The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:

iDRY Vacuum Kilns


Forestry Forum
Sponsored by:


TimberKing Sawmills



Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Norwood Industries Inc.




Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

Michigan Firewood, your BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

FARMA


Council Tool

Baker Products

ECHO-Bearcat

iDRY Wood Lumber Vacuum Drying for everyon

Baltic Abrasives Technologies Nyle Kiln Dry Systems




Author Topic: Wilderness Medicine Program--Protection  (Read 430 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Pulphook

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 220
  • Location: Downeast Maine
  • Gender: Male
  • Duty, Honor, Country
    • Share Post
Wilderness Medicine Program--Protection
« on: November 07, 2018, 06:59:19 AM »
Many of us retired work alone in the woodlot. The Wilderness Medicine courses offered nationwide give you the knowledge to maybe save yourself
in the woods if injured. Instructors often come out of combat situations with the training to teach emergency care when far away from help.
The course is intense and covers the responses to self care accidents and the needed simple tools for saving your life.
Simple techniques that could save your life. The program is normally run over a long weekend; worth your time.
Too many depend on either a cell phone or partner that is not always available.
JMNSHO
Two wood stoves ( Jotul Rangely ,Jotul Oslo ) heating 99 44/100%
24/7. No central heat. 6-8 cords firewood from the woodlot /year. Low low tech: ATV with trailer, 3 saws, 2 electric splitters, a worn pulphook, peavy, climbing line for skidding, Fiskars 27, an old back getting older.

Offline WV Sawmiller

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5770
  • Age: 65
  • Location: Hinton WV
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Green's Sawmill Services
Re: Wilderness Medicine Program--Protection
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2018, 09:33:53 AM »
   I worked all over the world and in some real remote areas. The best medical providers I ever met worked for us in a gold and copper mining camp down in the Gobi Desert in Mongolia (Oyu Tolgoi project). They were all ex/former military medics and were a real confidence builder. Those guys were good!!! We knew they were going to keep us alive till we got to a hospital whether a crushing injury or explosives accident or whatever. Their experience was a perfect match for the kinds of injuries and ailments we were likely to encounter in a very remote area - about an hour for the first available air medivac when called even under the best of conditions. The doctor in the local village would send patients to our camp that were beyond his ability to handle.

    Very good suggestion as many of us are working in the woods by ourselves and subject to some serious medical issued and often don't realize what we have at our disposal to provide emergency treatment if needed.
Howard Green
WM LT35HDG25(2015) , 2009 4wd Dodge PU, Kawasaki 650 ATV, Sthil 440 & 441, homemade logging arch (w/custom built rear log dolly), JD 750 w/4' wide Bushhog brand FEL

Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"

Offline Pulphook

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 220
  • Location: Downeast Maine
  • Gender: Male
  • Duty, Honor, Country
    • Share Post
Re: Wilderness Medicine Program--Protection
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2018, 08:14:29 PM »
Simple kit: duct tape, blood stopper powder, short bungee cord lengths.
Enough to get you out most of the time.
Two wood stoves ( Jotul Rangely ,Jotul Oslo ) heating 99 44/100%
24/7. No central heat. 6-8 cords firewood from the woodlot /year. Low low tech: ATV with trailer, 3 saws, 2 electric splitters, a worn pulphook, peavy, climbing line for skidding, Fiskars 27, an old back getting older.

Offline Old Greenhorn

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 685
  • Age: 63
  • Location: Catskill Mountains, NY
  • Gender: Male
  • An old coot, still learning.
    • Share Post
Re: Wilderness Medicine Program--Protection
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2018, 08:18:28 PM »
I am not retired, but close, and do work in the woods alone all the time. I recommend wilderness first aid courses strongly. There are several providers and one I strongly recommend is SOLO courses, they have, consistently, the best and most experienced instructors  If you can find a class from a group like the Red Cross, I advise caution. Find out who the instructor(s) are and what actual experience they have. 
 Up until recently I was a certified instructor for ASHI (a good curriculum I enjoyed teaching) as well as many other levels of training (first aid, oxygen, cpr, first responder, etc.) I worked for a number of years as an EMT and can tell you that wilderness medicine is a whole lot different from a patient care perspective that "street medicine". Now that I am mostly retired as a EMT, most of the patients I treat are friends, family, neighbors, and co-workers. Like everyone, they don't want to see a Doc or go to the hospital. I do what I can for them and sometimes stick my neck out medically. When I do this, it is with the knowledge I gained from my wilderness training and experience and not so much from my EMT training. There are things you can do in the wilderness (which, by the way, has a clear legal definition, it turns out) which a state certified EMT would lose his ticket for if he/she did them on the street.
 I have about 50 years of hiking, hunting, backpacking, and fishing. I have led hundreds of boys on countless camping and backpacking trips covering thousands of miles. You run into some 'stuff' with that kind of time. I have been in serious trouble myself a time or two (hypothermia at 9,000 feet with altered mental status 20 miles from a road comes to mind). 
 Yeah, a wilderness first class, especially if it is a weekend class with good instructors, is VERY worth it. (pay attention to the words 'infection control')
It might be of interest to note that I never had much interest in this medical EMT stuff myself, until one night I watched a friend die in front of me out in the woods and I had no idea what to do beyond calling 911 and running 2 miles to the road to direct EMS into the area. There were others who knew what to do and they did all they could and more. I resolved that night to never again not be able to do what needed to be done to give somebody the best chance of survival. Since that very bad night, I had the chance to save a few lives running on an ambulance crew, I also watched many more die or tried to save those who were already dead. No regrets. I kept my promise to myself.
Can You help out the Coleman Veterans Memorial by chipping in a few bucks? Go here for the full story: Can you help this year? in General Board



I ain't the woodcutter, but I can cut wood 'til the woodcutter gets here.

