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Author Topic: New chainsaws compared to old chainsaws  (Read 38267 times)

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Offline HolmenTree

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Re: New chainsaws compared to old chainsaws
« Reply #20 on: March 04, 2011, 03:44:44 PM »


BECAUSE THEY WILL!!!!!!    DO YOU OWN ANY OF THESE NEWER SAWS???????    IS THERE ANYTHING ELSE YOU WANT TO ARGUE ABOUT???????????   this is an online forum,everyone is allowed their own opinion.  i happen to own a few of the saws you are blowing about,as well as new saws. i simply expressed my opinion,now let it die.

The man has spoken with nothing else to say. smiley_clapping
There thats my opinion.

Willard.
Making a living with a saw since age 16.

Offline Al_Smith

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Re: New chainsaws compared to old chainsaws
« Reply #21 on: March 04, 2011, 07:38:17 PM »
The word "old " is relative .Does in mean mid to late 80's that really run as good as they do today .Mid 70's that most likely  don't or early 60's geardrives ???

Some people can keep them running forever and some have to cart them off to a dealer to change a spark plug  or replace a rope in a recoil . It's relative .

As far as old I kept a mid 80's  Stihl 038 Mag in service for a tree service long passed it's life time .It earned it's keep right up to the end and it still runs BTW .There's a 281 Husky in my shed that still get's it done in grand style so they can be very usefull even with a little age on them .

Offline weimedog

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Re: New chainsaws compared to old chainsaws
« Reply #22 on: March 06, 2011, 10:29:32 AM »
I think the best way to define "old" is by generations of technology. For example the new saws are the new generation "Strato" saws like the Stihl 441, Husqvarna 372XT & 576 etc. Old might be two generations back such as the Husqvarna 272XP & equivalent Stihl's. Antique would be the 1950's even some of the 1960's era bombers. Vintage might be the 1960's into 1970's. Things like the Homelite 925's and McCulloch 797's.


When you think of old as time in use..that's a different story. Care and maintenance can extend the life of any generation saw. And the toughness of the Vintage saws is real as they survived the 16:1 motor oil years and many are serviceable 30 and 40 years later! Are they useful? That's a relative thing as well! My 903 has cut a bundle of wood over the last 10 years. It's now been replaced with a variety of saws...right now a Homeowners 455 is the main saw. The 365/372 blend may unseat it..and you can ague the 365/372 is "old' as it was a blown up pile of parts before  I built it!

So..what do you mean by OLD! Many Vintage saws are very useful when brought to good running condition...Homelite 903-925's, McCulloch 3-10 thru 10-10's, Jonsereds 820 thru 930's..etc.  Many "old" saws can be made to cut within striking distance reliably with modern current generation saws after a muffler mod & port massage...Jonsered 630, Husqvarna 272XP's etc. And Current Generation 372XP's and Stihl MS460's can cut as well as the "New" generation saws stock when maintained right.

I think the real heart of the saw collecting habit is doing the actual research thru the ages to find, and in fact build the ground breaking saws of their time...McCulluch 44's and Homelite 925's, Jonsereds 630's etc. Do the research...Go find one! build it and run it. Report here and add to the knowledge base. As far as motor sports/collecting is concerned, you can't beat the bang per buck with saws! Most old saws are sold for trash prices (or just given away)...its only when you look within the community they all of the sudden get value! Dealers have junkers for junk  prices as its not worth their time, yard sales, land fills, loggers have a steel pile..etc. $20 - $30 bucks can bring you home a pile of projects if you hunt...that's all part of the fun. Also lets you enjoy other things like your motorcycles or car hobbies, gives you more reasons to drive..(Motorcycles are the best as you can't take home too much trash!)
Husqvarna 365sp/372xpw Blend, Jonsered 2171 51.4mm XPW build,562xp HTSS, 560 HTSS, 272XP, 61/272XP, 555, 257, 242, 238, Homelite S-XL 925, XP-1020A, Super XL (Dad's saw); Jonsered 2094, Three 920's, CS-2172, Solo 603; 3 Huztl MS660's (2 54mm and 1 56mm)

Offline Al_Smith

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Re: New chainsaws compared to old chainsaws
« Reply #23 on: March 06, 2011, 11:24:02 AM »
Then too often times some of the tree service guys would hang on to an oldie just to use for a stumper . While some of the more modern hot rods can cut circles around the vintage they can't stand up to the abuse a stumper takes .

