The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:

iDRY Vacuum Kilns


Forestry Forum
Sponsored by:


TimberKing Sawmills



Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Norwood Industries Inc.




Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

Michigan Firewood, your BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

FARMA


Baker Products

ECHO-Bearcat

iDRY Wood Lumber Vacuum Drying for everyon

Baltic Abrasives Technologies Nyle Kiln Dry Systems




Author Topic: Planning your last cut first story  (Read 6019 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Jim_Rogers

  • Board Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7286
  • Age: 66
  • Location: Georgetown, MA
  • Gender: Male
  • Keep your chisels sharp.
    • Share Post
    • jrsawmill.com
Re: Planning your last cut first story
« Reply #20 on: July 14, 2012, 10:44:20 AM »
The subject title is misleading, as the mispelled word throws one off.
The base word is "plan" not "plane", as in 'removing wood'.

Should read "Planning".  Will need an admin to correct it if it is of any importance, which it may not be. ;)

Title corrected thanks for the pointer. Jim Rogers
Whatever you do, have fun doing it!
Woodmizer 1994 LT30HDG24 with 6' Bed Extension

Offline Chilterns

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 76
    • Share Post
Re: Planning your last cut first story
« Reply #21 on: July 15, 2012, 02:49:31 AM »
Hi Jim,

This is an excellent topic and Piston is quite correct to bump this one back up to the top of the pile again.

Here is the challenge !

How do you support and saw a curved tree to produce a book matched pair of cruck blades or feature curved braces ?

What effect will the release of internal stresses in the log have on the flatness of the sawn face ? Does this matter ?

Chilterns

Offline Jim_Rogers

  • Board Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7286
  • Age: 66
  • Location: Georgetown, MA
  • Gender: Male
  • Keep your chisels sharp.
    • Share Post
    • jrsawmill.com
Re: Planning your last cut first story
« Reply #22 on: July 15, 2012, 08:33:46 AM »
Yesterday, my logger came in with some logs. In the junk pile he placed two curved logs. One is small and I may pull it out to make a pair of curved braces. One is longer and bigger that may make a good cruck log.

Recently I had a timber framer from Cape Cod contact me that he may need some cruck blades. So I'm going to pull this log out and saw it up.

I'll take step by step pictures when I do them.

In the past, I cut these:



What you do is place the log on your mill with the end towards the hitch or operator in a position so that the blade will enter the log.

The log has to be fairly level. Both ends and the middle have to be off the table the same amount. When I say ends I mean both end pith distances have to be the same off the table. So you may need to shim up the small end with a board or two in order to get it right. Then you shim the bend in the middle a little as well so that the pith is level.

You may need to put a board up as a fence along your log rests, as well. This board may get cut so don't use a really good board, something you don't care about and will be thrown away afterwards.

Next, you don't "hard" clamp the log. You just start sawing it as it sits.
You are going to cut on the top surface of the log, just enough to give you a nice opening face all the way down the log. You may even cut a little deeper if you need to.
But it all depends on how easy the log will pivot.

 As you cut down through the log you'll get to a point where you can't continue because the outer blade guide are going to hit the log due to the bend. Stop sawing. Stop the blade from moving. Leave it in the log, and use your peavy and pivot the log around until the blade guide will clear the part it wouldn't clear before.
Once the log is clear finish sawing it all the way to the end.

You may need to plan your last cut first in order to get your finish pieces to be the correct thickness for your brace stock or whatever you're using it for.

I believe in the above examples these were 4" thick. So I planned on having the log cut to be 8 1/8" thick. Or maybe I planned on having two 4 1/8" thick pieces of brace stock. So the finished cut on the second side of my log would have been 8 3/8" off the table. So I'd have 1/8" for the saw cut to separate them.

After you have one side cut flat you flip the log over and make the second cut doing the same thing. But now it's much easier as you have the flat sawn surface against your log table rails. And the log will pivot much easier.

I have done this without stopping the saw. We just set it going forward real slow and pivoted the log with a peavy as it was being cut. You'll have to make sure you can completely pivot it before you start. If the log catches on the rail dogs you may have a problem. You can set the log on some boards to lift it up above the rail dogs so that it can pivot out enough. If this is so, then you'll have to add the board thicknesses to your scale so that you end up with the right thicknesses of the finish pieces.
You need to plan it out carefully, and write it all down on paper so you don't forget to add it all up to come out right.

Once you have both sides cut flat, you cut it once done the middle separating the two halves.

If you plan it right you can do it all with just three cuts. But that all depends on the size of the logs and your finish thicknesses.

As I said I'll take pictures next time when I do it.

Jim Rogers
Whatever you do, have fun doing it!
Woodmizer 1994 LT30HDG24 with 6' Bed Extension

Offline Jim_Rogers

  • Board Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 7286
  • Age: 66
  • Location: Georgetown, MA
  • Gender: Male
  • Keep your chisels sharp.
    • Share Post
    • jrsawmill.com
Re: Planning your last cut first story
« Reply #23 on: July 15, 2012, 08:43:01 AM »

What effect will the release of internal stresses in the log have on the flatness of the sawn face ? Does this matter ?


We didn't find any stress that I can remember in these two eastern white pine pieces.

I have done the same thing with curved cherry branches and curved cherry logs, but I don't remember any huge stress in them either.

I don't think it matters, much.

When the timber framer gets these pieces if they have distorted some he'll just plane one side or both sides flat.

Here is a picture of one of them in place in the frame:





Whatever you do, have fun doing it!
Woodmizer 1994 LT30HDG24 with 6' Bed Extension


Share via delicious Share via digg Share via facebook Share via linkedin Share via pinterest Share via reddit Share via stumble Share via tumblr Share via twitter

xx
Saw cut planning....

Started by mrcaptainbob on Sawmills and Milling

5 Replies
1812 Views
Last post March 10, 2010, 05:27:10 AM
by Chuck White
xx
Planning My Mill Set Up

Started by Dana Stanley on Woodland Mills

11 Replies
1313 Views
Last post September 12, 2018, 06:50:21 AM
by Dana Stanley
xx
New guy with 9 months of planning to do

Started by Countrybiggen on General Board

6 Replies
647 Views
Last post October 16, 2016, 06:44:34 AM
by Roxie
xx
Planning an ELK hunt

Started by maple flats on The Outdoor Board

12 Replies
2803 Views
Last post October 19, 2007, 11:44:03 PM
by semologger
 


Powered by EzPortal