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Author Topic: Husky 372 vs. 575  (Read 7446 times)

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Offline Cedarman

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Re: Husky 372 vs. 575
« Reply #20 on: March 30, 2005, 12:18:43 PM »
Just talked to the dealer who said he got his info from Husky.  He said the carb is farther out on the saw and allows more cold air next to the carb that might cause problems. The heat kit is to keep more warm engine air close to the carb. He said he thinks the 575 is a good saw.  It is different and will take people a while to get used to it.  They had to pay their engineers to do something. 

You all buy some 575s and run them a couple years.  If they are real good then I'll follow you. Don't like being the leader when I have a good saw in hand.
I am in the pink when sawing cedar.

Offline jokers

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Re: Husky 372 vs. 575
« Reply #21 on: March 30, 2005, 04:00:00 PM »
Ok I am some what confused with all this rev limiter stuff maybe someone can clear this up for me. I may be wrong but if the 575s limited to 13,600 and you have taken it down below 13,600 with a tach and turned it back up to13,600. I understand at a free rev its going to hit the rev limiter and possibly get poor economy but I would think it should come OFF the limiter as soon as it hits the wood and you start working it rite? I dont think riching up the carb to 13,300 on a stock 575 is going to help any thing unless the saw is pulling 13,300 in the wood witch I highly doubt, if it is you need to cut rackers or sharpen your chain.

Eric,

I agree with the premise that the saw ought to be right on if tuned the way that you describe, but as I noted, the rev limit seems to be a moving target on my saw. Sometimes it will free rev 13,600, sometimes only 13,400.

Of course the saw isn`t pulling 13,600 or even 13,400 rpm in the cut but if you tuned the saw by ear to fourcycle out of the cut, how would you know for sure that you aren`t simply running lean and on the limiter? That seems to be where the problem lies. At any rate, I can demonstrate this condition and the poor fuel economy when on the limiter for you at the next GTG if there is sufficient wood available.

"There's a low pressure spot at the carb intake, and lower pressure air is cooler and more prone to atmospheric condensation"

Icing I assume,Good point fhcw. But without moisture, what is going to freeze? The carb body itself can be -100, but as long as the fuel(or water  contained within) doesn`t freeze, does it matter? I agree with jjmk98k that heat soak from the engine in the typical temperatures where a saw will be operated should be sufficient to keep reasonably water free fuel from freezing.

Russ

Offline fishhuntcutwood

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Re: Husky 372 vs. 575
« Reply #22 on: March 30, 2005, 05:36:32 PM »
Russ, the moisture in the air is what freezes.  The freezing problem isn't in the fuel, or even IN the carb, it's at the carb's inlet.  First of all, I'll say that on a chainsaw, even in most freezing ambient air temps, it's not likely an issue.   I'm speaking from knowledge on air craft, where the entire carb intake freezes over, or freezes enough to stop or disrupt air flow through it, and the plane crashes.  Same thing can happen on a turbine, except since there's no carb, it happens at the inlet to the compressor.  I agree though that in a saw, the pressure differential would be very minimal and not enough to ice the carb up, along with the thermal bleed over from the carb being mounted in such proximity to the engine itself.  I'm just guess that this is where the saw companies are coming from when they want us to heat our carbs when it's cold outside. ???

