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Author Topic: Injuries from the Sawmill Sector  (Read 4242 times)

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Offline Bill Johnson

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Injuries from the Sawmill Sector
« on: May 14, 2001, 05:12:33 PM »
Okay I'm going to try and separate out the Hazard Alerts by sector those being so far, the mill sector, the forest sector and the miscellaneous sector.

So from the Workers Compensation Board of British Columbia I've found the following.

HAZARD ALERT
CHIPPERMAN'S ARM AMPUTATED WHILE CLEARING JAM.

Wood coming from the infeed rollers jammed up as it fell onto the chipper conveyor belt. A chipperman tried to clear the jam without turning off any part of the machine or using a picaroon. His hand and arm were caught up in the teeth of the rotating rollers, and his body was pulled onto the chipper conveyor. The chipperman's arm was twisted off at the shoulder. Another worker heard his cries and rescued him before he was pulled into the chipper.

In a similar accident, a worker was clearing a wood jam on a trim waste conveyor while the machine was still moving. The worker climbed onto the guarding and reached over to clear the jam. His hand and arm were pulled into the tail spool, resulting in severe crushing.

SAFE WORK PRACTICES:
1)Provide written safe work procedures for clearing jams.
2)Use a restraining safety belt and lanyard (or other protection) when feeding or clearing a hog or chipper.
3)Use a picaroon or other effective tool to clear wood jams.

END

Bill
Bill

Offline Bill Johnson

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Re: Injuries from the Sawmill Sector
« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2001, 05:44:17 PM »
From: Workers' Compensation Board of British Columbia

HAZARD ALERT:
De-energize and lock out
SAWMILL WORKER LOSES EYE

A worker was injured while clearing sawdust from around a resaw using an air hose with a four-foot aluminum pipe nozzle extension. The saw was not shut down and the worker struck the saw with the pipe, causing the pipe to break. A piece of pipe struck the worker in the face. The worker lost an eye as a result of the injury.

The worker did not shut down and lock out the resaw and was not wearing protective eye equipment.

SAFE WORK PRACTICES:
1)Shut down and lock out all revolving saws, shafts and friction drives before blowing accumulated sawdust from them.
2)Post safe work procedures beside equipment.
3)Wear protective eye protection.
4)Educate and train supervisors and workers in safe work procedures.

End

Bill
Bill

Offline Bill Johnson

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Re: Injuries from the Sawmill Sector
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2001, 10:35:35 AM »
Industry Alert!!
Critical Injury: Infeed Chain

A maintenance worker at a sawmill was attempting to repair a broken infeed chain to a log pond. Logs were piled on the infeed behind him, but he believed the situation to be secure. As he worked, however, the logs suddenly came loose and started to roll towards him. He ducked down below the level of the chain to avoid being hit, but one log hit his right hand and crushed it against the chain. He suffered a broken finger and severe lacerations.

Preventive Measures:
1)The unstable pile of logs represents and "energized system" to which the standard lockout policies and procedures must apply.

2) The infeed-chain system must be locked out before any work can begin.

3)One part of proper lock out procedures is dealing with stored energy. If possible,the deck should be cleared of all logs before work begins. If this is not possible, blocking should be applied to prevent the logs from moving. (This might consist of "chocks" liked those used to prevent vehicles from rolling, or of sturdy posts inserted through the chain)

4)The workplace must establish a clear set of procedures for locking out each station. Workers must be trained in these procedures, Supervisors must monitor their understanding of (and compliance with) these procedures, and provide correction and upgrade training as required.

END

Bill

Source:OFSWA Archive files
Bill

Offline Bill Johnson

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Re: Injuries from the Sawmill Sector
« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2004, 10:39:36 AM »
INDUSTRY ALERT
INJURY

Resaw operatorís shoulder is broken after
shirt-tail is caught in rollers


What happened?
A resaw operator with four years experience was standing by the electrically driven rollers of an infeed table, guiding lumber into the resaw.  The operatorís shirt was unbuttoned and when he leaned over one of the rollers to reach for some lumber, his shirt-tail was grabbed by the roller.  The operatorís shirt and shoulder were drawn into the roller with such force that shoulder bone was broken and rollerís electric motor burned out.

