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Author Topic: Health and Safety  (Read 4417 times)

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Offline Bill Johnson

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Health and Safety
« on: April 20, 2001, 10:30:24 AM »
I've an idea I'd like to float here and see what the forum thinks.
As part of my job I sometimes receive what are called Industry Alerts from the Ontario Forestry Safe Workplace Association that detail recent incidents that have resulted in an injury, near miss or a fatality.
If the forum sees a value I would be willing to give a synopsis of each one I get so that folks out there can remember to think about what they are planning to do before they do it and to learn for mistakes others have made.

As an example this is one that came across my desk not too long ago.

Industry Alert-Fatality[/b]

Sawmill Worker struck and killed by flying metal cover from nearby chipper

What Happened?
A heavy steel access gate on an older model 48 inch chipping machine came loose from its fasteners and was thrown several feet striking a worker and causing fatal injuries. The chipper was located in a general work area of the mill and the worker who was struck was standing nearby doing some end trimming with his back to the machine.

Why?
The cover may have come loose due to failed hinge weld or the top securing nuts on the entry gate may have been improperly tightened. The cover is periodically removed to allow access to the chipping knives.

How can this type of accident be prevented?
In this case the chipper was acquired second hand and installed for use in the mill. Sawmills using this or similar types of chipping equipment should immediately ensure that the following hazard recognition and control measures are completed or in place.

Control Measures:
-Train operators and maintenance personnel to recognize potential hazards
-Installing used machinery of older vintage of requires a more detailed assessment for potential hazards that may result from inadequate guarding or exposure of workers to moving parts. The employers should consider retrofitting guards or other safety devices to protect workers from identified hazards
-Locating the chipper behind a barrier away from the general work areas
-Conducting circle checks of this type of machinery that includes inspection of hinges, guards, and fasteners prior to every start-up of the machinery.

This is just a sample of the stuff I get. I know that not every one in this forum works in either the woods or a mill but I'd be interested in seeing what you think of this as a semi regular item.
I also realize that the laws and regulations between the two countries is different and sometimes what we have as a requirement may seem unnecessary to others.

Any way let me know if you people see this as a value or a waste of space.

Bill

8)
Bill

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Re: Health and Safety
« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2001, 10:49:47 AM »
Excellent, Excellent! Bill, what do you think about adding another forum category for health and safety? That way we can keep it where it can be readily found.
Just call me the midget doctor.
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Commercial circle sawmill sawyer in a past life.
Ezekiel 22:30

Offline Bill Johnson

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Re: Health and Safety
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2001, 02:39:38 PM »
I had thought about that but was going to wait to see what the reception was to the thread before suggesting it.
I'd say give it a while to see what the others think then we can take it from there.
Bill
Bill

Offline Gordon

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Re: Health and Safety
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2001, 03:29:04 PM »
Excellent idea to add another topic for SAFETY. The most important thing when it comes to using saws, chippers and any heavy equipment.

If people stop by the forum and only browse a few pages, I believe that safety would be one of the topics visited. It just might make that person think twice about doing something wrong and not even realizing that they are doing it. It's the simple things that usually get you.

Gordon

Offline Ron Wenrich

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Re: Health and Safety
« Reply #4 on: April 20, 2001, 06:07:56 PM »
Pretty good idea.  The Northern Logger has several spots in them each month detailing a couple of accidents.  Not all are fatal, but are well worth the time to take a look at.  I'd be willing to spot them here.

As for the chipper, we had a guy who decided to open the chipper before it had stopped completely turning.  The lid flew back and broke his leg.  He can only stand for a few hours a day.  Now spends his day running dozer since workman's comp has paid him off.  All just to save a few minutes of time.

To give you an idea to the importance of safety, France has practically no health or safety regs.  By October, 2000 that had 44 fatal accidents for the year.  France is 20% the size of Texas.
Never under estimate the power of stupid people in large groups.

Offline L. Wakefield

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Re: Health and Safety
« Reply #5 on: April 20, 2001, 07:22:41 PM »
I think it's grim, but very important. I can add a few stories every now and then from the emergency room.  LW
L. Wakefield, owner and operator of the beastly truck Heretik, that refuses to stay between the lines when parking

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Health and Safety
« Reply #6 on: April 20, 2001, 07:36:34 PM »
An excellent Thread! Also cover "Near Misses".
~Ron

Offline Bill Johnson

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Re: Health and Safety
« Reply #7 on: April 21, 2001, 11:26:04 AM »
I am happy to see that folks see a value to this type of information and by all means if anyone has tales to tell feel free to do so.
I had thought about just posting the website address for the OFSWA and talking about the alerts they post, but I think that if I take the time to actually post them here that it helps me remember to the importance of thinking about what you are doing.
I hope to be able to find some near miss items but the next one I have is a fatality as well.

INDUSTRY ALERT--FATALITY!!
EXPERIENCED CUTTER KILLED WHEN STRUCK BY FREE STANDING TREE

What Happened?
An experienced cutter/skidder operator working alone in a private wood lot was killed by a free standing tree when it fell on him as he worked nearby.
He was found by another worker in a face down position, apparently having been struck from behind by the tree at a point on the tree measuring 54 feet from the stump.
The impact caused extensive internal injuries resulting in death.

