The Forestry Forum is sponsored in part by:

iDRY Vacuum Kilns


Forestry Forum
Sponsored by:


TimberKing Sawmills



Toll Free 1-800-582-0470

LogRite Tools



Norwood Industries Inc.




Your source for Portable Sawmills, Edgers, Resaws, Sharpeners, Setters, Bandsaw Blades and Sawmill Parts

EZ Boardwalk Sawmills. More Saw For Less Money!

STIHLDealers.com sponsored by Northeast STIHL


Woodland Sawmills

Peterson Swingmills

 KASCO SharpTech WoodMaxx Blades

Turbosawmill

Sawmill Exchange

Michigan Firewood, your BRUTE FORCE Authorized Dealer

FARMA


Council Tool

Baker Products

ECHO-Bearcat

iDRY Wood Lumber Vacuum Drying for everyon

Baltic Abrasives Technologies Nyle Kiln Dry Systems




Author Topic: Yote hunting  (Read 9895 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Reddog

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
  • Location: "nothing here is required" Mi based
  • Gender: Male
  • Forest & Urban woody plant management
    • Share Post
Yote hunting
« on: January 15, 2011, 09:32:40 AM »
I got permission after deer hunting to do some predator control. During deer season I had noticed the yotes where traveling and bedding in both of the swamps on the property.

I picked a very calm snowy mid morning to go out and see what I could pull out of the front swamp. I was on the down wind side of the front swamp. Set up the critter and ecall, got set in a portable blind and started the ecall. After a few minutes started with some distress calls on an open reed, continuing on for around 30 minutes. Then shut every thing off and waited for a 10 or so minutes, nothing. Oh well that is hunting.

Packed up my stuff in the sled and then covered it with a white camo cloth and took the 243 for a little walk down wind to see what might show in the fresh snow. Just a 100yrds over the hill where fresh tracks coming in behind me from way across an open field. They milled around there for while from the looks but then headed back down wind. Walked to the back of the property and watched a dozen or so deer milling around in the pines. Seeing where the yotes had come from helped understand where they are now bedding. I will give it a week and then set up knowing the changes.
It was a wonderful day out. :)

Offline Chris Burchfield

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1036
  • Age: 61
  • Location: 7882 Macon Rd. Cordova TN. 38018
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2011, 05:43:20 PM »
Last year I'd gone deer hunting out there before day light.  It was 9°F.  Nothing was moving, not fur, feathers or wind.  After a couple of hours my feet were getting cold and I'd started the shakes.  Folded and shouldered the blind, picked up the rifle turning around and looking before I walked.  There came a Yote, broad side to me.  Scoped on the trot and dropped him DRT.  Yotes and bobcat are why I don't see cotton tails anymore.
Woodmizer LT40SH W/Command Control; 51HP Cat, Memphis TN.

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 36319
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2011, 06:01:06 PM »
I saw lots of bunny sign, and one in the flesh, and lots of coyote tracts on the woodlot. I need the coyotes to keep them in check. ;D Looked like a barnyard of bunny trails. No deer sign around, we don't have hardly any maybe 3 or 4 in a wide area. We never had high numbers in my area.
Move'n on.

Offline Reddog

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
  • Location: "nothing here is required" Mi based
  • Gender: Male
  • Forest & Urban woody plant management
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2011, 06:06:17 PM »
The only place we see rabbit tracks is around the house and buildings.

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 36319
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2011, 06:10:11 PM »
I used to get one or two behind the house. They have to travel across wide open fields for acres to get there though. Grouse to, they used to fly in for apples and cranberries.
Move'n on.

Offline Autocar

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 2852
  • Location: Twenty five miles southwest of Lima Ohio
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2011, 08:29:09 PM »
One rabbit at my bird feeder but plenty of coyote tracks in the woods. D.N.R. keep selling doe permitts we won't have any deer eather.
Bill

Offline Larry

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5869
  • Age: 70
  • Location: NW Arkansas
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2011, 08:27:55 AM »
When I got out of the service in ‘72 I got a job, but it didn’t pay much.  To supplement I shot and trapped critters in mid Missouri.  Think it must of been spring of ‘73 I sold some yote hides that brought $50 each.  They were so big the buyer called em Colorado wolves.

Wonder what a hide sells for now...50 cents?
Larry, making useful and beautiful things out of the most environmental friendly material on the planet.

We need to insure our customers understand the importance of our craft.

Offline Reddog

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
  • Location: "nothing here is required" Mi based
  • Gender: Male
  • Forest & Urban woody plant management
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2011, 08:39:25 AM »
Find the right buyer around here and they still can bring 25. In the round 5 if you are lucky.

