The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:

iDRY Vacuum Kilns


Forestry Forum
Sponsored by:


TimberKing Sawmills



Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Norwood Industries Inc.




Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

Michigan Firewood, your BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

FARMA


Baker Products

ECHO-Bearcat

iDRY Wood Lumber Vacuum Drying for everyon

Nyle Kiln Dry Systems




Author Topic: Next year's wood.  (Read 5163 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline lxskllr

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1508
  • Age: 51
  • Location: MD USA
  • Gender: Male
  • dummy with saw
    • Share Post
Re: Next year's wood.
« Reply #20 on: April 14, 2019, 06:54:04 AM »
Well, I don't have a processor. I use 4-5 cords a years. I have a splitter and a saw. My operation is under way and its all hand hand work, so it takes time. Today was a long day and my back is a bit sore. The photo is 8am today, it's all cut split and stacked now. I have run another group of logs through today also, bucked a few after that to end my day. On the one hand I think I am ahead of last year, on the other I feel like I am very slow. It is what it is. It sucks to get old, but I have to give it to my chiropractor that I haven't had this little working pain since I was 40. I hurt and ache right now, but I expect I will be pain free in the morning. I sure wish I could find a 16 year old kid in the neighborhood that wanted to work for a day or 5.


(Image hidden from quote, click to view.)

People pay good money for that kind of workout. You're getting it free(nominal cost of fuel, chains, wear/tear), with a bonus of free energy on top of it  ;^)  It also isn't pointless work. When you leave your gym, something got done. Beats moving weight around a room for no purpose.


I'm not a fan of "alternative" wood measurement systems. They lack specificity, and in a sales environment, lead to fraud, and hard feelings. Cords, fractions thereof, or cubic feet are the only acceptable measures imo.

Offline scouter Joe

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 107
  • Age: 70
  • Location: Hanmer Ontario
  • Gender: Male
  • Making sawdust
    • Share Post
Re: Next year's wood.
« Reply #21 on: April 14, 2019, 07:57:19 AM »
A face cord is 4' high X 8' long X the length of the blocks .( A single row of cut blocks ) A bush cord is 4'high X 8'long X4' wide .(3 rows of 16" cut blocks )

Offline lxskllr

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1508
  • Age: 51
  • Location: MD USA
  • Gender: Male
  • dummy with saw
    • Share Post
Re: Next year's wood.
« Reply #22 on: April 14, 2019, 08:11:25 AM »
I wasn't familiar with the term bush cord aside from seeing it printed every so often. It's another name for a statute cord.

Offline thecfarm

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 28963
  • Age: 58
  • Location: Chesterville,Maine
  • Gender: Male
  • If I don't do it,it don't get done
    • Share Post
Re: Next year's wood.
« Reply #23 on: April 14, 2019, 08:35:34 AM »
Never heard of bush,face cords until on here.
Still not wood cutting for me,in the woods. I have some wood that I brought up before the warm up. I still have snow in the woods. Don't want to rut the ground up.
Model 6020-20hp Manual Thomas bandsaw,TC40A 4wd 40 hp New Holland tractor, 450 Norse Winch, Heatmor 400 OWB,YCC 1978-79

Offline John Mc

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5295
  • Age: 57
  • Location: Monkton, Vermont
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Next year's wood.
« Reply #24 on: April 14, 2019, 09:28:25 AM »
A face cord is 4' high X 8' long X the length of the blocks .( A single row of cut blocks ) A bush cord is 4'high X 8'long X4' wide .(3 rows of 16" cut blocks )
So by your definition, a bush cord is the same as a cord. If heard others define a bush cord as being the same as a face cord, with no defined number for the length, and still others define it as meaning a face cord with specifically 16" length
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline WV Sawmiller

