The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:

iDRY Vacuum Kilns


Forestry Forum
Sponsored by:


TimberKing Sawmills



Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Norwood Industries Inc.




Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

Michigan Firewood, your BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

FARMA


Council Tool

Baker Products

ECHO-Bearcat

iDRY Wood Lumber Vacuum Drying for everyon

Baltic Abrasives Technologies Nyle Kiln Dry Systems




Author Topic: Ash logs  (Read 1970 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline CX3

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 871
  • Age: 37
  • Location: SW Missouri
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Ash logs
« on: November 26, 2018, 06:11:48 PM »
I have a 40 tree portable ash job to saw. I looked at the standing timber today they are nice trees.

I have not sawn an ash log in my life. I have knocked out a few hundred thousand feet of oak though.

Are there any major concerns headed my way?

Many thanks.
John 3:16
You Better Believe It!

Online WV Sawmiller

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5762
  • Age: 65
  • Location: Hinton WV
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Green's Sawmill Services
Re: Ash logs
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2018, 06:27:26 PM »
   I find ash can often have stress so be ready for moving cants. It also tends to gum up my blades so use plenty of lube to clean them. It is very straight grained and can tend to want to split easily. I use 4 degree doublehard WM blades and am well pleased with their performance on ash. 

   IMHO it is beautiful wood and the smell reminds me of an old bee tree. Good luck. 
Howard Green
WM LT35HDG25(2015) , 2009 4wd Dodge PU, Kawasaki 650 ATV, Sthil 440 & 441, homemade logging arch (w/custom built rear log dolly), JD 750 w/4' wide Bushhog brand FEL

Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"

Online terrifictimbersllc

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 4447
  • Age: 64
  • Location: Mystic, CT
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Terrific Timbers LLC
Re: Ash logs
« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2018, 06:31:17 PM »
Yes, can expect lots of stress, maybe some won't have it.  4 degree bands and be able to keep them clean.  These are the thoughts I have about ash, too. 
DJ Hoover, Terrific Timbers LLC,  Mystic CT  2001 WM LT40SHDD (42HP Kubota, Accuset2, FAO's, Lubemizer, debarker), Peterson WPF 10-30 with chain slabber. Logrite fetching arch, WM BMS250 sharpener/BMT250 setter.  2001 F350 7.3L PSD 6 spd manual ZF 4x4 Crew Cab Long Bed

Offline GDinMaine

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 543
  • Location: I love Maine!
    • Share Post
Re: Ash logs
« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2018, 07:29:22 PM »
Smallish logs are the ones that give you the most grief. I had ash lumber, near the pith, split before I finished the cut, but that is about the worst of it. Box in the pith if you can, and cut it out of the lumber. I find it saws nice with WM Turbo 7 blades.
It's the going that counts not the distance!

WM LT-40HD-D42

Online Old Greenhorn

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 669
  • Age: 63
  • Location: Catskill Mountains, NY
  • Gender: Male
  • An old coot, still learning.
    • Share Post
Re: Ash logs
« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2018, 08:06:39 PM »
I have found that it cuts a heck of a lot easier than white oak, it's softer. I love the wood, nice grain. Yes, the logs I have done have some stress, but I don't have enough experience to know if it is because the way they grew, or just the wood in general.
Can You help out the Coleman Veterans Memorial by chipping in a few bucks? Go here for the full story: Can you help this year? in General Board



I ain't the woodcutter, but I can cut wood 'til the woodcutter gets here.

Offline Mad Professor

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 404
  • Age: 2015
  • Location: Northeast
    • Share Post
Re: Ash logs
« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2018, 08:27:26 PM »
It can end check badly.  End seal the logs as soon as bucked, and boards if you trim them.

Maybe I've been lucky but I have not had much problems with movement on sawn ash.  Maybe because the trees were all straight and clear of limbs for 1st 40 feet.

It makes good stock for timber frames if you box the heart.

Powderpost beetles love it.

Offline 1970bcg

  • Member*
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Ash logs
« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2018, 08:30:49 PM »
Keep the heart centered in the cant while you're sawing.  Turn more often if you have to in order to keep the timber spring (stress) centered. This will eliminate a lot of the board splitting.  Run water on your blade to stop sap build up.

Offline PAmizerman

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 480
  • Age: 27
  • Location: Loretto PA
  • Gender: Male
  • Just Another Day In Paradise!!
    • Share Post
Re: Ash logs
« Reply #7 on: November 26, 2018, 08:55:29 PM »
It is very dusty and the sawdust seems to stick to you. A dust mask can be a good idea. Plenty of lube to keep the band clean.
Woodmizer lt40 super remote 42hp Kubota diesel. Accuset II
Hydraulics everywhere
Traverse 6035 telehandler
WM bms250 sharpener
WM bmt250 setter
and a lot of back breaking work!!

