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Author Topic: Powered Polesaws  (Read 4345 times)

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Offline jokers

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Powered Polesaws
« on: December 09, 2001, 09:38:42 AM »
I was reading the post about Echo chainsaws that turned into a discussion about polesaws. I`m surprised that there isn`t more knowledge on this topic here, on a forestry discussion forum. Isn`t anyone using them? The Stihl HT-75 is an excellent tool and the Husky 325P4X looks promising. Anybody got any feedback? Russ :o :o

Offline Tom

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Re: Powered Polesaws
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2001, 10:05:52 AM »
Well Joker,  I'm sure we have folks who know but we also have a lot of members who are not Forestry or Arborist professionals.  School teachers and Sawyers don't have a lot of use for equipment like that but still yearn for the knowledge.  Unlike some of the other forums available, and I like it for this, Forestry Forum members attend the site specifically to learn rather than to teach.  Now that doesn't mean we have an aversion to teaching but we aren't afraid to plead ignorance either.  This cuts down on a lot of the Pontification you see elsewhere.  

If you are knowledgeable in polesaws please unload on us.  I am aware of their existance and have watched them in use but have never had one in my hand.  It looks like a really neat tool to prune plantation trees with though. Since this thread mentioning pole saws started it caused me to start doing some shopping for a gasoline powered one for my plantation.  Any light you can shed on the subject will certainly be appreciated.
extinct

Offline Kevin

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Re: Powered Polesaws
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2001, 12:29:34 PM »
They`re more of an Arborist tool.
I use a hand powered pruning saw to remove branches along my trails through the bush but I can`t justify spending that kind of money on a tool I might only use one or two days a year.

Offline Timber_Tramp

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Re: Powered Polesaws
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2001, 01:07:43 PM »
Hi There, I have an HT 75 Polesaw I bought during that bad ice storm we had. It comes in handy for me now when I have to cut back limbs along the back roads and edges of fields to allow access for logging trucks to a landing. It is kind of a gutless little thing but really isnt designed for limbs much bigger than 5" across. The higher the limb, the closer the operator must stand under the limb in order to sever it off, thus making it necessary to wear eye protection against the sawdust falling. Plus you must be proficient at sidestepping the inevitable bounce of the limb when it hits the ground. Pinching is one drawback, however this is just tecnique, by undercutting first on the right angle so the branch can be droped directionaly. A pole saw will pay big dividends if you reclaim your woodlot owners farm fields by cutting back the fence row. The saw is slow on the trigger, so I just turn up the idle screw to the point where the chain almost wants to turn.
The chain requires little maintainance because you are always in clean wood that isnt on the ground. Tanaka also builds a nice polesaw and I think Oleo- Mac does too.
John

Offline swampwhiteoak

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Re: Powered Polesaws
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2001, 05:03:00 PM »
My opinion after seeing some run in both arboriculture and forestry/plantation settings is that they can be a good tool, but are no means perfect.  Most people don't get a good pruning cut when they use one, they either leave too much stub on the branch, or make a flush cut.  Some of that may be ignorance, but I think it also reflects that machine polesaws may not be the easiest thing to handle.  Just my observations, I have never run one, so I can't say for sure.

Offline Jeff

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Re: Powered Polesaws
« Reply #5 on: December 09, 2001, 06:08:55 PM »
Swamp what would define a correct pruning cut? Good info for someone reading this thread that may not know. Of course I don't mean me,  ::)
Just call me the midget doctor.
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Offline swampwhiteoak

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Re: Powered Polesaws
« Reply #6 on: December 09, 2001, 08:21:36 PM »
Knowing I'll not be able to explain it in 1000 words, I'll use some links with pictures.

International Society of Arboriculture - Pruning mature trees
http://www2.champaign.isa-arbor.com/consumer/pruning.html

Proper Tree Pruning-This one's got a good picture of the proper technique to use.
http://www.co.broward.fl.us/bri00300.htm#Proper

Both of these are more arboriculture than forestry oriented, but the cut technique should be the same.

Offline John-NY

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Re: Powered Polesaws
« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2002, 04:48:44 PM »
I own a Power Pruner (now bought out by Echo) with the extension handle and even though it was expensive, it has been real handy when clearing along roadways.  I used to use a hand pole saw, but that gets old fast!:(  They do get pinched at times and you do have to side step falling branches as they fall.  Mine seems to be adequately powered. Overall, I'm pleased with the saw! :)
John-NY

Offline marc

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Re: Powered Polesaws
« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2002, 05:11:49 PM »
welcome John.

Offline Frank_Pender

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Re: Powered Polesaws
« Reply #9 on: January 09, 2002, 03:54:31 AM »
I have an Echo a friend gave me and it sets.  ??? The thing I like the most is my air driven pruning shears.  Now, that is great for the smaller limbs, up to 2".  For my smaller trees it is great.  I have an extension pole that allows for pruning up the tree. 16'.   I simply place the portable compressor in the back of my 4 x 2 Gator with a hundred feet of air hose and away I go.  This gives me a 200' circle without moveing the Gator.
Frank Pender

Offline L. Wakefield

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Re: Powered Polesaws
« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2002, 06:42:27 AM »
   One of the things that occurred to me when walking in the woods the other days- some of the limbs I want to prune are already dead. Does the criterion for pruning back to the cuff on the branch (I forget what you call it) also apply to dead branches? In some cases the bark is off so this small swelling/ change in shape is more subtle to discern- I mean, ya can't really see it too well. :D :D.  lw
L. Wakefield, owner and operator of the beastly truck Heretik, that refuses to stay between the lines when parking

Offline swampwhiteoak

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Re: Powered Polesaws
« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2002, 08:50:16 AM »
LW,
Short answer, yes.

Longer answer-
Proper pruning seeks to mimic what would occur naturally if the tree pruned itself.  If the tree is already pruning its branches then the branch collar has most likely already started to seal off the dead branch, eventually the branch would drop off.  By pruning before this stage (properly) you could speed up this process, but like you said it's too late for that.  If, however, you do a flush cut, the tree has to start over and you have created a possible site for fungal infection.  If you just cut part of the dead branch off (not all the way to the branch collar), you probably haven't really helped or hurt the tree, although it might solve any hazard branch situation you might have.  

The size of the branch collar is going to depend on the size of the branch and the species.  Conifers usually have small branch collars, while hardwoods are usually larger.  Long answer to a simple question.


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