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Author Topic: Tool Acquisition  (Read 1624 times)

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Offline jemmy

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Tool Acquisition
« on: November 01, 2018, 10:41:59 PM »
Young buck question that is fun yet expensive. I am looking a purchasing tools that make life easier, more efficient, higher quality of outcome etc. In the last 2 years I've been building my base, I've got my circle mill "operational" and now I need to build a building around it. Along with this project I want to start building many different wood related projects. In the past week I've purchased a few dewalt tough box set of sockets and ratchet wrench sets. I've been sick of not having the right tool for the job. I also got a Makita 402a timber circular saw, dewalt router, and I am currently committed to getting a dewalt radial arm saw (not the miter slider), and a Delta unisaw. I need a kiln really bad, so I am going to get a storage container, but that is a few months out. On my mind is chissels, planer, and hand sander next.  Space and power is not an issue up to like 10hp. And I have a fair bit of tools to approach a project like this. I think I am going to start a document listed "tools" and take a total inventory. Might take me a few months to totally complete. Please let me know what you guys would be looking to get next to build out a wood working shop!
Plan for the worst, hope for the best, and take what comes with a grin. - Grandpa Chuck

Offline jemmy

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Re: Tool Acquisition
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2018, 10:50:39 PM »
That Unisaw is a 1950's version, not the $2800 brand new model haha, Im in the ball park for deal off FB market place and Craigslist constantly. I cant cash poor myself, 20-200$ deals is what I'm looking for, I am willing to spend more on something "special" like that Makita Circular saw, ($340 delivered, so not a bad deal, just outside of the previous mentioned 200$) but I just can't cash poor myself with a 1500$ planer, sander, etc, I know you can go crazy in this department. Looking for a "heavy duty with a deal", I know its rare, but if you are patient and vigilant deals are out there. I know this takes heavy investment and time, that is why I am reaching out to the years of wisdom on this forum, so I can minimize my mistakes and ensuing consequences. Thank you all for your help and wisdom!
Plan for the worst, hope for the best, and take what comes with a grin. - Grandpa Chuck

Offline jemmy

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Re: Tool Acquisition
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2018, 10:56:30 PM »
The building is going to be 64x30 with two 24' spans.... so I need to find some engineers. Been doing some calculations, and about to post to the timber frame thread.
Plan for the worst, hope for the best, and take what comes with a grin. - Grandpa Chuck

Offline Brad_bb

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Re: Tool Acquisition
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2018, 01:40:54 PM »
You seem to be running about 100mph here.  You'll find construction requires patience.  There are tools that are necessary, and ones that are "nice to have".  The basics for timberframing are a 1.5 and 2" framing chisel, mallet, framing square, combination square, a razor knife/marking knife, and a good tape measure.  A regular circular saw paired with a good japanese hand saw or an American saw like a Stanley Sharptooth saw.  Those tools are what you need.  Everything else pretty much is "nice to have".

For a framing square, I recommend the stainless Japanese one from Lee Valley. Get two if you can.  Come in handy.

A small rough terrain forklift is very nice to have also.  Mine will life 2500 lbs., has a short wheelbase for tight turns, and is rough terrain capable.
Anything someone can design, I can sure figure out how to fix!
If I say it\\\\\\\'s going to take so long, multiply that by at least 3!

Offline jemmy

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Re: Tool Acquisition
« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2018, 09:49:06 AM »
Well I don't know why this post got moved to this thread, it was more a question of what tools to get for woodwork as in general, not necessarily for timber framing, I saw that the forum had a very long and informative post pinned in this forum. My question was more along the lines of what equipment should I be eyeing in the context of building out a woodworking shop. I have a lot of tools already, but nothing really specialized in wood working. I have a bobcat with forks and a grapple, triple axle trailer, and  a 7.3 f-350. So my capability to gather or move logs is pretty good (for now)... My father used to have a large landscaping company, and when he sold his business he kept the 'essentials' so I have a large base of random tools to work with, just nothing really specializing in woodworking. On a side not this building isnt going to be a mortise and tenon building, this will be secured together with brackets and fasteners. When I build my own house I think I might go with a classic mortise and tenon, but Im not going to get that far ahead of myself yet haha. 
Plan for the worst, hope for the best, and take what comes with a grin. - Grandpa Chuck

Offline jemmy

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Re: Tool Acquisition
« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2018, 09:52:01 AM »
And yes I may seem very scattered brained, but theres just a lot for me to process with many steps needing to be taken, and I dont wish to take any more steps in the wrong direction then I have to.
Plan for the worst, hope for the best, and take what comes with a grin. - Grandpa Chuck

Online btulloh

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Re: Tool Acquisition
« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2018, 04:21:39 PM »
A good approach might be to be buy a tool or tool as the need arises.  Really thinking through the need versus want is a key part of that.  If a tool really does make the job go better and quicker, that's a good reason to buy it, as long it's not a one-time need.

