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Author Topic: Ideal shop tools?  (Read 3397 times)

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Offline ksu_chainsaw

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Ideal shop tools?
« on: February 21, 2006, 07:07:08 PM »
With this new job I'm starting, I get to order some new tools.  I would like to know what everyone considers essential tools or nice to have tools in a wood shop.  I will be doing all kinds of woodworking, from rough framing to finish cabinets, to carving to plaques.
The existing tool list:
20" planer- not sure who made it but its old and big
LARGE Jointer- it has 4' long infeed and outfeed tables- not sure what brand it is
10" Radial arm saw
10" compound miter saw
small drill press
benchtop belt sander
12" Harbour Freight planer- I think that it will dissappear as soon as i get into the shop
jigsaw
circular saw
brad nailer
and several other boxes that I haven't dug through yet. Just not enough time, or enough room to store the stuff correctly yet

Thanks for all your input

Charles


Offline dutchman

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Re: Ideal shop tools?
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2006, 07:32:31 PM »
I don't see any clamps on your list , you'll need all different styles.
A router, router table , probably a dust collection system.

Offline pigman

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Re: Ideal shop tools?
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2006, 07:41:39 PM »
I think a cabinet  saw would be nice.  Either a $1000 import or a really nice Martin for about $7000  if the budget will allow ;). A 14in or 18in band saw would  help if cutting curved parts. ;D  If you will tell us the budget we can help you choose some nice tools. :D
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Offline isassi

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Re: Ideal shop tools?
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2006, 07:58:05 PM »
One thing you can never have enough of are bar clamps, all lengths.  ;)

Offline beenthere

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Re: Ideal shop tools?
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2006, 08:06:38 PM »
Panel sander, and maybe a spindle shaper, although the router table if sized right could work for some of that. Learning (or knowing) good tool sharpening techniques and blade maintenance for the planer and jointer would be real beneficial. With that would come some sharpening tools. You have a good start, and moving to a 12" sliding compound miter saw will probably be something 'needed' too. A turning lathe maybe.
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Offline JimBuis

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Re: Ideal shop tools?
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2006, 08:36:58 PM »
Emphasis on the high end table saw [sliding table preferred], if you don't have a sliding table saw then you need a panel saw, band saw, scroll saw, electric handheld plane, combination disk/belt sander, handheld belt sander, just to name a few.

Don't forget the handtools.  Hand planes, you need a variety, squares, rules, straight edges, levels, protractors, wood chisels, variety of hammers, handsaws, and all of the basic handtools such as pliers and screwdrivers.

I can give you a detailed itemized list if you need it.
Jim Buis                             Peterson 10" WPF swingmill

Offline Treasures

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Re: Ideal shop tools?
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2006, 09:36:32 PM »
 I would say, that buying the best you can afford in tooling is a must. Once you use quality tooling you'll never go back to the cheap stuff. Hand scrapers and a good quality HVLP system may be some other suggestions.
Small Alaskan Mill, 310 Stihl, Solar kiln,and small 1 man cabinet shop.

Offline sawguyver

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Re: Ideal shop tools?
« Reply #7 on: February 21, 2006, 11:12:52 PM »
Get a 20" powermatic band saw with blade welder if you can. Mine will cut metal or wood. I waited too long to get one and I knew it the first day I used it. When being flexable is more important than production a band saw should be the first purchase.

Offline Radar67

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Re: Ideal shop tools?
« Reply #8 on: February 21, 2006, 11:40:24 PM »
Charles,
     I ran a custom cabinet shop for a former employer for several years. The main tools I used daily were:

Delta 10" table saw
Delta Sawbuck (basically a 8" sliding compound mitre saw with it's own table)
5hp air compressor
Good spray gun for paint and finish
Blum multi head drill press (for European style cabinets. It bored multiple holes for adjustable shelves and bored and pressed the hinges)
Dewalt heavy duty screw gun
4 foot drywall tee square (works well on plywood layout)

I forgot to mention the 2 inch finish nailer and the brad nailer.

There are many specialty tools available if you have an unlimited budget. I found very little I had trouble building with these basic tools.

Stew
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Offline DuneCreature

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Re: Ideal shop tools?
« Reply #9 on: February 22, 2006, 02:07:27 AM »
The number one tool (or is that toy?) that you will use everyday on every job in a woodshop.

Workbench - Stable, as big and heavy as possible, sized to your projects with a good woodworking bench vise with a split nut (rapid opening and closing) and bench dog(s).

