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Author Topic: Question for chainsaw millers  (Read 3221 times)

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Offline dail_h

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Question for chainsaw millers
« on: May 18, 2006, 09:25:41 PM »
   I've got two big poplars,34, & 35 in to saw,and ain't no way they are gonna go on my Norwood mill like they are. Question is ,how to best get them into chunks that my mill will handle? I have the dustomers 310 Stihl with a ripping chain,and 20 in bar. I know bigger would be better,but this is what I got. Customer wants 8s ,and 6s.
   Not doing good tonight,gonna go crash,will check replies in the morning .

                      THanks Dail
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Offline Dan_Shade

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Re: Question for chainsaw millers
« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2006, 09:49:59 PM »
personally, I would use the chainsaw to take slabs off exactly as you would if you had a bandsaw big enough.

Woodmizer LT40HDG25 / Stihl 066 alaskan
lots of dull bands and chains

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Offline Ironwood

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Re: Question for chainsaw millers
« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2006, 11:39:38 PM »
Chalk a line down the center to guide the cut, or better yet screw a 2 x4 to it an use this as a guide (cut dead vertical, any variation should be evident) Also, cut incrimentally this will keep your line straighter as well. Reid
There is no scarcity of opportunity to make a living at what you love to do, there is only scarcity of resolve to make it happen.- Wayne Dyer

Offline iain

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Re: Question for chainsaw millers
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2006, 02:03:02 AM »
As Reid said but take a slab of the left face of the log, so whats that whats left will go on your mill in two bits,
make sure you slab heavy enough to get some thing good from the slab


iain

Offline New Inn Wood Man

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Re: Question for chainsaw millers
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2006, 04:44:40 AM »
Hi Dail,

I'd go with Iain on this one. ;) If you do this kind of thing often consider looking at the Logosol kit. Especially the model they call the 'Big Mill'. With a 20 inch bar it would allow you to cut from each side if you wished to half the timbers and the cuts join neatly in the middle, or you can quarter the timber or simply remove a slab. :) Worth a look on thier website. They have piccies of it being used for smaller timbers however if you want to see some some piccies of larger timbers have a snork at my website. Address is below.


NIWM

Offline Raphael

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Re: Question for chainsaw millers
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2006, 10:50:56 AM »
  Actually the Logosol Timberjig has webshop sale price of $148.50 right now and works quite nicely off the shop built "Big Mill" guide rail (2 straight planks joined edge to side in a long T, instructions and hardware come w/ the Timberjig).
  It's a handy thing to have around when you need to reduce a log to bandsaw size or the little voice in the back of your head says there's steel in there that you'ld rather not find it with your bandsaw blade.  It's a lot easier to replace a couple links in a chain that a couple smashed cutters than sharpen and reset an entire band.

  If you are ripping completely free hand then I'd:
1)  Wear Chaps!!!
2)  Run the blade vertically vs. horizontally, it's easier for the eye to find plumb than level.  Many people block the log high and back cut this rip (with the top of the bar first) walking along the log with the saw cutting on the near side.  It yields a smoother cut (fewer stops), makes it easier to  see the line and control the saw when going over rough bark.  Always Wear Chaps doing it this way!!!

  If you use a 2x4 tacked to the log as a guide then the 45 degree technique used with the Timberjig works fairly well (a strong steady left hand helps).   Chaps are optional here but hearing and eye protection definately isn't.
  There are good pictures of this process on Logosol's "Big Mill Timberjig" page:
http://www.logosol.com/webb/sawmills/2002a-big_mill_timberjig.php

  If the 310 still has it's dogs you'll need to remove them or clamp pillow blocks to the bar (it will reduce your depth of cut, but give you flat surface to run on a guide board).  I'd also test the saw out on a junk log first to make sure the chain isn't pulling to one side and get some comfort with your technique.

  I'd avoid splitting the Poplar in half as it can have enough tension to draw even an 8' log when split.  Also it makes it easier to keep the saw out of dirt and/or your cribbing.

Hope this helps.
Work safe and enjoy.
... he was middle aged,
and the truth hit him like a man with no parachute.
 --Godley & Creme

Stihl 066, MS 362 C-M & 24+ feet of Logosol M7 mill

Offline jpgreen

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Re: Question for chainsaw millers
« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2006, 11:21:22 AM »
I thought I'd mention for you chainsaw millers...

I've got steel GripperDogs, that I can't sell to swingmill owners anymore, but would be awesome for a chainsaw mill.

They will hold your log dead solid and you could easily raise the log to a nice working height.

I will let them go pretty darn cheap...  8)
-95 Wood-Mizer LT40HD 27 Hp Kawasaki water cooled engine-

Offline rebocardo

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Re: Question for chainsaw millers
« Reply #7 on: May 19, 2006, 02:37:24 PM »
> Question is ,how to best get them into chunks that my mill will handle?

How wide can your mill handle?

With only a 20" chain, I would be tempted to lop off the sides of the logs to make it into a big cant if the trunks were fairly round.

With a 20" bar, you are only going to get an effective depth of about 15" inches without going vertical with the chainsaw. This can be rather deadly with a ripping chain or just about any other chain as it gives you more of a chance to hit the upper part of the chain in the kerf.

What you can do, is start ripping it like you were going to halve it.  Cut about 15 inches down the whole length of the log. The roll the log to the right 90 degrees. Move over 15 inches or so to meet the kerf you just cut. Then remove that piece. Then roll the log back to its original position.

Now, your saw should be butted against the right hand side of the log, 15 inches down from top of the log. Your kerf will be moved over a bit (the width of your saw cover to your chain), but, now you should be close to halving the log on this run. The roll the log to the right 90 degrees. Move over 15 inches or so to meet the kerf you just cut. Then remove that piece.

Now you should have a 1/2 a log with a very small piece like a 1/4 circle attachef to the lft side you can freehand lop off.

Block the log so it can not roll left or right as you cut it.



Offline dail_h

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Re: Question for chainsaw millers
« Reply #8 on: May 19, 2006, 09:20:11 PM »
   Thanks guys,
   I put the Alaskan on the saw today,cute,with the dogs on the saw,and only a 20 in. bar,I could only cut about a 12 in wide face. Plan  B , use the beam machine,nope ,didn't like that either. Finaly just nailed a 1in board to the log,and split it in half,2 cuts.  Was going to just take off enough to give me about a 20 in cant,but with the heart check ,I wound up just quartering it,put it on the mill,and made boards. Did 1 quarter,got the heebie jeebies and couldn't think no more,left everything where it was ,'n come home. Monday's another day.

                  Thanks again

   I like the looks of that Timber Jig,gonna go back an look at that.
World Champion Wildcat Sorter,1999 2002 2004 2005
      Volume Discount At ER
Singing The Song Of Circle Again


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