Offline Brad_bb

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 3384
  • Age: 47
  • Location: Joliet, IL
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • My timberframe blog
Re: Ash logs
« Reply #8 on: November 26, 2018, 09:33:47 PM »
I've cut a lot of Ash in the last 3 years on my LT15, which may not be considered "a lot" to guys with Hydraulic mills.  I've probably milled 200 sticks?  Just a guess.  This included butt logs up to 36" and also included branch logs down to 8" dia.  Those were cut with flats on two sides.  Larger ones that would make jacket boards were kept.  

I have NOT noticed much stress or movement in all the Ash I've cut.  I have been attributing that to the face that most were dead on the stump and dried some in addition to how dry ash is to start with.  I'm assuming that process actually helped to make the wood more stable.  I've had logs that were very dry and logs that were still pretty wet in the middle, but usually the outside was more dry.  There was a gradient of moisture of course.  Very few were so green so as they were cut with a full canopy.  Most have very little or no leafing out when they were cut.  All of them were killed by the emerald Ash borer.

I always used a 4 degree double hard blade.  I run water only for lube, though adding a few drops of Dawn doesn't hurt.


I've cut mostly beams and produced a lot of 5/4 jacket boards(boards that come from everything outside of the beams.  I did cut about 6000 BF or 2x8's for T&G last winter and didn't see significant movement.  All machined out well after drying.

I've seen guys here post about powerpost beetles loving Ash, but I see their frass piles below my oak, and I'm not sure I ever see it from my Ash.  Just the same, the 2x8 T&G mentioned above was treated with Permachink's shellguard (alcohol borate)
Anything someone can design, I can sure figure out how to fix!
If I say it\\\\\\\'s going to take so long, multiply that by at least 3!

Offline SawyerTed

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 774
  • Age: 56
  • Location: Germanton, NC
  • Gender: Male
  • Summey Lumber Services, LLC
    • Share Post
Re: Ash logs
« Reply #9 on: November 26, 2018, 10:18:36 PM »
I recently had a job that included three ash logs out of a single tree.  Two sawed just like a green red or white oak.  One was ugly, lots of stress and lots of flipping 180 degrees.  I boxed the heart and actually threw it in the burn pile.  The 4x6 heart was moving as I ditched it.  The other two logs sawed fine.
Woodmizer LT35HD25, Kubota MX5100, IH McCormick Farmall 140, Granberg Alaskan Chainsaw Mill, Husqvarna 372XP, Husqvarna 455 Rancher, Ram 3500 6.7 Cummins

Offline barbender

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 6120
  • Age: 43
  • Location: Deer River MN
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Ash logs
« Reply #10 on: November 26, 2018, 10:30:30 PM »
I've sawn Green Ash, it is one of my least favorite to saw. I attribute most of the problems to the very low m.c. of the wood, it takes the edge off of blades fast and it takes a sharp blade to saw it straight. The sawdust is nasty dry stuff, it irritates my eyes. I also found some "timber break" in it, once you get the log opened up you find it is fractured👎 Aside from all of that, it made nice lumber. We also have black ash, that's a completely different animal. Saws beautifully and pleasant to work with all around.  I doubt you have black ash down there, though. 
Too many irons in the fire

Offline Hooterspfld

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 65
  • Age: 35
  • Location: Springfield, MO
  • Gender: Male
  • I'm a sucker for a chainsaw!
    • Share Post
Re: Ash logs
« Reply #11 on: November 26, 2018, 10:40:27 PM »
Where abouts in SW Missouri? I'm in Springfield, just getting into wood cutting.  Would like to see a mill in action if your close by.

Offline YellowHammer

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 3660
  • Age: 54
  • Location: New Market, Alabama
  • Gender: Male
  • Take Steps to Save Steps
    • Share Post
    • Hobby Hardwood Alabama
Re: Ash logs
« Reply #12 on: November 26, 2018, 11:33:33 PM »
Ash is one of the most splintering woods Iíve sawn.  When itís green its not too bad, but will occasionally try to splinter and stab you for the fun of it..

When its dry, it really turns mean, and I canít remeber the last time I handled dry ash, planed or unplaned, when it didnít splinter or stab me somehow. Often it will go through a glove like a porcupine.  Had some cut the palm of a glove a couple days ago when edging.  Donít push boards around with your thigh, or slide them through your gloves when stacking or coming off the mill.  If you see a punji stick developing on the edge of a sawn board, whack it off with a hatchet immedialty.  

I know a guy who was planing ash, no big deal, done it a thousand times, when a small splinter just grabbed the cuff of his glove and split off into a spike, where ran down inside the cuff of his glove and then through his hand, requiring significant wood from hand surgery.  

Ash is beautiful stuff, but itís cranky, so just watch it so it donít get ya.  