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 6767
  • Age: 66
  • Location: Hinton WV
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Green's Sawmill Services
Re: Next year's wood.
« Reply #25 on: April 14, 2019, 03:36:15 PM »
   I don't find the definition on line to verify it but my dad used to speak of a strand of wood and basically it was 1/3 of a cord. It was 4' X 8' X 16". Has anyone else ever heard of that measurement?
Howard Green
WM LT35HDG25(2015) , 2009 4wd Dodge PU, Kawasaki 650 ATV, Sthil 440 & 441, homemade logging arch (w/custom built rear log dolly), JD 750 w/4' wide Bushhog brand FEL

Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"

Offline WDH

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 29217
  • Age: 65
  • Location: Perry, GA
  • Gender: Male
  • April 1998 - August 2008
    • Share Post
    • hamsleyhardwood.com
Re: Next year's wood.
« Reply #26 on: April 15, 2019, 07:32:20 AM »
The official measurement for the Forestry Forum is a "whack". 
Woodmizer LT40HDD35, John Deere 2155, Kubota M5640SU, Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln, and a passion for all things with leafs, twigs, and bark.  hamsleyhardwood.com

Offline Logger RK

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 516
  • Age: 59
  • Location: North west wis
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Next year's wood.
« Reply #27 on: April 15, 2019, 08:20:37 AM »
I like the term "Rick"

Offline WV Sawmiller

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 6767
  • Age: 66
  • Location: Hinton WV
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Green's Sawmill Services
Re: Next year's wood.
« Reply #28 on: April 15, 2019, 09:20:29 AM »
   I think a rick and a whack may be the same only our members in the northern climes when talking in subzero weather could not be heard clearly with all the mufflers and such around their throats and people misunderstood them while our southern members, between bites of grits and boiled peanuts, clearly elucidated the word properly for all to hear. :D
Howard Green
WM LT35HDG25(2015) , 2009 4wd Dodge PU, Kawasaki 650 ATV, Sthil 440 & 441, homemade logging arch (w/custom built rear log dolly), JD 750 w/4' wide Bushhog brand FEL

Dad always said "You can shear a sheep a bunch of times but you can only skin him once"

Offline John Mc

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5295
  • Age: 57
  • Location: Monkton, Vermont
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Next year's wood.
« Reply #29 on: April 15, 2019, 09:24:50 AM »
The official measurement for the Forestry Forum is a "whack".
Is there a defined about of wood in a whack, or is it more like "that pile sitting over there"?


  I don't find the definition on line to verify it but my dad used to speak of a strand of wood and basically it was 1/3 of a cord. It was 4' X 8' X 16". Has anyone else ever heard of that measurement?
That's a new one on me. I can see the logic of it: the strand being a single row of wood.
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline LeeB

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 8001
  • Age: 60
  • Location: Yellville Arkansas
  • Gender: Male
  • proud to be a TEXAN in Arkansas
    • Share Post
Re: Next year's wood.
« Reply #30 on: April 15, 2019, 12:05:58 PM »
Rick is the common volume in the area I live in and to my knowledge it should be 1/3 cord (a face cord), but As far as I can see it can be anything from a light pick up load to a well rounded bed full. Not sure how many loads actually measure out to the correct volume. I bought wood when we first moved to the area but rarely do so any more.
'98 LT40HDD/Lombardini, Case 580L, Cat D4C, JD 3032 tractor, JD 5410 tractor, Husky 346, 372 and 562XP's. Stihl MS180 and MS361, 1998 and 2006 3/4 Ton 5.9 Cummins 4x4's, 1989 Dodge D100 w/ 318, and a 1966 Chevy C60 w/ dump bed.

Offline jmur1

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 109
  • Wood is King
    • Share Post
Re: Next year's wood.
« Reply #31 on: April 15, 2019, 02:14:28 PM »
You know it must be a serious question when the government steps in.  They also agree 48"x 48"x 8'  is the "cord"

https://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/mc-mc.nsf/eng/lm03963.html

jmur1 
Easy does it

Offline Rebarb

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 43
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Next year's wood.
« Reply #32 on: April 15, 2019, 10:56:39 PM »
I finished nexted years wood 2 years ago.....I like staying several years ahead.

