The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:

iDRY Vacuum Kilns


Forestry Forum
Sponsored by:


TimberKing Sawmills



Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Norwood Industries Inc.


Sawmill & Woodlot Magazine



Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

Michigan Firewood, your BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

FARMA


Council Tool

Baker Products

ECHO-Bearcat

iDRY Wood Lumber Vacuum Drying for everyon

Baltic Abrasives Technologies Nyle Kiln Dry Systems




Author Topic: Learning to hunt  (Read 4346 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline maestro

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 76
  • Age: 50
  • Location: St. Louis Missouri
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Learning to hunt
« on: November 05, 2008, 05:53:18 PM »
Almost embarrassed to post this but since you're all pretty decent about most things I thought I'd try.  I don't hunt, never had the opportunity to learn, and would like to try it.  My dad wasn't what you would call an outdoorsman so I had to figure out fishing on my own.  That is fairly simple and doesn't involve firearms.  Now, I've shot before and enjoy that...it's just been a while. Where do grownups go who want to "learn" to hunt? 

I don't even know what I'd like to start with and I know that determines many factors.  My biggest positive factor has been getting a degree in Conservation.  Opened my eyes to many things over the last several months.  Anyway, all help or guidance would be appreciated.  Guess I just want to be a bit more manly...lol.
For in the true nature of things, if we rightly consider, every green tree is far more glorious than if it were made of gold and silver.  Martin Luther

Offline ADAMINMO

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 659
  • Age: 42
  • Location: ellington,mo
  • Gender: Male
  • Today is gonna be another one of those days!!
    • Share Post
Re: Learning to hunt
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2008, 05:58:17 PM »
First thing you need to do is go through a Hunter Safty Course. Most conservation depts can help you find a place to go take it. Then you need to watch the hunting channel religiously. Next you can subscribe to the Missouri Conservationist. It is free and you will learn alot from it. If you can afford it try to go on a guided hunt sometime. The guides can teach you alot. But ... I bet you have a friend that is an avid hunter and would be glad to "show you the ropes". If I was closer I would help you get it figured out.

Offline Norm

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 7654
  • Age: 62
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Learning to hunt
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2008, 06:01:47 PM »
I was in the same situation, my Dad neither hunted nor fished. I grew up reading all the outdoor magazines I could and best I can tell is learned it from trial and error from there. In your situation I'd look to see if you have an Issac Walton league nearby. They have hunter gun safety classes and will teach all ages how to shoot. After learning the basics of gun safety you can see if they have any mentors that would be willing to show you the ropes of hunting. If you were closer I'd be happy to give you some hands on lessons. I think hunting is an endangered sport that all of us who enjoy it should be teaching those that don't but would like to know how.

Fur fish and game is a great periodical that has good tips on how to. Sports afield and outdoor life should also be available at your local library. Good luck and please ask any questions you might have. :)

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7931
  • Age: 83
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Learning to hunt
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2008, 07:30:41 PM »
Ditto! to the above. Join your local Sportsman' Clubs; take hunter safety classes, read outdoor magazines and books on hunting that interests you. Let your intertests be known and often a mentoor will come forward to help you out.

If you have an interest in deer hnting, Deer & Deer Hunting magazine is excellent reading for the beginner and seasoned deer hunter. Then just go, every hunt is a learning experience.
~Ron

Offline Radar67

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 3912
  • Age: 153
  • Location: Collins/Seminary, MS
  • Gender: Male
  • Cuttin Wood Now For My House Later.
    • Share Post
    • Stewart Photography
Re: Learning to hunt
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2008, 07:31:27 PM »
Definitely take the hunter education course in your state. Plan to start small, as in squirrels or such. You can get easily discouraged by starting with deer. Use your squirrel or rabbit outings to look for deer sign and watch what the deer are doing in your area.

If you can find a friend who hunts, that will be your best choice. Personally, I'm not to fond of guided hunts.
"A man's time is the most valuable gift he can give another." TOM

If he can cling to his Blackberry, I can cling to my guns... Me

This will kill you, that will kill you, heck...life will kill you, but you got to live it!