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 36319
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2011, 10:49:27 AM »
A neighbor had a nuisance dog that was always running. That included running in the woods chasing game, which is against the law. Mom's uncle was a trapper and he had a little trap line not far from his house, it was on his own and his cousin's land completely legit. Well, the dog got in the trap and it was a lethal trap. So uncle looked it over and figured it looked a lot like a wolf. He skinned and stretched it and and sold it on the fur trade. The buyers figured it was a timber wolf. The neighbor had been looking for his lost dog and asked uncle if he'd seen it, because he said the dog never leaves home. Uncle said he never seen his dog if it never leaves home. ;) This was probably 30 years ago and worth $200 or more. Beaver at the time, blanket sized, where worth $250 or more.
Move'n on.

Offline Chuck White

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 11728
  • Age: 70
  • Location: Russell, NY (Way Upstate)
  • Gender: Male
  • Sawing Mobile since 2005
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #9 on: January 17, 2011, 08:41:37 AM »
I inquired about yote furs about a week ago.  Not good!

The guy told me $10.00 skinned and stretched.

I told him they would find a ditch first!

I personally would not skin one for less than $25.00.

BUT, We hunt them anyway, sale or no sale! Good exercise and fun too!
~Chuck~
Retired USAF (1989), Retired School Bus Driver (2012), and now a Mobile Sawyer
1995 Wood-Mizer LT40HDG2425 Kohler - Shingle & LapSider, Cooks Cat Claw Sharpener, 4-foot Logrite cant hook.
Basic mechanical skills are all that's required to maintain the Wood-Mizer.
I LOVE MY SAWMILL

Offline doctorb

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4229
  • Age: 67
  • Location: Glyndon, MD
  • Gender: Male
  • Unofficial Team Physician
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #10 on: January 17, 2011, 03:04:04 PM »
We had coyotes move into our county a few years  ago.  Don't remember having them before.  Now, they're gone.  No one has seen, or heard one in a year or more.

While some of my neighbors hunted them, i heard that that can backfire on you with regard to the coyote population.  I was told that, in any given coyote family or group, only the alpha male and the alpha female bear young.  Even if their offspring are sexually mature, they will not mate as long as they are part of that family group.  If the alpha female is killed, then all heck breaks loose, with coyote pups everywhere. 

I was told that this is one of this species' ways of extending its range, as young adults get tired of this "restriction", and strike out on their own.

Is this true?  Can you rid your area of coyotes by hunting or are they just too prolific?

Doctorb
My father once said, "This is my son who wanted to grow up and become a doctor.  So far, he's only become a doctor."

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 36319
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2011, 04:17:08 PM »
The DNR here says that it's adds to the problem by placing a bounty on them. Where I am located I like the balance just fine. There never was a lot of deer where I live. It hasn't got a lot of the winter cover except cedar stands, and those stands are not continuous. Hardwood in winter deep snow and severe cold will not support deer up here. They have to yard up in good wintering ground where they can conserve energy while seeking food with the least effort.
Move'n on.

Offline Reddog

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
  • Location: "nothing here is required" Mi based
  • Gender: Male
  • Forest & Urban woody plant management
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #12 on: January 17, 2011, 04:20:28 PM »
Doc,
I only know of one guy that could rid an area of yotes and that was with traps. As soon as he pulled out, others would move into the area from outside. If they have good a good food supply they are very prolific.

I have never heard what you where told about the alpha dogs. It is a constant battle in the packs for alpha status and they will kill or run off others over it. Hence the old saying Dog eat Dog world.

Donk, What do they mean by adds to the problem?

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 36319
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2011, 06:22:23 PM »
http://www.gov.ns.ca/natr/wildlife/conserva/eastern-coyote.asp

"an eradication program might double their usual 4-year life expectancy (coyotes have been known to live for 19 years in captivity). It has been estimated that in order to overcome this built-in survival mechanism, an eradication program would have to kill over 75% of the coyote population every year for 50 years. In fact, a control program may even increase livestock predation by stimulating females to have larger litters, thus increasing the demand for food during the spring and summer when livestock are most vulnerable.

Despite extensive eradication attempts throughout North America - shooting and chasing with everything from snowmobiles to helicopters, and extensive poisoning campaigns - coyotes have not only held their own but have expanded their range. In Nova Scotia, as elsewhere, coyote populations will be controlled by the amount of available habitat.

Typically, a coyote pair (they often mate for life) will claim and defend a territory of about 50 km2 (20 mi2) in which to hunt and raise their young. This territory will be used by only the one mated pair, but typically it will also support 3-6 young-of-the-year as well as 2 or 3 transients. When the coyote population increases beyond the environment's ability to support it, parasites and density-dependent diseases such as mange and distemper will naturally prune their numbers. colonizing populations may overshoot this carrying capacity for a short time before these natural controls take over."

And Gerry Parker has written an excellent book on our eastern coyotes. He is a research scientist with the Canadian Wildlife Service. Our coyotes are bigger here in the northeast. Also, we have not had them here until the late 50's.

Member Coon in Sask. has been hunting them on bounty and I think he'll tell ya they are just as prolific as ever.
Move'n on.

