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Author Topic: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures  (Read 1731 times)

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Offline Old Greenhorn

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Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
« Reply #20 on: November 01, 2019, 12:22:35 PM »
Not sure how I got called out on this. I am just a lowly EMT, but I will second everything Doc said. I'll add the caveat that is also depends on how fast they are bleeding. Little holes, LOTS of time, big holes, not so much time.  But then, all bleeding stops eventually.  :D
 Patience is key along with a calm steady voice. 
Funny story, years ago (6?) I removed a splinter from my step-grandson because nobody else could seem to get at it. His brothers watched. I got the thing out without any hollering or crying, he was amazed. From that day forward all the brothers will only let me remove anything they can't scratch out themselves. They will wait two days if they have to. (It helps to have very fine surgical tweezers, they can't really feel much from those fine points.)
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) I mill for fun and my mental health. NYLT Certified.

I ain't the woodcutter, but I can cut wood 'til the woodcutter gets here.

Offline ManjiSann

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Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
« Reply #21 on: November 02, 2019, 07:56:28 AM »
@doc henderson and @Old Greenhorn thank you both for your advice and sharing experience on how to work with patients (and patience ;) ) I'll have to work on the calm part. I'm always honest even when I know it'll scare them because, as you pointed out, I figure if I'm honest when I tell them unpleasant things they'll trust me more if I tell them "this really won't hurt."  I don't think there's enough blood under the nail to drill it and make it work so unfortunately she'll have to wait for it to heal on it's own... how would you go about drilling it though? I've heard of heating a sewing needle to being pretty hot and letting that burn/melt its way through the nail, or thought of using a very small drill bit and spinning it with my fingers. Also, how soon after the injury do you need to do it before the blood will have clotted and there's no longer any value in drilling? Oh and Doc, from what I've read, I'd take your bedside manner after a 12 hour shift any day. 


I was fairly productive. I tried to cut up some of the twistier maple boards I had cut a few months back... man I wish I'd had the CSM when I'd done that but I kept telling myself I'd have never bought the bigger saw or made the mill had I not tried it the other way. A few of the boards may be beyond salvaging with the tools I have. I may try and make a sled of sorts for my router to see if I can level some of the other ones before running them through a planer. So long story long, I made a lot of saw dust but no real progress on that front.

I did weld up the new adjustable part for the CSM and it looks like it came out fine. 

The previous arm was ever so slightly no straight up and down so when I tightened the bar tip in the jig it caused the bar to bow just a little which caused the chain to run a little harder than needed and made adjusting height a little more complicated than I wanted to deal with. 

Here's a pic with some lines I drew in to try and show what I mean. Even if the bar was on it would have been hard to see in a pic as it was pretty slight but enough to be an issue:



If the red line is the bar and the blue is an exagerated representation of the vertical arm, when you tightened the bolt the bar would try to conform and get messed up. When I welded it up the first time I used 1.25" OD for the sleeves and 1" for the middle part and I didn't get the middle perfectly square so the vertical bar was off a few degrees... I hope that makes sense.

Anyhow, welded up a new on using 1.25" tubing for all parts to make alignment easier



Here's my nifty stick welder 



Love this welder. I'm still learning how to use it correctly and struggle to get the arc struck sometimes but with time and practice I'm certain I'll become proficient. For anyone that read my I Feel Blessed post, I believe I posted about the welder I was blessed to buy and this is the one. Solid, reliable, does the job with a minimum of fuss.

The new bar slides a bit easier than the old one and everything matches up well enough that if there's any deflection I can't detect it with my super accurate Mk.1 Eyeball so I'm happy.