"The man who can comprehend the why, can create the how." SFC J

Online beenthere

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 26932
  • Location: Southern Wisconsin, USA
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Learning to hunt
« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2008, 08:59:38 PM »
And I'd throw in, that I think one needs to have a desire to eat what he hunts.  :)
I like venison, so I hunt the deer. I've lost a taste for squirrel (don't fix 'em like Mom used to  :) ), so I don't hunt them. Wife won't eat rabbit (something about the soft eyes.. ::) ::) ) so i don't hunt rabbit.

Do you like wild meat?  If so, then follow the other great suggestions. If not, find someone who does, and hunt for them.  ;D ;D

But hunting is great, and I enjoy it a lot.
south central Wisconsin
 It may be that my sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others

Offline okie

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 435
  • Age: 39
  • Location: oklahoma
  • Gender: Male
  • Sawing lumber for our house
    • Share Post
Re: Learning to hunt
« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2008, 12:39:34 AM »
Definitely take the hunter education course in your state. Plan to start small, as in squirrels or such. You can get easily discouraged by starting with deer. Use your squirrel or rabbit outings to look for deer sign and watch what the deer are doing in your area.

If you can find a friend who hunts, that will be your best choice. Personally, I'm not to fond of guided hunts.
Ditto.
Your best friend here is time in the woods. If small game is plentifull in your area it is imo the best place to start. Many animals follow the same habits, observe closely. Examine all animal sign you find in the woods, if you dont know what it is bring a camera and take photos and do internet searches, as the signs that animals leave are what tells you what that particular animal is doing/ feeding on etc.
This is the most enjoyable part of hunting for me. Nearly anyone can go into the woods given the right situation and harvest the game theyre after, that is a very small part of the whole picture. The learning part is the most fun, imo, and what will seperate a hunter from an opertunist.
I like hunting with a squirrel dog, I enjoy watching dogs work and it gets me into the woods in a situation that does not require my full attention to be on hunting squirrels.
 While my dog is doing his thing, I am nosing around, finding sign and trying to decifer it. When the dog gets treed, I do my part and at the end of the trip I leave with a mess of meat for the kitchen, a happy dog, and hopefully an education.
My dad used to try to teach me to "see", not just look at whats in front of you , but to see everything in the picture. Its amazing what one will overlook if he's not paying attention.
If I were you, I would read up on your local game laws and seasons, purchase a second hand 20 ga shotgun and no 5 shells, and hit the woods for squirrel and rabbit. Take it slow and dont be too focused on taking game right away. I would do more observing than shooting for a good while.
I am excited for you. My early years in the woods hunting and traping are some of my happiest  memories.
Good Luck.
Morgan
Striving to create a self sustaining homestead and lifestyle for my family and myself.

Offline ely

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 2700
  • Age: 51
  • Location: atoka okla.
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Learning to hunt
« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2008, 08:07:39 AM »
i know i am a bit far from you, but if you would like to come down to my house this fall i would be happy to take you hunting and teach you what i believe to be the correct way to hunt. we can hunt whatever animals you like. my boys aint to picky about what we hunt. i was lucky as my dad and whole family on both sides were /are avid hunters.
you can watch the hunting channel as adam stated but as far as i am concerned it is basically entertainment. nothing will replace being in the woods with someone that enjoys what they do.

Offline WDH

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 28006
  • Age: 65
  • Location: Perry, GA
  • Gender: Male
  • April 1998 - August 2008
    • Share Post
    • hamsleyhardwood.com
Re: Learning to hunt
« Reply #8 on: November 06, 2008, 08:28:55 AM »
I agree with Beenthere.  If you take an game animal, I believe that you are obligated to utilize it for food, or obligated to take it to someone who will.  Killing game animals just for the sport is very unsporting in my book.

