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Author Topic: Sighting Marks  (Read 9300 times)

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Offline twistedtree

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Sighting Marks
« on: November 13, 2005, 09:38:52 PM »
I've seen references to Sighting Marks on a chainsaw for use in aligning the saw cut for felling, but I don't know what marks these are on my saws (Huskys).

As best I can tell, when doing a horizontal cut (like a back cut), the left-hand handle seems to point in the direction of the fall e.g. perpendicular to the bar.  Is that what I should be using?

I find that my felling wedges tend to be tipped rather than level.  Is there a line that will help me hold the saw level for the lower part of the wedge cut?

I guess this is what happens when you are completely self taught.

Thanks

Offline sawguy21

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Re: Sighting Marks
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2005, 10:59:27 PM »
The pro series Huskies (and brand X) have a black line on the rewind housing and cylinder cover. This is to give the operator a guide when felling as the line should be parallel to the intended path when making the cuts. Remember, it is a guide and there are no guarantees.
old age and treachery will always overcome youth and enthusiasm

Offline jokers

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Re: Sighting Marks
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2005, 04:31:40 PM »
I find that my felling wedges tend to be tipped rather than level.  Is there a line that will help me hold the saw level for the lower part of the wedge cut?

The bottom of your front handle(on the saw base) on most saws is perpendicular to the bar and should be plumb for a level bottom or felling cut. On Jonsereds, the top of the front handle is also perpendicular to the bar.

Remember that the sighting marks are parallel to the direction of intended fall but are offset from where the tip will hit by the distance between the marks and the centerline of the tree.

Russ

Offline twistedtree

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Re: Sighting Marks
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2005, 07:34:13 PM »
The pro series Huskies (and brand X) have a black line on the rewind housing and cylinder cover. This is to give the operator a guide when felling as the line should be parallel to the intended path when making the cuts. Remember, it is a guide and there are no guarantees.

Black lines?  Both my saws are pro models and I don't recall any black lines.  I'll look again.

Offline SawTroll

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Re: Sighting Marks
« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2005, 08:59:34 AM »
Stihl uses black lines, not Husky.

However, Husky molds lines and/or marks into the plastic in such a way that you can paint them (fill them) easily in any color you want.
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Offline Billy_Bob

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Re: Sighting Marks
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2005, 09:16:57 AM »
You can also stick an ax into your face cut and the handle will point out toward the direction the tree will fall.

I once saw a pro feller walk out and place a soda pop can on the ground. Then he said that was where he was going to drop the tree. Well that is exactly what he did. The tree dropped right onto that can! (He used the sighting marks on his chainsaw before making any cuts.)

Offline bitternut

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Re: Sighting Marks
« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2005, 08:47:02 PM »
GOL instructor put lines on my Stihl 026 pro. I tried them out and they work real good. All he did was mark up lines that were on the saw with a black magic marker. Very simple and very effective. Had them all along but just didn't know it. Kind of like seeing the forest for the trees.

Offline twistedtree

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Re: Sighting Marks
« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2005, 08:50:01 PM »
OK, I know the molded lines you are talking about.

Offline Frickman

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Re: Sighting Marks
« Reply #8 on: November 15, 2005, 09:14:33 PM »
The saw pictures below Billy Bob's name shows the saw felling lines/sighting marks. The black line right above the id tag on the saw, running through the decompression valve, is the felling sight. It runs all the way around the saw except for the bottom.

I don't trust using the bottom of the front handle. I've had saws that had this handle sitting at an angle. If your particular saw has this handle set at a right angle, then it can be used. I don't trust it myself though.
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Offline Deadwood

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Re: Sighting Marks
« Reply #9 on: November 16, 2005, 06:01:57 AM »
A few years ago they started pushing the Certified Logger Courses here in Maine. Some of the mills would not accept your wood if you were not certified. In any case, I took this course thinking I would not learn much.

It turns out, I learned a lot!!

The instructor showed us how to make the open face notch and then as each of us took a limb and drove it in the ground, we tried to hit the stake using the "sights" on our saws. I think the furthest one away from the stake was like three feet. I missed my stake by six inches so the open face notch trick made a believer out of me!

As for making the back cut level. I hold my saw by the top handle. The key word there is hold, not grab. I let the saw balance itself and that gives me a reference line in which to make the back cut. I found its quick, easy and gravity never lies no matter what ghillside you are on.

Offline SawTroll

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Re: Sighting Marks
« Reply #10 on: November 16, 2005, 06:55:09 AM »
As for making the back cut level. I hold my saw by the top handle. The key word there is hold, not grab. I let the saw balance itself and that gives me a reference line in which to make the back cut. I found its quick, easy and gravity never lies no matter what ghillside you are on.
That is one of the reasons that I want my saws to be in balance with the bar and chain on.

Do you hear, Jeff! ;)

It is not an exact way of making a level cut though, as the amount of fuel and oil in the tanks also come into play.....
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Offline Deadwood

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Re: Sighting Marks
« Reply #11 on: November 16, 2005, 05:37:39 PM »
I have a sneaking suspicion that Jeff and you have a little disagreement on bar lengths. I won't get into that, but I think too many people judge a saw by how long the bar is.

I might add two inches to the stock bar or so, but any longer than that and you are losing a lot of power. At the same time, you are also playing with fire. A longer bar gives a dramatically more violent kickback due to the laws of leverage.