Why did this happen?
No one witnessed the accident. An analysis of the circumstances leading up to the injury revealed a number of factors that may have directly or indirectly contributed to the accident including the following:
  1)The tree that struck the worker had been cut earlier by the worker along with four other felled trees and apparently left standing. It appeared from the marks on the the tree and on a supporting tree that the tree had been hung up for some time.
  2)The worker was apparently limbing the first four trees that had been cut, and judging from his position, the worker was in a direct path of the falling free standing tree.
  3)A skidder was parked nearby but there was no evidence that the skidder had been used in an attempt to bring down the free standing tree.
  4)It was noted from the evidence at the stump of all the trees cut by the worker, including the tree that struck him, that they were all dutch cut leaving no holding wood for control.
  5)There was also evidence of other poor felling practices such as multiple chicots in the area that had not been safely dealt with that may indicate that the worker was not carrying out safe operating procedures as required in a conventional logging operation.

How can this type of accident be prevented?
All workers must receive training in all aspects of the work they perform including policies and procedures for safe felling of problem trees and other cutting hazards that might arise when working alone.
Free standing trees and other problem tree hazards such as chicots must be safely felled before any other activity in the area is carried out.

END


Bill









Bill

Offline Ron Scott

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Re: Health and Safety
« Reply #8 on: April 21, 2001, 12:35:42 PM »
This thread will provide a lot of subject matter for required safety meetings and "tail-gate" sessions.
~Ron

Offline timberbeast

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Re: Health and Safety
« Reply #9 on: April 21, 2001, 11:38:55 PM »
The last cannot emphasize enough to leave "holding wood"  and use wedges.  It sounds to me like a case of "highballing",  the guy was hurrying too much and ignored safety to get the job done.  This is no slight to him,  his memory,  or family.  It happens.  STOP!  THINK!!
Where the heck is my axe???

Offline Gordon

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Re: Health and Safety
« Reply #10 on: April 22, 2001, 06:39:28 AM »
Take a look here.http://www.osha-slc.gov/SLTC/logging_advisor/mainpage.html

Here is a database that is more ag related but it gets down to the real deal. http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/nasd/bytopic.html
Gordon

Offline timberbeast

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Re: Health and Safety
« Reply #11 on: April 22, 2001, 06:42:39 PM »
Cool sites,  Gordon!
Where the heck is my axe???

Offline Bill Johnson

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Re: Health and Safety
« Reply #12 on: April 28, 2001, 02:43:32 PM »
I'm glad to see things are progressing so well here.
I've just spent a week on a Basic Certification Course of Joint Health and Safety Committees.
I'm not sure about all OHSA's but the one in Ontario requires that all workplaces no matter how many employees follow the act, and those workplaces with over 19 employees have joint worker-management committees to deal with H&S issues.
It was pretty in depth stuff and there still is a site specific training section which I've to complete.
The course I was on had twenty participants, we had mill supervisors, logging contractors, gov't employees right down to float drivers, this grouping made for some really good discussions and sharing of experiences.

During this time I also receive some additional industry alerts.
The following is a description of a critical injury.

INDUSTRY ALERT-CRITICAL!!
Critical Injury--Worker impaled when Ripsaw Kicks Back

What Happened?
Two workers in a sawmill were feeding stock into a single line ripsaw. One worker mannned the infeed while the other acted as tailman and returned the first piece out back to the infeed by sliding the piece along the ripsaw table. The infeed worker had just finished sending a piece for its last pass through the saw when the off-cut piece was kicked back by the moving saw blade. The piece of wood approximately 27 inches long by an inch wide and quarter inch thick was propelled with such force that it impaled the worker in the abdominal area causing major damage to abdominal muscles, organs and blood vessels. Emergency surgery was necessary to save his life.

Why did this happen?
An analysis of the circumstances leading up to the injury revealed a number of factors that may have directly or indirectly contributed to the accident including the following:
The ripsaw was an older model that was purchased used. It did not have the type of guarding and equipment safety features of modern designed ripsaws.
The machinery had only been in operation for several months before the accident happened.There was no record of pre-installation hazard analysis or specific worker training concerning the machine's operation;and
An examination of the ripsaw revealed that the anti-kickback fingers did not always drop down,nor would they adequately grab the stock. In fact, if the stock was "pushed" into the blade it was possible that the piece would by pass the fingers all together.

How can this type of accident be prevented?
Employers must develop policies and procedures that require pre-installation hazard assessments, and the identification of possible personal protective equipment or other safety device options of any newly installed equipment or device and ensure that all standard operating procedures for the equipment are written  and conveyed to all workers. Installing used equipment of older vintage must include a detailed assessment of potential hazards that may result from inadequate guarding or exposure of workers to moving parts and to ensure properly designed controls are developed and installed.
Ensure all workers receive training, post-training evaluation and follow-up supervision in new or revised procedures for any machine or device they may operate.
Anti-kickback fingers and similar devices must be maintained to ensure their capability to preform as designed.
END
Source:Ontario Forestry Safe Workplace Association Industry Alert.