Offline Reddog

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
  • Location: "nothing here is required" Mi based
  • Gender: Male
  • Forest & Urban woody plant management
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #14 on: January 17, 2011, 06:44:23 PM »
Interesting thanks for the link, don't agree at this point but interesting. :)

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 36319
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #15 on: January 17, 2011, 07:12:32 PM »
All I know is you guys didn't kill off enough of them out there, because we got them now. It's all your fault. :D :D :D

Ask anyone who have seen ours from outside of the NE and they'll tell ya they are different critters. But, maybe you agree on that part. Just saying. ;) Personally I never saw my first coyote until the early 80's as family members where trappers all there adult life. ;) One young feller I knew, about 15 at the time caught quite few in snares in the early eighties and everyone was saying they were causing the deer decline at the time. We were also loosing deer wintering ground due to harvesting, which later became the explanation for deer decline.

Up on my woodlot there was a guy with snares the last few years around near my place and he never caught any and I know there where from 3 to 5 on my place routinely. I could find where a group followed behind one another on fresh snow. Plus their meet and greet howls and yips once in a while. It's funny I only see one at a time though, in the flesh. There's lots of tracks up there now after the hares. I've got too many of them hares.
Move'n on.

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 8011
  • Age: 83
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2011, 08:40:02 PM »
True Story:

The  Governor of California is jogging with his dog along a nature
trail. A coyote jumps out and attacks the Governor's dog, then bites the
Governor.

   1.  The Governor starts to intervene, but reflects upon the movie
"Bambi" and then realizes he should stop because the coyote is only
doing what is natural.

   2.  He calls animal control. Animal Control captures the coyote
and bills the State $200 testing it for diseases and $500 for relocating
it.

   3.  He calls a veterinarian. The vet collects the dead dog and
bills the State $200 testing it for diseases.

   4.  The Governor goes to hospital and spends $3,500 getting checked
for diseases from the coyote and on getting his bite wound bandaged.

   5.  The running trail gets shut down for 6 months while Fish & Game
conducts a $100,000 survey to make sure the area is now free of
dangerous animals.

   6.  The Governor spends $50,000 in state funds implementing a
"coyote awareness program" for residents of the area.

   7.  The State Legislature spends $2 million to study how to better
treat rabies and how to permanently eradicate the disease throughout the
world.

   8.  The Governor's security agent is fired for not stopping the
attack. The State spends $150,000 to hire and train a new agent with
additional special training re: the nature of coyotes.

   9. PETA protests the coyote's relocation and files a $5 million suit
against the State.

Montana :

   The Governor of Montana is jogging with his dog along a nature
trail. A Coyote jumps out and attacks his dog.

   1. The Governor shoots the coyote with his State-issued pistol and
keeps jogging. The Governor has spent $0.50 on a .45 ACP  hollow point
cartridge.

   2. The Buzzards eat the dead coyote.

   And that, my friends, is why California is broke and Montana is not.








~Ron

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 36319
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #17 on: January 17, 2011, 10:08:37 PM »
 :D :D :D 8)
Move'n on.

Offline spencerhenry

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 362
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #18 on: January 18, 2011, 09:12:29 AM »
i too have heard that the more coyotes you kill that the more you will have. personally i think it could be true, in fact i wish it were then i would  have more coyotes to call and shoot.
 last year i got 39 confirmed kills and a couple of others that i am certain died but could not find, or ran across a fence. this year i am at only 16 so far. i have had road kill deer carcasses out for 6 weeks now and have not seen one dog on the bait yet, i got one picture of one at 3:00 am about 2 weeks ago. right now all i have is one fox that is a regular and bald eagles and golden eagles. i hunt the same areas over and over, there are not as many dogs in any of the areas that i hunt this year. last year i would see up to 5 at a time out in a pasture this year only 2 and not very often.

Offline beenthere

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 26932
  • Location: Southern Wisconsin, USA
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #19 on: January 18, 2011, 11:10:14 AM »
Quote
I too have heard that the more coyotes you kill that the more you will have.

I think a lot of this rhetoric comes from those who are anti-hunting and anti-bounty hunting.

south central Wisconsin
 It may be that my sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others

Offline doctorb

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4229
  • Age: 67
  • Location: Glyndon, MD
  • Gender: Male
  • Unofficial Team Physician
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #20 on: January 18, 2011, 12:19:37 PM »
beenthere-

You may be right, but you don't see a lot of groups taking up for this animal.  It's no polar bear, wolf, or grizzly!  I know that some are just anti-hunting, but the biology of this species is unusual.  I may try to look for more in depth info.  Maybe I should read the book that Swamp suggested.
My father once said, "This is my son who wanted to grow up and become a doctor.  So far, he's only become a doctor."

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 36319
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #21 on: January 18, 2011, 01:26:04 PM »
I don't think it's anti-hunting or anti-bounty at all. I believe the ones studying the animals have to find a balance out there. We don't have big lobby for save the coyote foundations in these parts. Nobody with a gun hardly ever bother with them and we have a varmet license for coyote.
Move'n on.

