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Author Topic: Seperating water from hydraulic fluid  (Read 41390 times)

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Offline beenthere

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Re: Seperating water from hydraulic fluid
« Reply #40 on: June 28, 2013, 01:01:34 PM »
popeye
What was the price of gas in Nov. 2010 ? 

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Offline clww

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Re: Seperating water from hydraulic fluid
« Reply #41 on: June 28, 2013, 08:02:56 PM »
No idea where popeye1 is from, but I just looked up the price from 27 NOV 2010 in VA Beach, which was at $2.71. The average in the city today is $3.37.

After working with hydraulics on the aircraft in the USN for over 20 years, my educated opinion is dispose of all hydraulic fluid contaminated with water. I would also flush the system extensively, and replace all filters at least once. Water in any hydraulic systems opens a BIG can of worms.
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Offline Banjo picker

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Re: Seperating water from hydraulic fluid
« Reply #42 on: June 29, 2013, 08:45:14 AM »
   that post is coming up on 3 years old.    ;)
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Offline Al_Smith

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Re: Seperating water from hydraulic fluid
« Reply #43 on: June 29, 2013, 08:02:15 PM »
 :D Might be 3 years old but it still applies .Once it's contaminated it only good to burn ,not as a lubricant and certainly not under pressure in a hydraulics system .

However for the frugal it might work as bar lube for a chainsaw. Homoginized hydraulic oil and water  couldn't be any worse than black as tar old crankcase oil I shouldn't think .

Offline julio

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Re: Seperating water from hydraulic fluid
« Reply #44 on: June 29, 2013, 08:30:52 PM »
i have funnel that have a filter made inside that will serparates water out of fuel and yes it does work  it is made by Racor
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Offline mad murdock

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Re: Seperating water from hydraulic fluid
« Reply #45 on: June 30, 2013, 09:07:43 AM »
I will second the filter idea.  The hydraulic shop here has a water separator for hydraulic oil, basically they transfer contaminated oil through a special filter that is a available which separates water, but oil can pass through, and it comes out clean.  After it catches a certain amount of water, the filter plugs( similar to water filters on diesels).
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Offline steamsawyer

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Re: Seperating water from hydraulic fluid
« Reply #46 on: July 03, 2013, 04:42:31 PM »
Hey woodbowl,

I know this is an old thread, but I was wondering if you ever found what was causing your problem.

I am assuming that you were referring to a tractor style backhoe where the hydraulic oil is stored in the transmission and rear axle cases. If so the first thing to look for is a torn or missing shifter boot. In most applications there will be some type of breather too, maybe under the seat. Check to see that it is not damaged. Any problem like this will let rain water or condensation in.

Usually everyday running will heat things up to drive the moisture out. If the machine is only used a little at the time and doesn't  get the chance to heat up you are likely to have a recurring problem with the water.

Alan
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Offline Al_Smith

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Re: Seperating water from hydraulic fluid
« Reply #47 on: July 04, 2013, 06:26:21 PM »
Once the water becomes entrapped in the oil it's amost like it's homoginized .I'm not so certain you could let it set and the oil float to the top .

Now of course it will drain out of the transmission or perhaps the final drive of a dozer or something of that nature.Once it gets well stirred up in a hydraulic system though I think it stays there forever until you drain the system .

Offline DDDfarmer

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Re: Seperating water from hydraulic fluid
« Reply #48 on: July 29, 2013, 07:10:11 PM »
Our hydraulic contractor has a combination unit of pumps-heaters-and multible filters.  I have seen milky dirty oil go in and clean turbine oil come out.  Yet he will only do that if it is going back into a unaltered system. 
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Offline BLink

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Re: Seperating water from hydraulic fluid
« Reply #49 on: January 07, 2018, 01:24:48 PM »
Has anyone added Sea Foam Hydra Trans Tune or any other additive to a hydraulic system to remove the moisture from the valve bodies where it freezes and will not drain out?
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Offline Corley5

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Re: Seperating water from hydraulic fluid
« Reply #50 on: January 07, 2018, 05:20:53 PM »
  I tried it in an attempt to keep the Greisen valve body on my Tree Farmer forwarder from freezing up.  It didn't make any difference.  The machine had to be started and allowed to warm up for the valve to thaw.  You could watch the snow melt on the oil line going into the valve body and tell when it was going to work ;D  It was that way when I sold it.
  I did use it in another machine when the reservoir cap was left off and the fluid got milky.  The fluid cleared up but it may have been from heat in the system.  If it wasn't an old fashioned gear pump I'd have changed the oil ;) ;D  I've got a couple cans on the shelf in garage.  They've been there a couple years now. 
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Offline Trahlin

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Re: Seperating water from hydraulic fluid
« Reply #51 on: January 07, 2018, 10:07:35 PM »
New oil, new clean up filters (short term), and change filters after a days work.  Most filters are have a cellulose (paper) media.  Water destroys the filter.  Use the clean up filters to trap the remaining water from the system.  Remember water and steel donít play well together.  Hydraulics are based on tight tolerances, and finely machined metal surfaces.  Pitted metal surfaces tear up seals and o rings.  It is a never ending cycle, if you choose the cheap route.  It hurts the wallet now, but will play out better in the long run.

