The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:

Draw for handbuilt acoustic guitar get your name in


Forestry Forum
Sponsored by:


TimberKing Sawmills



Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Norwood Industries Inc.


Sawmill & Woodlot Magazine



Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

Woodshax Outdoor Vending Solutions

FARMA


Council Tool

Baker Products

ECHO-Bearcat



Author Topic: emerald ash borer  (Read 30689 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Corley5

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 7904
  • Age: 49
  • Location: Wolverine, Michigan USA
  • Gender: Male
  • Wolverine, Michigan
    • Share Post
    • Whittaker Farms
Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #140 on: April 23, 2006, 10:46:09 AM »
Nope not a bit.  From what I was told there is a million and half dollars to work with statewide including the goings on at the Bridge.  Bye Bye ash trees :( :(
Burnt Gunpowder is the Smell Of Freedom

Offline Rural

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 52
  • Location: SW Ontario, Canada
  • Gender: Male
  • Managed Forest Owner
    • Share Post
Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #141 on: November 16, 2016, 01:06:48 PM »
The Emerald Ash Borer has been moving into SW Ontario, Canada in recent years and has now been found as far north as the northern Bruce Peninsular some 100km north of my property as well as several other areas somewhat closer. So far I have not seen any evidence of them in my bush but I understand it takes some years for an effected tree to show signs. Some municipalities and landowners reaction has been to harvest all mature ash in order 'to stop the spread of the insect' or to sell the lumber before it is effected, this seems to be an ineffective policy. Ash in this area is a very common tree and there is no way that ALL ash trees can be culled and thus the effort to stop the spread by this means is doomed to failure, in y own case it would mean the removal of perhaps 30% of my bush leaving just a few thousand acres of neighbouring properties covered in ash trees!
So after a long lead in can anyone here tell me if an ash tree effected by the borer, perhaps showing the first signs or even all but dead due to the infestation, is still good lumber? It appears that the EAB attacks the outer part of the tree so do we then have 'standing dried lumber' or something that is nothing but firewood?
If we see trees that are effected at what point should we cut them  if we want to mill the wood for lumber?

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7808
  • Age: 82
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #142 on: January 25, 2017, 03:25:34 PM »
RE:  EAB WORKSHOP

Science and Management of Ash Forests After Emerald Ash Borer
25-27 July 2017
Duluth, MN. 

Please visit our website for more details about the workshop and logistics https://ashworkshop.org/
 
The workshop will focus on the ecological effects of emerald ash-borer and management activities used to address the impacts on ash- dominant forests. Our intent is to discuss the current science and management and to strengthen networking and collaborations among forest managers and researchers. We invite contributions to the workshop in oral or poster format on the following and other related topics:
 
The call for abstracts (https://ashworkshop.org/call-for-abstract/) and registration (https://ashworkshop.org/registration/) are now open. The deadline for abstract submission is 28 February 2017.  We have also arranged for a special issue of Forests focused on this topic, and invite you to submit a manuscript by 31 December 2017.  For more information: http://www.mdpi.com/journal/forests/special_issues/EAB.
 
Nick Bolton
Representing the organizing committee

--
Nicholas W. Bolton
PhD Candidate
School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science
Michigan Technological University
1400 Townsend Drive
Houghton, MI 49931-1295
Tel: 269.303.1017
email: nwbolton@mtu.edu


~Ron

Offline Rural

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 52
  • Location: SW Ontario, Canada
  • Gender: Male
  • Managed Forest Owner
    • Share Post
Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #143 on: January 26, 2017, 01:49:50 PM »
can anyone here tell me if an ash tree effected by the borer, perhaps showing the first signs or even all but dead due to the infestation, is still good lumber? It appears that the EAB attacks the outer part of the tree so do we then have 'standing dried lumber' or something that is nothing but firewood?
If we see trees that are effected at what point should we cut them  if we want to mill the wood for lumber?

Having waited with baited breath for a knowledgeable sawyer to say if they have sawn any infested lumber without response I can only repeat my request for information in this regard. There have been further reports of infestations here in SW Ontario but dont see any in my bush.......yet!.