Offline Reddog

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
  • Location: "nothing here is required" Mi based
  • Gender: Male
  • Forest & Urban woody plant management
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #22 on: January 18, 2011, 03:53:32 PM »
I know a few Biologist's and have never had one tell me the way to less canine predators was to not hunt or trap them.
The thing is just like spencerhenry, you can never let up or they rebound and move in from other areas very quickly.

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 36319
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #23 on: January 18, 2011, 04:02:06 PM »
Trouble with coyotes is they are opportunists. If wild prey decline, then they could be in the sheep heard or the chicken coop, or the garbage dump. Shooting them knocks them back, but if there food source is around and you let up, they return. That's the trouble with bounties, once the bounty period is over, back they come. The food is still there. Something I think anyone can agree with. How many do the average hunter shoot? I think it's pretty low because it has not stopped the coyotes. Look at the wolf, we have wipe them out of this region about 150 years ago. And they ain't likely to come back. ;)
Move'n on.

Offline Reddog

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
  • Location: "nothing here is required" Mi based
  • Gender: Male
  • Forest & Urban woody plant management
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #24 on: January 18, 2011, 04:09:49 PM »
Look at the wolf, we have wipe them out of this region about 150 years ago. And they ain't likely to come back. ;)

What makes you say that?

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 36319
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #25 on: January 18, 2011, 04:38:23 PM »
Well, unless someone can resurrect them from the grave. ;D But 'ain't likely' is one of them loose terms. Means it's also remotely possible. ;) Probably won't make it across the St Lawrence or Bay of Chaleur. Maybe from Michigan across to Northern NY and New England and southern Que. ;)
Move'n on.

Offline Jeff

  • Fearless Leader
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 47645
  • Age: 57
  • Location: Harrison MI
  • Gender: Male
  • I know that I do not know.
    • Share Post
    • THEE Forestry Forum
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #26 on: January 18, 2011, 04:46:26 PM »
All you need is some wolf lovers to start a movement to reintroduce wolves to your area.
Just call me the midget doctor.
Forestry Forum Founder and Chief Cook and Bottle Washer.

Commercial circle sawmill sawyer in a past life.
Ezekiel 22:30

Offline beenthere

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 26932
  • Location: Southern Wisconsin, USA
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #27 on: January 18, 2011, 04:59:12 PM »
Yep, like Jeff says.
We had 'em do exactly that in WI and now the fight is on to get a wolf season on them because there are too DanG many. But there are those that say "it won't do any good to shoot them, as they will just fill in the voids with more and more pups".  Have heard that argument too many times. It is from the DNR infiltrators that border on the PETA desires. PITA IMO :)

And we used to have a coyote bounty, but the do-gooders managed to get all bounties in the State against the State law. Now when we need a bounty to encourage the taking of some animals, it is against the law. Instead, the State hires sharpshooters at about $600 a pop to take out the nuisance animals. Go figure.

south central Wisconsin
 It may be that my sole purpose in life is simply to serve as a warning to others

Offline Reddog

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
  • Location: "nothing here is required" Mi based
  • Gender: Male
  • Forest & Urban woody plant management
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #28 on: January 18, 2011, 05:12:23 PM »
Probably won't make it across the St Lawrence or Bay of Chaleur. Maybe from Michigan across to Northern NY and New England and southern Que. ;)


Well they are in Ontario and Quebec now, so a pretty short travel and you may have them again.

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 36319
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #29 on: January 18, 2011, 05:27:07 PM »
It's not going to happen, at least as long as I'm living. We have some sensible people in DNR, even though some of them may not be at the top of their game. But, there is no one, unless under the cover of darkness and without anyone knowing about it, that is going to be allowed to introduce a wolf into the NB wild. But not only that, we don't have a lot of provincial biologists in the department. Don't have the resources and usually one of the smallest budgets. Maybe two if we are lucky and he's usually at odds with Timber Management Branch over deer yards and cavity trees.  In New Brunswick, wildlife management has always been spelled Deer. That's why we have Deer Wintering Areas and in recent years a lot of those areas were harvested because the winter habitat crashed. Which was inevitable since the woods is dynamic not static, you can't simply draw a polygon on a map and expect it to remain unchanged on the ground. ;) Maine tried to re-introduce woodland caribou (twice) because someone apparently didn't know why they died out before. That failed miserably.
Move'n on.

Offline Jeff

  • Fearless Leader
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 47645
  • Age: 57
  • Location: Harrison MI
  • Gender: Male
  • I know that I do not know.
    • Share Post
    • THEE Forestry Forum
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #30 on: January 18, 2011, 05:28:44 PM »
Well, maybe we can take up a collection for ya. :)
Just call me the midget doctor.
Forestry Forum Founder and Chief Cook and Bottle Washer.

