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Author Topic: Log hauling  (Read 5784 times)

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Offline bandmiller2

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Log hauling
« on: April 15, 2011, 07:44:02 AM »
The arch is the time honored way to haul logs from your woodlot.Why not a narrow ,low tiltbed trailer you need the same winch as the arch and it can be street legal.You pull the trailer out of the woods with your tractor and hook it up to your truck for any distance.Easier to build and usable for outher things like hauling your snow machine or bikes. Frank C.
A man armed with common sense is packing a big piece

Offline Magicman

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Re: Log hauling
« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2011, 07:55:31 AM »
It would work, but you might need more winch to slide a log.  Also the winch would need to be on the tilting part (up) which would take a bit of "pineywoods" engineering.  You might also be limited to loading only one log.  ???

It's an interesting idea.   smiley_idea
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Offline captain_crunch

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Re: Log hauling
« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2011, 07:21:17 PM »
I would hunt down some old rollers out of a dryer cut them down to width of trailer about 3 of them on a 16 ft trailer would not take much winch to pull them on
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Offline fred in montana

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Re: Log hauling
« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2011, 01:44:48 PM »
You could build a winch mount near the tongue that was high enough to clear the top of the deck when it was tipped up. Or at least mount a pulley at that height. Would have to be sturdy.
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Offline DeepWoods

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Re: Log hauling
« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2011, 03:16:27 PM »
One of the ideas that I had before building my logging arch was to parbuckle the logs onto the trailer I have to haul the atv.  I was going to put small outriggers on the sides for support, and a winch that I could move to either side of the trailer to get logs from either side of the trail.  I use the parbuckling method to get the logs on my Norwood, and it is no trouble to get them on the mill with just a 1500 pound Warn winch.  The only reason I didn't go this route was the trailer had a 1000 pound load rating, and I figured I would have to build a different trailer to make it strong enough.

You could have removable stakes on the side of the trailer to hold the logs on during transit, or use a ratchet strap to hold the load.  You  wouldn't need a tilt bed trailer, but if you had one,  you may be able to tilt the bed and drive away and leave the logs behind depending on how they were balanced on the trailer. 

Just a thought.

Les
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Offline aardquark

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Re: Log hauling
« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2011, 04:47:40 PM »
Quote
Why not a narrow ,low tiltbed trailer you need the same winch as the arch and it can be street legal.

I started out this way... it did not work well (for me), because:
  • a (really) small trailer is usually too lightweight to handle the weight of more than one log
  • a trailer that is larger, heavy duty won't fit between the trees, and since I am taking a small number of trees here and there throughout the forest, that is a problem

So I built a log arch. It still is limited to one large, or perhaps three small logs, but it gets the job done.



Offline ROUGH CUT

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Re: Log hauling
« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2011, 08:30:49 PM »
Log Arches are really cool but I'm thinking that they don't allow the weight of the log to give traction to the rear wheels of the tractor.
I've been chaining logs to a drawbar on the 3pt. hitch. The only problem is I can't lift the log high enough if it's a big log because the log sits under the draw bar.
There must be a way to  hook the log over the drawbar or maybe just cradle the log between the lift arms with chains by removing the draw bar altogether?
                                               R.C.
It's not how you get into these things, but how you get out of them.

Offline tyb525

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Re: Log hauling
« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2011, 08:48:18 PM »
You might build/find a simple "crane" like mine. It works really well to get the log ends off the ground, plus it's good for other things. You might be thinking the logs will get dirty this way, but I really haven't had that happen, it's just the very end that gets some dirt on it but that's it.

I don't skid logs from the "tip", I put the chain right above the bracket for the top link, that gets it low enough to not lift the front much, but it still makes it easy to lift the log end. I can't remember the exact specs, but the tubing is 3" or so 1/4" wall, the braces on the bottom are 1/4" angle, and the top link bracket is 1/2" steel with 3 different pairs of holes for three different "settings".



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Offline ROUGH CUT

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Re: Log hauling
« Reply #8 on: April 19, 2011, 07:05:14 PM »
tyb525;  Your simple "crane" is exactly what I need. Thank you ever so much for the suggestion. I will add this project to my must do list for sure.
                    R.C.
It's not how you get into these things, but how you get out of them.