Fancy, as in Hard Maple laminated top, trestle legs, tool well etc. or simple as in ” (a least two layers) plywood and pine 2x6s it doesn’t matter. What a workbench does need to be is three things:

1 Dead flat
2 Have clamping ledges - 4” to 6” all around
3 As rock solid and stable as you can make it

That there’s where I’d start my blowing my budget in the toy deptment anyhoot. ;)
Wood Shavings and Sawdust - Not just another pretty byproduct.

Offline brdmkr

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Re: Ideal shop tools?
« Reply #10 on: February 22, 2006, 08:41:27 AM »
The big thing that I see missing is a table saw.   I'd opt for a good cabinet saw as mentioned above with a really good fence.   You may also want to consider a biscuit joiner to aid with glue-ups and face frame attachment.  A good pocket hole jig would also be nice (and will likely be the next item on my list 8) ).  Depending on the amount of cabinet work you do you should have either a big router or a shaper.  If you will be raising a good many panels, I might opt for the shaper, but if not, a big router in a good table will likely provide more service.
Lucas 618  Mahindra 4110, FEL and pallet forks, some cant hooks, and a dose of want-to

Offline metalspinner

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Re: Ideal shop tools?
« Reply #11 on: February 22, 2006, 09:45:28 AM »
Sanders have not been mentioned yet!    Aside from the hand sanders - belt, random orbit disc, and palm -  a drum sander is a great way to blow some money.  Every board I send through the planer goes through the sander. Yes, it is slow, but much faster and more acurate than doing it by hand. Also, boards you resawed on the new bandsaw for veneer can be sent through it - all the way down .032" at least!  Monster boards to big for the planer as well.  Now that I have it  - don't know how I got by without it. ;D
I do what the little voices in my wife's head tell me to do.

Offline iain

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Re: Ideal shop tools?
« Reply #12 on: February 22, 2006, 11:46:40 AM »
 Your imediat job's to be done, will determine what you need and when,

but DuneCreature is bang on with the number one, it don't have to be flash or afancy hard wood, my currant bench is 6x2 pine with 2x 18mm 8x4 chipboard sheets for a top, i can glue, screw, clamp, drill, do what i like to the top, then turn it around, then turn it over, then around again, then cut up to heat the work shop when its finally Knackered ;)

iain

Offline TexasTimbers

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Re: Ideal shop tools?
« Reply #13 on: February 22, 2006, 02:34:48 PM »
This Tool is one of my favorites. The first one I bought grew legs on a job where I was installing a custom staircase and I immediately got online that night and ordered another one.
The uses are limited to your imagination. A simpler "angle finder" will do in many cases but they aren't near as much fun.
Now for crown moulding, especially complex profiles with wierd mitres and bevels, nothing I've found can touch it.
The oil is all in Texas, but the dipsticks are in D.C.

Offline ksu_chainsaw

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Re: Ideal shop tools?
« Reply #14 on: February 22, 2006, 08:18:06 PM »
Thanks for all the suggestions.

I went back through the shop again, and the first time I went through the shop, they had moved stuff out to refinish the floor.
The other tools that are there:
10" table saw
panel saw
small craftsman router table- maybe 3' long
30 gallon craftsman air compressor
small hvlp pain system that I will share with the autobody shop- the spray booth is in there
small scroll saw
table top band saw
small lathe

And they were installing a large dust collection system- 4" lines with lots of extra drops, but only 1 floor sweep.

Thanks again for all the suggestions.

Charles

Offline iain

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Re: Ideal shop tools?
« Reply #15 on: February 23, 2006, 03:15:26 AM »
You one loaded cowboy ;D


iain

Offline DuneCreature

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Re: Ideal shop tools?
« Reply #16 on: February 23, 2006, 04:23:15 AM »
Yep, it sounds like a good baseline of tools to start with.

It also sounds like the outfit may actually have their employee’s heath and safety in mind with a nice dust collection system.

The fact that they and you are taking the time to do some house keeping bodes well also.

Good luck with the new adventure, Charles. You’ve obviously already figured out how to use one important tool, the Internet. Nothing like being able to tap the geezer knowledgebase at the touch of a button or two. I wish I had had that trick in my tool kit startin’ out.

~ Dune - The Geez with a Trick, Forgotten Techinque and Trade Secret or Two Left in His Toolbox

Wood Shavings and Sawdust - Not just another pretty byproduct.


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