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Author Topic: 36 inch white oak  (Read 4102 times)

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Offline brooksmill

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36 inch white oak
« on: April 05, 2007, 09:13:23 AM »
Cut a 36 in white oak yesterday and am wondering if I'll be able to saw it on my LT40HD25.     HELP    Hate to get it on the mill and find out I can't saw it.

Offline Brad_S.

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Re: 36 inch white oak
« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2007, 09:27:54 AM »
I don't own a WM, but according to the spec sheet, you will be able to saw it.
I strongly urge you to consider quarter sawing it if it is fairly clear. QS white oak is very beautiful and highly sought after.
"Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans." J. Lennon

Offline raycon

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Re: 36 inch white oak
« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2007, 09:33:56 AM »
Yes you can. You'll need to (may not have to but make provisions for)cut a groove for the adjustable saw guide. Or you can quarter it on the ground with a chain saw. I timed myself on a 50" maple and it was about two hours of work for me to prep two 8' lengths that 50" diameter into sizes that would fit on my mill.  I use a Stihl 066 with a 20" - 36" bar  for depending on the  task at hand.   
The best way I found to quarter with the chainsaw is put a 2x4 on the log (fastened to it) and use that as a guide. Minimizes wandering.  Make the sencond cut at 90 degrees to the first. You don't need to go through the center of the log instead offsetting one side or other of the pith.  You just need to get the log manageable (sp). We get 50+" diameter white oaks up here. Careful when standing on the log with a running saw. Wedge it so it won't roll.

Good luck.


Lot of stuff..

Offline footer

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Re: 36 inch white oak
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2007, 10:08:13 AM »
Cut a 36 in white oak yesterday and am wondering if I'll be able to saw it on my LT40HD25.     HELP    Hate to get it on the mill and find out I can't saw it.

There is usually nothing you can't do if you put your mind, and body into it ;D
Especially if you don't know that it can't be done :D
That said, a 36" log, if it is no bigger in spots, isn't bad. On big logs, I put the back stops down, and put a 4x4, 2x4, or some block or wedge up against the small tabs. That lets you get the log over so you can use more of the cutting width of the blade. Be CAREFULL! You do not want a log this size rolling off the back side of the mill. Make sure you put the back stops up before rolling the log! I will even saw a large cant with the back stops down and a 3/4 " board on the bed rails. That will allow you to saw boards 26" wide.
I also agree that I would quarter it if it were clear, unless you want or are going after wide boards over 20" wide.

Offline brooksmill

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Re: 36 inch white oak
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2007, 11:43:06 AM »
By quarter sawing are you meaning to quarter it up on the ground with a chainsaw.

Offline Dan_Shade

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Re: 36 inch white oak
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2007, 12:50:00 PM »
I would quarter a log of that size on the ground first if you want 1/4 sawn boards.  you will be limited by the throat depth to saw through the pith with the wood-mizer.  if you are looking for wide flatsawn boards, you will have to take several slab cuts, probably rolling the log 45 degrees instead of 90 degrees.
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Offline kderby

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Re: 36 inch white oak
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2007, 01:48:51 PM »
I am with Dan.  Quarter the thing on the ground especially as it is high value.  I have a Mizer and yes exceeding the 30 inch diameter can be done.  It is a fight.  I have milled enough large logs enough to know that efficiency and quality go right out the window.

It is possible for a stock pickup to go 130mph but you don't want to be in it or own it.

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Offline Robert Long

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Re: 36 inch white oak
« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2007, 03:05:48 PM »
brooksmill

How long, how straight, how clear is this log?
If only the butt is 36" you can trim out the taper with the chain saw and the mill will accept the log better anyway.......each log is a decision you must make and if it seems too much for the mill and your skill level than split the log first, but have equipment and/or help with it after splitting.

Like Brad said..you will be able to cut that log with your mill.... technically speaking.

Robert

Offline Brad_S.

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Re: 36 inch white oak
« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2007, 04:49:27 PM »
I should never have stepped into a WM thread! ::) :D

The spec sheet says a 40 series can do a 36" log, so why will he need to whittle it down with a chainsaw and what is with the 30" diameter  limit kderby is referring to? Rhetorical questions, actually. I don't really need to know.

IMO, life is so much easier quartering it on the saw, even if you have to square it up alittle first to get it through the guides. I'm going hunting in Arky's gallery to pull up a shot he has, then I'm going to Urban Loggers site to get his diagram of QS, then I'll add them to the post.


Arky's Wanda with a mouthful of quartersawing. Note a couple passes were made to square the sides to allow it to fit. It also saves a lot of edging.