This advice is based upon my career as a farm and industrial machinery dealer.  Pay now, or pay much bigger later.  I feel your pain!
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Offline HuckFin

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Re: Seperating water from hydraulic fluid
« Reply #52 on: January 10, 2018, 05:55:50 PM »
Where I live we get a lot of moisture in the air during the winter so when I had my Case 580B (parked outside) I found out that if I drained the water off at the hydraulic tank drain plug before starting it the first time in the spring the milky oil problem went away.

Offline mike_belben

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Re: Seperating water from hydraulic fluid
« Reply #53 on: January 15, 2018, 12:16:10 PM »
Any oil using an organic plant based stock is gonna be hygrosopic, itll absorb the water particles that it comes in contact with through condensate in vented crankcases and tanks etc. 

The easiest removal is by heat and vaccuum.  I have done a few thousand gallons of waste vegetable oil that could have had fully seperated or emulsified water.  Settling time is your friend, as its very inneficient to try to remove large quatities of water by decanting.   Let sit in the sun for a time and without any disturbing of the vessel, open cap and draw the cleanest oil off the top with a suction tube rig.  Stop way before you get near the bottom as itll draw a vein of trash up from inches below the suction tube. 

Really filthy stuff can be settled in another tank or go into the decanter.  A very simple rig would be a 55gal drum on blocks over some coals.  There needs to be a valve welded into the bottom to let air in, and a hose out the top to a vaccuum pump.  You heat it up a while under vacuum.  After an hour or so there will be moisture in the headspace of the drum.  Open the bottom air valve and the vacuum pump will let it burble in while suctiom that moisture out the top.  Youll want to make a condensor jar on the the suction line so it doesnt all go into the vacuum pump oil.  A pickle jar inside a bucket of water works great.  Dont fill your drum past 2/3s or youll be sucking up oil too.  Also welding some verticle angle iron, rebar or flat strip from bottom to top will help keep the drum from caving in, it doesnt take much.

If you added a gear pump circulator loop through a bank of filters in parallel with sequentially finer stages youd have you a reconditioning rig.

40 gallons of perfectly clean looking oil will typically have a beer can worth of water dissolved into it fyi. 
Revelation 3:20

Offline Gearbox

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Re: Seperating water from hydraulic fluid
« Reply #54 on: January 15, 2018, 07:53:35 PM »
Didn't think of this until today when I was trying to get all the wet oil out of my skidder . Jacked the cylinders up to top and down to bottom and pumped all the oil out of the trans. then put in 2 gallon and pumped that out . I use the spoon test . Take a small teaspoon put a little oil in it and heat it with a Bic . Any water trapped in the oil will boil off as bubbles and can be seen . Try it next time you think you may have wet oil .
A bunch of chainsaws a BT6870 processer , TC 5 International track skidder and not near enough time

Offline mike_belben

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Re: Seperating water from hydraulic fluid
« Reply #55 on: January 16, 2018, 04:06:46 PM »
Yeah, Lotta people call that hot pan test or hpt.  Its a good quick check for dissolved water.   bit more accurate if you smear some oil on the spoon or pan or in my case scrap of sheetmetal, then heat till it just starts to smoke a few whisps.  Now splash on a cap full of oil and look for the bubbles. 

If you start heating oil direct the oil itself will start to boil eventually and you can think its water.  The trick is to be above 212 yet below like 400 or so
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Offline Randy88

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Re: Seperating water from hydraulic fluid
« Reply #56 on: February 15, 2018, 08:58:00 PM »
Really old thread, but the best way to determine the amount of water in any oil is to have it sampled and run the tests in a lab, they'll give the percentage of water in the oil along with all the wear metals and silica [dirt] and micro minerals in the oil, gives an overall condition report of my machine's internal shape of the components.     

As for settling out the water, most hydraulic oil won't release all the water, the additives in the oil with encapsulate the water and not release it.     

There are water filter carts out there that will take a large portion of water out of the oil, but the filters are not cheap, and you need large volumes of oil to justify the cart and filter setup costs, most implements can't justify the cost of those units, let alone any individual.     

My advice is to keep the backhoe inside under cover whenever possible, change oil often and put a set of filters on the system, if for nothing else, to clean out wear metals and clean the oil as it flows through the system.         


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