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Author Topic: First Timberframe project  (Read 927 times)

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Offline bobborneman

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First Timberframe project
« on: November 03, 2018, 09:36:23 PM »
This is my first timberframe project.  I really learned alot.  I now understand that the right tools are really important.  Plans came from timberframehq.com, thanks guys! You are awesome.

 
Make it work, use what you have.

Offline jander3

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Re: First Timberframe project
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2018, 08:59:50 AM »
Nice.

Offline bobborneman

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Re: First Timberframe project
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2018, 04:47:54 PM »
one of the things i learned is, there is a big difference between 1/8" and 1/16" when cutting out the mortise.  And also cutting perpendicular to the grain inside a mortise is hard.  Are there any tricks of the trade, other than having a really sharp chisel?
Make it work, use what you have.

Offline Brian_Weekley

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Re: First Timberframe project
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2018, 08:01:15 PM »
Nice.  Thats one beefy table!

Making your first project is the best way to learn.  Yes, keep your chisels sharp.  A boring machine will help you drill a vertical hole.  Use your framing square as a gauge to check your mortise and tenon width (1.5 or 2 inches).   A combination square can be used to check your mortise depth and how vertical the mortise hole is.  Make another small project like timber frame saw horses and you will quickly refine your technique.  Youll be hooked before you know it!
e aho laula

Offline btulloh

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Re: First Timberframe project
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2018, 11:08:51 AM »
other than having a really sharp chisel?


Make sure your version of sharp includes the back of the chisel.  Flat, polished back and precise edge where the back meets the bevel makes a chisel cut straight, especially across end grain.  When there's a rounded junction at the back/bevel junction the chisel will go off line.  Rounding at that point happens as you work.  Keep them touched up as you work.  It helped me to use a 5x loupe to understand what was happening with the edge.  Over time I just knew without looking at it.

Don't know how many mortises you've cut, but like everything, the more you do, the better you get.  Taking the right size bite has a big impact on the process.  Experiment with it.  Usually a smaller bite makes it go faster, especially when you get near the finish line.  I find it better to maintain a reasonably vertical cut throughout the process instead of waiting til the end to get it flat and perpendicular. Just my personal choice. 
HM126

Offline bobborneman

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Re: First Timberframe project
« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2018, 12:12:33 PM »
I did not sharpen my chisels well enough when cutting the mortises.  I ended up spending way too much time trying to get it the right size, and to get it perfectly vertical on the sides.  How much time does it take you experienced guys to cut say a 5" x 1.5" mortise?
Make it work, use what you have.

Offline btulloh

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Re: First Timberframe project
« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2018, 08:19:56 AM »
Probably better not to worry about the time factor.  Whatever time it takes you is what is what it takes.  Sharp chisels are the first thing to deal with or you're in for frustration.  Things change depending on dry or green or what kind of wood.  Maybe do a few mortises in some nice poplar just for working on your technique.  Use smaller mortises if you want for practice.  Maybe limit the depth on a couple to begin.  Sometimes when learning a new thing I'll cut one a day just for practice.  It really does get easier with experience, but tools and techniques are important. The tool (not counting the drilling part) is the chisel.  Technique tends to come with some practice, although some input on that is helpful.  Watching a couple videos can help, but having someone look over your shoulder is even better - if you have access to someone with some experience.
HM126

Offline btulloh

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Re: First Timberframe project
« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2018, 04:55:06 PM »
That's a nice table.  

Looks like PT SYP.  That stuff does not work easily with edge tools, so if you made it through that things will get easier.  PT SYP and chisels that haven't been prepared and sharpened makes for a real bad combo.  Get your chisels set up and take 'em for a ride on some other kind of wood.  
HM126

Offline bobborneman

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Re: First Timberframe project
« Reply #8 on: November 06, 2018, 07:26:34 PM »
Yes it was pressure treated pine. And you are right, it was hard to work with.  Cutting the mortises made me say a lot of words I cant put here.  Cutting across the grain inside the mortise was hard. 
Make it work, use what you have.

Offline Brian_Weekley

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Re: First Timberframe project
« Reply #9 on: November 06, 2018, 07:40:26 PM »
Youre going to want a good framing chisel (e.g., 1-1/2).  They are longer and beefier than those Freud woodworking chisels you are referring to.  Did you first drill the mortise using a bit the same as the mortise (i.e., 1-1/2 drill for a 1-1/2 wide mortise)?  This reduces the amount of wood you have to chisel out.  Cross grain will always be tougher.  You cant avoid it-just use a sharp chisel and do your best.
e aho laula


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