 13, 2018, 02:55:28 PM »
They do make a bit of a "just for fun" competition out of their classes, but I wouldn't call it competitive sport, unless you choose to enter in the regional and national events, which involve some serious competition. Those regional competitions are not about teaching, they are a competition plain and simple - but they are not really a part of the courses they offer (other than making use of the techniques taught in those courses)
Our GOL 4 part course was run by MEMIC in Maine. The method of instruction for cuts was a very competitive sport, and fun.
Example: dropping a tree to a target stake when the lean was 90 degrees opposite to the fall. Or, in a 20" DBH trunk making the 2 bore cuts meet without cutting through the hinge. Tough at first...humbling.
If we didn't use the brake when moving around a tree, the instructor would tap us on the shoulder, stop the cut and de-brief the errors. It was like a benevolent D.I. :'(
Sounds just a lot mine, but compared to the regional and national competitions, this is more just something to make it interesting. All of the folks in all of the classes I took were very supportive of each other, and as one person was cutting, the instructor was pointing out to the rest of us things they were doing correctly and things they were missing. I learned as much from the commented observation as I did from actually felling the trees using the GOL techniques. In my GOL 4 class, we spent the day intentionally hanging up trees, and then using a variety of techniques to get them free.
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline Maine logger88

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Re: which of these 60-75cc saws would you buy?
« Reply #36 on: September 13, 2018, 08:24:07 PM »
I had the same issue about 8 years ago when I took a "train the trainer course" for a arborist training company.
We were all having turns in 2 man teams measuring the tree height with a stick and felling it .
While making my face and backcuts I made more then 2 steps without putting the brake on, I got my hand swatted twice by a stick  :D
My whole game plan was a mess and I was running that saw like a beginner :)
When I took the clp course the chain brake thing and keeping my face shield down are what got me in trouble the most lol
79 TJ 225 81 JD 540B Husky and Jonsered saws

Offline ehp

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Re: which of these 60-75cc saws would you buy?
« Reply #37 on: September 13, 2018, 09:22:12 PM »
I got my master ticket for Ontario , Im suppose to be one of 6 people with it . My biggest problem was when they said I had to use a file guide to sharpen a chain and I told them I would not , they said there was no way I could hand file as good as they could using a guide so I hand filed a chain and gave it to them to look at and 5 seconds later I got to take the chain off his hands , he grabbed it and was going to just move it around like a new chain , that's a big no no and the blood was flowing pretty good . After that we seem to get along a lot better ;D

Offline John Mc

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Re: which of these 60-75cc saws would you buy?
« Reply #38 on: September 13, 2018, 09:34:26 PM »
In my life, I've met a couple dozen of people who say they can freehand file a chain as good or better than with a guide. I've met 3 who actually could. (Sadly, I am not one of them - not that I've made a serious effort at learning. The results I get with a guide work fine for me.)

Ed, I can believe that you are one of those who actually can.
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline ehp

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Re: which of these 60-75cc saws would you buy?
« Reply #39 on: September 13, 2018, 10:42:13 PM »
a guide will dull the chain as you slide it along , yes I know for most people that still pretty sharp but Im not most people and cannot stand how a chain cuts after using a guide or a new chain out of the box , even stihl 33rs does not cut and has to be filed when brand new 


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