Offline BigJake

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Re: New chainsaws compared to old chainsaws
« Reply #24 on: March 07, 2011, 11:01:47 AM »
Hi guys,
  I'm brand new here, and this sounds like a good way to get my feet wet. I've been a full time professional logger since the mid 80's, so I have a fair amount of knowledge on the subject, but I've always run Huskies, so I can't speak about Stihl. I think I'm one of the few  full timers out there who still runs saws and cable skidders instead of processors, forwarders, etc. My first few saws were 266se and xp and 268xp, later went to 262xp, then 371, 372, 575, and currently running three 576's. I only keep saws a year or so, so maintenance is usually not a big issue except for day to day stuff.  As for cutting and power to weight, without having to work on them much, I'd take a 1986 266XP any day. Those things cut like mad, and ran great. The 262xp was a bit under powered, but turned high rpm's and was so light, if you weren't cutting big diameter hardwood, they were a great saw. If I didn't use a saw that much, I'd try and find a well maintained early 90's 262xp

Offline HolmenTree

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Re: New chainsaws compared to old chainsaws
« Reply #25 on: March 07, 2011, 12:43:40 PM »
Hi guys,
   If I didn't use a saw that much, I'd try and find a well maintained early 90's 262xp
Welcome Big Jake ,its good to talk to a veteren cut and skid pieceworker who is still cutting today. I gave it up 20 yrs ago when the processors took over. I started cutting in 1974 with a Jonsered 621. I run a residential tree removal service now, past experience sure helps me out. On another site I tried to explain to a bunch of city arborists about "common or natural lean" in a forest setting and these "know it alls" thought I was crazy. Only one logger from Denmark backed me up and agreed with me [he was the most experienced in logging].

I know an old fellow in my hometown here who has a brand new 1993 Husqvarna 272XP that has never cut a stick of wood. He only idles it for a few minutes every year to keep it from seizing. I have 372s and 3- 576s like you but I may have to by that 272, looks like a real nice saw to keep as a collector saw.

Willard. 
Making a living with a saw since age 16.

Offline BigJake

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Re: New chainsaws compared to old chainsaws
« Reply #26 on: March 08, 2011, 04:09:44 PM »
On another site I tried to explain to a bunch of city arborists about "common or natural lean" in a forest setting and these "know it alls" thought I was crazy. Only one logger from Denmark backed me up and agreed with me [he was the most experienced in logging].

Thanks for the welcome. So, are you saying that they didn't believe that every tree leans at least somewhat in one direction or other? That's absurd. Anybody who's ever walked in the woods should be able to see that every tree tries to get to the most sun, wherever it may be.

Offline Spike60

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Re: New chainsaws compared to old chainsaws
« Reply #27 on: March 08, 2011, 05:02:23 PM »
Willard is right about the 181 and 162 being groundbreaking designs. They both had 20 year runs, and their basic design philosophy is still being used today by most everyone. I don't think of these saws as "old", but as still comtemporary designs that are a generation or two back. I think in terms of Modern, Old, and Antique.

It's kind of like Weimedog pointed out; so much of this discussion depends on what you mean by "old", and most of us have a slightly different view. To me, a Jonsered 49SP could be called old; due not just to it's actual age, but to it's basic design architecture. But run one, (and I do regularly), and it really doesn't feel like an old saw. Some saws like the 630/670 and 266/272 family just hit the mark so well that they are still held in high regard. But it's not necessarily an old vs new thing; it's just a great saw. I think the 2171/372 family that replaced it was a noticeably better design. Guys absolutely love them, and I never hear them wish they could still buy 670's and 272's. That's not always the case. The 385/390 is a great saw, but guys who ran 288's still mourn the fact that they can't get them anymore. So a 372 guy would say that the newer stuff is better, while a 288 guy would say he prefers the older saws.
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Offline John Mc

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Re: New chainsaws compared to old chainsaws
« Reply #28 on: March 08, 2011, 08:06:57 PM »
Anybody who's ever walked in the woods should be able to see that every tree tries to get to the most sun, wherever it may be.