Offline Pulphook

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 220
  • Location: Downeast Maine
  • Gender: Male
  • Duty, Honor, Country
    • Share Post
Re: Wilderness Medicine Program--Protection
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2018, 09:40:17 AM »
I am not retired, but close, and do work in the woods alone all the time. I recommend wilderness first aid courses strongly. There are several providers and one I strongly recommend is SOLO courses, they have, consistently, the best and most experienced instructors  If you can find a class from a group like the Red Cross, I advise caution. Find out who the instructor(s) are and what actual experience they have.
 Up until recently I was a certified instructor for ASHI (a good curriculum I enjoyed teaching) as well as many other levels of training (first aid, oxygen, cpr, first responder, etc.) I worked for a number of years as an EMT and can tell you that wilderness medicine is a whole lot different from a patient care perspective that "street medicine". Now that I am mostly retired as a EMT, most of the patients I treat are friends, family, neighbors, and co-workers. Like everyone, they don't want to see a Doc or go to the hospital. I do what I can for them and sometimes stick my neck out medically. When I do this, it is with the knowledge I gained from my wilderness training and experience and not so much from my EMT training. There are things you can do in the wilderness (which, by the way, has a clear legal definition, it turns out) which a state certified EMT would lose his ticket for if he/she did them on the street.
 I have about 50 years of hiking, hunting, backpacking, and fishing. I have led hundreds of boys on countless camping and backpacking trips covering thousands of miles. You run into some 'stuff' with that kind of time. I have been in serious trouble myself a time or two (hypothermia at 9,000 feet with altered mental status 20 miles from a road comes to mind).
 Yeah, a wilderness first class, especially if it is a weekend class with good instructors, is VERY worth it. (pay attention to the words 'infection control')
It might be of interest to note that I never had much interest in this medical EMT stuff myself, until one night I watched a friend die in front of me out in the woods and I had no idea what to do beyond calling 911 and running 2 miles to the road to direct EMS into the area. There were others who knew what to do and they did all they could and more. I resolved that night to never again not be able to do what needed to be done to give somebody the best chance of survival. Since that very bad night, I had the chance to save a few lives running on an ambulance crew, I also watched many more die or tried to save those who were already dead. No regrets. I kept my promise to myself.


WELL SPOKEN !
SOLO is excellent and one or two others as effective here in New England. And, yes, forget the Red Cross, they are way behind in off road emergency care.
JMNSHO
Two wood stoves ( Jotul Rangely ,Jotul Oslo ) heating 99 44/100%
24/7. No central heat. 6-8 cords firewood from the woodlot /year. Low low tech: ATV with trailer, 3 saws, 2 electric splitters, a worn pulphook, peavy, climbing line for skidding, Fiskars 27, an old back getting older.

Offline John Mc

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5081
  • Age: 57
  • Location: Monkton, Vermont
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Wilderness Medicine Program--Protection
« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2018, 04:41:58 PM »
I found a SOLO link by searching for "SOLO Wilderness First Aid".

Who are the other good ones in New England you mentioned, @Pulphook (or anyone else knowledgeable in this)
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline Pulphook

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 220
  • Location: Downeast Maine
  • Gender: Male
  • Duty, Honor, Country
    • Share Post
Re: Wilderness Medicine Program--Protection
« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2018, 05:14:56 PM »
Evening John:
Scared me there with being "tagged" ;)
I took the  wildmed.com program run by LL Bean in Freeport, Maine.
Here's some other sources:
REI offrers classes.
AMC ( Appalachian Mountain Club ) also has programs.
NOLS ( Nat'l Outdoor Leader School ) mostly out West.
wildmedcenter.com

Also if you're a vet, look up local mil groups that have emergency care training.

Worth the time.
Two wood stoves ( Jotul Rangely ,Jotul Oslo ) heating 99 44/100%
24/7. No central heat. 6-8 cords firewood from the woodlot /year. Low low tech: ATV with trailer, 3 saws, 2 electric splitters, a worn pulphook, peavy, climbing line for skidding, Fiskars 27, an old back getting older.


Share via delicious Share via digg Share via facebook Share via linkedin Share via pinterest Share via reddit Share via stumble Share via tumblr Share via twitter

xx
Medicine

Started by Autocar on Health and Safety

2 Replies
505 Views
Last post January 23, 2013, 09:52:46 PM
by thecfarm
xx
The Outdoors is the best Medicine

Started by POSTON WIDEHEAD on The Outdoor Board

19 Replies
1063 Views
Last post November 27, 2014, 06:20:38 PM
by POSTON WIDEHEAD
xx
What’s in your medicine cabinet?

Started by Bibbyman on Health and Safety

12 Replies
3133 Views
Last post February 10, 2008, 05:45:10 PM
by blueox
xx
Joe Medicine Crow has passed

Started by dgdrls on General Board

2 Replies
468 Views
Last post April 08, 2016, 01:47:13 PM
by barbender
 


Powered by EzPortal