HobbyHardwoodAlabama.com

Offline moodnacreek

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 981
  • Location: Orange County NY
  • Gender: Male
  • Sawin by the notches
    • Share Post
Re: Ash logs
« Reply #13 on: November 27, 2018, 07:49:53 AM »
It is like sawing immature red oak. Also has pitch like conifer and can gum up the saw. Sometimes mixing a few maple logs in the run cleans off the gum.

Offline 69bronco

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 431
  • Age: 61
  • Location: Champlain Valley NY
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Ash logs
« Reply #14 on: November 27, 2018, 08:56:51 AM »
Thanks
Stress in ash🤔
 

 

Offline Mad Professor

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 404
  • Age: 2015
  • Location: Northeast
    • Share Post
Re: Ash logs
« Reply #15 on: November 27, 2018, 08:59:14 AM »
Ash is one of the most splintering woods Iíve sawn.  When itís green its not too bad, but will occasionally try to splinter and stab you for the fun of it..

When its dry, it really turns mean, and I canít remeber the last time I handled dry ash, planed or unplaned, when it didnít splinter or stab me somehow. Often it will go through a glove like a porcupine.  Had some cut the palm of a glove a couple days ago when edging.  Donít push boards around with your thigh, or slide them through your gloves when stacking or coming off the mill.  If you see a punji stick developing on the edge of a sawn board, whack it off with a hatchet immedialty.  

I know a guy who was planing ash, no big deal, done it a thousand times, when a small splinter just grabbed the cuff of his glove and split off into a spike, where ran down inside the cuff of his glove and then through his hand, requiring significant wood from hand surgery.  

Ash is beautiful stuff, but itís cranky, so just watch it so it donít get ya.  
If you want to talk splinters, eastern hemlock.........

Offline petefrom bearswamp

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 3545
  • Age: 81
  • Location: Finger Lakes region of NY
  • Gender: Male
  • made 70-11 and still feelin pretty darned good!
    • Share Post
Re: Ash logs
« Reply #16 on: November 27, 2018, 09:10:55 AM »
Right on th money 69bronco
Brings back bad memories
LT40SHDD51
Kubota 8540 tractor, Farmi winch
Kubota 900 RTV
Polaris 550 Sportsman ATV
1 Husky 1 gas Echo 1 cordless Echo vintage Homelite super xl12
241 acres of woodland

Offline alan gage

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 297
  • Age: 40
  • Location: NW Iowa
    • Share Post
Re: Ash logs
« Reply #17 on: November 27, 2018, 10:31:48 AM »
I'm still pretty new to milling but after reading people complaining about sawing ash I was very happy when I milled about 1000bf of it this fall and it behaved very well. Not much movement at all from the cants or boards. It was very dusty though and did put a little buildup on the blade if I didn't use lube.

Over half of that was from a couple large, clear, and straight logs and the rest came from less perfect logs that are destined to be flooring in my house. The ones for flooring air dried with very little defect and have been processed into strips. One of the logs had a lot of cracking as it got close to the heart so there will be a  lot of waste from those boards but most were fine.

I believe we have both green and white ash here and I'm not sure which I milled (both for all I know).

Alan
Timberking B-16

Offline CX3

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 871
  • Age: 37
  • Location: SW Missouri
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Ash logs
« Reply #18 on: November 27, 2018, 04:20:50 PM »
Bruner. Not far from Springfield. Stop by anytime
John 3:16
You Better Believe It!

Offline OffGrid973

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 469
  • Age: 41
  • Location: New Jersey
  • Gender: Male
  • Off Grid
    • Share Post
Re: Ash logs
« Reply #19 on: November 27, 2018, 08:39:38 PM »
Keep it thick seems to be ok...my 2x4 framed wall on the barn build danced all over the place when put together green. I would stay away from framing until it has a chance to dry.
Your Fellow Woodworker,
- Off Grid


Share via delicious Share via digg Share via facebook Share via linkedin Share via pinterest Share via reddit Share via stumble Share via tumblr Share via twitter

xx
Wanted - small diamater low grade walnut logs and pallet logs ...

Started by Wes Lyon on Wanted

2 Replies
1817 Views
Last post August 12, 2006, 10:31:53 PM
by Wes Lyon
xx
blue stain pine logs,aspen logs, Colorado

Started by logloper on Wanted

2 Replies
2776 Views
Last post February 23, 2010, 09:52:24 PM
by logloper
xx
8 ft logs vs vs split logs for seasoning firewood

Started by Christopher7789 on Drying and Processing

18 Replies
2674 Views
Last post March 30, 2017, 10:45:58 PM
by GeneWengert-WoodDoc
xx
What to pay for logs

Started by millstead on Sawmills and Milling

44 Replies
4069 Views
Last post December 23, 2012, 08:23:27 AM
by Okrafarmer
 


Powered by EzPortal