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Offline sawguy21

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Re: Husky 372 vs. 575
« Reply #23 on: April 24, 2005, 08:56:36 AM »
I have had considerable dealings with saws and deep snow. Without the winter kit, snow gets pulled in around the carb and filter, melts, then freezes after the saw is shut off. There is usually enough heat from the engine to prevent icing from high speed intake air. This is a problem on Honda engines because the crankcase vent tube freezes then she starts puking oil. I have seen crank seals pushed out.
FWIW, yesterday I took part in a demonstration of a rescue or vent saw attachment used by the fire departments. The bar has a slot to accomadate an adjustable depth guage and it was equipped with carbide tip chain. I cut a pallet full of nails, 14ga galvanized sheet metal, a roll of roofing material, drug it through the dirt and then cut a log!! Went completely against the grain to abuse a saw like that :D
They had it mounted on a 372XP as they found the Husky has the best filtration system to deal with the smoke, water and debris that comes with a fire.
I also tried the 570, good wide powerband, 575, heavy and no faster than a 372 although it may need to be broken in, and the 455. The 455 is smoother and more comfortable than the 55 but I still like ol reliable. Apparently, the 55, 365 and 372 will be available here for another two years
old age and treachery will always overcome youth and enthusiasm

Offline StihlDoc

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Re: Husky 372 vs. 575
« Reply #24 on: April 24, 2005, 10:05:19 AM »
On chain saws with isolated carburetors, carb icing happens more frequently than most realize. The high velocity of air moving through the carb venturi causes some of the atomized fuel in the air stream to evaporate which basically turns the carburetor into a mini refrigerator. At 40 degrees ambient temperature with 60+% relative humidity it is possible for the carb body to reach temperatures below freezing. The moisture in the air will freeze on the walls of the carb venturi, forming frost. The frost can form over the idle fuel feed orifices and also restrict fuel flow coming out of the high speed fuel feed nozzle. Erratic running and poor idle are usually the symptoms of carb icing. In extreme instances piston seizure can result.

Offline Ironwood

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Re: Husky 372 vs. 575
« Reply #25 on: April 29, 2005, 08:59:23 PM »
Well, all this talk of the awsome 372XP's going off the market makes me want one? Should I jump. Local Pro shop has 12 in stock at $600 with bar and chain. If anyone is in need,  Andrews Sales, talk to young Sammy. If you guys run on them he has instructions to save one for me! ;D 724-238-6020. Reid
There is no scarcity of opportunity to make a living at what you love to do, there is only scarcity of resolve to make it happen.- Wayne Dyer

Offline Hoop

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Re: Husky 372 vs. 575
« Reply #26 on: May 05, 2005, 08:49:13 PM »
I had the opportunity to use my 575 this week.  (my 372 has some electrical glitch).

It runs like a new saw.  I'm cutting 2' on the stump red oak, most of which has to be bore cut.

I don't know if its my imagination or what, but the 575 seems heavy and doesn't seem to cut all that great.  My other 3+ year old Frankenstein (made up from dead saw parts) 372 outcuts the 575.  And .....its lighter.

In a real world situation like mine, the 575 translates into less production.....and unfortunately less paycheck.
The engineers responsible for this boat anchor of a saw should be beaten badly.  I truly feel sorry for the Husqvarna dealers......who have to be apologists for this dud.

Before anyone gives me the tired line of the 575 not being "properly tuned"......save it.  The 575 is dead nuts tuned.  Tach reading is 13,000 rpm.

The sales people over at Stihl have to be dancing with glee.

Offline jokers

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Re: Husky 372 vs. 575
« Reply #27 on: May 05, 2005, 09:11:53 PM »
Before anyone gives me the tired line of the 575 not being "properly tuned"......save it.  The 575 is dead nuts tuned.  Tach reading is 13,000 rpm.

Oh, I get it now, being tuned too rich is now "dead nuts tuned". Sorry Hoop but you left yourself open on that one. I do however agree with you, the 575 isn`t a 372.

I still don`t see Stihl "dancing with glee" because I haven`t seen any of their new EPA compliant saws. The 575 may prove to be a white elephant by comparison or it may shine, we don`t know yet because we are only comparing a new emissions compliant Husky to old model Stihls.

Why don`t you write a letter stating your displeasure directly to Husky Hoop? I think they need to hear your feedback from the field.

Russ

Offline jjmk98k

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Re: Husky 372 vs. 575
« Reply #28 on: May 06, 2005, 08:08:26 PM »
Indeed, maybe write a letter to Husqvarna stating your details and see what thier response is


Jim

Warminster PA, not quite hell, but it is a local phone call. SUPPORT THE TROOPS!