Offline bandmiller2

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Re: Log hauling
« Reply #9 on: April 19, 2011, 09:01:46 PM »
I've tried most methods of yarding logs out of the woods save highlining.The less a log is dragged the better it only grinds grit into the bark.I used to cut, bunch and wait for snow to drag them out with an old Oliver crawler.Better was a heavy trailer with a jib crane behind a JD 830.Now I don't log as much as I used to so now just use a low heavy trailer with a winch behind a farm tractor. You guys with wood lots time spent on good access roads is time well spent. What would probibly work well is a three point crane like Ty has that could lift the log high enough to put a two wheel dolly under then lower the crane to have the log off the ground. Frank C.
A man armed with common sense is packing a big piece

Offline sealark37

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Re: Log hauling
« Reply #10 on: April 19, 2011, 09:16:59 PM »
I use the three-point mount boom pole on My Ford 4000.  Back up to the log until the cross bar of the boom is six inches or so in front of the log.  Lower the boom to touch the log or as low as it will go.  Chain or grapple the log as close to the front of the boom pole as possible.  Lift boom and drive away.  My tractor has handled a 33" red oak 12 feet long like this.  You must be careful about hanging the forward edge of the log, as the tractor will rotate backwards over the drive axle very suddenly.  Regards, Clark

Offline beenthere

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Re: Log hauling
« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2011, 11:15:08 PM »
Rough Cut
I use the 3 ph with a quick hitch. Toss the logging tongs or choker chain over the top hook and raise one end of a log off the ground, drag the other. Works well for the logs I pull up out of my woods.

 

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Offline thecfarm

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Re: Log hauling
« Reply #12 on: April 20, 2011, 08:20:18 AM »
Rough Cut,what have you got for a tractor,HP too. I think what tyb has is a good idea. When we had the old Ford in the woods,just for fire wood,we would cut the front part of the log about half way down and split out a piece,about 2 feet. This would make it half as big and than we could get the lift we kinda needed. Our ground is not the best,so if the front went over a small knoll than the rear of the tractor would drop and cause the log to dig in. You know what that is like,if you are really into the woods and your ground is uneven. What ever you do,just be as careful as you can. Make a few more trips is better than having something happen to you.
Model 6020-20hp Manual Thomas bandsaw,TC40A 4wd 40 hp New Holland tractor, 450 Norse Winch, Heatmor 400 OWB,YCC 1978-79

Offline ROUGH CUT

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Re: Log hauling
« Reply #13 on: April 20, 2011, 08:34:35 PM »
Rough Cut,what have you got for a tractor,HP too. I think what tyb has is a good idea.
thecfarm; Please don't laugh but it's just a 40 hp. Massey Furgeson 35 gas. I used to log with a teem of horses but someone shot one of them.
It's not how you get into these things, but how you get out of them.

Offline tyb525

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Re: Log hauling
« Reply #14 on: April 20, 2011, 08:57:20 PM »
40 hp will work fine for ya
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Offline thecfarm

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Re: Log hauling
« Reply #15 on: April 21, 2011, 07:59:12 AM »
Rough Cut,why would I do that? 40hp is nice to have. If you was eating a bowl of grits on it I would laugh at ya.  ;D I like just about all tractors.Those old ones really get me looking. Sometimes I get the look from the wife when I drive off the road looking too much.
Model 6020-20hp Manual Thomas bandsaw,TC40A 4wd 40 hp New Holland tractor, 450 Norse Winch, Heatmor 400 OWB,YCC 1978-79

Offline r.man

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Re: Log hauling
« Reply #16 on: April 21, 2011, 09:12:20 AM »
40 hp, I wish. All my stuff is in the 30 hp range. My brother brought large logs out of a low area with a tractor rated in the 20s. The trick is to get the end up so it doesn't grab and that also puts traction on the back of the tractor. Just don't get greedy and pick it up too high. The lower it is the more stable the tractor is. Tyb, I have owned a rowcrop for 20 years and I wouldn't trade it for anything but I don't take it on slopes. A local fellow here had his roll on him and the only thing that saved him was the sandy ground underneath him. Straight up or straight down hills is fine but you have to work a hilly field different with a rowcrop.
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Offline Lud

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Re: Log hauling
« Reply #17 on: April 22, 2011, 07:19:34 AM »
Roughcut  thinks the arch doesn't allow enough weight to the tractor tires. That opinion came from a load too far back on the arch which created lift. I've had loads  too far forward that  lifted my front tires!   I'd say about 40-45% behind the centerpoint leaves you with a good bit of tongueweight for traction but no strain on the hydraulics.
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