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Author Topic: Door width in log cabin  (Read 486 times)

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Offline revid

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Door width in log cabin
« on: January 13, 2019, 08:59:17 PM »
Building butt and pass cabin and wondering about the rough door opening width. For a 32” door how much do I cut the rough opening ? Cutting a 2x4 key way in end of logs, do I then put 2x6” or whatever around opening and then door box or just door box against logs?same for windows?

Online Don P

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Re: Door width in log cabin
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2019, 09:13:58 PM »
A 32" door typically then has a 1-1/2" jamb so rough opening of 34", plus 3" for the bucks = 37" log opening, same for windows, manufacturers rough opening width callout plus 3" for the bucks is typical.
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Re: Door width in log cabin
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2019, 04:23:35 AM »
Thanks btw what do you call bucks?

Online Don P

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Re: Door width in log cabin
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2019, 06:44:18 AM »
 



This shows a bucked window and a yet to be bucked door. These are 2x6 bucks, mixed red and white pine logs that averaged around 12" dia x 8" stack height. The corners were a V and A type of notch and pass to help make them a bit more weathertight. Instead of 2x2's this had 2x2x1/4" angle iron trenched into grooves in the logs and inset in the bucks. There were slots cut in the bucks outside of the steel zone to attach the bucks to the logs yet allow them to settle. A 2x6 across the tops of the bucks and a 1x7" attached to the top of the log opening allowed a top trim slip joint. The windows were foamed on the sides with fiberglass in the head settlement void.
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Re: Door width in log cabin
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2019, 06:57:53 AM »
Ok thanks Don. I might use the angle iron also instead of cutting 1 1/2 x 3 1/2 groove for a 2x4. Do you fill out the buck to cover the full width of the end log so your trim can go over the face of the logs or trim to the inside end of the logs? Home that makes sense. 

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Re: Door width in log cabin
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2019, 07:39:56 AM »
In that pic the trim bumps into that 3/4" flat between the buck and the window flare, that works well for random width logs. For milled logs I've gone over them but never really liked the voids behind the trim, so then I started insetting the trim into flattened areas cut into the round faces. The head trim then becomes an issue. You need to be able to really predict settlement and have a floating flashing let into a reglet, a slot in the log over the head trim.
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Re: Door width in log cabin
« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2019, 07:20:12 AM »
WThanks Don just found a video on YouTube thats a great way to do window trim 

On another topic, how do you do receptacles? Vertical or sideways? Was thinking cause of curvature Im log that sideways would be better . Was going to make up a jig and router in the holes and then use those plastic receptacle boxes . Would like your thoughts?

Online Don P

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Re: Door width in log cabin
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2019, 08:07:28 AM »
I've built one of theirs, years ago. They did air dry their log cants for about a year prior to milling, a large part of shrinkage was done with. I'm saying that to preface this. That trim does not allow for settlement. By nailing the side casings to the logs it locks them in place. The head trim is sitting on the sides and the window. The top flashing is sitting in a reglet right on top of the head trim. Now think about what happens if the log wall moves downward and the window being unable to lose height contacts and is crushed by the upper trim. In dry logs with tight bucks this works, if you are building green and allowing for settlement it doesn't.

This is a double switch box in an 8" mixed southern pine log wall. Lots of Virginia pine in that one, notice the lefty logs above and below the hole, these were not fun. I just built for them once too, could digress for awhile on their thinking problems. I've run receptacles both ways but your switches and double gangs need to be standing so plan for that. You need enough flat for the cover plate so I make that first and check it with a sample cover plate then layout the box, use deep boxes to avoid wire fill problems. I drill a single 1" hole for wire in a single box and 2 holes in a double. Don't forget some wires run up and down. We drill at each log level and use a long piece of 5/8 allthread to ream out and pound the chips out every time, do not skip that step if chips jam in the hole and get wet it isn't fun. You can see some band strapping in the holes in the pic. When we finish a box I stick scrap band strapping down the hole into the basement, this confirms the hole made it and provides a fish for the sparky. I do prefer plastic boxes. You can remove the ears and use a belt sander to smooth that then secure them with drywall screws on the sides. I just used a drill and chisel to waste out the holes.





This is how I was making the switch plate flares;





I saw this pic while looking for the one above. Interior stud wall abutting a log wall. I cut a trench alongside the stud wall on each side of the studs to allow the finish goods and a trim strip to be inserted in that groove. This was a non settlement system but it works well with either. The logs can slide down but the stud wall finish stays sealed and nice looking. I build the end stud pack with 2 studs oriented with the wall length and one cap stud faced normal over those. This leaves a 1/2" gap between the end pair. Drill an oversized hole or slot depending on settlement allowance and attach the stud pack to the log wall. If a settlement system the stud wall is built short of what is above and a crown trim slides down over the wall finish goods.



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Re: Door width in log cabin
« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2019, 09:24:45 AM »
Thanks and nice work. Certain will take your advice. My logs are going on four yrs old but no doubt still a little green


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