Commercial circle sawmill sawyer in a past life.
Ezekiel 22:30

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 36319
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #31 on: January 18, 2011, 05:44:42 PM »

Well they are in Ontario and Quebec now, so a pretty short travel and you may have them again.

Always have been, but on the north shore of the St Lawrence in both provinces. And Quebec government allows them to be hunted and trapped pretty hard. ;)
Move'n on.

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 36319
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #32 on: January 18, 2011, 05:47:32 PM »
Well, maybe we can take up a collection for ya. :)

Coyotes and foxes are enough to suit me. :D
Move'n on.

Offline Burlkraft

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 3838
  • Age: 12
  • Location: Galisteo New Mexico
  • Gender: Male
  • Professional survivor......Still a wooodturner
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #33 on: January 18, 2011, 07:13:39 PM »
I thought this thread was about cats   ;D ;D ;D
Why not just 1 pain free day?

Offline stumpy

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 927
  • Age: 66
  • Location: Pewaukee, WI
  • Gender: Male
  • I feel alot more like I do now than I did before
    • Share Post
    • Rustic-woodfurniture/Stumpy's Wood Works
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #34 on: January 18, 2011, 07:21:04 PM »
Burl,  It doesn't matter, eventually it will be about food 8)
Woodmizer LT30, NHL785 skidsteer, IH 444 tractor

Offline Reddog

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
  • Location: "nothing here is required" Mi based
  • Gender: Male
  • Forest & Urban woody plant management
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #35 on: January 18, 2011, 07:28:18 PM »
I thought this thread was about cats   ;D ;D ;D
pull_smiley Back to your Go Bears thread.  ;D

Offline Burlkraft

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 3838
  • Age: 12
  • Location: Galisteo New Mexico
  • Gender: Male
  • Professional survivor......Still a wooodturner
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #36 on: January 19, 2011, 09:24:11 AM »
I thought this thread was about cats   ;D ;D ;D
pull_smiley Back to your Go Bears thread.  ;D

 :D :D :D  That was a good 'un eh Wally?
Why not just 1 pain free day?

Offline doctorb

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4229
  • Age: 67
  • Location: Glyndon, MD
  • Gender: Male
  • Unofficial Team Physician
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #37 on: January 19, 2011, 11:02:55 AM »
I have tried to delve into the reproduction of the coyote family "pack", and while many sources don't talk much about it, those that do say that the size of a coyote litter is directly related to the available food supply and the size of the family.  While non-dominant adults can "attempt reproduction", most literature describes these pregnancies as very unlikely to be sucessfull.  I presume that means that if the alphas don't want your kids around, they ain't gonna be around!  Litter size can be from a low of 3 to a high of 12.

The sources I checked did not relate population growth or decrease to hunting or killing of the alpha female.  I have to look further to see if that specific issue, as it relates to coyote population size, has been scientifically studied.  As I heard this addressed from several people in my area, they either were listening to each other or there's some source that is stating that such hunting may increase their numbers.
My father once said, "This is my son who wanted to grow up and become a doctor.  So far, he's only become a doctor."

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 36319
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #38 on: January 19, 2011, 11:06:28 AM »
Everyone has there little prejudices. :D :D :D ;D
Move'n on.

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 36319
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #39 on: January 19, 2011, 11:14:16 AM »
Doc, the western coyote at least, is known as the prairie jackal. I saw a documentary one time of the silver back jackal in Africa. It showed the dominant male and female bearing the young and some older siblings helping to raise the young. It was a decent show,and I taped it on audio. This was 25 years ago. They were not normally prey to other predators and they scavenged for less than 10 % of their food. Small rodents and young gazelle were some of their prey. It was some type of rat that was the most sought after. This one family of jackals they followed for a long time, several generations back in the 1970's. An unknown disease had claimed them in the end, all the jackals being studied for 7 years.

Here an excerpt of the same Dr and her jackals.

Move'n on.

Offline clww

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5117
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Williamsville, VA & Some Interstate Near You
  • Gender: Male
  • Oh yeah? Watch this!
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #40 on: January 21, 2011, 09:47:38 PM »
We've had the coyotes start moving into the western part of VA starting about 5 years ago now. 2 years ago when I was camped out for my deer season, about 11 pm one night, a pack of them had all gathered down in the valley, no more than a mile away. They started barking and howling, making a huge ruckus. Made the hair on my neck stand up. Sounded like something in a B-Grade horror flick.
Fast forward to this past deer season. I was up my stand at about 30 feet in the air and saw some movement about a quarter mile away in a clear cut. Kept watching it for about 10 minutes, just getting a glimpse every now and then as it got closer. At about 300 yards this turned into a coyote, big one, too. She sat down and barked a few times, with her head tilted back. Last thing she ever did! Took her to my taxidermist the next day. She weighed 37 pounds, which he said was a big coyote. Beautiful coat and will make a great mount. I've hunted all over the continent for the past 25 years and this was the first one for me.
Many Stihl Saws-16"-60"
"Go Ask The Other Master Chief"
18-Wheeler Driver for CFI