Offline ladylake

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Re: Husky 372 vs. 575
« Reply #29 on: May 18, 2005, 08:05:44 PM »
woodsjunkie
I'm with you on the RPM. Anyone running a saw around 13500 isn't running it, more like abusing it.  Isn't  the HP rated around 9000 RPM + or - a little.  Steve
Timberking B20 14000 hours +  Case75xt grapple + forks+8" snow bucket + dirt bucket   770 Oliver   Lots(too many) of chainsaws, Like the Echo saws and the Stihl and Husky     W5  Case loader   1  trailers  Wright sharpener     Suffolk  setter Volvo MCT125c skid loader

Offline David_c

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Re: Husky 372 vs. 575
« Reply #30 on: May 18, 2005, 10:59:30 PM »
put tack to my Dan henry 372 the other day it is running about 14,700

Offline jokers

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Re: Husky 372 vs. 575
« Reply #31 on: May 19, 2005, 04:27:13 PM »
woodsjunkie
I'm with you on the RPM. Anyone running a saw around 13500 isn't running it, more like abusing it.  Isn't  the HP rated around 9000 RPM + or - a little.  Steve

Steve,

Consider this scenario, we have a saw that has pretty hot port timing numbers right from the factory, a factor that will make the saw produce peak power at a higher than normal rpm and likewise the saw will still four stroke at a higher than normal rpm. What this means is that in the case of the 575, it`s likely that the saw will four stroke way beyond 13,600 rpm and we both know(right?) that to be properly tuned by ear that we would lean the mixture(rpms increase out of cut) until the engine stops four stroking and cleans up, then we would richen the mixture to where it just starts burbling or "four stroking" again and the carb should be pretty well tuned for "in the cut" performance which is around 9500 rpm on this saw as I recall.

So if the rev limiter starts to work somewhere between 13,400 and 13,600 rpms, how do we tune this saw properly? I`ve concluded that I have to compromise and tune the 575 at 13,300 with the tach so that I don`t hit the limiter although maybe I should tach it at 13,400, I`m just trying to buy a margin of safety incase the limiter starts working at a lower rpm and I erroneously tune the saw lean, but the consequence is that the saw is probably tuned over rich. I don`t recall anyone saying that the 575 runs at 13k in the cut, thats just wj being smart since he should understand exactly what I`m trying to describe with his vast experience in race saws.

I assume that David_c is stating that his Dan Henry 372 has had it`s port timing altered enough that it still four strokes at 14,700 while a stock 372 often stops four stroking around 13.7 to 13.8 in the few that I`ve had. That sort of shift in the powerband when it`s free revving does correlate to a higher "in the cut" engine speed doesn`t it?

Russ

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Re: Husky 372 vs. 575
« Reply #32 on: May 19, 2005, 08:47:00 PM »
yes that was what I ment to say Russ it is four stroking at 14,700. sorry for any confusing.

Offline ladylake

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Re: Husky 372 vs. 575
« Reply #33 on: May 20, 2005, 06:40:35 AM »
Russ
Must have missread your orginal post, sounded to me like it was wasting fuel and misfiring when cutting.   I can see where it would be hard to tune if it's running up against the rev limiter.  Maybe Husky should set it a little higher.   Steve
Timberking B20 14000 hours +  Case75xt grapple + forks+8" snow bucket + dirt bucket   770 Oliver   Lots(too many) of chainsaws, Like the Echo saws and the Stihl and Husky     W5  Case loader   1  trailers  Wright sharpener     Suffolk  setter Volvo MCT125c skid loader

Offline David_c

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Re: Husky 372 vs. 575
« Reply #34 on: May 20, 2005, 07:41:06 AM »
it does like to drink ;)but no misfiring. runs  8)


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