Why did this happen?
Two main factors contributed to the resaw operatorís critical injury.

     1. The operatorís shirt was unbuttoned and hanging loosely as he worked.  He had been trained on
     resaw operating procedures and had received general safety training that included the hazards of
     loose clothing.  No one realized that the electrically driven rollers on the infeed table were a
     potential source of entanglement.  Resaw operators were allowed to work with their shirts
     unbuttoned.

     2. The surface of the infeed tableís rollers was slightly irregular in places due to axe marks caused
     by various attempts to remove ice and mud from boards before feeding them into the resaw.  The
     irregular surface of the rollers increased the risk of entanglement for anyone who worked close to
     them.

How can it be prevented?
The least obvious hazards often pose the greatest risk to workers, because of a natural tendency to overlook or forget about them.  Loose clothing, long hair, jewellery or other loose articles can become entangled in machinery or other moving parts, causing potentially devastating injuries.  But being aware of this hazard is only the first step in preventing these injuries.  Employer, supervisors, and workers also need to identify all areas in the workplace where the hazard could arise.

Any axe marks or other surface irregularities on the infeed tableís rollers should be smoothed down in order to reduce the chances of entanglement in the rollers.  After the incident, free-wheeling rollers were installed to make it a safer, passive conveyor.  Use of tear-away Velcro aprons by operators would also reduce the risk of entanglement.

The dangers of loose clothing and other entanglement hazards should be regularly emphasized to all workers in sawmills and veneer/plywood and other board mills.

Source OFSWA Industry Alerts.

Bill

Offline Bill Johnson

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Re: Injuries from the Sawmill Sector
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2004, 03:07:49 PM »
INDUSTRY ALERT
INJURY

What happened?
A slicer operators helper at a veneer plant was working with an electric chainsaw trimming off the ends of white pine logs.  The slicer operator, wanting to talk to him about the amount being cut off, walked up close behind him and called out.  Hearing something behind him, the helper turned around suddenly while lifting his chain saw over the log and swinging it around.  The electric chain saw, which continues to run for several seconds after the trigger is released, caught the slicer operator across the stomach causing abdominal lacerations that required 15 stitches to close.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
1) Proper procedure for cutting log ends with an electric chain saw should be posted at the workstation, workers should be instructed in proper procedure and supervisors should insure that procedures are followed.
2) Wait until the saw is completely stopped before turning or moving forward or backward.
3) Never approach anyone using a chainsaw from behind always approach from the front and with until the saw is completely stopped before talking to the operator.

Source OFSWA Industry Alert Archives
Bill

Offline Bill Johnson

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Re: Injuries from the Sawmill Sector
« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2004, 03:09:10 PM »
INDUSTRY ALERT
INJURY

What happened?
An employee at a sawmill was riding on the side ladder of a forklift truck.  The operator stopped the machine to allow the worker to get down.  The employee slipped and fell on the icy ground, but the forklift operator didnít notice.  As the machine pulled away, it ran over the workerís right leg causing multiple fractures.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
1) Explain standards when training employees.
2) Post and enforce a ďNo RiderĒ rule
3) Meet regularly with yard personnel to develop and upgrade standards.


Source OFSWA Industry Alert Archives
Bill

Offline Bill Johnson

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Re: Injuries from the Sawmill Sector
« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2004, 03:10:39 PM »
INDUSTRY ALERT
INJURY

What happened?
A worker at a sawmill left his post to help free a jammed 16í log on the slasher deck.  He did not lock out or even turn off the 36Ē circular saw before doing so.  While attempting to free the log with a pickaroon, he braced his left foot against the saw guard.  His foot slipped into the saw, with the result that his boot was completely cut open from the bottom.  One tooth of the circular saw caught and penetrated the bootís steel toe and snapped the workers foot forward.  This resulted in a fractured bone in his foot Ė miraculously, his only injury.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
1) The trimmer operator should never leave his post without shutting off and locking out the saw.
2) No one, should leave his normal work station on the slasher deck to free jam-ups (or perform any othe work) unless the saw is turned off and locked out.
3) Supervisors should ensure that all workers are thoroughly familiar with the rules regarding lock-outs, and should monitor the workersí performance to ensure compliance.


Source OFSWA Industry Alert Archives
Bill


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