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Author Topic: I made a peg die.  (Read 348 times)

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Offline Brad_bb

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I made a peg die.
« on: January 11, 2019, 11:02:01 PM »
So in the past I used a knife plate that had a 1" hole clamped to some timber drops on saw horses as a peg die.  The clamps would work their way loose every 8 pegs or so. Well we had to use the knife plate in a frame, so I needed a new die.  The die does get dull after 300 pegs or so I think so It's good to get a new one.  It's just a 1" hole drilled in steel.  You drive from the burr side.

So I took a couple of 8x8 timber drops and some flat bar and drilled some holes.  I put a shallow mortise in the timbers for the flat bar so they couldn't move.  I also got some 1/2" x 3 square head lags and washers to complete the look.  On the bottom are a 1x3 oak board on each end to keep it from sliding off the saw horses.  Maybe a little overboard, but that's just the way I envisioned it.



 

Anything someone can design, I can sure figure out how to fix!
If I say it\\\\\\\'s going to take so long, multiply that by at least 3!

Offline CJ

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Re: I made a peg die.
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2019, 09:00:13 AM »
Hi Brad,  I'm not sure how this jig works. So, do you take your stock and hammer them through the hole to give you a round peg? Do you still not have to give it an octagon shape after that stage? I'm new to this whole timber frame gig, and what I've been doing is running my stock through the table saw, then setting the blade at a 45 degree angle to cut the corners to obtain my octagon. I know that it's not the genuine timber frame way of making them, but I don't have the wide spread of the country here in the city. 
 I've been trying to concoct a peg jig myself using cast iron mechanical pipe. I just haven't found the time to concentrate on actually doing it, but when I do, I will gladly display it for the rest of the community. In the meantime, I have been working on a sharpening jig for my chisels. I'm almost there!! I told the Mrs. that I'm going to patent it. LOL! Have a good one!

Offline Brad_bb

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Re: I made a peg die.
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2019, 09:48:03 AM »
The peg blanks are split from the round with a froe, draw knifed while green to a round shape close to the final diameter.  Then a point is put on them with the draw knife.  Then they are allowed to dry.  Then they can be driven through the die with a 3 LB maul/sledge.

There are two ways to peg - a line to line fit where your peg and hole are about the same diameter, and draw bore where your mortise and tenon holes are offset from each other and your peg is tapered for about 3/4 of it's length.  I've done both and both methods work.  There are definitely varying opinions on both, but done correctly, both work.

This die is for line to line fit.  I don't use octagonal pegs in hardwood for concerns of splitting.  I don't use any softwood(as I'm not in softwood country), but I would think that octagonal pegs would be more in line with softwood as the softwood would compress a little.

Line to line is ok when your material is fairly stable, and you're housing your joints so you're not as concerned about gaps showing as the timbers dry and shrink because they'll be hidden in the housing.  Draw boring on the other hand will pre-load your joint a little and if you ever needed to, you could drive a little deeper in the future.   I haven't needed to though.  Theoretically it'll keep your gaps tight. As your mortise timber shrinks, it will tend to put pressure on the peg.  This is why in some historical frames the draw bored pegs have a"U"shape in the middle.  The pressure flexed the peg and it permanently took this shape after many years in that position.
Anything someone can design, I can sure figure out how to fix!
If I say it\\\\\\\'s going to take so long, multiply that by at least 3!


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