Hopefully I'll have the energy and drive to make some more boards when I get home from work. Speaking of which, it's time to clock in so stay safe y'all :)

Brandon 
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Offline Old Greenhorn

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Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
« Reply #22 on: November 02, 2019, 08:06:28 AM »
@doc henderson and @Old Greenhorn thank you both for your advice and sharing experience on how to work with patients (and patience ;) ) I'll have to work on the calm part. I'm always honest even when I know it'll scare them because, as you pointed out, I figure if I'm honest when I tell them unpleasant things they'll trust me more if I tell them "this really won't hurt."  I don't think there's enough blood under the nail to drill it and make it work so unfortunately she'll have to wait for it to heal on it's own... how would you go about drilling it though? I've heard of heating a sewing needle to being pretty hot and letting that burn/melt its way through the nail, or thought of using a very small drill bit and spinning it with my fingers. Also, how soon after the injury do you need to do it before the blood will have clotted and there's no longer any value in drilling? 
I am gonna let Doc take this one as he has tons more experience on this having done it many times more that I ever will. I only do this on myself, and on others I have instructed and coached them through the process. I have never had to do this on a pediatric patient, that can be tough, no matter what. Good luck.
Oscar 328 Band Mill, Husky 450, 372 (Clone), Mule 3010, and too many hand tools. :) I mill for fun and my mental health. NYLT Certified.

I ain't the woodcutter, but I can cut wood 'til the woodcutter gets here.

Offline doc henderson

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Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
« Reply #23 on: November 02, 2019, 08:10:56 AM »
first great job on the mill frame.  the key to the fingernail thing, is knowing when it will make a difference.  if there is only a speck of blood, and it does not contribute to the pain, do not poke it.  if the nail is floating on an ocean of blood and you can push the nail down and it moves, then there is a blood cushion.  the blood under the nail will usually not clot.  draining the blood can reduce pain, and make it less likely you will hydraulically loose the nail.  nails are made from the same stuff as hair and is not live tissue, except for at the base under the cuticle. drill bit, hot paper clip, needle.  I use a pen cautery, and even with "grown men"  @Old Greenhorn it may take a lot of reassurance and 5 attempts and approaching the finger with a red hot wire.  the key is if there is not enough blood under the nail, it will hurt worse when you are done.
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Offline doc henderson

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Re: Manjisann's First Chainsaw Milling Session
« Reply #24 on: November 02, 2019, 08:17:12 AM »
we developed a process for getting objects out of noses by blowing in the opposite nostril.  after trying for years to coach and reassure the age group that puts stuff in their nose, we started having a little fun with it.  if a nasal foreign body pops up on the screen, it is like a fire drill.  everyone grabs the tubing and mushroom suction device, and before mom and child walk through the door we are ready.  we instantaneously tell mom what we are doing , and blow into the opposite nare and out pops the bead.  the kid is so surprised they sometimes forget to cry and are ready to go home 2 minutes after they arrive.  like many things in life, nothing can replace education and experience.  we did not develop the blowing part, but gave up on 30 minutes of trying to gain the confidence of a 2 year-old.
timberking B 2000, 277c track loader, PJ 32 foot gooseneck, 1976 F700 state dump truck, JD 850 tractor.  2007 Chevy 3500HD dually, home built log splitter 18 horse 28 gpm with 5 inch cylinder and 32 inch split range with conveyor 12 volt tarp motor

Offline ManjiSann

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #25 on: November 02, 2019, 11:24:27 PM »
So I've decided to rename the thread and treat it as kind of an ongoing project/adventure/etc thread rather than start a dozen little threads, so hopefully it stays fun and useful  8) 8)

Doc and OG, thanks for the advice on handling patients... the blowing in the opposite nostril seems like something young boys would do to gross the girls out  :D :D

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Offline ManjiSann

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #26 on: November 02, 2019, 11:46:19 PM »
I'm scheduled to help remove a mid sized cottonwood tree next Wednesday so will hopefully have some great lumber to mill from that. Here's the thread where I was asking some questions http://forestryforum.com/board/index.php?topic=108240.0 for future readers.