Online Old Greenhorn

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1801
  • Age: 64
  • Location: Catskill Mountains, NY
  • Gender: Male
  • An old coot, still learning.
    • Share Post
Re: Next year's wood.
« Reply #33 on: April 16, 2019, 07:17:21 AM »
I finished nexted years wood 2 years ago.....I like staying several years ahead.
The more I read things like this, the more I wish I could do it, But I would have to store it 'somewhere' and that is the issue. Best I can do is cut and stack logs ahead, then buck and split each year for what I need. No idea where I would stack and store 10-15 cords and then would still have to move it to the house each year. Good for you, I wish I could do that.
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) I mill for fun and my mental health. NYLT Certified.

I ain't the woodcutter, but I can cut wood 'til the woodcutter gets here.

Offline John Mc

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5295
  • Age: 57
  • Location: Monkton, Vermont
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Next year's wood.
« Reply #34 on: April 16, 2019, 07:57:40 AM »
I finished nexted years wood 2 years ago.....I like staying several years ahead.
The more I read things like this, the more I wish I could do it, But I would have to store it 'somewhere' and that is the issue. Best I can do is cut and stack logs ahead, then buck and split each year for what I need. No idea where I would stack and store 10-15 cords and then would still have to move it to the house each year. Good for you, I wish I could do that.
When I manage to get that far ahead, I drop the trees, winch them trailside, and cut and stack them there. I just lay a couple of poles down to stack them on to keep it up off the ground. When I have the space at home, I bring my splitter into the woods and split them right into the back of my trailer to haul them home (sometimes I'll load the rounds in the trailer, bring them home and split right onto my storage stacks).
It doesn't dry as quickly stacked in the woods as it does out in the open exposed to the sun & wind, but that is generally not a concern if I am that far ahead.
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Online Old Greenhorn

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1801
  • Age: 64
  • Location: Catskill Mountains, NY
  • Gender: Male
  • An old coot, still learning.
    • Share Post
Re: Next year's wood.
« Reply #35 on: April 16, 2019, 08:38:45 AM »
When I manage to get that far ahead, I drop the trees, winch them trailside, and cut and stack them there. I just lay a couple of poles down to stack them on to keep it up off the ground. When I have the space at home, I bring my splitter into the woods and split them right into the back of my trailer to haul them home (sometimes I'll load the rounds in the trailer, bring them home and split right onto my storage stacks).
It doesn't dry as quickly stacked in the woods as it does out in the open exposed to the sun & wind, but that is generally not a concern if I am that far ahead.
Well, I am close to that now. I pile up the logs between seasons, then buck and split right into the trailer, forward to the house and stack. Maybe I should think about bucking them and stacking as you do. It adds a handling, but would look neater and give me a better idea of what I have. I am almost out of logs now and am cutting up the larger branches too good to pitch into the rot pile. It takes more time, but wood is wood. I am driving around through the woods picking up hitches of small trees or deadfall I had forgotten. This helps to clean things up too, so it goes slower, but the place looks nicer. I will probably wind up dropping another tree or two before my stacks are full this year. Good idea and stacking the rounds. they will split easier in a years time and dry faster once on the pile, plus I can pull the splitter right up to the round stack and keep 'moving on down the line'.  :)
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) I mill for fun and my mental health. NYLT Certified.

I ain't the woodcutter, but I can cut wood 'til the woodcutter gets here.