Here's a link to Urbanloggers page showing the Quarter sawing method I like to use.
http://www.scottbanbury.com/qsawmethod2.pdf

Hope Scott and Arky don't mind me raiding their information stashes. ;)
"Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans." J. Lennon

Offline Percy

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Re: 36 inch white oak
« Reply #9 on: April 05, 2007, 06:42:30 PM »
I havent seen your log so I have no opinion one way or the other on quartersawing it. If you decide to whittle it down, a straight 36 inch diameter log with no protruding knots can be done without too much fuss. As said earlier, log positioning is critical(placing the log where the complete 28 inches+ of blade can be effectively used. This is done usually by lowering the backstops a bit and clamping the log against them.IT will take a bit of time and you may have to shim one end or the other for a optimal position). When Im workin the bigguns, I position the log without the blade on. By slowly running the head forward without the blade on, you can get an optimum log  postion and figure just how low you can go without any knotching or which knott is gonna give you greif.  IT takes very little time to do it this way and you spend the rest of the time cutting. Productivity can be very good on these bigguns but when they get a bit crooked or have big knots stickin out, its time well spent to prepare the log before stickin it on the mill. Also, theres a time when experience will tell you, "Im thinkin this log is too big." When that happens to me, I bring it over to Dennis, my buddy with the Lucas Swinger who has had his mill set up in my yard for close to a year now.  If he ever leaves, Ill have to buy one of them things, just too handy.... ;D

GOLDEN RULE : The guy with the gold, makes the rules.

Offline dad2nine

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Re: 36 inch white oak
« Reply #10 on: April 05, 2007, 08:24:08 PM »
As said earlier, log positioning is critical(placing the log where the complete 28 inches+ of blade can be effectively used. This is done usually by lowering the backstops a bit and clamping the log against them.

When Im workin the bigguns, I position the log without the blade on. By slowly running the head forward without the blade on, you can get an optimum log  postion and figure just how low you can go without any knotching or which knott is gonna give you greif. 

;D

You got it, put the log on the mill, run the head through the log without any blade, this will let you know where it's hitting, mark those spots with a lumber crayon and trim with a chain saw. It's usually the flat metal piece on the blade guides that hits and sometimes the top of the head. I thought about grinding those blades guides down but figured and extra inch or two was not worth it.

Once the head clears the log, throw a blade on and saw away. But if you put the  covers back on you loose about 2 inches and all is fruitless. The fasteners protrude on the inside where you cutting. shhh... when working with big logs, I run without the guards.

The ideal sized log to QS on my LT40 is about 24 ~ 26" diameter BIG END. I wished I could split the pith of a 36" diameter log, but it's not going to happen with my mill, atleast not without some major modification. I think I need a bigger mill, not an LT70, but something that will split the pith on a 60" hickory. I think I may be dreaming  ::)

Offline Part_Timer

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Re: 36 inch white oak
« Reply #11 on: April 06, 2007, 02:35:33 PM »
The wife and I cut a 35" red oak on the LT15 we had.  it was a long day and took some doing  but anything is possible with enough "want to". 
You shouldn't have any problems doing it on your mill.
Peterson 8" ATS.
The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary.

Offline Handy Andy

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Re: 36 inch white oak
« Reply #12 on: April 06, 2007, 08:58:03 PM »
  I cut some really big logs with my MP32.  I put the small end on the saw head end, used the winch to turn them till I had it positioned the best way, then just trimmed
off what I had to to get the saw carriage by the log.  Have to be careful with the chainsaw when cutting on the saw, lots of metal, but I got by.  A couple were a little over 36 on the butt end, and my saw only has 32" between the posts.  I got some
really wide boards, had trouble putting them in the barn by my own self, but have
plenty layers on top of them to hold them flat.
My name's Jim, I like wood.

Offline Robert Long

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Re: 36 inch white oak
« Reply #13 on: April 07, 2007, 05:42:12 PM »
brooksmill


Here are a couple of pictures of us cutting a 40" dia. x 12 ft. cottonwood log, you can see it's not a problem because it's perfectly straight.

Robert

Offline Robert Long

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Re: 36 inch white oak
« Reply #14 on: April 07, 2007, 05:46:01 PM »
brooksmill

Sorry, here is the other picture........I must include it as it 's my Grandson Ethan sizing up that 40' er

Robert

Offline toxedo_2000

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Re: 36 inch white oak
« Reply #15 on: April 11, 2007, 10:30:51 PM »
Ho, I like it. I just cut an oak like this yesterday! Nice, so nice !
Toxedo
Toxedo
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