I wish you great success.  I too am excited for you.  Keep us posted!
Woodmizer LT40HDD35, John Deere 2155, Kubota M5640SU, Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln, and a passion for all things with leafs, twigs, and bark.  hamsleyhardwood.com

Offline rbhunter

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 366
  • Age: 55
  • Gender: Male
  • I'm new!
    • Share Post
Re: Learning to hunt
« Reply #9 on: November 06, 2008, 04:38:33 PM »
My father did not hunt so I learned from others and the hunter safety course along with magazines. Learning about hunting is an ongoing process. I have also learned from reading magazines and also from talking to others. One of the best ways is to take what you know and get out and hunt. You will learn from what goes right and what goes wrong. When you see wildlife make a mental note of the time of day and what they were doing. Talk to others about what you have experienced. Spend time practicing with guns or bows. If you are going to deer hunt shoot your deer rifle and make sure it is sighted in. Another good idea is possible to get a little 22 with a scope to be able to practice more shooting a rifle, or use it with open sights if your deer gun does not have a scope.

"Said the robin to the sparrow, I wonder why it must be, these anxious human beings rush around and worry so?"
"Said the sparrow to the robin, Friend I think it must be, they have no heavenly father, such as cares for you and me."
author unknown. Used to hang above parents fireplace.

Offline semologger

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1018
  • Age: 41
  • Location: doniphan mo
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Learning to hunt
« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2008, 11:32:08 PM »
As far as you going squirrel hunting dont worry about it. When you start deer hunting they will be climing up the tree you are sitting in. :D. I say every year i am going to take my 22 for squirrle when i am deer hunting. They will drive you crazy.

Offline stumpy

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 926
  • Age: 66
  • Location: Pewaukee, WI
  • Gender: Male
  • I feel alot more like I do now than I did before
    • Share Post
    • Rustic-woodfurniture/Stumpy's Wood Works
Re: Learning to hunt
« Reply #11 on: November 09, 2008, 07:18:39 AM »
Everything that has been said is valid and valuable info.  Especially what Beenthere said.  Eat what you shoot.  I would also add, that no one can teach you everything you need to know.  You just gotta spend time in the woods.  The other thing is,  Learn with a single shot or at the very least, a manual (pump or bolt).  Not only are they more accurate, they cause you to aim and make sure of your shot.  Too many people learn with a semi-automatic and just shoot till it's empty.  I tell the young ones, "one shot one kill" should always be your goal.  If you do that, you will get more animals and less wounded ones.
Lastly, learn to enjoy the total hunt.  If you can't get any enjoyment out of hunting and being outdoors unless you kill something, find another sport.
Woodmizer LT30, NHL785 skidsteer, IH 444 tractor

Offline WildDog

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 981
  • Age: 54
  • Location: Glen Innes NSW Aust
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Learning to hunt
« Reply #12 on: November 10, 2008, 06:48:27 AM »
Hi Maestro, no need to be embarassed, it is way more preferable to ask questions 1st before going out there blasting away, running the risk of wounding animals, all hunters had to learn somewhere.

I have always liked being in the bush and fortunately have a job that allows this, including the chance to hunt. I learn't from living on my uncles farm, when i was young he would give me 1 .22 cal short and a singleshot Lithgow .22 open sight rifle, before I could hunt with the pump action i had to come home with a rabbit every day for what seemed like months. I recall slidding up on my belly through the burrs and thistles on numerous occassions just to get the dominant buck rabbit of his mound, I really learn't to place my shots correctly. I recently bought an old Lithgow for $50 to start my 2 1/2 year old son of with when he gets old enough, I can't wait.

Time spent in the bush getting to know and respect your prey by observing, tracking and stalking without a firearm is a good start, know the anatomy of your prey and correct target points eg head shots, front on and side, heart and lung side on and quartering away. Head shots in different species don't differ much, front on usually take a cross from the ear across to the eye, side on headshot between the butt of the ear and eye. Side on for dear I usually take a point alongside the elbow, animals do differ, downunder with the wilddogs the heart sits real low in the chest cavity and hunting feral Billy goats the boss of the horn can get in the way. At home unless a dear is on the run I prefer to take them all with head shots so its not as messy when field dressing. Downunder we don't tend to shoot from trees so I can't comment on bullet placement in this situation however at work when shooting from above in helicopters our shots are between the shoulder blades.

