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Author Topic: Horse Barn for loose hay  (Read 251 times)

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Offline dustyjay

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Horse Barn for loose hay
« on: February 28, 2019, 11:18:04 AM »
I don't plan on starting construction until 2020, but I've been dreaming about this for a few years now, and since the house is (mostly) done I am thinking about the barn. I've built 3 timber-frames now in the 20x12'ish range so think  I can handle this, working slowly.

Wants that drive the design: 
1) Drive through end to end with horse wagon or tractor
2) Uninterrupted space for loose hay track under ridge and room for each jag of hay to move
       Lotsa hay storage room
3) Box stalls
4) at least 4 tie stalls
5) Maternity stall at least 12x16'
6) South facing tack up area
7) North facing 2nd story space for massive window and killer view
8 )Be able to assemble with minimal/no crane use

My biggest concern is how much lateral force the weight of the roof is going to put on the exterior walls. The central core of this barn is essentially a copy of a barn I examined in Brattleboro, VT which has stood for over 150 years, so I think it's OK. I would be tempted to potentially add steel cable and tension to each bent if needed.

I've tried to make it pretty straightforward as far as joinery is concerned.
I plan to put it on an 8" thick poured slab, 16" thick under each post, 1/2' rebar 1'OC, on undisturbed well packed dense gravel soil in Southwestern NH. 

What do you think?
What am I missing?
Proper prior planning prevents pith poor performance

Offline Mike W

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Re: Horse Barn for loose hay
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2019, 01:06:43 PM »
Regarding the foundation, what is the frost line depth in your area?  would think if pouring a monolithic slab with thickened spot piers to support the posts the load bearing pads should be a  few inches below frost line in your area at the least.  I personally would isolate the load bearing points separate from the slab to allow each to react independent of each other during different stresses from seasonal changes and other natural loading.  What type of hold down are you planning, an embed pour in place like a Simpson base anchor or planning a knife plate type of base? Sure your already on top of this, just make sure whatever anchor is used the footings are sized per the specs at the minimum for coverage.  

If pouring a monolithic type slab, make sure to saw cut in a diamond pattern around the post above the location where the thicker footing transcends into the thinner slab, at least this will attempt to keep the cracking in a straight line as best as possible.  Two things concrete will do, it will get hard, and it will crack, besides the fact concrete waits for no man while setting up :-\

keep us up to speed on your progress, will be looking forward to your updates, 

Offline Dave Shepard

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Re: Horse Barn for loose hay
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2019, 02:07:19 PM »
Can you post a screenshot to the gallery? I can't open Sketchup files. Thanks. 
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Offline dustyjay

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Re: Horse Barn for loose hay
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2019, 07:28:19 PM »
 "isolate the load bearing points separate from the slab to allow each to react independent of each other during different stresses from seasonal changes and other natural loading."

I like that plan. I could do 12" piers for load bearing posts and rig a gap between that and the slab so as so allow movement. I'd have to go down 4' to frost line.
 I haven't decided on fasteners yet.
Proper prior planning prevents pith poor performance

Offline dustyjay

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Re: Horse Barn for loose hay
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2019, 07:30:01 PM »
Here's a screenshoot, looking west through the barn. It's hard to see all the detail in a single angle.

 
Proper prior planning prevents pith poor performance

Offline Dave Shepard

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Re: Horse Barn for loose hay
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2019, 07:34:58 PM »
Thanks for the screenshot. That is a very unusual frame. 
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Offline Brad_bb

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Re: Horse Barn for loose hay
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2019, 11:12:48 PM »

Biggest concern for me is a barn fire.  Best to have hay in separate building.  In a recent barn, a timberframe barn was built.  At the back of the barn, is a 10 foot isle way (Port-cochere/Breezeway).  On the other side is an all metal building with concrete floor and stem walls for hay storage.  It's connected to the main barn by metal.  It looks like one continuous building with the same standing seam roof.  All electrical (lighting) is in conduit.  If it catches fire, it won't burn the rest of the barn where all the stalls are.  Please, take fire considerations carefully.  Too many barn fires and horses/animals killed.

Anything someone can design, I can sure figure out how to fix!
If I say it\\\\\\\'s going to take so long, multiply that by at least 3!


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