I read some where that Pine and some other species don't grow towards the sun, they grow away from gravity. It's one of the reason they tend to grow straighter and more symmetrical than most deciduous species. They are descended from more primitive tree species. It wasn't until later that some species developed the "improved" strategy of growing towards the sun.
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline HolmenTree

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Re: New chainsaws compared to old chainsaws
« Reply #29 on: March 08, 2011, 10:27:22 PM »

I read some where that Pine and some other species don't grow towards the sun, they grow away from gravity. It's one of the reason they tend to grow straighter and more symmetrical than most deciduous species. They are descended from more primitive tree species. It wasn't until later that some species developed the "improved" strategy of growing towards the sun.
Hi John, I'm not trying to derail this thread with tree biology but I have to say a pine is a conifer not a decidious [I think you may just have misprinted it]
But I can speak with the "urban arborist folks" here about for example what you explained about "growing away from gravity" and "growing towards the sun". In tree biology responses in growth to gravity is called "geotropism" and growth angles toward sunlight is called "phototropism".

But up here in the northern boreal forest most all of our trees on level ground have a common lean towards the SE. I believe you folks in Vermont share the boreal forest also.

Willard.
Making a living with a saw since age 16.

Offline John Mc

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Re: New chainsaws compared to old chainsaws
« Reply #30 on: March 09, 2011, 08:54:40 PM »
Willard -  no misprint. I didn't say Pines were deciduous, I said they tend to grow straighter and more symmetrical than most deciduous species. (I probably should have said most conifers, rather than singling out pines).

And yes, I'm familiar with the terms phototropic and Geotropic. I tend not to be the one to introduce those terms into conversation, since some of the folks I deal with just think I'm trying to be pretentious when I say it. I brought up the subject in response to Big Jakes comment about every tree trying to get to the most sun as a means of explaining why trees tend to have a common lean. That just doesn't explain it for me when you are talking about geotropic trees. There must be some other reason, but I don't know what it is.
If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.   - Abraham Maslow

Offline Smurf

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Re: New chainsaws compared to old chainsaws
« Reply #31 on: March 13, 2011, 11:34:09 AM »
Blk:
Just my 2 cents have cut fire wood for over 45 yrs. If you are serious about cutting eg: 10-20 cords (Hardwood) then you had better look at a newer saw unless your are experienced within small engine repair. The Older Stihl & Husky 266 SE or .030 were great saws but part sourcing could become a burden . As Shinn has advised a Solo , Efco and Dolmar make very good Prosumer or Professional Series units also. However Dealer Quality sometimes is sketchy . If you have the $$ J-Red , Husky and Stihl are still the solid
Manufacturers with established Dealer Networks within North America . Have fun with your selection process , seems like a lot of experienced forum members with yrs of wood cutting behind them . ;)

Offline 1270d

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Re: New chainsaws compared to old chainsaws
« Reply #32 on: March 15, 2011, 07:20:02 PM »
I would also have only run Husky's and don't know a whole lot about stihl.   I can attest to one thing though, after running two gallons/gas a day for close to 2 years.  I would much rather have one of the new generation saws.  In my case this was a 385.   It was a huge step up from the 288xp.   288 has much more torque, while the 385 revs.  The new motor mounting systems are just so much more superior.     
Your arms are at least two inches longer after a day on a 288  ;D

Offline Myhome

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Re: New chainsaws compared to old chainsaws
« Reply #33 on: December 29, 2018, 12:16:22 AM »
Hi all new here and just getting my bearings. First never have used a chainsaw so here's my question, have been looking at a used Homelite Super2. The seller says it may need a new chain.  
Is this a decent chainsaw and is the chain easy to change? I have been looking at reviews , but reviews can be skewed so thought I'd ask the group.

Online Ianab

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Re: New chainsaws compared to old chainsaws
« Reply #34 on: December 29, 2018, 12:52:40 AM »
It's not a saw I would give to a new user, or even use as a daily tool. No modern safety features like an inertial chain brake etc. I think the later ones had anti-vibe handles, but the first 70s vintage ones didn't. Plus being a top handle saw is a bit more risk for inexperienced users. 

