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Author Topic: Elm  (Read 739 times)

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Offline xlogger

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Elm
« on: January 17, 2019, 01:29:43 PM »
Saw up my first Elm today into some nice slabs. Should elm dry slow or should I put some fans on it?
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Offline K-Guy

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Re: Elm
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2019, 03:19:28 PM »
It depends on the species. Some are a group 2 wood and some group 3 using the Nyle L53 or L200 manual.
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Offline xlogger

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Re: Elm
« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2019, 06:07:14 AM »
I'm just planing on air drying it to around 20 before I put it in the kiln.

 
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Offline xlogger

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Re: Elm
« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2019, 06:10:46 AM »
Danny, what species do you think?
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Offline WDH

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Re: Elm
« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2019, 08:06:29 AM »
If you look at the slab where the bark meets the wood, and if you look closely at the bark, and if you look at where the outer bark meets the inner bark, and if you see a light cream colored band between the outer bark and the inner bark, it is American elm.  If there is no difference in color, r.e. a thin cream colored band, it is slippery elm, also known as red elm. 

The outer bark is called the rhytidome or outer phloem and is the hard part.  The inner bark, called the inner phloem is the soft part that functions to transport sugars from the leaves to the roots.  It is between these two layers that you need to look for that thin cream colored band.

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Offline GeneWengert-WoodDoc

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Re: Elm
« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2019, 03:44:32 PM »
As thick as the slab is, very slow drying is the best idea.
Gene - Author of articles in Sawmill & Woodlot and books: Drying Hardwood Lumber; VA Tech Solar Kiln; Sawing Edging & Trimming Hardwood Lumber. And more

Offline xlogger

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Re: Elm
« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2019, 05:51:11 PM »
that is just the next one to cut, I cut them 9/4
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Re: Elm
« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2019, 05:54:25 PM »
If you look at the slab where the bark meets the wood, and if you look closely at the bark, and if you look at where the outer bark meets the inner bark, and if you see a light cream colored band between the outer bark and the inner bark, it is American elm.  If there is no difference in color, r.e. a thin cream colored band, it is slippery elm, also known as red elm.  

The outer bark is called the rhytidome or outer phloem and is the hard part.  The inner bark, called the inner phloem is the soft part that functions to transport sugars from the leaves to the roots.  It is between these two layers that you need to look for that thin cream colored band.
thanks
Timberking 2000, Turbo slabber Mill, 584 Case, Bobcat 773, solar kiln, Nyle L-53 DH kiln

Offline offrink

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Re: Elm
« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2019, 05:55:01 PM »
Good information! smiley_thumbsup 

Offline Brad_bb

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Re: Elm
« Reply #9 on: January 19, 2019, 06:09:48 PM »
I've sawn a couple red/slippery elms.  I've noticed that they hold a lot of water and as they dry, get considerably lighter(weight).  It's a lighter wood than walnut I'd say, when dry.
Anything someone can design, I can sure figure out how to fix!
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Offline moodnacreek

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Re: Elm
« Reply #10 on: January 19, 2019, 08:27:33 PM »
The thick elm I have on sticks needs 1 year per inch and then must be resawn to make flat. Also have pp beetle problems with these wet summers. Elm is one of the most beautiful hardwoods when finished.

Offline GeneWengert-WoodDoc

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Re: Elm
« Reply #11 on: January 19, 2019, 10:40:01 PM »
Just a quick note about the powderpost beetle in air drying.  This is also called the ambrosia beetle and what they like best is to bore out of the lumber and go to the ground and mothers lay eggs in any wood debris on the ground.  So pick up all the debris to help control them.
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Offline moodnacreek

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Re: Elm
« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2019, 09:47:26 AM »
Just a quick note about the powderpost beetle in air drying.  This is also called the ambrosia beetle and what they like best is to bore out of the lumber and go to the ground and mothers lay eggs in any wood debris on the ground.  So pick up all the debris to help control them.
Thanks, I didn't know that, have to put my wife on it as soon as the snow melts.

Offline nativewolf

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Re: Elm
« Reply #13 on: January 20, 2019, 11:05:53 AM »
Just a quick note about the powderpost beetle in air drying.  This is also called the ambrosia beetle and what they like best is to bore out of the lumber and go to the ground and mothers lay eggs in any wood debris on the ground.  So pick up all the debris to help control them.
Thanks, I didn't know that, have to put my wife on it as soon as the snow melts.
why wait? :D
Liking Walnut

Offline YellowHammer

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Re: Elm
« Reply #14 on: January 21, 2019, 12:51:00 AM »
Saw up my first Elm today into some nice slabs. Should elm dry slow or should I put some fans on it?
Put some tons on it.  Park your car on it, two if possible.  Buy some cheese dip because some of it will turn into potato chips no matter what you do.  Stuff moves like a snake.  

Very pretty wood, but the same grain that makes it look great, also makes it move.  In 4/4 we estimate we yield about 25% bowed or twisted wood after drying.

Standard air dry, no fans.
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Offline moodnacreek

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Re: Elm
« Reply #15 on: January 21, 2019, 08:55:38 AM »
4/4 is too thin. I say 5/4 min. and sticks 12" o.c. and then the D8 !

Offline Al_Smith

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Re: Elm
« Reply #16 on: January 22, 2019, 06:57:14 AM »
Back in the day when  you could find any elm large enough to saw it was preferred for things like loading planks and wagon tongues .Oak is strong but never looses much weight as it dries .Heavy as lead wet and about like cast iron dry .Elm looses weight and is limber as a  noodle.It bends,oak breaks .

Offline moodnacreek

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Re: Elm
« Reply #17 on: January 22, 2019, 08:51:01 AM »
Here and there we still find fair sized elm. Easy to saw, hard to dry. I make sickle bar swathe boards, to use and give away, from elm. It is also good for wedges.

Offline 1countryboy

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Re: Elm
« Reply #18 on: January 22, 2019, 09:20:28 AM »
I just pulled in a 30+ ft red elm log that blew over.   It has no bark so been dead a while.  Tree was over 70 feet tall.  Lot of firewood in the top or OWB.  The log was cut to 16 feet.  (my mill length).  30 inches across.  When squared I had 18" x 18".   Cut into 2 by 12 s for plates and a 12 by 12 beam under an old bank dairy barn.   Will use beams for vertical support on concrete risers. 

Dad always used red elm for beams on wagon running gear.  Bend but never break.  I have a couple more red elm still standing (leaning).  Trees are about 70 feet tall.   Will wait for mother nature to help me drop the trees.  

The logs sawed very easily on my Norwood HD 36.   Every thing is buried now under 16" of snow and sub zero weather.

I do have pix, but are on my cell phone.  Maybe someday will take time to get them on here.  
Ohio Certified Tree Farm, Ohio (almost there, Centennial Farms)

Offline Al_Smith

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Re: Elm
« Reply #19 on: January 22, 2019, 10:52:41 AM »
Actually I have a fair amount of little elms but they seldom get any larger than 6" then they die .After a few years the roots fail and the wind takes them over .Every few years I clean up parts of the ground and if I find one,which I know once I cut into them I save them to side haul logs etc .You'd be surprised how much oak log a few skinny little elms can handle .

These are mostly under story trees in amongst 100 foot oaks so they have to reach for the sky to get any sunlight .I'm not sure if that is what kills them off or Dutch elm .Could be both .


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