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Author Topic: Historic Logging and Milling Photos  (Read 170982 times)

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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Historic Logging and Milling Photos
« Reply #560 on: August 17, 2015, 03:48:56 PM »
Nope, not for another 400. ;)

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
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Offline caveman

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Re: Historic Logging and Milling Photos
« Reply #561 on: December 20, 2017, 10:18:21 PM »
I don't know if this has been posted on the Forestry Forum previously but this is a video of the last train load of cypress harvested and milled by Cummer and Son's cypress in Lacoochee, Fl.  My great grandfather on my mother's side was a railroad man who lived in Lacoochee.  One of my uncles, who died last year at around 93 years old retired from Seaboard Coastline as an engineer but as a young man, he fed wood to feed steam powered engines.  Anyway, I heard from one of my cousins that my Uncle Bud had a video tape of this last train of cypress but no one in the family I asked could come up with it.  My dad found it on Youtube.  The picture quality is not too good but I was glad to find it nonetheless.
 

Offline Chuck White

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Re: Historic Logging and Milling Photos
« Reply #562 on: December 20, 2017, 10:41:23 PM »
Some of those pictures reminded me of the way they did it here in the Adirondack Mountains of New York!

That's especially true when using the horses!   It's a marvel as to what a team of horses can move!!!!

My Maternal Grandfather was born in one of the lumber camps here in the Adirondacks and had many stories to tell about growing up there!

Great Video/pics, thanks for posting!
~Chuck~
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Historic Logging and Milling Photos
« Reply #563 on: December 21, 2017, 02:45:18 AM »
Yes, for sure about the horses, sometimes two teams hitch to a load. But logging was the main reason for a rail road in these parts. Most of it all abandoned now, but it also helped settle the country moving animals and freight up the river valley.

Enjoyed the cypress logging video caveman.  You couldn't complain too much when you had a job. A lot of those old timers lived a long life, so physical work never hurt them, it was often the hazards of the job that shortened the life span of a few or made it difficult.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline WDH

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Re: Historic Logging and Milling Photos
« Reply #564 on: December 21, 2017, 07:44:57 AM »
Very interesting.  Thank you, Kyle.
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Offline Magicman

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Re: Historic Logging and Milling Photos
« Reply #565 on: December 21, 2017, 09:20:43 AM »
Thank You for that video.  Those were some lonesome mournful sounds at the end of a long lost era.
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Offline WV Sawmiller

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Re: Historic Logging and Milling Photos
« Reply #566 on: December 22, 2017, 07:38:25 AM »
   Very interesting video. I loved the early shots of the loggers wading out through the swamps to get to the work area. I know I would not want to be wait to chest deep in gator and moccasin infested water, cypress knees and water bonnets to pull a cross cut saw. I remember my grandfather talking about girdling cypress near there. They'd girdle the  trees so they'd die on the stump and float out easier. He'd have to notch the tree root "flares" build a scaffold to stand on then when finished he'd carve or stamp his initials in the tree so they knew who to pay. I think he got 10 cents per tree.
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Offline caveman

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Re: Historic Logging and Milling Photos
« Reply #567 on: December 22, 2017, 04:16:21 PM »
JMoore and I went and got some live oak logs this morning near the Withlacoochee River, which is about 15 minutes from my house.  I used to fish and canoe in that river quite a bit several years ago.  There are still a few of the big ones left in there. Some of the enormous cypress stumps remain and are rotting from the inside out.  A few of the scaffold board notches are still visible in some of them.

There are still plenty of big gators and moccasins in that river.  The place where we got the logs this morning has an old Cracker style cypress house on it that flooded during Irma.  The owners are going to build another house since mold has evidently made the old house uninhabitable. 

Caveman

Offline newoodguy78

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Re: Historic Logging and Milling Photos
« Reply #568 on: December 22, 2017, 08:31:53 PM »
Den

If you look in the backrground of your first picture, you can see how they used to skid those big logs out by horsepower.  There is a really nifty skid trail consisting of split rails.  They used to grease those up so that horses could skid them to a landing.  Then loaded onto a railcar.  It also seems that they used to use the drainage areas ... ie the streams.
Williamsport, PA was the lumber capital of the world in 1850.  My, how times have changed.  They used to have mills that produced 250 MMbf of lumber per year.  30 Mbf/day was the norm for edging strrips that were turned into kindling for the New York City markets.  Most modern mills in our area don't produce that much.

I sit back in awe to see what they used to do 100 years ago as compared to what we can do with our "modernaization".   Our mills are smaller, and where we can log is limited by mechanics.  I used to mark timber to an area where guys could drag a winch line to.  Then I would go up slope another 100 yds. and find a charcoal flat.

One thing to keep in mind that the best production for a shift was set in New Hampshire around 1910 (I believe).  Over 100 Mbf in a shift (12 hrs).
Ron,
Do you or anyone else know if this production record stands or was that a record for that period in history? That's a massive amount of lumber. And also do you know at what mill and where in New Hampshire it was?