After I arrived home from talking to the gentleman about the cottonwood I milled another pear tree trunk using the mill. It lines up and is easy to set the height on now but I found it was dogging the motor. I did sharpen the chain and set the rakers. I've not made any shims to hold the boards up as I am milling, didn't seem to make a difference on the last one. I wonder if there's a weird angle to the bar now in relation to the jig, I'll have to look into it more. I didn't have time this evening as I was racing the sunset



This gives you a better idea of my set up space wise. I'm very fortunate my neighbors haven't formed a mob with pitch forks and torches  ;)  I've talked to them and they say they don't notice the noise or if they do it's not a bother. I'm blessed with some fine neighbors. Anywho, back to the milling



I checked and the sawhorses are rated to hold 2500 lbs each. You can make out the edge of one of the 2x3's I have under the log that keeps it from rolling. It is very stable. That being said, if you decide to follow my example against the advice of those wiser and more experienced than I... be sure your equipment is up to the task and that everything is solid and secure. I'm not saying I'm smart, just that I believe I know the risks of what I'm doing and have taken precautions to mitigate them to my comfort level of risk... said every fool ever before getting injured but I digress. Here's a pic showing the boards better, it doesn't look like much but the weight of the log on the boards keeps everything solid.





The first cut left a fair bit of meat on it but there was a knot I was trying to remove. I was able to go fairly far down though so there wasn't too much waste





I'm still amazed by how much sawdust is created in the process. My lovely wife came out, took one look and said "That's a lot of Man Glitter!" The youngest came out and wanted to play in it  :D :D



Brandon 
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Offline Old Greenhorn

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #27 on: November 02, 2019, 11:48:06 PM »
That whole blowing thing is new to me, but makes sense (and I will keep it in my kit). That is all Doc. When it works for you, you can tell the patient who is responsible for it. With me it's a lot simpler. if I can't fix it i 2 minutes, they are going to the hospital, where they will hopefully meet a guy like Doc who will deal with the issue at hand. My credentials and protocols rarely allow me to fix things, they just allow me to sustain life until such time as they can be billed. In fact, I have been reprimanded several times for treating and releasing people on scene for minor injuries. "Treatment is NOT in or protocols" I was told. :D My bad, I do it all the time when it applies.
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I ain't the woodcutter, but I can cut wood 'til the woodcutter gets here.

Offline thecfarm

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #28 on: November 03, 2019, 06:58:50 AM »
My brother put a marble up his noise. I can still hear my Mother tell the story about the "blow" part.
The blood under the nail should be done as soon as possible for it to work. Not 2 days later.  I have heard of a device that is put over the nail and than so called activated and a red hot point is tripped into the nail to releive the pressure.
Enjoying all the sawing post you are doing.
Looking forward to the building posts with the lumber. Yes,it has to dry first.
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Offline doc henderson

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #29 on: November 03, 2019, 07:11:50 AM »
I spent 20 years trying to teach children to "all the sudden" know how to blow their nose.  It only worked once, and that was an accident cause the girl started laughing since both parents and all 4 sisters were imitating blowing out their nose.  the point is with kids sometimes you have to give up on them being adults! :) . I am not suggesting you should try this at home.  for years parents have blown in their own kids mouth to get stuff out of the nose.  we use compressed O2.  Twice the bead has flown out of the nose and landed in their mouths.  enjoy your breakfast.
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Online Nebraska

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #30 on: November 03, 2019, 08:28:34 AM »
Oh I will thank you. ;)

Offline ManjiSann

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #31 on: November 03, 2019, 10:08:49 AM »
I decided to walk away from the cottonwood tree due to legal liability concerns. I feel kinda dumb not realizing it as I was talking to the guy :-[  I woke up this morning at 3am and couldn't get it off my mind. The tree is on the guys property line or in his neighbors property and without liability insurance and the money to afford a lawyer if some stuff I was told turns out to be false it just doesn't seem like a smart risk.  Oh well it's a fantastic learning experience of where my comfort line is. 

I'll save the money I might have had to pay a lawyer and buy some lumber or something  ;)  In the mean time I'll keep milling the small stuff I've been getting.