Would likely be better to look around for a more modern saw, like a small Echo or similar. Something built in this millenium... 

All saws let you swap over the chain and bar pretty easily. It's something you often need to do in the field, especially if you try and cut a rock or nail (which you eventually will). It's usually a couple of nuts and the bar and chain come off the saw.  Just make sure you put the chain back in the right direction, they don't cut well backwards. (Don't ask how I know this  :D )

Also plan on a sharpening kit, and some safety gear. The chain WILL get dull, but that's 5 mins with a file and guide. And chains cut legs even better than they cut wood, ( Saw chaps should stop that). Ear and eye protection, saws are loud, and throw small bits of wood in random directions. And if you are dropping trees, then a hard hat. All in one forestry helmet is what I use, that way all the kit stays together on your head, even if I fold up the screen or muffs. 
Weekend warrior, Peterson JP test pilot, Dolmar 7900 and Stihl MS310 saws and  the usual collection of power tools :)

Offline Pulphook

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Re: New chainsaws compared to old chainsaws
« Reply #35 on: December 29, 2018, 07:09:32 PM »
Think about this " MTBR"/ The Mean Time Between Repairs is what makes improvements in anything, including my body :o. In my old unit, the Tankers would whine about how often their tanks broke down. Forget this "oldies but goodies" junk.
My newish Stihls start easier, run better, are lighter with more torque than any my older ones from even the 90's. Though my old tree saw a 009 still does the job.
Hey, how many flat tires or blowouts do we know ?How few breakdowns of later vehicles compared with 20+ years ago.
New anytime.
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24/7. No central heat. 6-8 cords firewood from the woodlot /year. Low low tech: ATV with trailer, 3 saws, 2 electric splitters, a worn pulphook, peavy, climbing line for skidding, Fiskars 27, an old back getting older.

Offline teakwood

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Re: New chainsaws compared to old chainsaws
« Reply #36 on: December 30, 2018, 09:04:34 AM »
My newish Stihls start easier, run better, are lighter with more torque than any my older ones from even the 90's.


add good anti vibrations to it!!

Totally agree with you, always new!!

It's not that every new saw is always better than the saw before, but over the decades everything evolves and gets improved engineering. some things don't work and we learn from them. 

Beside the nostalgic factor, who wants to go back to run an old iron chainsaw, tank style which weighted a ton and had absolutely no operator comfort or safety!??
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Offline thecfarm

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Re: New chainsaws compared to old chainsaws
« Reply #37 on: December 30, 2018, 09:11:41 AM »
Kinda like those model A and T cars. Nice cars,but how many drive them 10,000 miles a year.
Model 6020-20hp Manual Thomas bandsaw,TC40A 4wd 40 hp New Holland tractor, 450 Norse Winch, Heatmor 400 OWB,YCC 1978-79

Online lxskllr

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Re: New chainsaws compared to old chainsaws
« Reply #38 on: December 30, 2018, 09:13:44 AM »
Antivibe is a big plus of new saws. My first saw; an "old" Poulan Pro, wasn't even that old. I got it in 2012, but it didn't have any antivibe. I didn't notice it at the time, but after getting my 362cm, I'd notice my fingers tingling after using the Poulan for not that much time. I can run my Stihl and echo all day without issue.

Offline HolmenTree

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Re: New chainsaws compared to old chainsaws
« Reply #39 on: December 30, 2018, 02:02:24 PM »
My first 30 years making a living witht a saw was with the old school rubber mount Jonsereds and Stihls.
Then at the time 15 years ago when I first discovered the internet I bought my first spring av mount Husqvarna a OE 372XP, then a 346XP,395XP,576XP 562XP, and a 550XP.
Then recently getting ready for retirement and slowing down my pace....nostalgia took over and I sold all my Huskies except the 562XP. Bought a new MS261CM my first Stihl with spring anti vibe and air injection.
Rebuilt my Stihl 066s and reacquainted with some old friends.

My next new saw will be my last, I'm seriously waiting for the fuel injected Stihl MS500i. :)
Making a living with a saw since age 16.


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