My 16 and 14yr old boys have reverted back to a .17 cal 1000fps airifle for their rabbit shooting, nice and cheap.
If you start feeling "Blue" ...breath    JD 5510 86hp 4WD loader Lucas 827, Pair of Husky's 372xp, 261 & Stihl 029

Offline underdog

  • Full Member x2
  • ***
  • Posts: 121
    • Share Post
Re: Learning to hunt
« Reply #13 on: November 10, 2008, 09:56:25 AM »
The kill and the care after will take some learning. Best done with someone who knows how.
Where to aim on big game to bring them down quick and not waist alot of the good meat.
Gutting and skinning is another special area.
Then you have to think like a butcher.
Those three things are best learned with someone with experience.

Offline Weekend_Sawyer

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 3557
  • Age: 58
  • Location: Laurel, MD
  • Gender: Male
  • Jack of all trades, master of fun
    • Share Post
Re: Learning to hunt
« Reply #14 on: November 10, 2008, 01:36:37 PM »

 I have been hunting and butchering for many, many years. Once you pull the trigger it gets pretty messy from there ut the rewards are worth it. I enjoy venisin more than any other meat.

A couple of years ago a buddy gave me this DVD I highly reccomend it.

https://www3.dgif.virginia.gov/estore/proddetail.asp?prod=VW250

for me field dressing is always much more messier and if some one who knows can show you it would be best.

Jon
Imagine, Me a Tree Farmer.
Jon, Appalachian American Wannabe. ... and it looks like my dream will come true!

Offline maestro

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 76
  • Age: 50
  • Location: St. Louis Missouri
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Learning to hunt
« Reply #15 on: November 12, 2008, 03:51:57 PM »
Thanks for all the info so far...much more to learn!  Spending time in the woods is easy for me, I'd be out there no matter what.  I'm planning my free time around hikes and volunteer work that gets me out in the Ozarks.  I am thinking though that some small game hunts might be my best starting point.  Birds too, I think.  Had the opportunity to try some goose this past weekend and loved it!  Will probably invest in a used .22 and see what I can find in a 20 gauge as well.  There is a good range close to home where I can do target and clays almost any time.  Get some practise in and take the safety course soon then see where we go.  Since squirrel season is so long, that would be a reasonable place to start.  I'll have to learn to dress them myself and understand about the glands.  Maybe my neighbor will take me under his wing, so to speak.  lol.  Keep the tips coming, the info has been great!  How do you find a reputable used rifle dealer? 
For in the true nature of things, if we rightly consider, every green tree is far more glorious than if it were made of gold and silver.  Martin Luther

Offline ely

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 2700
  • Age: 51
  • Location: atoka okla.
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Learning to hunt
« Reply #16 on: November 12, 2008, 04:00:34 PM »
sometimes that is about as hard as finding a good lawyer.
you better have a friend that knows something about rifles, or be prepared to learn fast. learning sometimes = money.
if you find something at the pawn shop that you want some info/opinions on then post it on here. we can help as best we can.

Offline Radar67

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 3912
  • Age: 153
  • Location: Collins/Seminary, MS
  • Gender: Male
  • Cuttin Wood Now For My House Later.
    • Share Post
    • Stewart Photography
Re: Learning to hunt
« Reply #17 on: November 12, 2008, 06:19:18 PM »
If you are going to purchase a shotgun, new or used, I would recommend getting a 12 gauge. The 20s are nice, I have one, but there is a much better selection of shot for the 12, especially if you get into goose and duck hunting. You have to use steel shot for federal game birds and the 20 is severely limited there.