Brandon 
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Offline ManjiSann

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #32 on: November 03, 2019, 10:09:37 AM »
Doc, I enjoyed my bowl of fruity pebbles while reading your story  ;) ;)

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Offline ManjiSann

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #33 on: November 03, 2019, 10:17:40 AM »
@thecfarm What I'm doing is pretty small potatoes compared to many of the forum members so I'm pleased you find it entertaining  :)  

Hopefully in time some bigger stuff comes my way that's in my skill and risk comfort level but until then I'm happy to do this smaller stuff. If nothing else making all this man glitter keeps me entertained and mostly out of trouble and I can post about it and then read about Doc's amazing culinary skill with beads  :D :D

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Offline SawyerTed

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #34 on: November 03, 2019, 10:26:18 AM »
I decided to walk away from the cottonwood tree due to legal liability concerns. 

I'll save the money I might have had to pay a lawyer and buy some lumber or something 
Wise!  According to my insurance agent, tree service is a 100% claim industry.  In other words, insurance companies expect every tree service to have to file a liability claim for injury, property damage or cutting wrong trees etc.
Without proper insurance for tree service work, you got to be very selective on trees you cut for people.  I'm only insured as a portable sawmill business so I don't cut trees anywhere but on our own farm.
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Offline thecfarm

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #35 on: November 03, 2019, 11:09:29 AM »
@ManjiSann, Most furniture is not made with 16 footers. ;)  Unless you are a FF member from CA. :D That small stuff works just fine. ;D  As long as you are enjoying something and not harming Old People or Little Kids,have fun. :) 
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Offline ManjiSann

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #36 on: November 03, 2019, 01:43:24 PM »
I decided to walk away from the cottonwood tree due to legal liability concerns.

I'll save the money I might have had to pay a lawyer and buy some lumber or something
Wise!  According to my insurance agent, tree service is a 100% claim industry.  In other words, insurance companies expect every tree service to have to file a liability claim for injury, property damage or cutting wrong trees etc.
Without proper insurance for tree service work, you got to be very selective on trees you cut for people.  I'm only insured as a portable sawmill business so I don't cut trees anywhere but on our own farm.
@SawyerTed I appreciate the info, makes me feel better about walking away  :)  

I always wonder if I'm over thinking things or what awesome experiences I've talked myself out of due to worry (I had a lot of anxiety as a youth.) So it took me a bit of thinking through things early this morning to finally decide it wasn't overthinking or anxiety but prudence or some wisdom from up above.

SawyerTed, mind if I ask what you pay per year for insurance?  

I'm wondering about the feasibility of CSM on peoples property once they have cut the tree down. The main risks I can think of is damage to grass from walking on it or excessive saw dust. The saw dust I could minimize with tarps. I suppose there's always the outside chance of fire due to malfunctioning engine. Obviously the risk of bodily injury that's always present when running a chainsaw. Damage if I'm not paying attention and back my truck into something. What else am I not thinking of?

In my mind it would allow me to get nice longer boards without having to own and use heavy equipment to remove large logs.  Otherwise I'm limited to about 24"diameter by 4' long logs at the biggest assuming favorable land configurations. 

Trying to brainstorm how to feed my passion within the limitations of my situation  8) 8)

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Offline ManjiSann

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #37 on: November 03, 2019, 01:45:00 PM »
@ManjiSann, Most furniture is not made with 16 footers. ;)  Unless you are a FF member from CA. :D That small stuff works just fine. ;D  As long as you are enjoying something and not harming Old People or Little Kids,have fun. :)
@thecfarm That's a good point and helps to keep it all in perspective, thanks :)
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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #38 on: November 03, 2019, 02:31:30 PM »
I sent a pm to answer your question 
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Offline ManjiSann

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Re: Manjisann's Chainsaw Milling Adventures
« Reply #39 on: November 03, 2019, 02:46:21 PM »
I sent a pm to answer your question
Thanks for the information!
Brandon 
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