Offline rebocardo

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Re: Sighting Marks
« Reply #12 on: November 21, 2005, 12:33:09 AM »
twisted tree,

When making an open face notch what I have done to make sure where the tree will go, I rest the saw into the hinge and look down at the line. Then do the same for the back cut. On the pro models the two lines (one each side) are there I think for the ones that come with the full wrap handles.
 

Offline jokers

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Re: Sighting Marks
« Reply #13 on: November 21, 2005, 10:17:45 AM »
I don't trust using the bottom of the front handle. I've had saws that had this handle sitting at an angle. If your particular saw has this handle set at a right angle, then it can be used. I don't trust it myself though.

Well I thought that it would be clear without more elaboration that the handle must be square to the bar, not angled, for the handle bottom to be used as a sight to help make a level bottom or felling cut.

If it is square, why wouldn`t you trust it Frickman? This attitude seems like leaving your wedges back in the truck too because you might not drive them in evenly and thus jack the tree of it`s intended fall line.

Sometimes the axe in the face cut trick doesn`t work because the head is too thick toward the back to fully seat in the notch, so in other words, an angle away from the fall line toward the blade of the axe is indicated.

Gunning sticks can also be used. Just use two sticks exactly the same length that will fit in the corners of the notch, angle them equally toward each other and where the tips intersect is one point on the fall line which starts at the center of the tree`s diameter. This method makes some assumptions such as a level face and felling cut, an even hinge and no dutchman without all of the normal considerations of lean, wind direction/speed. canopy, vines, and other trees or obstructions in the direction of fall.

If the tree is sound you will have plenty of time to clean up or correct the face cut to make sure that it goes where you want it.

Russ

Offline fishhuntcutwood

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Re: Sighting Marks
« Reply #14 on: November 21, 2005, 03:07:59 PM »
Do you hear, Jeff! ;)

Yes, I hear!  :D   However, I usually just rely on myself to hold the saw level.  I've always just thought to level the saw myself before making the cut.  I've never had a problem with cuts not being level.

And yes Deadwood, SawTroll and I go back and forth on bar length and full wrap handles.  But it's certainly all friendly banter and well intended.   Right SawTroll?  ;)

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Offline rebocardo

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Re: Sighting Marks
« Reply #15 on: November 21, 2005, 06:47:49 PM »
Jokers,

I never had even heard of the term gunning sticks.

You just taught me something.  8)
 


Offline jokers

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Re: Sighting Marks
« Reply #16 on: November 22, 2005, 08:56:30 AM »
Jokers,

I never had even heard of the term gunning sticks.

You just taught me something.  8)
 



Good! Then I am proof to the axiom that you can learn something from everyone, even an idiot! :D

Russ

Offline SawTroll

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Re: Sighting Marks
« Reply #17 on: November 23, 2005, 09:29:48 AM »
I have a sneaking suspicion that Jeff and you have a little disagreement on bar lengths......

  :o                 smile_belly_laugh smile_belly_laugh

And yes Deadwood, SawTroll and I go back and forth on bar length and full wrap handles.  But it's certainly all friendly banter and well intended.   Right SawTroll?  ;)

Right! ;)

Deadwood, it really has to do with the vastly different conditions under which we use our saws.
Jeff mainly cut big soft trees, while mine is much smaller, but somewhat harder.

Also take note that the 361 is Jeffs smallest saw, while it is my biggest.....

I would also use long (unbalanced) bars and full wraps if the situation warranted it, but unlike Jeff I have the opportunity to use balanced saws/bars without having to use excessively heavy powerheads, and full wraps would normally just be in the way.

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Offline slowzuki

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Re: Sighting Marks
« Reply #18 on: November 23, 2005, 10:37:56 AM »
Sawtroll, from what I understand your forests are similar to ours in Eastern North America.

Its rare for me not to be able to fell a tree with a 16" (400 mm) bar.  I suspect deadwood is similar over in Maine.

Offline Deadwood

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Re: Sighting Marks
« Reply #19 on: November 24, 2005, 07:13:18 AM »
Yes that is true. I normally keep my bar length at 18 inches because it helps in felling trees and is not so long that it gets in the way when limbing. If you look at my picture to the left, you will see that I have a 24 inch bar on the saw. I should have taken it off while doing this kind of logging, because for me anyway, it makes the already tedious process of limbing even worse. I have to really pick the saw up to get the nose of the saw over the trunk of the tree. After doing this all day, that extra lifting really takes a lot out of my arms and back.

The reason I installed such a long bar in the first place was out of laziness as well. At the time I was doing a lot of firewood for my father and the extra length kept me from having to stoop over so much while working up a pile of wood. ???

Offline SawTroll

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Re: Sighting Marks
« Reply #20 on: November 24, 2005, 08:45:16 AM »
Slowsuki and Deadwood,
it looks like we have about the same size of wood to cut.

I have been using 15" bars mostly on both my Husky and Stihl, and 16" on the old Jred (bucking mostly).
The 18" bar on the 361 will reach trough 90 to 95% of my trees at stump hight, and is usually the bar I choose for felling. I am a bit undecided at the moment on which is best for bucking, but 15" and 3/8"x8 sprocket is the preferred combo for limbing.
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Offline fishhuntcutwood

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Re: Sighting Marks
« Reply #21 on: November 25, 2005, 11:54:51 PM »
Also take note that the 361 is Jeffs smallest saw...

Not anymore SawTroll...check my signature...

Jeff
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