As for the reputable used gun dealer, consider this. A good, brand new shotgun can be had for under $250. I saw a Mosseburg 500 12 gauge that will hold up to a 3 inch shell at Gander Mountain a few days ago. You can also pick up a new 22 semi-auto from Walmart for under $125. It depends on your budget, but new would be a better option, then you would not have to worry about a good, used dealer.
"A man's time is the most valuable gift he can give another." TOM

If he can cling to his Blackberry, I can cling to my guns... Me

This will kill you, that will kill you, heck...life will kill you, but you got to live it!

"The man who can comprehend the why, can create the how." SFC J

Offline maestro

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 76
  • Age: 50
  • Location: St. Louis Missouri
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Learning to hunt
« Reply #18 on: November 12, 2008, 06:29:01 PM »
As far as a 12 gauge, my dad has a pump with adjustable choke (what that's for, I dunno...) and I actually inherited a double barrel version with outside hammers.  Acme brand, makes me think of the roadrunner.  lol.
I've never shot the double, would it be worth taking to a gunsmith for a checkup?
For in the true nature of things, if we rightly consider, every green tree is far more glorious than if it were made of gold and silver.  Martin Luther

Offline Radar67

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 3912
  • Age: 153
  • Location: Collins/Seminary, MS
  • Gender: Male
  • Cuttin Wood Now For My House Later.
    • Share Post
    • Stewart Photography
Re: Learning to hunt
« Reply #19 on: November 12, 2008, 07:18:22 PM »
The adjustable choke sounds like what we call a poly choke. If you removed the outside portion, you would find the barrel has been slit into fourths. This adjustable choke allows you to change the pellet pattern. A full choke gives you a tight pattern, where a modified or improved cylinder widens the pattern. Modified is usually used for birds.

The newer shotguns have changeable choke tubs that are removed from the barrel with a special wrench.

Having a gunsmith check the double out is a good idea. I have seen people test fire old guns by clamping them to a table, tying a string to the trigger, and stepping behind cover before pulling the string. I would not recommend this though. You could end up blowing the gun up if it is in poor condition.  :(
"A man's time is the most valuable gift he can give another." TOM

If he can cling to his Blackberry, I can cling to my guns... Me

This will kill you, that will kill you, heck...life will kill you, but you got to live it!

"The man who can comprehend the why, can create the how." SFC J

Offline thecfarm

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 27862
  • Age: 57
  • Location: Chesterville,Maine
  • Gender: Male
  • If I don't do it,it don't get done
    • Share Post
Re: Learning to hunt
« Reply #20 on: November 13, 2008, 07:41:55 AM »
Ask around for a good gun smith.They are just like chainsaw dealers.Some are real good and some are real bad.Have fun with your new hobby.Respect other people land that you are walking on.Leave it just the way it was when you went into to it.
Model 6020-20hp Manual Thomas bandsaw,TC40A 4wd 40 hp New Holland tractor, 450 Norse Winch, Heatmor 400 OWB,YCC 1978-79

Offline ely

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 2700
  • Age: 51
  • Location: atoka okla.
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Learning to hunt
« Reply #21 on: November 13, 2008, 08:51:59 AM »
yes i say have the double checked out. be careful the man does not run the quality of your gun down and then offer to buy it from you. alot of older guns are still servicable but it pays in the long run to be sure.


Share via delicious Share via digg Share via facebook Share via linkedin Share via pinterest Share via reddit Share via stumble Share via tumblr Share via twitter

xx
Learning to bow hunt.

Started by Weekend_Sawyer on The Outdoor Board

13 Replies
2939 Views
Last post October 30, 2006, 01:16:49 PM
by Raphael
xx
Hunt something that can hunt you.

Started by Texas Ranger on The Outdoor Board

14 Replies
2067 Views
Last post April 30, 2005, 09:01:22 AM
by florida
xx
Where to hunt

Started by J Beyer on Travel Guide

3 Replies
1390 Views
Last post December 28, 2002, 01:35:31 AM
by ADfields
xx
The hunt is over

Started by Outlaw on Sawmills and Milling

13 Replies
1227 Views
Last post October 01, 2018, 09:03:40 PM
by Outlaw
 


Powered by EzPortal