One thing I learned over the years is that properly holding the work is 87% of the job in woodworking.  A good workbench, with the right kind of dogs and vises (for what YOU are doing) goes a long way.  Positioning the work correctly and conveniently eliminates a lot of frustration and leads to better results.  Organization and keeping the most used items close to hand is another big deal.  More a matter of thinking than spending.  Early on when setting up a shop you should be spending as much time getting organized or adding storage as you spend working on stuff.  Off course that can't go on forever, but invest some time in improving the workflow.  In the evening, after the sawdust settles and you're relaxing, think through what you did and how it could have been more efficient.

Acquiring tools is a good and necessary thing, but it's not the only thing.  There are tons of articles around about setting up a shop and what the most important power and hand tools are.  The top four or five are pretty easy to determine, then it comes down to your specific tasks.  Then there's the setup.  Getting four new power tools at once is a bit of nightmare because each needs to set up and aligned.  You need to make a few jigs and fixtures and get familiar with each tool.  It's a bigger process than we'd all like and it can be overwhelming if you have four or five things that just came out of their crates.  Just cleaning off the cosmolene takes a while.  

You're in a good position to get your shop tooled up and spittin' out some work.  Just take it a piece at a time and enjoy the journey.  Check back through some of the woodworking magazines about setting up a shop.  They all seem to run stories every few months about that.
HM126

Online btulloh

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Re: Tool Acquisition
« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2018, 04:33:40 PM »
By the way, a good workbench doesn't have to be expensive or beautiful.  It needs to be functional.  That starts with being sturdy and the right height for the work you'r doing.  It can be done with framing lumber and some fairly inexpensive vises and things.  You know a lot more about the right workbench design to fit your needs after you've worked with it for a while.  Some of us choose the wrong bench design and then moved on to a different design.  Go pretty generic at first because then you can improve on that with your next bench.  (I'm no sure what you were going to be working on ??)  

Assembly tables are another important thing.  Don't use your work bench for an assembly table or you don't have a workbench anymore. Assembly tables don't need to be fancy either.  Right height, right size, cheap, fast to build.  There's lots of ways to build them so they won't rack and not require complex joinery.  

Clamps.  
HM126

Offline jemmy

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Re: Tool Acquisition
« Reply #8 on: November 06, 2018, 06:35:11 PM »
Well, I have most of the practical tools knocked out so far, and I have like 3 work benches, all ugly but with sturdy 2x12 tops on them, I got them for free, so you cant really beat the cost or effort. I've got a vise that I am going to be setting up, and I'm currently looking for a large vise. Funny you mentioned a vice and work bench because those were the first two tools that I was truly happy about having. That combo has to be the most important tool. I cant count the times I've used a vise across different projects. But I would say it easily has found its way into about every project. I have a lot of little projects that come up that I need space in my shop for normal tools and working on miscellaneous projects on. But the woodworking will take up about 1/2 of the room and will be focused on 3 main things, 1) beehives and components production, 2) slab flattening/prep work  (only have room for 1-2 and maintain a workable area 4 if maxed out with massive slabs) 3)miscellaneous smaller things made of wood (tables, chairs, shelves, etc etc)

The tools Im going to get this week are going to be a set of wood chisels, never owned a set, so I think I'm just gonna get a dewalt set. Read decent things about them, and seem like a nice intro level set. 
Plan for the worst, hope for the best, and take what comes with a grin. - Grandpa Chuck

Offline jemmy

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Re: Tool Acquisition
« Reply #9 on: November 06, 2018, 06:37:51 PM »
The reason I ask this question is because there seems to be a lot of tools that I find after a project(s) that could have made the project astronomically easier, quicker, and cheaper. So Im casting a wide net and seeing what comes back. I know it will take years, and I will end up swapping set ups quite a bit. This is my first shop Im putting together. 
Plan for the worst, hope for the best, and take what comes with a grin. - Grandpa Chuck