Being a New Hampshire native and having a great grandfather that worked in the lumbercamps and sawmills of New Hampshire this caught my eye.
I know this quote goes back aways but I enjoy when these older threads resurface. It's hard to comprehend all the info buried back in this forum.
Thanks in advance for any info you might have

Offline WDH

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Re: Historic Logging and Milling Photos
« Reply #569 on: December 22, 2017, 11:01:52 PM »
Some of the big pine mills in the South are producing 250 MMBF per year. 
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Offline newoodguy78

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Re: Historic Logging and Milling Photos
« Reply #570 on: December 22, 2017, 11:57:45 PM »
Is that mostly being cut for the pressure treated market?

Offline Ianab

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Re: Historic Logging and Milling Photos
« Reply #571 on: December 23, 2017, 12:44:59 AM »
Some of the big pine mills in the South are producing 250 MMBF per year.

I can believe that. The new Red Stag mill near Napier here in NZ cuts (if my conversion maths is right) about 220 MMBF, and is boasted as the largest mill in the Southern Hemisphere. Which means there are larger ones Nth of the Equator, probably the ones you are thinking of.

To put that into perspective, that's 8,000 logs per DAY, and the sorting machine is handling 90 boards a minute. Puts our portable sawmills to shame.  :D

Product is all grade from premium clear pine to fence posts, and the wood waste powers the drying kilns.
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Offline SwampDonkey

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Re: Historic Logging and Milling Photos
« Reply #572 on: December 23, 2017, 03:23:29 AM »
At St Leonard, Irving is producing 340 MMBF per year of SPF lumber and 40 MMBF of hardwood lumber at their Veneer Sawmill there.

At their new Ashland , Maine mill they produce 130 MMBF of 2 x material 6-12' length.

Their Grand Lake mill does 230 MMBF.

Sussex does 120 MMBF, but that mill is their proving grounds, so to speak. They implement the most up to date technology there and probably their best people.

These are all Irving, and they have more mills not listed.

Their waste is hog fuel and pulp material.

Pre-commercial thinning pays off. :)

'If she wants to play lumberjack, she's going to have to learn to handle her end of the log.'
Dirty Harry

Offline WDH

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Re: Historic Logging and Milling Photos
« Reply #573 on: December 23, 2017, 07:45:18 AM »
Jake (Customsawyer) saws at what is purported to be the largest hardwood sawmill in the US.  They use 150 to 175 tractor trailer loads of logs per day.  That is 4000 to 5000 tons/day. 
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Offline dgdrls

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Re: Historic Logging and Milling Photos
« Reply #574 on: December 23, 2017, 08:31:26 AM »
Some Canadian Archival shots.

 

  



 


Loggers squaring a pine at Jocko River, Ontario, 1890

D

Offline petefrom bearswamp

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Re: Historic Logging and Milling Photos
« Reply #575 on: December 25, 2017, 09:48:59 AM »
those old broadaxe guys were artists at making a pretty smooth surface
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Re: Historic Logging and Milling Photos
« Reply #576 on: December 28, 2017, 07:02:53 AM »
Have seen that engine many times ,but it now has disappeared ,don't know where it went! :(
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Offline gman98

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Re: Historic Logging and Milling Photos
« Reply #577 on: January 04, 2018, 03:29:14 PM »
About '66 was the end of the drive. Irving built some piers above Beechwood dam before it's construction, near Clearview, that never got used when the government stopped the drive.

J. K. Irving's wife, Jean, wrote a book about Rev. R. H. Nicholson from up near Woodstock (Riceville), who was also a painter and teacher. Many of the paintings are of horse logging and camp life, which Jim Irving commissioned Nicholson to paint in 1960 from his memories. The Irvings own many of his paintings, some are at the Faculty of Forestry at U of Toronto. A lot of the scenery you can tell is from Carleton County, you look at them and know exactly were they were if you know the area up along the river valley in the Woodstock area. He would teach Mrs Irving to paint when she enrolled in his classes in 1977. The folks in the family here knew the Rev. because he was a Wesleyan preacher and involved in Bethany (a Wesleyan Bible college), which was founded in Woodstock in 1945 and moved to Sussex in 1966.

I have a copy of the book here signed by Mrs Irving and Rev. Nicholson. My aunt in Sussex, now 80, is a retired teacher and she paints as well. She gave this copy to us.

This is one of Rev. Nicholson's paintings called "Icing at Night".

(Image hidden from quote, click to view.)

I don't know if anyone has seen this, but my grandfather has done this work years ago. They iced the roads to make it easier sledding the wood out of the woods. My grandfather  (mom's dad) would have been the same age as the Rev. born 1909. It was dad's side of the family that has the church ties to the Rev. But dad's mom had uncles that were woods contractors or teamster with hired men and camps they built.
Starting my second summer doing pct and plantining crew management with Irving in may and I enjoy looking at his paintings in the office on Saint John.
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Offline Darrel

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Re: Historic Logging and Milling Photos
« Reply #578 on: January 05, 2018, 07:43:06 PM »
MUD! MUD! MUD!  The weather is muddy, should be icy!  There shouldn't be no stinkin mud in January!

End of rant!

Carry on. . . . .

Edit to add: Sorry, wrong thread, but carry on just the same.
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Offline 4x4American

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Re: Historic Logging and Milling Photos
« Reply #579 on: January 05, 2018, 07:55:35 PM »
 :P
Boy, back in my day..


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