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 36319
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #41 on: January 22, 2011, 06:20:45 AM »
clww, did you see many yotes in other parts of the country? I usually see more single foxes in a year here. But, the yotes are always present, they have learned to stay out of view. If you see one even 1/2 mile away he heads for the bush. A couple winters ago I was heading down to the shop and about 3/4 mile away was one sitting on the farm road howling. He sat there I bet 30 minutes howling. I actually like the sound of'm myself. I have no desire to be attacked by one though. He'd probably spit this tough raw hide out. ;D One night in the summer a couple years ago I hear this yipping in the drive way, not far from an open window. Went on for a awhile and I said to myself I gotta get up and settle this argument. I went out and it was a fox barking back at 2 or 3 yotes about 1/2 mile away down in the woods. One morning that darn fox was cornering a cat in the lilacs. She's rough country up here, you could get ate up. :D :D
Move'n on.

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 36319
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #42 on: January 22, 2011, 06:35:34 AM »
Here's one of the yotes I've seen on the woodlot.

Move'n on.

Offline clww

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5117
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Williamsville, VA & Some Interstate Near You
  • Gender: Male
  • Oh yeah? Watch this!
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #43 on: January 22, 2011, 08:51:40 AM »
I've seen many of them out west and up in Canada. I usually am hunting with a bow and they never get within my 50 yard limit.
Many Stihl Saws-16"-60"
"Go Ask The Other Master Chief"
18-Wheeler Driver for CFI

Offline chain

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 997
  • Location: Missouri
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #44 on: January 23, 2011, 10:08:14 AM »
I've watched so many 'yotes, I know where these locally travel as from their bedding area to their hunting ground. If you can locate a crossing; for instance, two timber trails intersecting, many times they will leave their droppings or urine post to mark their territory. But there are good attractants such as 'yote glandular lure that may pull in a shy 'ol 'yote in close. I reccommend a lure made by 'Sullivan's' called "coyote con", a long range lure with staying power. But there are a number of good lures out there, patience is the key.

Offline Kansas

  • In Memoriam
  • *
  • Posts: 5271
  • In the mountains of Kansas
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #45 on: January 23, 2011, 03:34:41 PM »
When I was in high school, there were lots of coyotes in the area. Lots of hunting for them. Then the mange hit. That pretty well wiped them all out. Now they are finally back. I love listening to them. Watched a family of them off and on all summer trotting by my window. It was fun watching the pups try to keep up in the tall grass.

Offline VT_Forestry

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 481
  • Age: 37
  • Location: Newport News, VA
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #46 on: January 24, 2011, 06:14:19 AM »
Here's one that Mom got a picture of in the yard...looks like a German Shepard to me  :D



Forester - Newport News Waterworks

Offline clww

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 5117
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Williamsville, VA & Some Interstate Near You
  • Gender: Male
  • Oh yeah? Watch this!
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #47 on: January 24, 2011, 08:37:13 AM »
Was that one in Newport News?
Many Stihl Saws-16"-60"
"Go Ask The Other Master Chief"
18-Wheeler Driver for CFI

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 36319
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #48 on: January 24, 2011, 11:11:08 AM »
VT can answer for himself, but I think his folks are in Blacksburgh area.
Move'n on.

Offline Wrangler55

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 62
  • Location: Kingsport, TN 37660
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #49 on: January 24, 2011, 06:22:42 PM »
Here's my only coyote photo... This one was laying out in my hayfield. He let me set up my rifle, get my camera out, line up the photo, and load my rifle... He was just a little too curious for his own good.

I'm so covered with sawdust, my nickname should be dusty...

Offline Huntress

  • member
  • *
  • Posts: 9
  • Age: 59
  • Location: NE WI
  • Gender: Female
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #50 on: January 26, 2011, 10:21:04 AM »
I inquired about yote furs about a week ago.  Not good!

The guy told me $10.00 skinned and stretched.

I told him they would find a ditch first!

I personally would not skin one for less than $25.00.

BUT, We hunt them anyway, sale or no sale! Good exercise and fun too!

I just checked the results of the last NAFA sale and the prices are up a little.
All USD
Western/Heavy-ave. $51.21 top $76.00
Eastern-ave. $26.15 top $47.00
Semi Heavy-ave. $22.42 top $48.00

If you know that you will be doing a lot of coyote hunting you might want to check with some of the taxidermists in the area...they may be looking for some to mount and would probably buy them in the carcass. A black yote like VT_Forestry posted could bring you $75-$150+.

“One day your life will flash before your eyes.….Make sure it’s worth watching.”