Offline thechknhwk

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1045
  • Age: 41
  • Location: St. Charles, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Story of the Trees
Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #144 on: January 27, 2017, 01:53:02 AM »
Infested trees make good lumber as long as they don't stand dead too long.  Sometimes they rot, or dry out on the stump and the logs get deep cracks in them.  Hope that answers your question.

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 35821
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #145 on: January 27, 2017, 03:43:20 AM »
We've been lucky so far here, no bugs. But only a matter of time I suspect. The woods here in the farming areas has lots of ash with maple. One decent tree the moose don't harass too much. ;D

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline square1

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 184
  • Location: Central Michigan
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #146 on: January 27, 2017, 04:44:21 AM »
What the lumber is intended for also needs to be considered. Boards from an infested tree can make good lumber for local use. It would be poor lumber if the plan was to ship it elsewhere.

@thechknhwk is spot on with the comment about what happens after the tree is killed.

Offline thechknhwk

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1045
  • Age: 41
  • Location: St. Charles, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
    • Story of the Trees
Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #147 on: January 27, 2017, 04:57:22 AM »
Shipping out of the area should not matter as long as the lumber is free of bark since the larvae lives in the cambium layer beneath the bark.  Although it may not be allowed or kiln drying may be required depending on your local ordinances.  It's pretty much a lost cause around here.

Offline square1

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 184
  • Location: Central Michigan
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #148 on: January 27, 2017, 12:26:52 PM »
There may be quarrintines in place legally prohibitting the movement of the material. It is correct the larvae live in the cambium but in preparation for the pupa stage it can / does burrow into the sapwood.

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7808
  • Age: 82
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #149 on: January 28, 2017, 03:56:29 PM »
The heartwood of the affected trees are primarily sawn. Much has been sawn here in Lower Michigan.

http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php/topic,31656.msg457361.html#msg457361
~Ron

Offline Rural

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 52
  • Location: SW Ontario, Canada
  • Gender: Male
  • Managed Forest Owner
    • Share Post
Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #150 on: January 31, 2017, 04:13:11 PM »
Thanks guys, I figured the wood would be ok and you have confirmed that, we do have a quarantine area but I am not sure if it applies to sawn wood.

Offline catalina

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 68
  • Age: 45
  • Location: SW PA
  • Gender: Male
  • Its a dogs Life!
    • Share Post
Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #151 on: January 31, 2017, 05:18:10 PM »
Here in Preston County West Virginia (PA and WV line) the emerald ash borer hit with vengence this year. seen a few trees over the last 5 yrs hit but this year it was massive in my area. Terrible.
 

Offline DonT

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 510
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Ontario
  • Gender: Male
  • Lifes rough wear a helmet
    • Share Post
Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #152 on: February 01, 2017, 11:15:11 AM »
The Ottawa area of Eastern Ontario has been hit hard by the ash borer.We are seeing it move steadily west every year. It was my understanding that many of the quarantines had been lifted by the Canadian food inspection agency (regulating body) Sawn lumber with no bark did not have any restrictions that I was aware of. Woodchips, bark , debris and firewood size pieces could not be moved.I would check the CFIA website for updates or check the Ontario woodlot owners assoc. website for information.  DT

Offline estiers

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 306
  • Location: Lakeville, MN
  • Gender: Female
    • Share Post
Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #153 on: March 07, 2017, 03:58:56 PM »
Rural - Wood originating in a quarantined area is considered regulated until it has been inspected and deemed "treated" and therefore the risk of spreading the insect is gone.  Sawn lumber would have to have NO wane/bark, and be inspected before it could leave a quarantined area legally.
Erin Stiers
State Plant Health Director - Minnesota
United States Department of Agriculture

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7808
  • Age: 82
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #154 on: July 28, 2017, 11:19:05 AM »
Scientists Invade Duluth to Share Emerald Ash Borer Research

(Duluth, MN - July 23) - As emerald ash borers continue to spread across 32 states and two Canadian provinces, killing tens of millions of ash trees of all varieties, more than 170 scientists and forestry experts converged on Duluth to share their knowledge of the pest, offering a look at the future of ash trees in North America.

The E-Forester
~Ron

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7808
  • Age: 82
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #155 on: November 01, 2017, 04:25:07 PM »
The 2017 EAB trapping in Michigan's UP is complete with no new detections.