Offline John Mc

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5295
  • Age: 57
  • Location: Monkton, Vermont
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Next year's wood.
« Reply #36 on: April 16, 2019, 08:59:21 AM »
Well, I am close to that now. I pile up the logs between seasons, then buck and split right into the trailer, forward to the house and stack. Maybe I should think about bucking them and stacking as you do. It adds a handling, but would look neater and give me a better idea of what I have. I am almost out of logs now and am cutting up the larger branches too good to pitch into the rot pile. It takes more time, but wood is wood. I am driving around through the woods picking up hitches of small trees or deadfall I had forgotten. This helps to clean things up too, so it goes slower, but the place looks nicer. I will probably wind up dropping another tree or two before my stacks are full this year. Good idea and stacking the rounds. they will split easier in a years time and dry faster once on the pile, plus I can pull the splitter right up to the round stack and keep 'moving on down the line'.  :)
I figure that at least cutting to stove length and stacking helps it start drying, since the logs don't dry out much when in long lengths. It is one more handling, but stacking the rounds takes me less time than stacking the split wood (fewer pieces to handle), plus it gets things up off the ground. And your right, splitting from a stack of rounds is easier: start at one end of the stack, split till it's no longer an easy reach, pull ahead a bit and split some more. My wife also appreciates it when the mess from splitting is left in the woods, rather than up nearer the house.
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 36774
  • Age: 52
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Next year's wood.
« Reply #37 on: April 16, 2019, 12:56:03 PM »
I can't get at mine for another 3 weeks, the road is still snowed in and of course muck under it. Dries real quick though once the snow is off. :)

I don't need any equipment to bring it out except chain saw and wheel barrel or arm loads. It's within 200 feet of the road for most I would be cutting for the next 10 years. I'll have a 4 wheeler before then to go back deeper. I'm just cutting the pulp grade out. I burn anything. My experience is that it all makes good heat. ;D
Move'n on.

Offline brianJ

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 196
  • Age: 51
  • Location: near syracuse
  • Gender: Male
  • Only get excersize if I choose the right hobby
    • Share Post
Re: Next year's wood.
« Reply #38 on: April 17, 2019, 01:24:32 PM »
Speaking of next winter's heat,   How do you guys handling trees that have ants in them?   Do these ants only infest trees?   Are they an issue for the rest of the wood pile?   If you were buying firewood with ants would you feel cheated?

I sell 30 something ricks a year and have 3 years of inventory in various out door piles.   Nearly nothing gets stacked.  Not worth my time.

Offline Willbillys

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 11
  • Age: 35
  • Location: WV Eastern Panhandle
  • Gender: Male
  • Excited to Learn
    • Share Post
Re: Next year's wood.
« Reply #39 on: April 17, 2019, 01:40:17 PM »
Speaking of next winter's heat,   How do you guys handling trees that have ants in them?   Do these ants only infest trees?   Are they an issue for the rest of the wood pile?   If you were buying firewood with ants would you feel cheated?
From my experience carpenter ants will move into rotting crevices of the log that already exist and clear some of the rotted wood out to make room, not consuming the wood.  I would assume the firewood you have was left on the ground and started to rot, but it's possible the majority of the cord doesn't have ants as they tend to stay clustered together. 
I disrupted a colony a couple weeks ago in a 6 year old ash log that had been flat on the ground and just yesterday I found some of the ants had relocated just 5 feet away to the small pile of short stickers I keep at the end of the mill tracks.  I did end up getting a couple decent pieces out of that ash log, though.


 
Woodland Mills HM130
2017 Mahindra 1526HST
1939 Farmall A
2000 Tundra
24x40 carport building
3.78 acres
19 Chickens, two dogs, one horse and a bunny


Share via delicious Share via digg Share via facebook Share via linkedin Share via pinterest Share via reddit Share via stumble Share via tumblr Share via twitter

xx
almost out of wood for the year!

Started by Tom L on Firewood and Wood Heating

111 Replies
5431 Views
Last post February 22, 2014, 06:10:11 PM
by SwampDonkey
xx
3 year old Maple Wood.....need I.D.

Started by POSTON WIDEHEAD on Sawmills and Milling

6 Replies
616 Views
Last post May 30, 2017, 09:19:13 PM
by Deese
xx
First load of wood for the year!

Started by Logging logginglogging on Firewood and Wood Heating

21 Replies
4821 Views
Last post May 09, 2013, 10:50:20 PM
by r.man
xx
Sawing 100 year old Barn wood

Started by oregonsawer on Sawmills and Milling

5 Replies
2532 Views
Last post June 30, 2011, 02:47:50 PM
by redbeard
 


Powered by EzPortal