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Author Topic: Upgrade or not to upgrade...that is the question.  (Read 2708 times)

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Offline freesouled

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Upgrade or not to upgrade...that is the question.
« on: November 07, 2006, 09:54:38 PM »
My grandfather bought a used Timberking back around 1996ish.  It is fully hydraulic with a deck extension added to it allowing it to cut over 20 foot logs.  It has developed many issues over the years of use.  The major problems are premature blade breakage at around 400bf (this is a generous estimate) and doesn't seem to help any if you stop to sharpen and reset the teeth.  Also the hydraulic system has develop quite severe leaks.  Another problem I have noticed is the cutting head frame rubs the cross members jarring each time it goes across one.

I have looked into upgrading to a newer mill and I am having mixed feelings whether I should do it, or try and work the bugs out of the older mill.  If I bought a new mill I would have to dedicate the next five years or so trying to pay for the purchase.  What do you guys think?

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Re: Upgrade or not to upgrade...that is the question.
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2006, 10:13:12 PM »
how many hours are on the mill?

how worn is it?  will it cut square lumber?  are the rails and bed straight?
Woodmizer LT40HDG25 / Stihl 066 alaskan
lots of dull bands and chains

There's a fine line between turning firewood into beautiful things and beautiful things into firewood.

Offline freesouled

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Re: Upgrade or not to upgrade...that is the question.
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2006, 10:41:39 PM »
The hour meter broke shortly after my dad took it over, so I have no idea how many hours are on it.  I know my dad has cut at least 50 Mbf with it (probably much more), I have cut around 8 Mbf and I am not sure how much my grandfather cut on it before he passed. 

It is worn...not sure exactly what you mean specificly.  I believe the rollers must be worn explaining why it hits the cross members. 

It is a challenge to cut square lumber with it.  I am getting better.  You end up having to "eyeball it" to get it square after the first time you roll the log.  The arms the log rests on are not square with the bed.  My dad says he has tried to shim the arms to square them up with no luck.

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Re: Upgrade or not to upgrade...that is the question.
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2006, 10:58:32 PM »
i'm not sure how timber kings are adjusted, but i'm sure you could adjust the saw so it's square again. 

depending on your financial situation/need for a reliable saw/other variables, i'd let all of that work towards what you decide you want to do.

if you're making a living with your saw, it may be smarter to go get a new saw than to keep fixing up the one you have.  if you're a hobby guy, then it may make more sense to get the saw squared up and refreshed. 

a saw should just be getting started after 50,000 board feet!

Woodmizer LT40HDG25 / Stihl 066 alaskan
lots of dull bands and chains

There's a fine line between turning firewood into beautiful things and beautiful things into firewood.

Offline Bibbyman

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Re: Upgrade or not to upgrade...that is the question.
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2006, 11:09:04 PM »
It may be worth it to talk with TimberKing and see if they have a program to rebuild/refurbish your mill.  Itd likely mean taking it back to KC.

I know WM has such program for their mills that is.
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Offline Percy

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Re: Upgrade or not to upgrade...that is the question.
« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2006, 02:05:23 AM »
One thing Ive learned is there aint a thing that cant be fixed(almost..heh) ;D. If this mill can exceed your production expectations, Id fixer up. If it wont, Id still fix it up and sell it and upgrade to a mill that can meet/exceed your production requirements. LIke Bibby said, bring her to the factory and tellem to "make it like new". Youll be better off no matter which road you take.... ;D
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Offline Kelvin

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Re: Upgrade or not to upgrade...that is the question.
« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2006, 07:39:29 AM »
click and clack the public radio guys have a saying about fixing the small things on your car before they pile up to make you want to buy a new one.  I think they have a point.  If the mill is fast enough and has the features you need, the most cost effective thing would be to fix it.  Even if you end up going with something else, repairing things will get you way more money when you go to sell it.  Its a win win situation.  Sounds like not too much lumber has been sawn with it, so if it were me, i'd start going after those little things one at a time.

Offline oldsaw

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Re: Upgrade or not to upgrade...that is the question.
« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2006, 08:57:59 PM »
click and clack the public radio guys have a saying about fixing the small things on your car before they pile up to make you want to buy a new one.  I think they have a point.  If the mill is fast enough and has the features you need, the most cost effective thing would be to fix it.  Even if you end up going with something else, repairing things will get you way more money when you go to sell it.  Its a win win situation.  Sounds like not too much lumber has been sawn with it, so if it were me, i'd start going after those little things one at a time.

I'm with Kelvin.  You will probably find that a few minor repairs that should have been done a few years back are causing most of your problems.  You keep trying to work around the problems rather than fix them, which tends to cause other problems, like premature blade breakage and out of square boards.  The hydraulic leaks should have been fixed as they appeared, rather than have the accumulate.  Click and Clack are annoying, but they are quite often right...especially on a philosophical level.  Your attitude has been shaped by the problems that never got addressed, and it could end up costing you thousands of dollars, whether you keep it or sell it.

Mills are reasonably simple machines, with reasonably simple parts (the hydraulic system is a bit more complex, but only a bit).  If the machine can handle what you cut, and can do it fast enough, then you would be far better off spending a few hundred dollars to get this mill straightened up, since a new one with hydraulics would be thousands of dollars. 

If $500 fixed everything on your mill, would you keep it?  How about $1000?  A replacement would be pushing $20k.  I would fix it, run it, and if I didn't like it, sell it running for a couple or three thousand dollars or more than selling it "broke".  You are suffering the sins of your fathers.

Mark
So many trees, so little money, even less time.

Stihl 066, Husky 262, Husky 350 (warmed over), Homelite Super XL, Homelite 150A

Offline ladylake

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Re: Upgrade or not to upgrade...that is the question.
« Reply #8 on: November 09, 2006, 06:17:41 AM »
For the blades breaking Timberking used solid steel wheels a while back which caused problems if not lined up real good.  If your are solid steel I,d get a set with v belts .  I have a B20, blades last a long time unless I let the belts get wore down to far.  Steve
Timberking B20 14000 hours +  Case75xt grapple + forks+8" snow bucket + dirt bucket   770 Oliver   Lots(too many) of chainsaws, Like the Echo saws and the Stihl and Husky     W5  Case loader   1  trailers  Wright sharpener     Suffolk  setter Volvo MCT125c skid loader

Offline freesouled

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Re: Upgrade or not to upgrade...that is the question.
« Reply #9 on: November 09, 2006, 07:52:44 PM »
For the blades breaking Timberking used solid steel wheels a while back which caused problems if not lined up real good. If your are solid steel I,d get a set with v belts . I have a B20, blades last a long time unless I let the belts get wore down to far. Steve

The sawmill has the v belt wheels.  My dad seems to think it may be the spring tension system they use for the blades.  Does the hydraulic tensioner work better?

Offline ladylake

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Re: Upgrade or not to upgrade...that is the question.
« Reply #10 on: November 10, 2006, 02:39:52 AM »
Mine has  spring tension with a hydraulic gauge. Make sure your belts are'nt wore so far that the blade is touching the outside of the wheel. Soon as mine touches it'll break blades like crazy.  My B20 uses a B56.  Goodyear is a good brand as they are a little taller than some other ones.   Steve
Timberking B20 14000 hours +  Case75xt grapple + forks+8" snow bucket + dirt bucket   770 Oliver   Lots(too many) of chainsaws, Like the Echo saws and the Stihl and Husky     W5  Case loader   1  trailers  Wright sharpener     Suffolk  setter Volvo MCT125c skid loader


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