Offline jemmy

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Re: Tool Acquisition
« Reply #10 on: November 06, 2018, 06:43:01 PM »
Another note, i got that dewalt radial saw home, and wow those things are beasts. For $150 I cant believe that you can get a 3.5hr motor, on a cart with everything in really good condition. I also took the leap this week and got a 3 phase table saw. I knew it was inevitable for me to avoid 3 phase so I took the plunge, now I just gotta get a converter set up. But that probably isnt going to happen for a few months. I gotta get power out to the shop first. No sense in building something you cant run. Im dropping the electric in the next 2 weeks along with the water main, for both my shop and sawmill. So I am pretty excited! 
Plan for the worst, hope for the best, and take what comes with a grin. - Grandpa Chuck

Online btulloh

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Re: Tool Acquisition
« Reply #11 on: November 07, 2018, 08:15:21 AM »
Sounds like you've got it goin' on.  Radial arm saws are a good value these days since they've lost out the sliding miters.  I like a RA because I grew up with one.  The new technology is good too.  Nothing wrong with having both.

I'd get a 1ph motor for that table saw, but whatever suits you.  

Above all, work safely.
HM126

Offline Brad_bb

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Re: Tool Acquisition
« Reply #12 on: November 09, 2018, 11:53:10 PM »
I had interpreted your original post as you were asking tools needed to build the building.  From the statement that the next thing was to build a building, and then you mentioned the Makita timber saw....I interpreted your post as tools for building the building, and also interpreted that it was a timber frame or at least a post and beam (given that you were using a circle mill I assumed you were cutting beams).

For general woodworking, you start with the basics and then add tools as you need them and as you can afford them.  That question has been asked many times.

Table saw to start.
Compound miter saw is pretty darn handy too.
Then a planer.
I'd get a drill press next.
A band saw can help you speed up preparing stock.
A jointer would be my next choice.

I'm assuming you have the basics of hand power tools like circ saw, Router, cordless drill driver and impact. Dremel tool, RO sander, Belt sander.

Hand tools:
Good chisels and mallet
A good crosscut saw like Stanley Sharptooth 26"
A japanese double sided crosscut and rip saw.
low angle block plane
#5 Bailey or stanley plane with a good iron (like Hock brand).
Since you have a sawmill, a draw knife can be handy for debarking.
Clamps, can never have enough, and buy good ones.
Anything someone can design, I can sure figure out how to fix!
If I say it\\\\\\\'s going to take so long, multiply that by at least 3!

Offline jemmy

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Re: Tool Acquisition
« Reply #13 on: November 10, 2018, 11:04:21 PM »
Sounds like you've got it goin' on.  Radial arm saws are a good value these days since they've lost out the sliding miters.  I like a RA because I grew up with one.  The new technology is good too.  Nothing wrong with having both.

I'd get a 1ph motor for that table saw, but whatever suits you.  

Above all, work safely.
The table saw has 1.5hp motor it just needs a 3-phase converter. The radial arm is 3.5hp that runs off 120 thankfully.  

And I will knock the new day technology compared to the reliability and capabilities of the old saws. Dont get me wrong I like the miter saws, but in terms of a piece of equipment I value the radial saws of "old" wayyyy more. Its heavy duty, fixable, and will outlast me hopefully. With all that being said I've been on the hunt for a miter saw the whole time. And I know I will own like 20 of them, that's their issue imo, very useful but break down easily compared to radials.
Plan for the worst, hope for the best, and take what comes with a grin. - Grandpa Chuck

Offline Woodpecker52

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Re: Tool Acquisition
« Reply #14 on: November 10, 2018, 11:34:50 PM »
Nice to see the young still try to cram a week into a day!  I have found that a good band saw, table saw, and drill press with a few good hand powered or just hand  tools and you can do any project.  The key is patience, planning and relaxation, enjoy life son before you know it you wake up and your 66.
Woodmizer LT-15, Ross Pony #1 planner, Ford 2600 tractor, Stihl chainsaws, Kubota rtv900

Offline thecfarm

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Re: Tool Acquisition
« Reply #15 on: November 11, 2018, 09:06:37 AM »
No wood working skills here. My wood working skills stops when the tree hits the ground. ;D
But I buy "tools" for my place as I need them. Yes,I might look for 3-4-5 years before I buy what I wanted 3-4-5- years ago,but I buy to make things easier,better for me.
Model 6020-20hp Manual Thomas bandsaw,TC40A 4wd 40 hp New Holland tractor, 450 Norse Winch, Heatmor 400 OWB,YCC 1978-79


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