Offline iffy

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 476
  • Age: 72
  • Location: junction city, kansas
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #51 on: January 26, 2011, 04:16:24 PM »
I read an article that said coyotes populations will always adapt to habitat. The biggest thing influencing the population is the rabbit population cycle. If outside influences such as heavy hunting, trapping or natural disaster reduces the population very far below optimum, the coyotes will compensate by having larger litters, and in some documented cases, 2 litters a year.

Heard a story once about a town meeting in one of the western states, specifically sheep country, where the coyote population was severely decimating the sheep herds. They had a lot of ranchers at the meeting, some fish and game people, biologists, news hounds, and peta. While discussing various ways of reducing the coyote population, a sweet young lady from peta stood up and asked "why can't we just neuter all the male coyotes?". A grizzled old rancher in the back stood up and said "honey, they ain't s----ing our sheep, they're eatin' them!"

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 36319
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #52 on: January 26, 2011, 04:32:53 PM »
The old timers around here that had sheep told me it was bears that took the sheep. Then there were bear bounties. But that was times before the war and we never had yotes that far back here in NB. Yotes will eat about anything good to eat, whatever it can get, make no mistake. Not much for sheep farming around these parts now. When you go down to the woolen mill, there is hardly a cow let alone any chance to see a sheep. ;) I must say though the neighbors had a half dozen or so for a couple years. They even had a pet silver fox. :D
Move'n on.

Offline Burlkraft

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 3838
  • Age: 12
  • Location: Galisteo New Mexico
  • Gender: Male
  • Professional survivor......Still a wooodturner
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #53 on: January 26, 2011, 08:13:13 PM »
There are quite a few yotes in Madison.
There is lots and lots of green space in and around the city.
There have been deer seen on the capitol square.
Lots of suburbanites have lost little dogs and kats to yotes.
A few years ago they hired "Professional Hunters" to decrease the deer population in the city ;D

What a joke that was  :D  :D  :D  :D laugh_at laugh_at laugh_at
Why not just 1 pain free day?

Offline nas

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 903
  • Age: 46
  • Location: Gods Country, Milton Ontario
  • Gender: Male
  • Measure twice and cut aw DanG
    • Share Post
    • Traditional forest products
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #54 on: January 28, 2011, 08:10:47 AM »
Had a big yote hanging around my place the last month or so.  I would see him at least a couple times a week.  Last week I was working on the mill and saw him sitting about 100yds behind the barn.  I got on the snowmobile and gave chase.  I was about 15-20ft behind him when he cut left, and I couldn't make the turn at 60+mph >:(  Haven't seen him since ;D

Nick
Better to sit in silence and have everyone think me a fool, than to open my mouth and remove all doubt - Napoleon.

Indecision is the key to flexibility.
2002 WM LT40HDG25
stihl 066
Husky 365
1 wife
6 Kids

Offline Chuck White

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 11728
  • Age: 70
  • Location: Russell, NY (Way Upstate)
  • Gender: Male
  • Sawing Mobile since 2005
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #55 on: January 28, 2011, 09:24:51 AM »
I just had a birthday on the 26th and my wife got me a FoxPro game call for a gift.

I think I'll be trying it out at my first opportunity.

We have coyotes come within easy shooting distance from the house, but usually they travel at night.

I think if I put the caller out around 100 yards from the house, I could likely get one to come in.
~Chuck~
Retired USAF (1989), Retired School Bus Driver (2012), and now a Mobile Sawyer
1995 Wood-Mizer LT40HDG2425 Kohler - Shingle & LapSider, Cooks Cat Claw Sharpener, 4-foot Logrite cant hook.
Basic mechanical skills are all that's required to maintain the Wood-Mizer.
I LOVE MY SAWMILL

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 36319
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #56 on: January 28, 2011, 11:41:24 AM »
I got on the snowmobile and gave chase.  I was about 15-20ft behind him when he cut left, and I couldn't make the turn at 60+mph >:(  Haven't seen him since ;D

Nick

My father tried that 30 years ago, giving chase to a fox in the field. The fox was too smart and father ended up rolling the ski do. ;D
Move'n on.

Offline Just Me

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 692
  • Location: Upper-lower Michigan=Troll
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #57 on: January 30, 2011, 09:11:23 AM »
 I grew up chasing coyotes or bob cat in the 60's-70's with dogs. There was a bounty back then, and the hides were worth something, so it paid its own way. I have a 243 with a coyote bite in the stock from when I got too close one day. They removed the bounty, and the hide prices dropped in relationship to the cost of dog food and fuel, so everyone mostly stopped around here.

Now there are coyotes everywhere. It was back then that if a coyote crossed a road they would urinate all the way across the road, we assumed because of fear of man. You never just saw a coyote, they were invisible. Now, over the last 20-30 years their habits have totally changed. They do not have any fear, they are often in town, something that just never happened back in the day. I have a house in town and there is a 5 acre woodlot across the street from me that has a fox family living in it, would not have happened back when the bounty and fur prices were up.