Bill

Bill

Offline Bill Johnson

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Re: Health and Safety
« Reply #13 on: May 03, 2001, 10:38:51 AM »
I picked this Alert up at Steve Nix's site, and thought I'd post it here.

Subject:Safety Alert-Fatality

A non-fire related fatality occurred on Friday, April 27 in North Carolina.
Two U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees were transporting heavy equipment when a private vehicle pulled out in front of them and they had to slam on the brakes. The chain holding the equipment broke allowing it to move forward crushing the cab of the transport. The equipment operator/driver of the transport was killed. The passenger escaped injury by ducking down when he heard the chains break. This accident occurred off the refuge in the town of Manteo, North Carolina.
Please share this information with your equipment operators so that we may prevent similar accidents from happening.

End

Bill

Offline Bill Johnson

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Re: Health and Safety
« Reply #14 on: October 31, 2001, 08:40:28 AM »
From the OFSWA Archives

CRITICAL INJURY:FALL,VENEER MILL

Bill

Offline Bill Johnson

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Re: Health and Safety
« Reply #15 on: October 31, 2001, 08:52:52 AM »
From the OFSWA Archives

CRITICAL INJURY:FALL,VENEER MILL

An employee at a veneer mill was walking from the parking lot to the entrance of the plant. Snow and ice on the parking lot had partially melted because of mild conditions the previous day, but had refrozen over-night. Also, a light snow had fallen, covering the icy patches from view. The employee suddenly stepped onto one of the hidden sections of glare ice, slipped and fell to the ground. She suffered a broken bone in her leg.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
1)Every employer should make provisions for dealing with icy conditions-in the parking lot, in the yard, on sidewalks and outside walkways between buildings.

2)Whoever handles snow removal-be they plant employees or outside contractors-should be clearly instructed to deal with the ice as well as the snow.

3)Any ice buildup in areas where people walk should be reported and dealt with immediately. It can be chipped away or it can be sprinkled with sand, salt or special "ice melting" products.

4)In addition to all possible measures to remove ice hazards, employers may consider posting warning signs.

Bill

Offline CHARLIE

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Re: Health and Safety
« Reply #16 on: October 31, 2001, 12:32:57 PM »
If having to walk on a surface that may be slippery (ie ice/snow), widen your stance, point toes outward a bit and take short steps. This increases your base and decreases the chance of falling.  If you fall anyway, quickly jump up and look around to see if anybody saw you, if not, then you can cry, if someone saw you, pretend the fall never happened and walk quickly to a remote place where you can cry.......... ::)
Charlie
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Offline Tom

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Re: Health and Safety
« Reply #17 on: October 31, 2001, 12:54:32 PM »
Charlie,
I always wondered how you had gotten your base widened  :D

Bill,
I agree with everything you posted and it is important for those responsible for certain areas to take the responsibility seriously.  Many times companies talk about how much they value their employees but when it comes right down to providing a safe place to work, will cut corners or just blatantly not pay attention.

An area I have been concerned about is the direction in attitude that so many have taken about their safety in today's society.  When someone is injured it's someone else's fault and the Gov. or Company's responsibility that it happened and to stop it.  The same goes for a lot of youth's thoughts on education and malingerers thoughts on finding a job and employees thoughts on why they don't get ahead.

It just seems to me that as individuals we should except or at least share in the responsibility of our own existence.

I would, for once, like to see a Government report or mandate directed to individuals saying something to the tune of, You are responsible for yourself, act accordingly.  

Directions given to companies by the U.S.A.'s OSHA and other "free governments' citizen protection programs are good and warranted but fall short of the mark by not including the main character in the play.

extinct

Offline Bill Johnson

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Re: Health and Safety
« Reply #18 on: August 26, 2003, 08:48:15 PM »
Gatorade Bottles are for Gatorade Water Bottles areK!

A few years ago, the EFR (Ontario Eastern Fire Region) had an unfortunate and preventable accident.

Someone on the fire line had put chain oil in a Gatorade bottle.  The chain oil is red and does not have a strong odor so it was mistaken for Gatorade and an unsuspecting crew person took a drink.  At the time the issue was discussed in local briefings and the issue seemed taken care of.

This past week, on an EFR fire, two water bottles were found to contain improper liquids.  One bottle contained chain oil and the other contained gas.

The practice of using improper containers for chain oil, gas or any other liquid not intended for that container is unsafe.

Not only is accidental consumption a danger but gas in a water bottle could be placed to close to the fire line or other open flame with the unsuspecting person unaware of the danger.

The employer has provided proper containers for transporting chain oil and gas.  If crewmembers want smaller containers they need to bring their request to the FFSE committee.  The committee will research the availability of smaller containers and will recommend testing of any that are found.

Protect yourself and others by:

h Using approved containers to transport liquids.
Bill


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