Please let MI Dept. of Agriculture know if you have any questions at:

John M. Bedford
Pest Response Program Specialist
Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development
Pesticide and Plant Pest Management Division
525 W. Allegan
Lansing, MI  48933

P. O. Box 30017
Lansing, MI 48909

Desk: (517) 284-5650
Cell: (517) 243-1247
Fax: (517) 335-4540
E-mail: bedfordj@michigan.gov

~Ron

Offline Carson-saws

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 410
  • Age: 59
  • Location: Michigan
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #156 on: March 13, 2018, 10:53:43 AM »
First Infestation Of Tree-Killing Emerald Ash Borer Found In Vermont
First Infestation Of Tree-Killing Emerald Ash Borer Found In Vermont | Vermont Public Radio
Let the Forest be salvation long before it needs to be

Offline Tin Horse

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 100
  • Location: Ontario, Canada
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #157 on: March 13, 2018, 07:37:21 PM »
I have also noticed my ash trees going fast. In about a years time in eastern Ontario. No leaves and then the bark falling off. The small trees end up as firewood and the larger trees for lumber. so far the quality is good. If left standing for long they seem to deteriorate quickly. I have a lot on 110 acres and am trying to keep up. I look for signs that some are surviving but no luck yet.  :(
Bell 1000 Wood Processor. Enercraft 30HTL, Case 580SL. Kioti 7320.

Offline CJennings

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 178
  • Age: 32
  • Location: Vermont
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #158 on: April 18, 2018, 02:15:48 PM »
I spent a summer in Michigan in 2015 marking timber. Based on what i saw there the situation for ash is pretty bleak but it's not a total elimination of the species I think if we're careful and have a little luck finding a long term solution. The smaller pole sized ash seems to survive in enough numbers they were around. There was plenty of regen coming up from the seed of the mature ash recently killed. These seedlings are the best hope for bringing back ash without having to plant it in the future. The mature ash were mostly killed but I saw an occasional survivor. Some got hit hard and were in poor shape but still alive. Some looked pretty healthy. I'm not sure that anyone has really confirmed any level of resistance to EAB yet in these survivors but it is a possibility. My inclination is to get ash regen established when the EAB is close. But not to remove any but the most obviously unhealthy mature ash until the borer comes through. That way any potential survivors are given a chance. The borer was just found in VT only a few towns away from my woodlot. I plan to select the healthiest mature ash I have (not many given the cost) for chemical treatment to be certain I have a seed source present. That will buy some time for keeping ash in the landscape in the form of young trees. The rest of my ash will be on their own, to be tested by fire so to speak when it arrives.

Offline Ed

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 678
  • Age: 54
  • Location: Mid Michigan
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: emerald ash borer
« Reply #159 on: May 04, 2018, 11:05:01 PM »
I'm actually getting new Ash growth here, have been for a few years now. Seeds will lay dormant until conditions are right.

Still have a few trees the bug didn't get, not in perfect health, still leaf out every year.

Big question is, will the borer come back? Spoke with a local entomoligst about it.....they just don't know.

Turning into a parallel of Dutch Elm disease, still have Elm trees & regeneration, they get smaller all the time before dieing. I still have at least 2 that are 16" dbh. Soon as they show disease signs, they'll be on the sawmill.

Mother nature is stubborn, time will tell what the future holds for our Ash trees.

Ed


Share via delicious Share via digg Share via facebook Share via linkedin Share via pinterest Share via reddit Share via stumble Share via tumblr Share via twitter

xx
Emerald Ash Borer

Started by Chuck White on Ask The Forester

12 Replies
2528 Views
Last post May 26, 2009, 10:20:56 AM
by wesdor
xx
Emerald Ash Borer

Started by sharp-shod on Forestry and Logging

40 Replies
6958 Views
Last post October 13, 2010, 11:57:17 PM
by Okrafarmer
xx
emerald ash borer

Started by 9shooter on General Board

3 Replies
1233 Views
Last post April 08, 2005, 11:24:36 AM
by Emrldashbr
xx
Emerald Ash Borer

Started by ruckus on Ask The Forester

4 Replies
952 Views
Last post April 30, 2013, 07:35:40 PM
by samandothers
 


Powered by EzPortal