This was a much better place to small game hunt back then as well. It is rare to even see a rabbit track any more, and partridge hunting is pretty much just a nice walk in the woods these days.

As far as them moving around, they will cover some ground if they need to. We chased them across the Straits of Mackinaw more than once, a 5-10 mile run depending on the path they took. This is why there will be wolves in the lower peninsula if there is not already, the big lake freezes up at some point most winters in the straits.

I would suppose that the St. Laurance would not be that much of a problem for them as they seem to have no fear of man at this point. There are some fairly remote crossings that they could easily get across, one I crossed to get out of Quebec comes to mind.

Don't know if it is good or bad, but there are a lot more now. I am building on the edge of the Pigeon River Forest and I do know I do not want to see wolves in my  own back yard. The elk in the garden will be problem enough.....

Offline Ron Scott

  • Forester
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 8011
  • Age: 83
  • Location: Cadillac, MI
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #58 on: February 03, 2011, 08:53:48 PM »
DEER PREDATION STUDY IN MENOMINEE COUNTY

Published in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel [ http://www.jsonline.com/sports/outdoors/115154119.html]. 

Coyotes #1.  Bobcats #2.  Preliminary results of a longer-term study started in 2009. 

~Ron

Offline Reddog

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 1481
  • Location: "nothing here is required" Mi based
  • Gender: Male
  • Forest & Urban woody plant management
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #59 on: February 03, 2011, 09:56:33 PM »
Ron that is an interesting study. Always fun to read what is being tracked.


Edit: the post was pulled that I am referring to here. But I will leave my comment it for future reference.

Don't make me call for cleanup on this thread!  >:(

I didn't start this to have it turned into a political rant!




Offline Troublermaker

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 76
  • Location: Virginia
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #60 on: February 04, 2011, 11:25:56 AM »
This happen about 7 or 8 miles from me. Been here all my life and this is the first time I ever heard anything like this was this year. In fact I never even seen a real coyote. We done had some wild dogs from time to time that people have drop to pack up and kill some people sheep's but never coyote. They have just show up lately.

Gloucester supervisors hear about coyote attacks

 http://www.dailypress.com/news/gloucester-county/dp-nws-gloucester-coyotes-20110201,0,6201885.story

Offline Just Me

  • Senior Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 692
  • Location: Upper-lower Michigan=Troll
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #61 on: February 04, 2011, 05:18:51 PM »
 Interesting article. They are adapting to our increasingly urban world. I like how the politicians will discuss it at their meeting in two weeks, meanwhile.........

I'm not buying the bounty does not do anything BS.  It sounds to me like something the WWF came up with and has spread around. They sure have proliferated around here since the bounty was dropped and their habits have drastically changed as I have said before.

Twelve cows is a lot of money, and it is directly out of the profit. Has to sting if it is just a small farmer. Hope he has insurance for that.

Offline SwampDonkey

  • Forester
  • *
  • Posts: 36319
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Centreville, NB
  • Gender: Male
  • Large Tooth
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #62 on: February 04, 2011, 09:42:49 PM »
It's not so much that the bounty doesn't have an impact, it's the fact that when the bounty ends they rebound. Also, if the pelts have not much value then there are far less participants to. And when your government, as in Canada, is scared to death of guns there are far less hunters to take care of business because your gun becomes a target of tax collection to create anther government welfare job. Not every place is influenced by the WWF so much as scientific study. As far as Canada is concerned WWF ranks us at the bottom of the G8 and most people don't care (0.5 % support). Blaming some of these organizations often becomes a convenient "I told you so" even if they have little influence in the matter. ;)
Move'n on.

Offline Norm

  • Senior Member x2
  • *****
  • Posts: 7654
  • Age: 62
  • Gender: Male
    • Share Post
Re: Yote hunting
« Reply #63 on: February 05, 2011, 08:31:16 AM »
I see they are using that same tired line that the more you shot the more you get. BS, I can tell you that aggressive hunting especially with greyhounds puts a dent in the population. Of course she doesn't have a clue what she's talking about nor do the college DNR boys. 


Share via delicious Share via digg Share via facebook Share via linkedin Share via pinterest Share via reddit Share via stumble Share via tumblr Share via twitter

xx
Bow hunting in WV

Started by WV Sawmiller on The Outdoor Board

4 Replies
754 Views
Last post October 20, 2015, 11:02:43 AM
by WV Sawmiller
xx
Hog Hunting in Tn.

Started by Weekend_Sawyer on The Outdoor Board

17 Replies
940 Views
Last post March 17, 2014, 10:43:15 AM
by Raider Bill
xx
Log Hunting

Started by Nova on Sawmills and Milling

14 Replies
3884 Views
Last post April 03, 2006, 04:45:53 PM
by Nova
xx
Hunting in the UK

Started by Tom on The Outdoor Board

5 Replies
1996 Views
Last post June 02, 2008, 11:38:12 PM
by Lurcherman
 


Powered by EzPortal